December 2012 dooms du jour
Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
December, 2012

[Commentary] ©2012 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Walker's Furlough Campaign Stunt To Stick It To Taxpayers. Again. 12/25 Cognitive Dissidence via cognidissidence.blogspot.com
    MILWAUKEE, Wisc., USA - ...The problem was that he never sat down at the bargaining table to negotiate those concession. So even if the unions were willing to make those concessions, they were never given the chance. Walker wanted to use this as a campaign talking point as he was running for governor. Walker had made the unions the boogeyman for his [redneck] base to hate and fear and help carry him to being elected. To make a long story short, the furloughs were taken to arbitration and found to be illegal... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Then it's layoffs or taxes.]
  2. Federal workers feel unease over potential layoffs, furloughs unleashed by ‘fiscal cliff’, 12/25 WashingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., USA - ...Furloughs “or other personnel actions” — layoffs — remain a real possibility. - see whole article under today's date.
    [Better time cuts than job cuts = timesizing not downsizing.]
  3. 35 hours mandatory job search, 12/26 SheffieldForum.co.uk
    SHEFFIELD, U.K. - ...how can someone on the dole afford to use the internet for 35 hours a week? ... Wouldn't doing 35 hours be classed as full time work?... - see more comments under today's date.
    [Again raising the question, then what's so radical about the French 35-hour workweek?]
  4. BONUS update - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f ) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books, Boston-Cambridge MA, & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston-Somerville MA USA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Groupon slides after news of acquisition, 12/25 Boston Globe, B7.
    ...fell following news it's acquiring CommerceInterface [for undisclosed $$]...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Charles Durning, acclaimed character actor, dies at 89, 12/26 Boston Globe, B10.
    ...His experiences in World War II were harrowing. He was in the first wave of Army troops to land on Omaha Beach on D-day and his unit’s lone survivor of a machine-gun ambush... In Parade, he recalled the hand-to-hand combat. “I was crossing a field somewhere in Belgium,” he said. “A German soldier ran toward me carrying a bayonet. He couldn’t have been more than 14 or 15. I didn’t see a soldier. I saw a boy. Even though he was coming at me, I couldn’t shoot.” They grappled — he was stabbed seven or eight times — until finally he grasped a rock and made it a weapon. After killing the youth, he said, he held him in his arms and wept..\.. By war's end he had been awarded..three Purple Hearts... He spent months in hospitals and was treated for psychological trauma... Mr. Durning said the memories never left him...
    [And yesterday's obits had Jack Klugman's, who also served in the Army in World War II.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The holiday season drew to a muted close for many retailers, according to preliminary data, reflecting what some experts said was the slowest spending growth since the 2008 recession, 12/26 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Stocks lose favor, despite run-up, 12/25 Boston Globe, B7.
    [What runs up, can run down, especially when lack of fundamentals means run-up's a PP (Ponzi pyramid) and when facing a trumped-up fiscal cliff; for example -]
  • Dow Jones industrial average, 12/25 Boston Globe, B7.
    Yesterday..down 51.76 or 0.4% \to\ 13,139.08
  • With clock ticking on the 'cliff,' stocks slip, 12/25 Boston Globe, B7.
    ...Stocks had fallen sharply Friday; the Dow had its biggest drop in more than a month after House Republicans called off a tax vote, leaving budget talks in disarray days before tax increases [good, on rich] and government spending cuts [bad, during doldrums] kick in, which some economists fear could spark a recession...
    [Restored taxes on the idle hoard$ of the wealthy will help fund spending and demotivate cuts; ergo, net no effect, except dramatics.]
  • Budget talks cloud outlook - Hopes dim for a big deal on fiscal cliff, prolonging uncertainty for economy, 12/26 Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Immigration and policing - The Obama administration promises a stricter focus on deporting serious offenders, editorial, New York Times, A18.
    [Promises, promises...]



    Sun.-Mon, December 23-24, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Obamacare and 30 hour work week, 12/24 Yellow Bullet Forums via yellowbullet.com/forum
    RISING SUN, Mryld., USA - ...My wife works for Walmart and was informed that after the first, she would be cut to 30 hours a week. Is this part of Obama care and what is the purpose of companies going to 30 hour work weeks?... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Strange are the ways that worktime per person is being driven down when people don't have the sense to make it dynamically offset unemployment because economies require maximum employment-consumerspending-monetarycirculation. This is not optional if you want a smoothly running economy. It's a sys req = a system requirement, period. But this is still the Dark Ages of economic "science," which is still heavily polluted with politics (ie: the colossal insulated suicidal tendencies of onepercenters), as in the old name for it, "political economy."]
  2. More Wage Cuts And Work Sharing On The Way, 12/23 CloseQROPS.com
    GUERNSEY, Channel Is., Crown Deps. - ...Work sharing to save money: The ILO points out that when workers choose to work fewer hours, then their drop in wages is often picked up by the government in various welfare benefits. Some may even be offered training schemes to help their long term employment prospects... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["Even" offered training?! Training will be a standard option in the most competitive economies of the future.]
  3. Saudi Shura council mulls 40 working hours proposal, 12/23 Xinhua via Philippine Star via philstar.com
    RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabia's Shura (consultative) Council has suggested to reduce the weekly working hours for private sector to 40 to offer employees with two-day weekend, Al Eqtisadiya newspaper reported Sunday... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS update - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f ) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books, Boston-Cambridge MA, & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston-Somerville MA USA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Brooks Automation details restructuring, 12/23 Boston Globe, G5.
    ...will cut 100 jobs...as it looks to "achieve cost synergies" following an acquisition... The Chelmsford MA company...provides automation, vacuum, and instrumentation products for such markets as the semiconductor industry...

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Brooks Automation details restructuring, 12/23 Boston Globe, G5.
    ...will cut 100 jobs, or 6% of its workforce, as it looks to "achieve cost synergies" following an acquisition... The Chelmsford MA company...said 29 of the jobs being cut are in Massachusetts...
    [Whatever happened to corporate empire building? Apparently it turned into buying other companies and cannibalizing them till they're just names. You can't get sustainably profitable by cutting your customers' customers & impoverishing their dependents. What should Brooks Automation be doing? Instead of a traumatic 6% workforce cut (100 of its 1666-person workforce) as it alienates & defunds its customers' customers (ie: its employees) and their dependents, it should be trimming a negligible 6% of its workweek (29 minutes a day less for everyone, including executives, down to a 37.6-hour workweek), re-investing overtime profits & earnings in OT-targeted training & hiring, & keeping all employees together working, earning & buying 94% as much as usual of their customers' products.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Windows 8 sales disappoint in shaky market,
    12/24 New York Times, B1.
  • Stabilization won't save us - Painkillers won't cure our economic cancer, by NYU Prof. Nassim Taleb,
    12/24 New York Times, A19.
  • The cause of the crisis - Why Gary Gorton thinks we could repeat the panic of '08, 12/23 Boston Globe, K1 pointer to K2.
    Q&A: An invisible run on banks - The real problem behind the financial crisis was not what we think, says Gary Gorton, [Yale Mgmt professor studying financial crashes & author of "Misunderstanding Financial Crises: Why We Don't See Them Coming" (Oxford: Nov/2012)], interview by Ben Schreckinger, Ideas via 12/23 Boston Globe, K2 target article.
    ...Gorton argues that the true culprit...was a run on the "shadow banking system," a huge, largely unregulated system in which an immense amount of money changes hands daily, all behind the scenes. This "shadow" system is..legal; it funds traditional banking, and the two are deeply intertwined. But its transactions are unregulated and invisible on banks' balance sheets - so when a crisis of confidence strikes, as it did in 2008, a surprised government [actually the Bush regime was deeply complicit in the coagulation of the money over its entire devastating term, as indeed most GOP administrations have been since TR left the White House in 1908] must[?] turn to drastic and risky tactics to stanch it. [And the main tactic that Wall Street manipulated Congress into doing = the $700 bailout, was just a transfer of a huge further chunk of the money supply to those who spend and donate a smaller percentage of their lode than any other bracket, and as for their claim that "we'll get that money right back to work creating jobs!" WHERE are the jobs?? Gorton ignores the repeal of Glass-Steagall which kept banking, brokerage and insurance separate and kept the shadow banking system of which he speaks out of the huge conflicts of interest it got into between 1999 and 2008...and since. So to say the shadow system is "perfectly" legal is too much. And it sounds like he may also be ignoring the overall effect of the conflicts of interest = too jump the concentration of the money supply beyond the point where the amount left in circulation could convincingly support the value of the newly swollen amount in the financial sector.]
    The shadow banking system still exists [because as leading S&L-crisis cleaner-upper Bill Black points out, 2008 elicited no big investigation and cleanup], with large financial institutions quietly borrowing and lending money in massive short-term arrangements known as sale-and-repurchase agreements [designed largely to evade taxation]. Although there aren't definitive measures, the most recent estimate by an international group of regulators put it [the shadow banking system] at $67 trillion worldwide - roughly two-thirds the size of traditional banking...
    "If 'greedy bankers' explains the crisis..we would have financial crises every other week." [blowout quote]
    - see whole article under today's date.
    [First, if he's saying that bankers' focus on figures without regard to whole-system requirements was not the underlying problem, he's wrong as plenty of their actions testify, like lobbying for repeal of Glass-Steagall and pushing liar's loans and NINJA loans. Leave us not forget G.K.Chesterton's Pan-Utopian Flaw. Second, we do have financial crises every other week, but because greedy bankers own the media and are smart enough to know they have to present the illusion of calm normalcy as they coagulate the money supply ever further and because they have to avoid the parallel but more visible weakening of their supporting markets involved in forcing taxpayers to be their sacrificial lambs every other week (by insuring and bailing them out), they usually find sacrificial lambs within their own number, cook the books, and/or invent some new clarity-poor coverup-rich "investment instrument" to hide crises even from themselves. Plus this one huge economic experiment called the USA has no control experiment to demonstrate just how much Wall Streeters are weakening their own economic habitat and how incredibly better off it would be for everyone, including themselves! if they supported an efficient market-oriented money-centrifuge mechanism like Timesizing. Professors have a natural tendency to suck up to Wall Streeters and make them look less powerful-responsible, more well-meaning/victims, possibly in hopes of being tossed a few crumbs, even ju$t a million or two, for their careers &/or their colleges(=theircareers).]
  • Investors sending signals to lawmakers, 12/23 Boston Globe, G5.
    Investors sent Washington a reminder Friday that Wall Street is a power player in talks to avoid the fiscal cliff...
    [Ah, the constant fight to build on the Separation of Church and State to achieve the Separation of State and Market, to keep money out of politics or once it's in, to get it back out. Why? Because the more plutocracy, the less democracy, and the more skewed, or strangled, or totally choked-off the feedback. Generally the wealthy are doing OK; for them the systems seems to be working and "if it works, don't fix it." They are the biggest single group against progress, despite their massive PR campaigns to the contrary and a few highly publicized exceptions, like the L.L. Bean executives we featured yesterday in the less strategic GOOD NEWS section.]
  • Education gap between the economic classes is growing [and the educational system itself is complicit] - The larger role of class in academic success surprises, by Jason DeParle, 12/23 NYT via Boston Globe, A15.
    ...Weekends, summers were devoted to a college-readiness program, where [Angelica Gonzales'] best friends, Melissa O'Neal and Bianca Gonzalez, shared her drive to "get off the island," to escape the prospect of dead-end lives in luckless Galveston TX. ...By the time [they] donned mortarboards in the class of 2008, their story seemed to validate the promise of education as the great equalizer.... Four years later, their story seems..a study of obstacles in an age of soaring economic inequality. Only one is still studying full time, and two have crushing debts. Angelica, who left Emory University owing more than $60,000, is a clerk in a Galveston furniture store.... Education, a force meant to erode class barriers, appears to be fortifying them.... Thirty years ago, there was a 31% difference between the share of prosperous and poor Americans who earned bachelor's degree... Now the gap is 45%. ...And even after accounting for financial aid, the costs of attending a public university have risen 60% in the past two decades...
    [Timesizing replaces a huge part of the current classist and makework educational system with mushrooming on-the-job training.]



    Saturday, December 22, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Goodfellows: With hours cut, help with bills, Omaha World-Herald via omaha.com
    OMAHA, Neb. - Business can ebb and flow in the fast-food industry. When it ebbs, that can mean fewer work hours for employees.
    [Better fewer hours than no job.]
    That was the case for Jessica Thomas, who says a reduction in work hours means more penny-pinching so she and her 3-year-old daughter, Ava, can get by.
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Why doesn't Nebraska have a worksharing program to keep people like Jessica and Ava off charity? Any system that relies for vital functions on serendipitous charity is lethally flawed.]
  2. If my contract states that i work 35 hours a week which i do monday to friday, how much notice doineedfor[overtimedemand]? uk.answers.yahoo.com
    LONDON(?), U.K. - ...[Q] for the next monday she wants me to work an extra 2 hours overtime witch clashes with family plans. how much notice shall she give me to work those extra hours ? ... [A] Giving you advance notice is [a] big bonus, frankly, and though 2 hours is a bit more than the odd 30-60 minutes, it is not unreasonable. You should do it if humanly possible but if you truly cannot (nor rearrange your own plans slightly) then you will have to hope they understand. - see whole article under today's date.
    [Pressure builds for clear and enforced overtime rules.]
  3. How telecommuting increases your work hours, DeccanChronicle.com
    BANGALORE, India - ...The study, co-authored by Jennifer Glass from Population Research Center, shows that most of the 30% of respondents who work from home add 5-7 hours to their workweek compared with those who work exclusively at the office. They are also significantly less likely to work a standard 40-hour schedule and more likely to work overtime. In fact, most telecommuting hours occur after an employee has already put in 40 hours of work at the office... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So, to have more of the most basic and fundamental freedom, Free Time (if there are any of you "prisoners" out there who don't "love their chains"), work at, and only at, the office.]
  4. BONUS update 1 - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f ) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  5. BONUS update 2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS (archives) -
  • Executives put on work boots for last push - All hands on deck as order deadline is latest in history, by David Sharp, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    L.L. Bean chief executive Chris McCorm[i]ck and company spokeswoman Carolyn Beem were among the executives who pitched in preparing packages for shipping. (photo caption)
    FREEPORT, Maine, USA - ...At L.L. Bean, top executives abandoned their desks to work in the shipping department and to answer customers' phone calls as part of an annual all-hands-on-deck approach to ensure last-minute purchases arrive at their destinations before Christmas... In company parlance, they are dubbed "day hikers," since they are on a temporary daily assignment... In the past, McCormick worked on a product-sorting conveyor line, in the retail-store stockroom, and in a recycling area breaking down cardboard boxes. The worst job, he said, was one stint working in the part of the call center that deals with angry and frustrated customers...
    ["If you would rule the empire, you must experience the worst the empire has to offer." Lao Tzu.]
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books, Boston-Cambridge MA, & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston-Somerville MA USA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • TJX buys Internet retailer Sierra for $200 million, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • NRA's response to shootings: An armed officer in each school - Sees zero need for gun controls, Boston Globe, A1.
    [How long do the leaders of the National Rifle Ass'n figure they have before the nutcases start going after them? "Why would they?" "Why" is the less important question here when "How" is so easy and "When" is getting more and more frequent.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Distressed pharmacy says it is bankrupt - Status changes victims' recourse, by Zachary Sampson, Boston Globe, B1.
    New England Compounding Center, the [Framingham MA-based] pharmacy accused of distributing tainted steroids that have killed 39 people and afflicted hundreds more nationwide with meningitis, filed for bankruptcy on Friday...

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Canceled budget vote sinks stocks, Boston Globe, B7.
    The Dow industrials fell 120.88 points or 0.9% to 13,190.84.., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Debt ceiling rises again as threat for the U.S.,
    New York Times, B1.
  • Postal Service shares letter-perfect appeals to one aging elf - For over a century, childrens' wants included more than toys, by David Filipov, Boston Globe, A1.
    ...Some made heartbreaking appeals on behalf of needy loved ones...
  • The four largest Greek banks are in "need" of a capital boost of $36 billion [our quotes], WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
    [A-ga-a-ain? So aren't we all!]
  • Thousands of looters ransacked stores in Argentina for a second day in the latest challenge to Kirchner, WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
    [Even though she's pretty?]



    Friday, December 21, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. White House warns federal workers of furloughs from sequestration, Washington Business Journal via washingtonpost.com/blogs
    WASHINGTON, D.C., USA - Federal labor leaders say that the Obama administration on Thursday warned federal employees that furloughs could result as a last resort if the White House and Congress don't come to an agreement on spending cuts that would occur on Jan. 1 through the process of sequestration... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Better to cut worktime, than workforce and everything else in the process!]
  2. Saku Tuominen: Redesigning the work week, Good News from Finland via goodnewsfinland.com
    [Sounds hopeful, but where's the beef? Lotsa jabber, no substance - unless that strange nonsequitur in the middle is IT, in which case it's Bad News from Finland, going in the wrong direction: "Work more, complain less". That's no different from what da massa say to dee happy slaves! Hardly a "bold idea." Oh well, we cite plenty of articles with real hourscuts spun as bad - this is a silk purse made out of a sow's ear.]
    HELSINKI, Finland - A broader concept of design allows us to, say, redesign the work week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Motion for regulated working hours legislation rejected, Lexology.com
    [This too is bad news but at least HK's talkin' the talk, where most of the world is still yapping about makework and foreign investment.]
    HONG KONG, China - ...This momentum suggests that some form of legislation to regulate working hours is on the distant horizon, however we do not anticipate seeing a draft bill until at least 2014. - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS update 1 - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  5. BONUS update 2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books, Boston-Cambridge MA, & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston-Somerville MA USA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • New York Stock Exchange to sell itself in $8.2 billion deal [to IntercontinentalExchange Inc.] - Planned takeover highlights rise of electronic trading, Wall Street Journal, A1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Boehner's budget 'Plan B' collapses, by Hook & Bendavid & Lee, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    House speaker John Boehner, facing a rebellion in his party's conservative ranks, abandoned his own plan to avert tax increases for most Americans Thursday night...
    [against the advice and desires of even super-rich such as Buffett and Gates! This GOP is really suicidal.]
    ...Mr. Boehner unexpectedly disbanded the House [of Representatives] until after Christmas, leaving behind uncertainty about whether Congress and Pres. Barack Obama would be able to avoid $500 billion in spending cuts [more recession = good to avoid] and tax increases [on the rich? less recession! = bad to avoid] that begin in January...
    [because -]
    Vital signs - Spending by the federal government is boosting the country's economic growth,
    WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • The uncertainty could rattle investors and markets that have been relatively stable on expectations of a deal,
    WSJ, A1:2 pointer to A1:6.
    [Investors and financial markets are side issues compared to consumers and consumer markets.]
  • The Fed's tough job on forecasting, WSJ, C8.
    [Maybe they should stick to their job description, starting with fighting unemployment...]
  • Executives sold amid stock buyback - Such transactions, considered red flags to investors, raised concerns among employees at firm [PSS World Medical], WSJ, C1.
  • The U.S. population grew by 2.3 million in 2012 to 313.9 million, the Census estimated, WSJ, A1 news squib.
    But the growth rate remains at historically low levels.
  • Regulators postpone big fishing cuts - Fishermen make plea for their livelihoods, Boston Globe, B2.
    [More job desperation from guys who are extincting their livelihoods anyway.]
  • Syria unleashes cluster bombs on [own] town, [Marea].., New York Times, A1.
    [Ready to swat-team Assad yet?]



    Thursday, December 20, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. GAPS staff to take second furlough day, Albany Democrat Herald via democratherald.com
    ALBANY, Ore., USA - ...Greater Albany Public Schools [GAPS] initially set four class days and one holiday as furloughs this year. Two days have since been restored: April 15 and the May 27 Memorial Day holiday... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Better a few furloughs for all than total joblessness for a few.]
  2. Lakeport police admin office to close for holidays, furloughs, Lake County Record-Bee via record-bee.com
    LAKEPORT, Calif., USA -- The Lakeport Police Dept.'s administrative office will be closed Friday through Jan. 1, but officers will remain available to handle calls for service during that period. The closure is the result of the holiday season and employee furloughs... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update 1 - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update 2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books, Boston-Cambridge MA, & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston-Somerville MA USA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Brooks Automation to cut 600 jobs, 29 in Mass., by Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...Brooks recently acquired Crossing Automation Inc...

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Brooks Automation to cut 600 jobs, 29 in Mass., by Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...Brooks recently acquired Crossing Automation Inc...

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Housing plan for homeless unveiled, by Jenifer McKim, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...1,000 housing units and support services [such as] child care, job training, mental health care.\.by 2015... Currently, there are about 15,000 units of such "service-rich" housing in Massachusetts...
    [Still fixing the symptoms instead of the disease: responding to technology by cutting jobs (see downsizing section above) instead of trimming workweeks.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Billerica MA battles state plan to add 500 prison beds, Boston Globe, No1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Optimism on 'cliff' seems to melt away, Boston Globe, B8.
    Dow Jones industrial average at 13,251.97, down 98.99 or 0.7%,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • Permits for guns climb in Mass. - Crackdown fear, desire for "safety" [our quotes] spur 5-year rise, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Nevermind people with guns have the most gun accidents including deaths. And you thought Massachusetts had some sense!]
  • Drastic cuts in fish quotas expected [in New England] - But blame for disappearance of cod, flounder shifting from overfishing to ocean changes as temperatures rise, Boston Globe, B1.



    Wednesday, December 19, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. The Role of Short-Time Working Schemes During the Global Financial Crisis and Early Recovery - A Cross-Country Analysis, oecd-ilibrary.org
    PARIS, France - ...There has been a strong interest in short-time work (STW) schemes during the global financial crisis. Using data for 23 OECD countries for the period 04Q1-10Q4, this paper analyzes the quantitative effects of STW programmes on labor market outcomes by exploiting the country and time variation in STW take-up rates... The results indicate the STW raises hours flexibility by increasing the output elasticity of working time and helps to preserve jobs in the context of a recession by making employment and unemployment less elastic with respect to output... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Ooh, doncha luvvit when they talk like that!]
  2. Reintroduction of administrative authorisation for short-time work, Lexology.com
    PARIS, France - A Decree of 19 November 2012 (n°2012-1271) re-establishes the employer's obligation to ask for an authorization before implementing short-time work. It came into force on November 22, 2012... After receiving express or tacit authorisation, the employer shall ask the DIRECCTE to be awarded a special short-time work allowance... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update 1 - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update 2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza Gatineau QUÉBEC, & updating from Kate's Kaffee (jawohl!) in Boston-Somerville USA -

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Rise in youth homelessness , New York Times, A1 pointer to A14.
    Tens of thousands of unemployed young adults, many with college credits or work histories, struggle to find shelter in the wake of the recession.
    "After" recession [our quotes], more young adults are living on streets - Rise of homelessness among an elusive group,
    NYT, A14 target article.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Almost all taxpayers would pay more next year if Obama and Boehmer close the deal they have been negotiating,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A10.
    [So let me get this straight: They want to tax the furiously circulating money of the ninety-nine per cent instead of concentrating on clawing it back out of the torpid trillions being hoarded by the 1% who have 20-30% of the money supply and are already causing recession? That will just shift monetary circulation from faster decentralized individual spending to slower centralized government spending - and turn the officially denied recession into an officially denied depression.]
  • Stock trading: Exchanges inching closer to 'kill switch' [for before software glitches cause havoc],
    Reuters via Toronto Globe, B6.
  • Too big to jail? Bank officials avoid laundering charges, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B6.
    Decision not to prosecute HSBC is assailed - $1.9b deal for laundering cash called inadequate, BG, B6 target article.
  • Mortgages [Québec] - An unsuspected load, La Presse de Montréal, Aff1 pointer caption to Aff2.
    To the surprise of several homeowners, banks are establishing a mortgage guarantee a lot weightier than the borrowed sum. For your own good, say they. What's the truth?
    [They're guaranteeing the mortgage for more than the value of the house, supposedly so you can later take out a home equity loan for that much more without all the mishegas of refinancing. But -]
    "It's a practice that limits negotiation... Lenders are very conscious that in doing it, they are binding the client to themselves. And that's what they want to do." Madame Jean Lambert, president of the Chamber of Notaries (blowout quote)
    [Bankers everywhere seem determined to make themselves REAL UNPOPULAR.]



    Tuesday, December 18, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Times Charities: Group helps LVN nurse finances when hours cut, TimesRecordNews.com
    WICHITA FALLS, Tex., USA - Emily, a single mother of two, works as an LVN while also going to school full time to become a registered nurse... All these years, Emily has been fiercely independent, receiving no assistance from the children's father... Her independence was shattered recently, though, when her nursing home hours were slashed... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours is happening anyway but not the best way.]
  2. Apple Now Tracking Working Hours for Over One Million Supply-Chain Employees, MacRumors.com
    CUPERTINO, Calif., USA - ...Compliance with Apple's 60-hour work week standard stood at 88% in November, below the peak of 97% reached in July and August. Apple notes, however, that it allows the normal 60-hour standard to be exceeded during period of high demand if workers volunteer for the additional time... - see whole article under today's date.
    [SIXTY hour workweeks?! Shame on Apple = high tech with laptops, low tech with employees. But at least it's lower than it was and they've finally got around to trying for compliance.]
  3. BONUS update 1 - Check out this flagcounter & 4 short videos -
    f) Flagcounter near bottom of this webpage, showing nationalities & pageviews of website since Nov. 25, 2012.
    1) Washington State Dept. of Labor explains benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing, alias *'shared work'.
    2) A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    3) Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express for immediate economic first-aid.
    4) The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update 2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm(archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Wireless - Clearwire board accepts Sprint buyout [for $2.2-billion], AP via Toronto Globe, B10.
  • Benckizer Group agrees to acquire Caribou Coffee [for $340-million], Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B12.
  • Exxon Mobil to buy South Africa site [on coast owned by Impact Oil & Gas, for $??], Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B12.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Most of light-rail project art budget to be spent on..'functional art'..\..benches, railings, maps...- Let's not 'skimp' on public art, councillor urges, Ottawa Citizen, C4.
    [Ah, taxpayer-funded public art, one of the great realms of modern makework - but do we even have it on the list yet?]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The Newtown killer's mother was just another ordinary American mom with an arsenal, Toronto Globe, A2 pointer to A15.
    Gun culture - Mommy's got a Glock, op ed by Margaret Wente, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Regulatory failure - Let the war on domestic terrorism begin, op ed by Lawrence Martin, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Sandy Hook... - It's human evil, not [supernatural] tragedy, op ed by John Moscowitz, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Online hoaxes rampant in aftermath of shootings - Unprecedented number of pranks follow recent violence, Postmedia News via Ottawa Citizen, A5.
    [And last week it was a hoax by two Australian newscasters resulting in a nurse's suicide. Timesizing gives everyone more free time and more money and unleashes the millions of watchdogs we need in this compound-complex world.]
  • Social studies...- Obesity exceeds malnutrition [globally except in sub-Saharan Africa], by Michael Kesterton, Toronto Globe, L10.
    "Obesity is now killing triple the number of people who die from malnutrition as it claims more than three million lives a year worldwide..," reports The Daily Telegraph. "...Eating too much is now a more serious risk to the health of populations than eating poorly, [according to] the Global Burden of Disease study, published in a special edition of The Lancet."
    [And poverty breeds obesity because fastfood full of sugar, salt and grease is all you can afford.]
  • Income inequality [in Canada], letter to editor by chairman Ed Broadbent of Broadbent Institute, Ottawa Citizen, A10.
    ..."The reigning Canadian expert" on the incomes of the top one percent is Michael Veall of McMaster University. In the most recent issue of the Canadian Journal of Economics, Veall says that "the surge in top income shares began in approximately 1985 [what a coincidence! just long enough for the postwar babyboomers to enter the job market, get settled in and restore the labor surplus of the Depression!] and continued through to 2007." The top onepercent share of all income fell slightly from 1998 to 2002, but rose until 2008 before declining a bit in the recent recession. This pattern is important because it shows that inequality in Canada rose even in a time of low unemployment and steady[?] growth. A rising tide no longer lifted all boats. ...The share of all income in Canada going to the top one percent has almost doubled from 8% in the mid 1980s to almost 15% today.
    [Ed, a suggestion: drop the relatively unactionable term "income inequality" in favor of the relatively actionable term, "money-supply concentration" or "coagulation" or "funneling." This metaphor lends itself better to an understanding of how this process slows consumer spending = monetary circulation and creates recession; it is much more easily translated into terms of System Requirements and System-requirement Violations; and it suggests its own solution = deconcentration, transitionally by wartime levels of graduated income and estate taxes and sustainably by shorter-hours-borne labor shortage.]
  • What ever happened to the future? by Virginia Postrel, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    [The future was greatly constrained by the failure to adjust the workweek lower as technology got higher. That common sense approach was replaced by workforce downsizing whose harvest of insecurity drove wages down and currency concentration up. So much of the money supply was funneling to the onepercent that it far exceeded what they spent or donated and eventually what they "put back to work creating jobs," despite their rhetoric to that effect.]
    ...'The future.\.Mars mission..that people in the 1960s hoped to see is still the future we're waiting for today..', writes Founders Fund partner Bruce Gibney... (illustration caption)
    It has been 40 years since the last astronauts left the moon. That anniversary..has put some prominent technologists in a funk. "You promised me Mars colonies. Instead, I got Facebook," reads to the cover of MIT Technology Review. In an essay titled Why We Can't Solve Big Problems, editor Jason Pontin considers "why there are no disruptive innovations" today...
    [Punchy Pontin wants disruption?? Open your eyes, pal, every worksaving innovation that gets the usual CEO response of downsizing is disruptive. That's why we've got a "slow recovery": getting-nowhere "slow" and never-getting-there "recovery".]
  • Businesses seeking growth advised to look south, RandallAnthony Communications via Toronto Globe, B11.
    [More "further fields are greener (cuz they're pretty drought-parched here)." After all, these are developing countries, formerly more accurately called "underdeveloped" countries. And besides, all these clichéd-thinking economists doing the advising are quick to coin catchy phrases and cite statistics about growth - for the developing countries - carefully silent on the negative growth for developed countries (except their CEOs) -]
    Economists call it "south-south trade." [Sooo catchy!] ...The southern share of world trade increased from 7.4% in 1990 to 10.3% in 2000, and to 15.3% in 2007...
    [In 1990, most of us still thought we were better off this year than last. By 2007, that had changed.]
  • Insurance - Seeking safety, Sun Life [of Canada] retreats from a risky U.S.,
    Toronto Globe, B1.
  • S&P/TSX composite index to 12,281.35 down 15.37 or 0.12%, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Bay Street slips, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Canadian stocks moved lower following weekend reports on the latest high-level talks aimed at resolving the budget stalemate in Washington. S&P/Toronto Stock Exchange energy stocks were down 0.25 per cent, while financial stocks dropped 0.5 per cent.
  • India cuts economic growth forecast, AP via Toronto Globe, B12.



    Sun.-Mon, December 16-17, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. 2013 Sacramento Public Library Holiday and Furlough Schedule, 12/16 saclibrary.org
    SACRAMENTO, CAlif., USA - View our schedule for upcoming holiday and furlough closure dates... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Basically one furlough day a month like Rae Days in Ontario, Canada in the 1990s.]
  2. Politics - Universal Credit: 35 hour week question, Digital Spy via forums.digitalspy.co.uk
    HEREFORD, U.K. - ...I work 30 hours, i doubt very much if I can get any more, certainly not after Christmas as everything will slow down and we will lose hours. The only way I can see my self getting more hours is going to night shift, that then that could cause problems with my health... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours is happening anyway but not the best way.]
  3. BONUS squib - Celebrating 'astonishingly stable' Europe, Toronto Globe, B8.
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President François Hollande touch hands during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony at City Hall in Oslo Dec. 10. (photo caption)
    [What a coincidence! These are the two large economies that have made the most use of workspreading via workweek reduction, Germany with Kurz-arbeit (worksharing) and France with the world's shortest official nationwide workweek (35 hours). Result? Larger percentage of total population employed with higher earnings activating higher consumer spending and markets - and dependent markets: business and financial. In short, stronger consumption per capita and monetary circulation than any other large economy.]
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Battle for Inmet Mining goes hostile - First Quantum [makes hostile $5.1B bid], 12/17 Toronto Globe, B1.

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • New [Canada Post] delivery method inefficient, exhausting, letter to editor by Melissa Wilson of Ottawa, Ottawa Citizen, A8.
    ...I have been a letter carrier for seven years and have never seen such stress among my co-workers. ...In my station alone, we lost 14 walks and inherited the former drivers' responsibilities onto our increased walks. Management wonders why we cannot finish in eight hours. Lunch is no longer an option. We never stop, working nine-to-10-plus-hour shifts. Carriers who work on the second wave work many hours in the dark. We arrive back exhausted to be confronted with numerous flyers to prep for the next day. The idea that we will get out early is a myth. We still have mail to sort manually and prep as before. Except now we have parcels to organize and a truck to load, too...
    [How is it that Canada Post has had such incompetent management for so many years? Budget cuts? Back to the cushioned and dozing Onepercent with their self-serving taxcuts and "just give all the money to us and we'll get it right back to work creating jobs"?]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • A moment in time = Dec.17, 1903: Wright Brothers make first controlled flight in powered airplane, by Peter Cheney, 12/17 Toronto Globe, A2 photo caption.
    ...But the brothers' legacy was complicated by legal battles with rival builders over their patented system of flight control. Although the courts ultimately ruled in their favour, the Wrights' litigiousness stalled the U.S. aviation industry for years, and cast a pall over their brilliant achievement. One competitor said that if someone leaped in the air and waved his arms, the Wrights would sue.
    [Whoa, another icon "clasted"! So litigiousness in America goes back a looong way. What a contrast with Richard Trevithick and George Stevenson, pioneers of the steam locomotive a hundred years earlier in Britain! Especially Geo. Stevenson, who could have been a zillionaire but was more interested in effectiveness than money. And job desperation thanks to perpetuating our pre-automation workweek into the robotics age has made litigiousness survive and grow huge in America today. Job desperation has many many negative effects, in terms of strangling generosity and a larger perspective.]

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Social studies - Banker hits rock bottom, by Michael Kesterton, 12/17 Toronto Globe, L8.
    ...Kevin Browne [an] investment banker went to the United States to run a firm on Wall Street. Then came the crash of 2008; he lost his business, his marriage and his home. Browne had to rely on a charity to fly back to Britain earlier this year. He slept rough [outdoors] and ate at soup kitchens. ... He never saw homelessness coming...
    [That's how easy it is. And it will get easier if we keep up unlimitedly large funneling of money to unlimitedly small slices of our population. It starts with the funneling of employment thanks to a rigidly regulated pre-automation workweek. That creates so much un(der)employment and job insecurity that wages and spending and markets go down down down, but "the frog in the pot" doesn't notice the danger because the water is coming to a boil slooowly. Investors are the frog in the pot, and the boiling of the water is the unlimited portions of more and more of the money supply that they are diverting to themselves, and gradually starving the economic habitat they live in and depend on. The antidote is derigidifying the upward-only ratchetable workweek,adjusting it downward, and employment spreading via timesizing, not downsizing.]
  • Ottawa Mission a welcoming place for holiday meal - ..Need growing for annual Christmas dinner, says organizer, by Ilana Belfer, Ottawa Citizen, C3.
    Ottawa police Chief Charles Bordeleau serves orange juice and tomato juice to those attending the annual Christman dinner at the Ottawa Mission on Sunday [12/16]. (photo caption)
    Rob Legue..out of work and on disability..put it [like this,] "rent is high and food is low." ...He wasn't alone. The mission was set to serve 2,500 dinners over the course of the day, about the same number as it served last year... In the end, they only served 1,784 meals, with staff attributing the decline to the weather - snow and ice pellets [=hail and freezing rain] - and other community events taking place rather than a decreasing number of people in need. "Every year there's more people coming for Christmas dinner and you're starting to see children come in," said Diane Morrison, who will soon retire after 20 years as trhe mission's executive director...
  • The weekly challenge: getting enough to eat on $5 a day, as many North Americans do, Toronto Globe, A2 pointer to L2.
    ..But could I really eat on $5 a day? \-\ It seemed like a worthy idea to help raise awareness of all the people who rely on food banks (or food stamps in the U.S.).., by Courtney Shea, Toronto Globe, L2 target article.
    [So. We've reached the milestone in socioeconomic deterioration where respectable, female columnists in prestigious conservative newspapers are preparing their minds for the worst, under the guise of "helping raise awareness."]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • U.S. school shooting - Killer's mother [part of] 'prepper' movement ready for social chaos [hoarding supplies]..,12/17 Ottawa Citizen, B2.
    Nancy Lanza..mother of suspected mass shooter Adam Lanza, was a gun-proud 'survivalist who trained with weapons in preparation for an economic collapse... (photo caption)
    ..."She prepared for the worst," her sister-in-law Marsha Lanza told reporters. "Last time we visited her in person, we talked about prepping - are you ready for what could happen down the line, when the economy collapses?"...
    [Can we just reduce everyone's level of anxiety with full employment guaranteed by workspreading based on cutting the workweek as much as it takes?]
  • Property sales drop..in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal, 12/17 Toronto Globe, B2.
    Economists expect little GDP growth [in Canada's October figures coming out this week], 12/17 Toronto Globe, B2.
    [So, must be that "further fields are greener"? - and we're talking about underdeveloped nations here?? -]
  • Executives see value [for whom?] in opening trade doors, 12/17 Toronto Globe, B3.
    To bolster prosperity [whose?], businesses look to emerging markets, 12/17 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Today's lazy and incompetent CEOs, who can't do anything but M&As and constant reorgs while absorbing as much "compensation" as they can quietly slip up their sleeve, receive different frontpage wording which lends itself a more prophetic and disquieting interpretation -]
    Canada's CEOs see emerging markets as the future of our economy.., 12/17 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    [This is truer than the headline writer knew - we're going down - and if China is our future, we may as well cut to the chase and explore Japan's harakiri concept before we too are jumping off factory roofs like FoxConn workers, or eking out a miserable subsistence on rice with the hundreds of millions who can't find work. China needs Timesizing more than anywhere.]
    With new markets come new geo-political realities [ie: less predictability and control], 12/17 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [More of "further fields are greener." So now we need journalists to belabor what we used to regard as obvious? -]
  • A temporary foreign work force is hardly an enduring solution to the [skill] shortage in this country, 12/17 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    [No, but automatic conversion of overtime into OT-targeted training and hiring IS a sustainable solution to the skill shortage - and will be in place in ANY country worth living in, 50 years from now.]
    Why training beats importing a work force from abroad - Core of labour "shortage" problem [our quotes] lies with Corporate Canada,
    by Barrie McKenna, 12/17 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [That's for sure, cuz current high unemployment levels mean there's no labor shortage at all, just a shortage of TRAINING thanks to cheap CEOs spoiled by the floods of desperate resumes from the repeatedly downsized.]
  • How to attack the [male-female] pay gap? Speak up [and use pink play money], 12/16 New York Times, Bu1.
    ...Anne Houle of the WAGE Project in the Bronx...
    [There's still a lot of momentum/inertia from the past when there were far more men in the workforce than women, and these men therefore represented far more seniority - and seniority raises. I don't think I have ever seen this seniority consideration factored into this discussion. At any rate, much more disabling to the functioning of the economic system is the rich-poor paygap, or rather the 1%-99% paygap, sometimes called the income gap or the general problem of inequality, none of which are as actionable terms as the overconcentration of the money supply, which in itself suggest the solution = deconcentrate the money supply = stop funneling it without limit to an unlimitedly tiny population in the financial sector. And the only way that has effectively been done in economic history is by an employer-perceived labor shortage, as during war or plague, or more intelligently, via workweek reduction, as during 1938-40 in the USA, 1997-2001 in France, and possibly 2004-11 in South Korea. Women will do a lot better in the first economies that move from emergency bandaid worksharing timesizing, and so will all other "minorities" - as long as we don't keep expanding them via unregulated trade, unenforced immigration laws and the kind of exponential birthrate boom that sabotaged India's decent 5% economic growthrate in the 1920s.]



    Saturday, December 15, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Reduced transfers, furlough days help Poulsbo balance budget, KitsapSun.com
    POULSBO, Wash., USA — Poulsbo city council members approved the 2013 budget Wednesday, balancing a $511,319 shortfall expected in next year's budget by reducing the amount put into reserve funds and instituting four furlough days, among other cost-saving moves... Four furlough days and wage benefit adjustments saved $39,352 in the budget, which ended up at roughly $24.7 million... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Opening hours cut plan for Wymondham TIC, Norfolk Eastern Daily Press via edp24.co.uk
    WYMONDHAM, Norfolk, U.K. - ...Officials at the town council said the reduced opening times were proposed after three of the four staff that work at the TIC decided to retire and South Norfolk Council officers warned that the £8,000 a year grant for the facility could be cut. It means that the Market Cross will be open to tourists two days a week during the winter period, instead of three, and the summer openings will be reduced from six days a week to four... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Air France-KLM Group to cut up to 600 crew jobs, Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B10.
    ...from its main unit by 2014 as Europe's biggest carrier pares flights to cut costs. Voluntary departures from the Air France division will be sought, though flight attendants could be fired if unions fail to back the proposals and CEO Jean-Cyril Spinetta's Transform 2015 savings plan...
    [Sounds more like Flush 2015 (down the crapper).]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Wall Street declines, Toronto Globe, B14.
    U.S. stocks fell amid worries about Washington's budget impasse over the looming [& alarm-inflating] 'fiscal cliff,' with a sharp drop in Apple weighing on the Nasdaq. The technology sector dragged...
    Dow Jones industrial average to 13,135.01 down 35.71 or 0.27%.
  • Advisors or salesmen?, La Presse de Montréal, Aff6.
    "It is alarming to see the nests of tension and conflict giving birth to mounting examples of inequality between rich and poor, and the prevalence of selfish and individualistic states of spirit which manifest also in an unregulated financial capitalism." Pope Benedict XVI (photo caption)
  • The inverse of the American dream - These killings [Newtown CT] speak volumes on the fraying of the fundamental values of the United States, La Presse de Montréal, A39.
  • Drop in sales in Canada in October - Disquieting lethargy in manufacturing production,
    La Presse de Montréal, Aff10.
  • Opposition to labor camps widens in China, New York Times, A1.
    [They have "labor camps" in China?! And China is the Onepercenters' idea of the future???]
  • Referendum in Egypt - "Women have much to lose" - "All Egypt fares badly. The Copts (Coptic Christians) even worse", La Presse de Montréal, A37.



    Friday, December 14, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Companies turn to 'work-sharing' to preserve jobs, ResourceInnovations.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - Employees around the world have seen changes in hourly rates and the number of hours in which they work so that companies can prevent redundancies, according to a new report... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Layoffs and short-time working, People Management Magazine Online via peoplemanagement.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - ...“Short-time working” used to be common in manufacturing industries (and some employers expressly retain a contractual right to put employees on short-time working or lay them off if there is a dip in trade). With the economic downturn, the practice has become more widespread. It is a way for an employer to save money and may help avoid the need to make redundancies... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • PetroChina, Encana [Canada] enter gas pact - In $2.2-billion deal, state-owned company gains 49.9% stake in Alberta project - just shy of new foreign takeover limits, Toronto Globe, B1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Pay gap evident in fast-food biz - CEOs rake in millions while working poor cook and serve, Ottawa Citizen, F1 pointer to F4.
    [That's because CEOs foster a shortage of themselves and a grotesque surplus of everyone else, which has historically only been corrected by workweek reduction, as in USA (1840-)1938-40, France (1840-)1997-2001 and S.Korea 2004-2011; or by war, as in (1914-)1917-18 and (1939-)1941-45; or by plague, as in 1348 etc.etc. Pick one. Oops, here's a new one -]
    Texting pedestrians a hazard - Distracted walking affects everything from speed to safety.., Ottawa Citizen, F3.
    [Nevermind texting drivers.]
    McJobs show scale of U.S. income gap - McDonald's paid its CEO $8.8M last year while a Chicago man who flips burgers earns $8.25 an hour minimum wage and can't get full-time work after 20 years, Ottawa Citizen, F4 target article.
    ...The pay gap separating fast-food workers from their CEOs has doubled at McDonald's Corp. in the last 10 years. (photo caption)
  • Fiscal cliff fears bring markets down, Ottawa Citizen, F6.
    Wall Street retreats, Toronto Globe & Mail, B10.
    U.S. stocks closed lower under a cloud of 'fiscal-cliff' concerns that overshadowed a batch of somewhat positive economic data on jobs, retail sales and inflation...
    Dow Jones industrial average at 13,170.72, down 74.73 or 0.56%.
  • Bay Street declines, Toronto Globe, B10.
    Canadian stocks snapped a four-day winning streak, as worries over the 'fiscal cliff' in the U.S. resurfaced, sparking a broad selloff...
    S&P/Toronto Stock Exchange composite index at 12,289.17, down 63.92 or 0.52%.
  • Over the cliff, letter to editor by Andrej Derkowski of Oakville ON, Toronto Globe, B16.
    ...When I woke up this morning, and stumbled out of bed,
    Picked up my Globe and read the news, was filled with angst and dread.
    For U.S. pols are playing chicken, having their Left-Right tiff,
    and are about to push us all, over the fiscal cliff.
    Then I remembered the world will end
    next week the Maya said.
    So I forgot the "fiscal cliff" and went right back to bed.
  • One woman [Maya MacGuineas] to 'fix' U.S. debt, Ottawa Citizen, A6.
    'Private capital markets want to be lending the government money because it is a safe asset.' Ethan Pollack, Economic Policy Institute (blowout quote)
    ['Safe asset'? Not when wealthy investors are pushing their own easily paid taxes onto non-wealthy consumers, meaning rapid-circulation consumer spending is being replaced by slower-circulation government spending and slowest-circulation onepercenters' spending.]
  • Canadian household debt levels hit new high amid borrowing spree, Toronto Globe, B1.
    Statistics Canada - Household debt hits new record, Canadian Press via Ottawa Metro, 16.
    ...more in debt today than ever before... Debt to annual disposable income reached a new high at 164.5%, from 163.3% the previous quarter...
    [You can't maintain the circulation of your money supply for long on consumer borrowing. Banksters love this, but then, their policy amounts to Suicide, Everyone Else First. But don't worry, be happy -]
    StatsCan shift makes debt look worse, Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    ...The high debt-to-income number may surprise Canadians who only a few months ago were told it was just above 150%. But Statistics Canada has recently revised how it calculates the measure to make it more representative of actual household finances.
  • Controversial employment insurance changes in effect Jan. 6 - "Reforms" [our quotes] could deprive deserving recipients of assistance, opposition parties charge, Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    ...The federal government's changes to the $17-billion employment-insurance program will come into force Jan.6, 2013, when recipients will be expeced to commute possibly an hour or more for a job and accept work if it pays between 70 and 90 per cent of their previous income...
    [Are YOU doin' better this year than last?]
  • Women slow to climb corporate ladder: study - Equal representation a long way off,
    Ottawa Citizen, F3.
  • Mortality rates down, but not in Gatineau - Patient death ratio in Ottawa Hospitals falling.., Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    ...according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information. ...The news was grim for the Hôpital de Gatineau and the Hôpital de Hull. Not only has their Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio risen more than 13% since 2007-08, their 2010-11 mortality ratio of 133 was the highest in Quebec. (For Quebec hospitals, 2010-11 was the latest year data were available.)...
    [Oh oh, those are my local hospitals north of the border. But hey -]
  • How counting the dead helps the living, Toronto Globe, A10.
    Around the world, 60 million people die each year. We don't know the cause of death for 50 million of them because they lived in developing countries.
    In India, World Health Organization figures showed 15,000 deaths from malaria. The actual number was 200,000.
    An estimated 400,000 deaths were attributed to HIV/AIDS, but the number was only one-quarter of that figure.
    The Canadian epidemiologist behind the [Million Death Study] is aiming to accurately decipher how one million Indians died, to help find preventable causes and apply remedies.
  • Follow will of voters: robocall lawyer - [Canada's Federal] Court told voting must take precedence over challenge of election results, Ottawa Citizen, A3.
    [Corrupt results are not the "will of voters." Partisan election manipulation is not "voting."]
    Arthur Hamilton, who is representing six "Conservative" MPs in the robocall case [that told voters, e.g., the wrong polling station], says allowing a challenge to elections could open up every vote to potential litigation.
    [Fine. DO IT! The whole purpose of democracy rather than plutocracy is accurate feedback, especially the kind that indicates direction and pace of needed change = negative feedback. No feedback, no adaptability, no survivability. Wealthy people think the system is working, and "if it works, don't fix it." No adaptability, no survivability. What do we need to adapt to? How about -]
  • In relevance revolution, businesses must adapt - Rate of change and impact of change are increasing, by Mark Sutcliffe, Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    When my grandfather was born, the Wright Brothers were still trying to figure out how to get their flying device off the ground. By the time he was 68, he was watching a live television signal from outer space as Neil Armstrong walked on the moon...



    Thursday, December 13, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Porsche to cut working hours, maintain pay, AFP via France24 Podcasts via france24.com
    PARIS, France - Luxury sports carmaker Porsche said Thursday it will attract highly-skilled workers by gradually trimming working hours without paycuts... The group's more than 17,000 staff would therefore see their working hours cut gradually between now and mid-2013 from 35 hours to 34 hours "with full compensation"... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Porsche apparently has either a long-term view to be concerned about attracting workers when they're being forced to trim hours, or, if we take them at their word and there is no drop in demand pushing them to cut hours, then they're actually timesizing to create more jobs and markets for their product = also very long term. And very advanced indeed!]
  2. Flexi work week to be finalised next year, Go-Jamaica.com
    KINGSTON, Jamaica - ...Those arrangements seek to address the variations in the number of hours worked each day or week, as well as the days of the week when employees work... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Hopefully then, a small step from variations in the number of hours and days worked to a fluctuating workweek, gradually fluctuating against unemployment.]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Gilead Sciences buying YM BioSciences in $510-million deal - Ontario firm's research into treatments for bone-marrow disorder focus of sale, Toronto Globe, B4.
  • U.S. firm Cardtronics buys Ottawa cash machine network [for $??] - Can-Do-Cash operates more than 800 ATMs, Ottawa Citizen, B12.

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Barclays tightens its belt, Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B3.
    The British banking giant is the latest to join in an industry-wide global cost-cutting spree, planning to cut as many as 2,000 [investment banking] jobs, likely concentrated in Asia and continental Europe.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Canada: Tories 'hit the reset button': F-35 mess to be reviewed - Bombshell findings shock MPs: Costs could soar to $45.8 billion over 42 years, long-awaited KPMG report warns, Ottawa Metro, 12.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Argentina. Sex-slavery acquittals spur protest, AP via Ottawa Metro, 18.
    [And then there's Argentina in Canada? -]
  • Dad [Guy Turcotte] who killed his kids to be freed, Canadian Press via Ottawa Metro, 09.
    ...less than four years later...from a psychiatric institution..Montreal's Pinel [not penal?] institute...
    [As if EVERY murderer isn't mentally ill and therefore "not criminally reponsible."]
    The Harper government plans to make it more difficult for mentally ill offenders found not criminally responsible to be released from custody \to\ make the safety of the public the paramount factor for review boards that determine an offender's release.
    [At last the Tories are planning something constructive.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Dow Jones Industrial Average..down 2.99 or 0.02% to 13,245.45, Toronto Globe, B18.
    Wall Street seesaws, Toronto Globe, B18.
    U.S. stocks ended nearly flat, giving up most of the day's gains after the Fed reiterated that monetary policy won't be enough to offset damage from the 'fiscal cliff' [or rather, the corruption the Fed still hasn't cleaned up from the financial collapse]. Wal-Mart was the biggest drag on the Dow [as indeed it is on small-town businesses and everything else], falling 2.8% following India's announcement of an inquiry into the company's lobbying practices.
    [India's got a lot more sense than we have.]
  • Fed targets U.S. unemployment -
    [Sing hallelujah! It's a Great Day in the Mornin' for all us non-Onepercent 99%ters! The Massa has finally glimpsed the light = the right target is JOBLESSNESS. However -]
    - Central bank to keep interest rates near zero until jobless rate falls to 6.5%; continues its bond-buying policy to stimulate economy, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [The bad news is that zero interest is no incentive to support the risk of lending into a "slow recovery" or _____(fill in latest euphemism for continued officially-denied recession), and who cares if the Fed buys its own bonds: it's just masturbating. And since when is 6.5% unemployment No Problem? This takes us back to the old NAIRU of the 90s (foster 6% unemployment cuz lower will trigger inflation, so 6% is the NAIRU = lowest Non-Accelerating Inflation Rate of Unemployment). The good news is that the Fed has hit upon the right variable to squeeze something else as much as it takes to reach a lower jobless figure. Iif we now switch from squeezing interest rates to squeezing the length of the workweek = the point where overtime begins, and implement overtime-to-training&hiring conversion strategies - and THEN keep squeezing - we'll reach the 6.5% jobless goal a lot faster and we'll have in place a free alternative (non-double-edged!) inflation control that will allow us to go far below 6.5% unemployment without needing rollodex pricetags.]
  • Foreign workers - No Canadian hires for four years at Chinese-owned B.C. mine, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [But last "temporary" foreign worker doesn't leave till 15 years from now.]
  • I didn't vote due to robocalls, Quebecer says - First complainant to step forward speaks out [Daniel Speik, of Saint-Columban], Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [Harper taking lessons from Karl Rove of the Bush White House basement? But what's poor Harper gonna do when Canadian voting machines still have quaint paper trails?]



    Wednesday, December 12, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Police brotherhood fights for 3-day workweek, CJAD.com
    MONTRÉAL, Québec - ...The police brotherhood is promising a fight over the city's decision to abolish the 3 1/2 day weekly schedule currently worked by many Montreal cops. The city announced it was abolishing [that] workweek out of concern the longer days are too tiring... Meantime, [the] union has studies that show how a shorter workweek with 10-hour workdays is best for police patrol officers and for citizens because it allows the force to put more cops on the ground during the critical evening hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The good news here is that Montreal police already have a shorter-than-40-hour workweek, but it's actually just a 35-hour workweek that's been repackaged into three-and-a-half 10-hour days rather than the futuristic 24-hour workweek (3x8) that it sounds.]
  2. Media General Bonuses Help Make Up for Furloughs - Five days' pay for those who sacrificed income in the lean years, Broadcasting & Cable Mobile via broadcastingcable.com
    RICHMOND, Va., USA - ...Hinting at its new life as a pure-play broadcaster, Media General is giving those who lost income during a 2011 furlough program a cash payment equal to up to five days of pay. "To thank you for your loyalty and dedication, we are going to reinvest some of the dollars generated by our strong performance this year back into our employees," said Marshall Morton, president and CEO, in an internal memo... - see whole article under today's date.
    [At last, a CEO with some common sense! And an example of how crisis-cushioning timesizing instead of traumatic downsizing often lets companies recover so well they can completely compensate their employees, without government help, for the emergency temporary timesizing (assuming it really was a temporary emergency and not a long-term downward trend).]
  3. BONUS squib - German data help elevate TSX, Canadian Press via Toronto Star, B5.
    ...Data suggest..Germany will be able to avoid slipping into recession...
    [So despite Greece and Spain, the world leader in worksharing (German "Kurz-arbeit") is hanging onto it.]
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • WebMD [NYC-based] to cut jobs by 14% [250 jobcuts], Ottawa Metro, 10.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Is there any value in an unpaid internship? If I accept a position as an unpaid intern to break into my desired field of work, am I just selling myself short? Toronto Globe, B19.
    [There's tremendous temporary value for The Onepercent in their campaign to take the general population back to slavery, not just halfway back to feudal serfdom, nevermind what that will do to the economy - and their investments.]
  • Michigan delivers big blow to unions, Toronto Star, A1.
    Michigan becomes a 'right to work' [ie: right to benefit from unions without supporting them] state, AP via Toronto Globe, B9.
    ...Michigan, the centre of the U.S. auto industry, will become the 24th state to ban requirements that non-union employees pay unions for negotiating contracts and other services...
    [And those dreadful unions, already lying mortally wounded on the floor with less than 13% of the workforce, definitely need another round of vicious kicksinthehead so insulated&isolated CEOs can hasten their agenda of Suicide, Everyone Else First. But then, if unions had stayed On Issue = their power issue of preventing mounting labor surplus by pushing for shorter hours instead of higher pay and trinkets, oops, benefits - they'd still be 35% or more of the workforce, as they were in the 1950s. And we'd still have an economy instead of a Cadillac in quicksand. And it's not staying in the U.S. -]
  • PM readies legislation for [Canadian] unions to open books - Vote comes one day after Michigan passes two anti-labour laws, Toronto Star, A6.
    ...Liberal interim leader Bob Rae said Bill C-377 "is an exercise in bureaucratic overkill that has nothing to do with transparency and everything to do with simply trying to punish trade union organizations."...
  • HSBC pays $1.9 billion to stay out of court, Toronto Star, B1.
    HSBC's 'stunning failure' - Hefty fines but no criminal charges after bank launders money for drug cartels and violates U.S. sanctions, Toronto Globe, B9.
    [No pain, no change. But pain is only for unions and the general population, not banks and banksters -]
  • Economic status: Poorest Canadians see few gains in absolute income - "Although the traditional benchmark of income inequality isn't showing an increase, the absolute levels of income matter enormously" TD Bank chief economist Craig Alexander, Ottawa Metro, 10.
  • Coal mine hiring sparks conflict - Unions protest HD Mining's move to use temporary workers from China.., Toronto Globe, B6.
    ...HD interviewed some 300 applicants in Canada before going overseas [ie: home] to find workers... Critics say it's implausible that Canada, a country rich with mining, could not provide a single qualified applicant for Murray River BC..\.. Local unions..say HD..advertised wages below the industry norm \and\ made Mandarin a requirement...potentially creating the first Canadian mine that is not operated in either French or English...
    [But investors don't give a damn about diversity in the form of nationalism, only about money = quantity, not quality = pecking order, not sustainability -]
  • CNOOC: tepid reception, hot prospects - Despite Ottawa's hesitation, shares of Chinese oil giant [finally owning a piece of Canada by taking over Nexen] are an intriguing investment option, by Josh O'Kane, Toronto Globe, B11.
    [And did Ottawa really hesitate? -]
  • Canada's CEO [PM Harper] just doesn't get it, by David Olive, Toronto Star, B1.
    ...Harper last Friday rebuked the majority Canadian-public opposition to a proposed Chinese government takeover of Calgary oil producer Nexen Inc. with his approval of [CNOOC's] $15.1-billion deal, and of a $5.2-billion Malaysian government state grab for Alberta oil and gas assets... Harper [tried to cover by saying] that foreign government takeovers in the oilpatch will henceforth be blocked, other than those arising from "exceptional circumstances." Gosh sakes, every takeover is "exceptional"...
    [And that's not the only thing that Harper just doesn't get -]
  • Canada and Israel deepen ties with joint foreign-aid pact, by Ken Mackrael, Toronto Globe, A1.
    ...strengthening ties between the two countries at a time when Israel faces increasing international isolation [for more squatter-based land theft ("settlements") from Palestinians]...
  • Hon Hai hits snag in push for automation in China, by Mozur & Luk, Toronto Globe, B8.
    [That's the good news. The bad news is -]
    Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. [is trying] to automate production across China...
    [which, if it's followed by the usual downsizing instead of timesizing, will worsen China's already way-over 20% unemployment - but what does Hon Hai care?! -]
    It has 1.5 million workers in China and has faced controversy over problems including underage workers, employee suicides and a September plant riot..\.. The Taiwan-based company, which uses the trade name Foxconn, is a contract manufacturer for Apple Inc. and other consumer-electronics companies...
    [So, the dark side of the idealistic, holier-than-thou Apple world.]
  • Britons outraged by corporate tax avoidance - Foreign companies that legally move profits to other other jurisdictions labelled immoral, Toronto Globe, A13.
    Starbucks...has paid just $13.7-million in taxes in 14 years [less than 1m a year]. (photo caption)
    [More effective would be to take them at their word = "no taxable profits" in Britain - and revoked their licenses as pointless to continue.]
  • British Columbia: Rising sea means dikes need upgrades, Toronto Star, A8.
    ...across the Lower Mainland...



    Tuesday, December 11, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Vestas Wind Systems Cuts Hours at Colorado Plants to Save Jobs, Bloomberg.com
    WINDSOR & BRIGHTON, Colo., USA - Vestas Wind Systems A/S, the world’s biggest wind-turbine maker, cut working hours at two Colorado plants to save jobs. Employees paid by the hour at blade-manufacturing factories in Windsor and Brighton were told yesterday they’ll have their working week cut to 32 hours from 40, Denmark- based Vestas said today... The work-share plan was approved by the Colorado Dept. of Labor & Employment and workers will receive payment for the lost hours from an unemployment insurance trust fund... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. $822,000-Worker Shows California Leads U.S. Pay Giveaway, Bloomberg.com
    SACRAMENTO, Calif., USA - ...Lacy, the governor’s spokesman, said hiring freezes and furloughs, or the unpaid time Schwarzenegger forced employees to take, combined to inflate accruals of vacation and leave. Lacy said the expiration of Brown’s version of the furloughs at the end of June will help reduce the [im-?]balances. Employees are told they must take unpaid furlough days before using paid vacation. That has boosted the backlog of unused leave, especially at agencies with round-the-clock operations... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Public meetings to resume as USPS proposes cutting hours, Bluefield Daily Telegraph via BDTonline.com
    BLUEFIELD, W.Va., USA - ...The Bishop Post Office, Falls Mills Post Office, Jewell Ridge Post Office and Keen Mountain Post Office would all have their hours reduced from 8 to 4 hours a day. Post offices in Narrows and Rich Creek also would see their hours reduced from 8 to 6 hours a day. The reduced hours will be implemented over a period of two years with completion scheduled by September 2014. - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - dishes bipartisan PR with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crowne Plaza & Ottawa's Globe Mags&Cigars, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • G.M.'s Opel unit plans to close a German plant to contain losses, New York Times, B1 pointer to B2.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • A proposed Army handbook suggests Western ignorance of Afghan culture has driven a spike [jump] in insider attacks, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A8.
    [More insider attacks, more rejoicing midst the weapons merchants - extoll ignorance! -]
    U.S. schoolchildren continue to trail those of major rivals in math and science exams despite progress on some tests, new results show, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Great, now can we get some culture exams and make sure they're trailing there too?!]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The decline and fall of the American consumer empire [& economies that depend on it like China?], and a lasting change to the U.S. economic landscape, by Scott Barlow, Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to globeandmail.com/unlimited
  • For many financial advisors, stocks become a hard sell, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [And no wonder, when, for example -]
  • HSBC plans to acknowledge that for years it ignored money laundering, part of a $1.9 billion settlement with U.S. authorities that capped the bank's disastrous foray into the U.S. market, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Investors unloaded Italian stocks and bonds following the weekend's news that Prime Minister Mario Monti would resign early, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
    [So he was more of a Mounty than a mountebank?]
  • Japan's economy shrank for the second quarter in a row in the three months through September, indicating that it has entered a recession, WSJ, A1 pointer to A14.
    [Or at least that the "experts" finally have to admit to one.]
  • The noisy depths, New York Times, A1 pointer to D1.
    Because of human activity, ocean depths have grown noisier, which is especially bad for the whales...



    Sun.-Mon, December 9-10, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Insight: Making France work again, 12/09 Reuters via WTAQ.com
    ÉCUEILLÉ, France - ..."Even given that each French worker produces 5% more per hour than an American, he produces 35% less over his working life"...
    [Then drop mandatory retirement and create the extra needed jobs by cutting the workweek as far as it takes.]
    Even that would not be disastrous if employers simply hired more people - the whole point of the 35-hour week after all was to reduce unemployment by requiring more workers to be taken on to do the same job. But small companies like CBN insist it was plain unrealistic to assume they can simply hire more people for the same cost and without disruption to existing work patterns... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here we get into the poor transition design that France used: only two steps, large then small companies (South Korea cut from 44 to 40 hours with SEVEN yearly company-size steps 2004-2011); a dividing-line at only 20 employees; and worst of all, letting the largest company, the government, go second along with small companies! South Korea sweetened the whole process by having large companies create a lot more jobs and consumer spending first.]
  2. Report: Work sharing a positive to come from recession, 12/10 Institute of Leadership & Management via i-l-m.com
    LONDON, U.K. - ..."Work sharing is a reduction in working time to avoid lay-offs. The company temporarily gets a reduction in its wage bill and the employees don't lose their jobs. It is a measure that helps to stabilise the economy,"... For instance, government-funded partial unemployment benefits and better training opportunities may be offered to staff members affected by a proportional reduction in wages... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And another take on the same report -]
  3. Economic crisis leads to huge changes in working practices, 12/10 KUwait News Agency via KUNA.net.kw
    GENEVA, Switzerland -- ...According to the report, employees have seen changes in their hourly wage rates, as well as in the number of hours they work. Large numbers of employees are getting lower wages because they are working fewer hours and doing less overtime. Many are also 'work sharing' - in order to avoid being laid off...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&wages&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books, Cambridge, New England & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Gatineau, New France -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Personal finance - How to plan for a layoff, 12/09 Boston Globe, G1 pointer to G5.
    If you're in danger of being laid off, don't wait until you lose your job to start networking.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Hostess..used wages that were supposed to help fund employee pensions for the company's operations as it sank toward bankruptcy, 12/10 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Using wages for something else, - isn't that theft? or is it OK if big corp.s(es) do it?]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Chinese firm wins auction for A123, by Erin Ailworth, 12/09 Boston Globe, B2.
    ...a politically charged auction for nearly all of A123 Systems Inc., the Waltham MA battery maker that filed for bankruptcy protection after receiving hundreds of millions of dollars of government [ie: forced-taxpayer] support... Wanxiang Group, an auto parts conglomerate...
    [So, another triple disaster, this time on the U.S. side of the Tomifobia River (where tomfoolery meets claustrophobia): makework, bankruptcy, foreign takeover.]
    ...A deal that had drawn criticisms in Congress, 12/09 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B2.
    [Too little too late?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Chinese firm wins auction for A123, by Erin Ailworth, 12/09 Boston Globe, B2.
    ...a politically charged auction for nearly all of A123 Systems Inc., the Waltham MA battery maker that filed for bankruptcy protection after receiving hundreds of millions of dollars of government [ie: forced-taxpayer] support... Wanxiang Group, an auto parts conglomerate...
    [So, another triple disaster, this time on the US side: makework, bankruptcy, foreign takeover.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Unwanted at home, free to strike again - The vast and secretive US prison system for immigrants, stymied when it tries to deport some criminals, has quietly released thousands, including killers, a Boston Globe investigation shows, first of three parts, by Maria Sacchetti,12/09 Boston Globe, A1.
    Yongwei Guo's wife was killed in 2010 by a criminal who had been released by immigration officials. (photo caption)
    8,500 convicted criminals released since 2008 because their native countries would not take them back. (blowout stat)
    ...In New England, immigration officials have released as many as 10 convicted murderers since 2008... More than 20 governments from Jamaica to China routinely block deportation [ie: repatriation] of their citizens, even dodging calls from US immigration officers seeking to expedite the process, and critics say they suffer few consequences.
    [Outrageous. Rejecting your own citizens?!? Here's a high-priority for the United Nations! Meanwhile, we suggest parachuting them back into their irresponsible homelands - or drop them back off on the beach. Or escalate by denying visas -]
    Some [critics], such as US Rep. Ted Poe (R-Tex.) argue that the United States should stop accepting diplomats [or anybody!] from countries who do not repatriate their citizens... Federal officials have refused to issue visas to only one nation, tiny Guyana in South America... The Globe found that immigration officials almost never try to declare a detainee dangerous: In the past four years, immigration officials have released thousands of criminals, but court officials say they have handled only 13 cases seeking to hold immigrants longer because they are dangerous...
    [America's spreading death wish? Let's see. What else can we do to mutilate our nation and toxify our children's future?]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Consumer spending is losing its vigor, 12/10 WSJ Montreal edition, A1.
    [WHAT vigor?? Still, the Montreal edition is more unsettling than the Boston edition -]
    Consumer spending wobbles - Job worries, 'fiscal cliff' uncertainty threaten a key engine for U.S. economy, 12/10 WSJ Boston edition, A1.
  • NASDAQ Composite index, 12/09 Boston Globe, G5.
    This week down 32.30 or 1.1% to 2,978.04
  • Apple, fiscal cliff weigh on investors,
    12/09 Boston Globe, G5.
  • Small[?] banks are making a last-ditch attempt to persuade Congress to extend a crisis-era blanket guarantee on nearly $1.5 trillion in deposits, 12/10 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [So, probably "small" banks are doing this like the taxbreaks for zillionaires and megacorps(es) are gonna help small businessmen and entrepreneurs. And are we to understand that these poor little rich kids want a blank check on taxpayers in perpetuity? and simultaneously they want to cut taxes (their own)? They're not even spending, donating or investing the bazillions they've already stolen! And at last, the Krugster is starting to "get it" -]
  • Michigan labor fight cleaves a union bulwark,
    New York Times, A1.
  • Robots and robber barons - Why are the workers being left behind? op ed by Paul Krugman, 12/10 NYT, A25.
    [But he's still arguing for pity instead of unveiling a system-crashing stupidity - workers shmerkers, these are customers!!! (or WERE!)]
  • Bat fan* visits Boston [Franklin Pk zoo] to learn about disease - Population dwindling as result of fungus, 12/09 Boston Globe, B3.
    ...*Miriam Parrucci..a third-grader from Havertown, Pa...
  • Quebec's corruption scandal is a Canadian problem, by Barrie McKenna bmckenna@globeandmail.com, 12/10 Toronto Globe, B1.



    Saturday, December 8, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Agencies set up plans to manage cuts if Congress, Obama fail to reach deficit deal; WashingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., USA - ...The Defense Department is likely to impose an immediate hiring freeze on its civilian workforce, said a spokeswoman, Army Lt. Col. Elizabeth Robbins. Some furlough notices, rather than layoffs, would begin within a few weeks, she said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing, not downsizing!]
  2. One in three Limerick home help service users have hours cut, LimerickLeader.ie
    LIMERICK, Ireland - One in three people in Limerick city and county who receive home help had seen their hours reduced by November 23 - and more service users will suffer cuts [in hours but not jobs] between now and Christmas... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Volkswagen Gets Over 60,000 Orders for New Golf - Report, Dow Jones Newswires via FoxBusiness.com
    WOLFSBURG, Germany - ..."We're doing well. In November, group deliveries were roughly 10% up from the previous year," driven by sales of the new VW Golf, Hans Dieter Poetsch was reported as saying. Apart from VW's German truck and engineering unit MAN SE, which has announced short-time work for January, "there is, from today's perspective, no threat of short-time work" elsewhere in the group, he was quoted as saying...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Canada approved [Beijing-based] Cnooc's $15.1 billion takeover bid for oil-sands operator Nexen, Boston Globe, B7.
    ["Canada" as in Canada's tapeworm prime minister, who nevertheless has the gall to "warn that it would be the last such sale - yeah, now he's got HIS cut from China...]
    Canada [foto is PM Harper] clears $15 billion Chinese takeover of an energy company - Unease over selling a strategic asset to a foreign owner, New York Times, B1.
    [A triple disaster, for national economy, security and ecology, but robopathic Harper only "follows da money" for his own little oil clique, just like today's braindead Republicans -]
    Dinosaurs and denial - Republican anti-intellectualism is antediluvian, op ed by Charles Blow, NYT, A19.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Memories sold at restaurant auction - For 137 years, Boston's Locke-Ober served the best, Boston Globe, B5.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • US fiscal cliff fears knock confidence - Economic uncertainty amid need to cut deficit, Financial Times, p.1.
    [The Financial Times tries to tie consumer confidence to onepercenters' bogeyman "cliff," but face it, most consumers have never heard of any fiscal cliff. And of course, the silverytower Financial Times can't even imagine maxxing out on your credit cards -]
  • Consumer debt rises to $2.75 trillion - Increase is due to credit cards, vehicles, tuition - Borrowing in the category that covers autos and student loans increased by $10.8 billion - Borrowing on credit cards rose by $3.4 billion, AP via Boston Globe, B7.
    [or falling off the end of unemployment benefits = jobseeker subsidy -]
  • Jobs report doesn't allay concerns - Unemployment rate falls, but 350,000 stop looking for work, Boston Globe, B5.
    Labor market plods "forward" [our quotes] - Concerns about 'fiscal cliff' don't squelch hiring [completely~] but lackluster pace reflects weakness in economy, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    Scrooge. 'Grinch.' Congress. - Extending federal jobless benefits is the least lawmakers should do,
    editorial, NYT, A18.
  • In medical triumph [only], homicides fall despite soaring gun violence, WSJ, A1.
    The number of of U.S. homicides [defn requires a death] have been falling for two decades, but America has become no less violent...
  • Germany's central bank cut its growth outlook for the coming year and warned of a looming recession, WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.



    Friday, December 7, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Collective Bargaining Agreements and Worksharing, WV Center on Budget and Policy via wvpolicy.org
    CHARLESTON, W.Va., USA - ...The Ohio House passed their SharedWork bill with broad bipartisan support, as well as with backing from the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, nonpartisan policy analysts, the National Federation of Independent Business/Ohio, and the Ohio Manufacturers Association. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Calls for short-time work scheme for temporary staffing, Staffing Industry Analysts via staffingindustry.com
    HAMBURG, Germany – ...The scheme has proved successful in the recent recession and helped to save jobs. Under Kurzarbeit, the German state compensates up to 67% of an employee’s net salary if an employer has to cut back on wage cost and working times during an economic slowdown. Head of the federal labour agency, Frank-Jürgen Weise, now said in an interview with the news magazine Der Spiegel that he would support the idea of introducing the scheme in the temporary staffing industry... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Another turnpike project up in the air - State and developer at odds over long-term lease for $450m Fenway Center, by Casey Ross, Boston Globe, B5.
    [Good! How much are these current taxpayer-leaching leeches trying to get?]
    Columbus Center - The 39-storey condominium, hotel, and retail development failed in 2008 after a decade-long battle by the developer to get permits and government subsidies. (photo caption)
    The $450 million [47-storey] Fenway Center development over the Massachusetts Turnpike in Boston is [currently] in jeopardy because of a stalemate between the developer and state officials over a long-term lease for the property... That would doom another project involving turnpike air rights to failure... The last successful air rights project in Boston was Copley Place, which was built in the early 1980s using $19 million in federal grants...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Fined hedge fund [Diamondback Capital Management] to close, NYT via Boston Globe, B7.
    ...ensnared in the government's insider trading investigations...

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • U.S. companies were sitting atop a record pile of cash at the end of September, but have slowed down saving as the economy has emerged from recession, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [A. Since when has the persistently slow "recovery" enabled the economy to "emerge" from recession? B. SItting on record piles of cash on the part of both companies and individuals (the famed "onepercent" and moreso, the 0.01%) has perpetuated the officially denied recession, which with adequate indexes would be seen as worsening, not ending. The money supplies of the world, especially the US dollar, are still being more and more funneled to a tiny population who have FAR more than they spend or donate, or than they can even invest sustainably.]
  • The forgotten millions - Why aren't we talking about jobs? op ed by Paul Krugman, New York Times, A27.
    [Because the subtext of the nitwittery that passes for high economy theory today has replaced the New Economy nonsense of the late 1990s ("return on investment is sooo OLD economy") with New Finance nonsense ("it's all about investment - jobs are sooo beside the point and beneath mention").]
  • No single cause in [Massachusetts' economic] slowdown, by Megan Woolhouse, Boston Globe, A1.
    Gov. Deval Patrick blamed political gridlock in Washington and the so-called fiscal cliff... But..a weak national recovery and global economic slowdown have weighed on the Massachusetts economy since spring...
  • European Central Bank cuts 2013 economic forecast, leaves rates unchanged - Growth is being held back across the eurozone as governments slash spending and raise taxes [on spenders (the 99%) instead of hoarders (the 1%)], AP via Boston Globe, B6.



    Thursday, December 6, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Unfair overtime criticism – radiographers, TimesOfMalta.com
    [But then, criticism of ANYbody's reduced working hours in the robotics age is not only unfair but violates economic system- requirements for full employment, maximum consumer spending and monetary circulation.]
    VALETTA, Malta - ...The society was reacting to an observation by the National Audit Office that radiologists are paid overtime for additional hours above their 35-hour week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But then, incentivating people to work long hours is also system corrosive.]
  2. Long working hours cause depression, South China Morning Post via scmp.com
    HONG KONG, China - ...A Hong Kong survey has put a statistical face on the situation. Among people who work more than 50 hours a week, 35% show symptoms of depression... But when the working week drops below 50 hours, the incidence of mental distress declines to 27%... At inflexible workplaces 33% of workers suffer mental distress, versus 25% in more flexible environments... The survey of about 1,000 people, aged 18-60, was carried out in September and October by the University of Hong Kong. - see whole article under today's date.
  3. The four-hour workweek fantasy, Nextgov.com
    TRAVIS AIRFORCE BASE, Calif., USA - ...This trend is rising up as a result of advanced technologies that allow us to work from anywhere, shifting business and personal priorities and books like 'The 4-Hour Work Week' (Crown Archetype, 2009) that tell us we can live differently.”.. - see whole article under today's date.
    [That's another way it's happening "but not the best way": employees are working from home, discovering shortcuts, billing for much longer hours than they're working but still getting the job done - control-freak work-ethic management is being circumvented and less downsizing is happening cuz ... with automation and robotics there just ain't 40hrs/wk for everyone anymore.]
  4. One in Four Brits Want to Change Their Working Hours, FreshBusinessThinking.com
    LONDON, great BRITain, UK - ...As a result, the concept of a ‘weekend’ and ‘working hours’ will be less mainstream... There will be more opportunities to be employed by more than one organisation... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And to be employed for less than one frozen pre-automation workweek?!]
  5. BONUS update - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Citigroup says it will cut 11,000 jobs and take a $1 billion charge, NYT, B1.
  • As Companies Seek Tax Deals, Governments [= taxpayers] Pay High Price, by: Louise Story, (12/02 late pickup) NYT via cnbc.com
    In the end, the money that towns across America gave General Motors did not matter. When the automaker released a list of factories it was closing during bankruptcy three years ago, communities that had considered themselves G.M.'s business partners were among the targets. For years, mayors and governors anxious about local jobs had agreed to G.M.'s demands for cash rewards, free buildings, worker training and lucrative tax breaks. As late as 2007, the company was telling local officials that these sorts of incentives would "further G.M.'s strong relationship" with them and be a "win/win situation," according to town council notes from one Michigan community. Yet at least 50 properties on the 2009 liquidation list were in towns and states that had awarded incentives, adding up to billions in taxpayer dollars, according to data compiled by The New York Times. Some officials, desperate to keep G.M., offered more [at that point]. Ohio was proposing a $56 million deal to save its Moraine plant, and Wisconsin, fighting for its Janesville factory, offered $153 million. But their overtures were to no avail. G.M. walked away and, thanks to a federal bailout, is once again "profitable" [our quotes - "profitable" for whom? a couple of cushioned creeps in executive suites]. The towns have not been so fortunate, having spent scarce funds in exchange for thousands of jobs that no longer exist...
    [Sick sick sick.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Britain said growth was weaker than expected and an austerity plan would continue longer than planned, WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
    [The longer the austerity, the weaker the growth.]
  • European countries hardest hit by the euro-zone debt crisis were rated among the most corrupt in the EU, WSJ, A1 pointer to A13.
    ["Corrupt" as in an unlimitedly tiny percentage of the population can absorb and decirculate an unlimitedly huge percentage of the country's money supply? Oh but North America is immune, right? Wrong -]
  • Federal prosecutors are investigating New Orleans ex-mayor Ray Nagin as part of an ongoing corruption probe, WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    [Then there's Toronto's (ex yet?) mayor Rob Ford... Gotta lighten up! How about a Polish joke? -]
  • Reality hits Poland, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.3.
    Polish pride in being the only country in the EU not to suffer a recession in 2009 is being replaced by fear as growth in consumption, investment and exports declines and policy makers scramble to react.
    [The only thing that matters, cuz it determines the others, is consumption (consumer spending = maximum circulation) - and that requires jobs, and in the robotics age, jobs require worksharing via workweek reduction, however far down it take.]



    Wednesday, December 5, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Roundup: MAN Corp. starts with short-time working in the new year and sets high revenue goals, dpa-AFX via Burse News via Börsennews.de
    Roundup: MAN startet mit Kurzarbeit ins neue Jahr und setzt hohe Renditeziele [original header in German/deutsch]
    MÜNCHEN, Germany - MAN Corp. is sending thousands of workers into short-time working due to the weak truck market in the new year. "We will introduce short-time working in two plants by January 14 after the Christmas break," said the head of the truck division, Anders Nielsen... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Opel To Start Short-time Work at Bochum Plant in January, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany -- ...Short-time work is a German government program that subsidizes the wages of those who work reduced hours, aimed at avoiding layoffs and economic hardship. The plant will evaluate on a monthly basis after January whether the work pattern will need to continue... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Baxter International buying Swedish medical device maker for $2.76B, Boston Globe, B7.

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • FedEx workers to get buyout offers, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...should reduce "fixed headcount by several thousand people."..
  • Connecticutt questions utility on layoffs, AP via Boston Globe, B7.
    Hartford-based Northeast Utilities...says when new hires are factored in, there have been only 155 job reductions..\..since its $5 billion purchase of Boston-based NStar was completed in April...
  • Reebok cuts 150 jobs, 65 of them in Canton MA [HQ] - Layoffs follow slashing of sales forecase, Boston Globe, B5.
    [Sales is first. Consumer base means consumer spending BASE. Keep dreaming that it's trumped by trade or the financial sector and you'll have a tougher and tougher time clinging to the mirage of Recovery. Keep taxing what you want, sales, with sales taxes, instead of what you DON'T want, more coagulated spending power trapped in the world-unto-itself Onepercent, and you'll keep "shipping water." Keep talking the talk of Growth alias UPsizing while walking the walk of DOWNsizing, and you'll keep looking like damn fools - like most of our conventional economists and many of our perversely incentived CEOs today. And we don't have it as bad as some other places, yet -]
  • Ranks of jobless in Spain edge up toward 5 million, by Ciaran Giles, AP via BG, B7.
    ...The Labor Ministry said unemployment rose a monthly 74,296 in November, or 1.5%, to a record 4.9 million. The unemployment rate is released separately, and [only] quarterly. It stood at 25% at teh end of the third quarter [Sept.30]; youth unemployment was above 50%...
    [And this in Europe which is leading the world in walking the walk of cutting workhours instead of workforce, yet even Europe doesn't GET IT = that this is the one and only way out. It's still focused on phony financial megabandaids -]
    ...European finance ministers approved release of $51.6 billion in bailout aid for Spanish banks hit by the real estate collapse in 2008...
    [The onepercenters in the banks don't need the money! They've already got way more than they spend, or donate, or can invest sustainably. Europe could have a much longer-lasting megabandaid by DISTRIBUTING $51,600,000,000 TO EVERY ONE OF THE 47,000,000 SPANIARDS instead of just to the unlimitedly absorbtive onepercenters because THEY SPEND and the wealthy do not. Many MANY have pointed this out. That's $1098, nearly $1100 for each and every Spaniard instead of $51.6BILLION for, what, at most 10,000 cushioned and insulated bankers? You do the math. How can an "intelligent species" stay this stupid for this long?]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Dow Jones industrial average, Boston Globe, B8 graph caption.
    Yesterday 12,951.78, down 13.82 or 0.1%...
  • Massachusetts to study state's underground economy - Effort to gauge effect on tax income, budget, by Casey Ross,
    Boston Globe, B5.
    ...first-of-its-kind study...to find widespread violations of tax and labor laws...
  • Lions' habitat shrinking in Africa, AP via BG, A3.
    ...have lost as much as 75% of their habitat in the last 50 years as humans overtake their land and the lion population dwindles, said...researchers at Duke University, including prominent conservationist Stuart Pimm, [in a] study published Tuesday by the journal Biodiversity and Conservation, \which\ warned that the number of lions across the continent has dropped to as few as 32,000, with populations in West Africa under incredible pressure..."with no large population remaining and lions now absent from many of the region's national parks."



    Tuesday, December 4, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Shared Work Program, VirginiaPublicRadio.org
    RICHMOND, Va., USA - Members of Virginia’s Unemployment Compensation Commission are weighing whether to endorse creation of a “shared work” program that could potentially benefit both businesses and employees during an economic slowdown... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Virginia's worksharing bill is sponsored by state Sen. George Barker.]
  2. Hickman Ferry reduces hours, cuts some service from continued drought, WPSDlocal6.com
    HICKMAN, Ky., USA - ...The ferry continues to serve passenger vehicles, but Floyd said the number of cars using the ferry has been cut in half, partly because he made the choice to end service an hour early because of darkness... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Austrian Industry Calls for Flexibilization of Short-Time Work, Austrian Business & Financial News via Friedl News via friedlnews.com
    VIENNA, Austria - ...Kapsch thinks that businesses are not flexible enough if the recession returns. “I hope that we can react quicker this time,” he says. According to Kapsch, short-time work must be implemented within days... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. German truck maker MAN cuts working hours: report, Agence France-Presse via google.com/hostednews/afp
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...Under short-time work schemes, employees have their working hours reduced for a limited period, but the state, in the form of the Federal Labour Agency, partially makes up for the corresponding shortfall in pay. The measure was used widely by German companies during the crisis of 2008-2009, and helped avoid widespread layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. BONUS update - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Bank of America Corp. plans to close a Dorchester MA call center and a check-processing operation in Malden MA, ending nearly 200 jobs, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
  • NY Times offers [30] newsroom buyouts, NYT via BG, B6.
  • Pfizer planning [unspecified] layoffs targeting US sales reps, AP via BG, B7.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • US manufacturing shrinks to 3-year low, AP via Boston Globe, B7.
  • Britain takes on US firms for 'tax avoidance', Boston Globe, B6.
  • Real estate recovery [in 2012 Massachusetts] sounds familiar, by Stephen Syre, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...looks a lot like our rocky road "out" of the collapse of the 1990s [our quotes]...



    Sun.-Mon, December 2-3, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Career Corner: Shared-work program, 12/02 Somerset County Daily American via dailyamerican.com
    SOMERSET, Pa., USA - ...A shared-work plan allows an employer to temporarily reduce the work hours of a group of employees as an alternative to a layoff. Employees covered by the plan receive a percentage of their Unemployment Compensation, or UC, while they work the reduced schedule, if they are otherwise eligible for UC... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Suncrest Introduces Short Working Hours, 12/03 Harare Herald via AllAfrica.com
    HARARE, Zimbabwe - Suncrest Chickens, a division of CFI Holding's Crest Poultry Group (CPG), last Friday introduced short working hours for its employees citing financial challenges... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But this case may involve a bad policy masqerading as a good policy.]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Banks and securities firms are under pressure to tighten their belts fast enough to keep pace with shrinking sales,
    12/03 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Foreclosure filings in Massachusetts have plunged, and nationally, lenders are expected to start 1.1 million fewer foreclosures in 2012 than they did in 2010, 12/02 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to G1.
    [Great, but that still leaves 1.8 million foreclosure starts, and what about the 10? 15? million foreclosed Americans already out there?]
  • Lines blur as Texas [=tax con-sultant G. Brint Ryan] gives industries a bonanza, 12/03 New York Times, A1.
    ...of state and local tax breaks and other business incentives...
    [= shades of The Suicidal Corporation by Paul Wever = America's corporate socialism for the rich - heading for a cliff all right, and not just fiscal, and maybe not that fiscal at all -]
  • Some analysts doubt dire predictions of tax increase -
    [actually taxes on the rich are the only transitional solution, transitioning to rebalancing labor and employment by cutting the oversupply of labor and amplifying the undersupply of employment in turn simply by cutting the dysfunctionally excessive (for the robotics age) workweek and smoothly converting overtime into OT-targeted training & hiring]
    - Most stocks are held in accounts that are exempt from taxes at the moment, 12/03 NYT, B1.
    [So it's all a sham mounted by that snake Bernanke - except the cut spending part: if they do that, they will trigger Gawd's Own Depression.]
  • Why we're bored, 12/02 Boston Globe, K1.
    [Ah, heavensent boredom! One of the truly great (tho' neglected) agents of change. When humanity finally gets thoroughly bored with Other People's Agendas and realizes it has a lot of ideas for its Free Time, maybe we can move on out of the age of overwork-cum-workaholism nextdoorto the quiet desperation of un(der)employment and get some good out of our unprecedented automation levels.]
  • Climate skeptics seek to roll back state laws on renewable energy, 12/02 Boston Globe, A11.
    [Skeptics is too good a word for them. If insufficient headline column space for "climate-change deniers" how about just NITWITS.]



    Saturday, December 1, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. German Labor Agency Sees Spike in 2013 Shorttime Work Report, DowJones Newswires via EuroInvestor.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - Germany's labor agency is earmarking funds to subsidize more short-time labor next year, the weekly WirtschaftsWoche magazine reported Saturday... Short-time work is a government program subsidizing wages of workers with reduced working hours, which helps to avoid layoffs as well as economic hardship for workers... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. What do you think of Germany's Kurzarbeit = short work, Bodybuilding.com Forums via forum.bodybuilding.com
    SOMEWHERE in Germany - ...Whatever..pontificating about how this will work in theory, let's see what it has done in practice: Germany, even though it is paying for the rest of the EU, still has a budget surplus. Unemployment is 5% and falling. It is the largest net exporter in the world, beating China, Japan, etc. Would you support kurzarbeit in your country?... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Toyota is offering retirement incentives to 2,000 workers in Kentucky, a sign it is adopting some cost-saving measures recently used by its Detroit rivals, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
    [- measures that cost its Detroit rivals their once-huge Detroit markets and in fact, their city.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • U.S. to pay $3.98 billion [i.e., FOUR billion (more!)] for next lot of F-325 jets, New York Times, B1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • (Photo of a Twinkie), The Other 98% via other98.com via Chris Powell's Facebook wall.
    A Teabagger [=person in ultra-right "Tea Party"?], a union member, and a CEO are all sitting at a table with a dozen Twinkies. The CEO immediately takes 11 Twinkies for himself. The CEO then turns to the Teabagger and says, "Watch out for that union guy - he wants part of your Twinkie." (photo caption)
  • The Dow...lost 70.88 points in November for its second consecutive monthly decline,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B5.
  • The [GOP-dominated] House voted to allow more foreign students with advanced U.S.-earned degrees to stay and work, WSJ, A1.
    [- never mind there aren't nearly enough jobs for advanced degrees already here and never mind this is an Obama/Democrat position (mistaken, unsustainable, unecological, wage-depressing, deficit-bloating...). And although all this looming charity for foreigners is going to mean more entitlements, the dithering GOP are pretending to fight entitlements -]
  • GOP takes aim at entitlements - Senate majority leader [Mitch McConnell] calls for bipartisan support of changes to Medicare & Social Security to get deal, WSJ, A1.
    [And some Dems too have been wandering across the aisle, the House minority speaker for example -]
    'Everybody knows that we have to have cuts, we have to have growth, and we have to have revenue. So why are we stalling?' Nancy Pelosi (D.), House minority leader (blowout quote)
    [Maybe because these goals contradict: cuts are downsizing, growth is upsizing. The only cuts you can have that don't cut growth and revenue are cuts in the workweek that spread employment and get more people earning and spending - and this agenda still hasn't "got legs."]
  • Israel advances settlement plan near Jerusalem..., NYT, A1.
    ...development of Jewish settlements in a contentious area east of Jerusalem... [More land theft to ignite anti-Semitism the world over and keep selling those weapons. Israel has become an embarrassment and a growing danger to world Jewry.]