Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
November, 2012

[Commentary] ©2012 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hourscuts or furloughs -
  1. Iowa Cities Cutting Hours to "Prepare" for ObamaCare [our quotes], 11/29 IowaCityOwl.com
    IOWA CITY, Ia., USA - ...The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, set to go into effect in January of 2014, will include a 12-month "look back period" where businesses will have to pay for the health care of their employees that have worked for them from January 2013 onward. In order to qualify for your employer to pay for your healthcare, you have to work at least 30 hours a week... Other cities [in Iowa besides Cedar Falls] are..cutting hours of city employees: Altoona, Ankeny, Ames, and Pleasant Hill... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Courts may cut workweek, 11/29 (11/30 over dateline) Pacific Daily News via guampdn.com
    HAGATNA, Guam (U.S) - ..."Without additional cash infusion from outside the judiciary, it was determined that the best way to address that shortfall was -- for all of the employees, from the chief justice to our other employees -- we will institute a shortened work week," Carbullido said... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Long work hours, stress take toll on resident physicians, 11/30 Canadian Safety Reporter
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - More than three-quarters (76.2%) of resident physicians responding to a survey said they had made errors at work due to the consecutive number of hours they are required to work, and two in 10 (18.5%) said they made errors that negatively impacted patient care... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Revolution brewing among masochistic martyr-complex megahour medical masters? About time! "Physicians, heal yourselves!"]
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours cuts or furloughs -
  1. 36-Hour Work Week on the Table at Thursday's Judicial Council Meeting, PacificNewsCenter.com
    HAGATNA, Guam - ...So far they have identified reducing that shortfall by about $900,000. Though not much of a solution, it includes reducing workhours by having the courts close an hour-early Tuesday-Friday every week. If adopted, the 36-hour workweek [9hrs x 4 days] will go into effect in May next year... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 4 Day Work Week, BeginnerTriathlete.com
    CARMEL, Calif., USA - I'm having trouble finding a training program to adapt to my work schedule. My workweek is 4 days on, 2 days off so the standard 7-day-per-week programs don't really work well. The hours are also crazy but I'll figure that out (first two days are 4pm-1am, last two days are 8am-4pm)... - see whole article under today's date.
    [9hrs x 2 days + 8x2 = 18+16 = 34-hour workweek.]
  3. BONUS update #1 - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update #2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • North Korea is continuing illegal shipments of weapons...bound for Myanmar and Syria..,
    Wall Street Journal, A1:2 pointer to A1:3.
    [And we're shipping to Israel to keep things het up.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • A needless charge for prison families, editorial, New York Times, A26.
    ...Private telephone companies...charge outrageously high rates for the calls that many of the nation's 1.6 million prison inmates make to stay in contact with their families...
    [1,6000,000 prison inmates? - is that still the world record?]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials fell 89.24 points to 12878.13 as the specter of bumpy U.S. budget negotiations surfaced late in the trading day, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Executives' good "luck" [our quotes] in trading own stock, WSJ, A1.
    [But "there's no such thing as coincidence"...]
  • Broader tax for fighting inequality [& mattress-$tuffing] - Taxing the rich is a start, but it won't be enough, by Eduardo Porter, New York Times, B1.
    [No, you also need engineered labor "shortages" via Timesizing, and its successor-programs.]
    ...Our lopsided economy...delivered 93% of our income growth in the first two years of the economic "recovery" [our quotes] to the richest one percent of families, and only seven percent to the rest of us...
    [And so the slow "recovery" drags on and on because the richest one percent of families were already spending all they cared to before they got this 93% of income growth.]
  • Banks feel currency [trading] pinch - Profits are eroding as electronic trading and new [electronic trading] platforms see gains [and there's -], WSJ, C1.
    ...a calm in currency markets relative to the swings of the last few years...
  • Problem: There's too much steel, WSJ, B1.
    [Bad news for one of our best timesizing companies, Nucor Steel.]
  • The increase in the level of student-loan debt is fanning worries that the federal government has made it too easy to borrow too much, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:6.
    [And speaking of students -]
  • The House [of Reps] will take up a bill making it easier for foreign students to stay in the U.S. after earning advanced degrees, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Thus incentivating foreign countries to make it harder for their best and brightest to study in the U.S. - and get cherrypicked.]
  • Europeans skimp on gifts as economy clouds holiday, WSJ, B1.
    [Geez mabeez, it's not even December yet!]
  • Hollande threatens nationalization if Mittal fails to guarantee French jobs, Financial Times, p.1.
    France's Hollande threatened to nationalize a steel plant that owner ArcelorMittal wants to partially close, fueling concerns of foreign investors, WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
    [What's the diff to investors if Mittal wants to close a chunk of it anyway?]
  • China's main stock index closed at its lowest level in almost four years on Tuesday and slipped below a key psychological level, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • The U.S. Treasury repeated that China's currency remains significantly undervalued but again declined to label Beijing a currency manipulator, WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
    [Maybe because Beijing basically OWNS the U.S. Treasury by now, and China learned everything it knows about currency manipulation from - daa dada daaaah - the U.S., including mainly the Creature from Jeckyll Island (= da Fed) ana T-reasura nervosa.]
  • Brazil: Pace of Amazon region deforestation declines, WSJ, A11.
    [But it's still going on.]



    Tuesday, November 27, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours cuts or furloughs -
  1. Wild employees taking paycuts, going to 4-day work weeks, Minneapolis Star Tribune (blog) via startribune.com
    MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., USA - All Wild [Minnesota Wild Hockey Club] employees will now feel the effects of an NHL lockout that is 73 days old. During an all-staff meeting at 2 p.m. CentralTime, the Wild announced that the roughly 200-person staff will be put on four-day, 32-hour work weeks, Chief Operating Officer Matt Majka told the Star Tribune. That will mean a 20% paycut for almost all employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But if the whole city cut the workweek, it would create an employer-perceived labor shortage and pay would be maintained or raised - and so would consumer spending on a citywide basis, and so would citywide prosperity. Proof by experience? W.K. Kellogg of Kellogg Cereals did it in the tougher business environment of the Great Depression (1930-31) to provide jobs for 800 more heads of household in his hometown of Battle Creek, Mich. and by 1935 had everyone back up to 40 hours pay - for a 30-hour workweek! (=five 6-hour days rather than the four 8-hour days mentioned here). See Ben Hunnicutt's book, Kellogg's Six-Hour Day.]
  2. State Looks at WorkSharing to Ease Layoffs, (11/26 late pickup) PublicNewsService.org
    CHARLESTON, W.Va., USA - During interim legislative meetings this week, state lawmakers will look at voluntary work-sharing. Instead of laying off employees when they need to cut costs, employers could collaborate with the unemployment-insurance system to keep people working at reduced hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. OCIMF makes recommendations on seafarer work hours, MarineLog.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y., USA - ...Oil Companies International Marine Forum acknowledges that international legislation on working hours has been in place for some time, but says that its provisions have been interpreted differently by individual administrations, resulting in differing requirements for vessels operating under different flags..\.. "These recommendations set out our minimum expectations, which we hope that shipping companies will take into account to achieve compliance with IMO and ILO rules, prevent fatigue and reduce fatigue-related incidents," says Captain Cotterell... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Hanover tables work hours decision on retirement, Dunkirk Evening Observer via observertoday.com
    HANOVER, N.Y., USA - ...The town, in trying to comply with a 2009 state law for reporting retirement hours, is moving forward with determining standardized work hours for its employees enrolled in the retirement system... Budget Officer Elmar Kiefer explained it is important to determine whether a standardized workday is 8, 7 or 6 hours depending on the department. He explained an employee may be at work for 8 hours but if they get a 1 hour unpaid lunch then for the purpose of retirement they only worked 7 hours... "They get credit for retirement for the hours they are paid"... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So here (above) is a new (to us) reason for defined (if not shorter) worktime per person.]
  5. Hong Kong needs standard working hours, South China Morning Post via scmp.com
    HONG KONG, China - The long-awaited Labour Dept. report on standard working hours is a hefty 344 pages. It provides a wealth of information about the experience of a dozen countries and offers 27 scenarios for the impact on Hong Kong's economy and workforce of their introduction here. It seems impressive for the depth and breadth of its coverage of a topic sensitive to the business community... For all the research, though, an important matter has been neglected: how the lives of Hong Kong people would be affected. That is, after all, the purpose of setting a limit on weekly working hours and ensuring paid overtime... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Actually, no. The Market does not care about mere people when a context of grotesque overpopulation and gross un(der)employment has been allowed to develop. In this worst-case scenario, which China, at its own great expense, is doing the world the huge favor of demonstrating-by-experience, there is indeed a much more serious purpose for setting a limit on worktime per person per time period. And that would be? - To prevent the unlimited concentration of our most precious vanishing resource on too few potential consumers to even maintain, let alone grow, current levels of MARKETABLE productivity and SUSTAINABLE investment. That resource is: natural market-demanded human employment in the age of robotics. We cannot keep overworking and downsizing our way to Growth, which if and when you ever take the trouble to THINK about it, requires a modicum of UPsizing - of markets, not fewer&fewer huger&huger more&more crash-prone investment portfolios and financial hoardings. A or B: A. Redistribute upward and you slow your economy. B. Redistribute downward and you speed it up. Why are we still choosing A's method and bemoaning the lack of B's result?]
  6. 42 questions to ponder before taking next step, ChinaDaily.com.cn
    BEIJING, PRC - Cheung said the government was not looking for any particular outcome from the subsequent debate [about standardizing working hours and obsoleting long hours] - the committee could even explore non-statutory approaches to address the problem of long working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So where are the 42 questions? - or are the Mysterious Chinese here talking about a 42-hour workweek? - in which case they've already standardized their working hours ... at least mentally.]
  7. Public asked for ideas on how to cut working hours, Hong Kong Standard via thestandard.com.hk
    HONG KONG, China - ...A government report, completed in 18 months and released on Monday, studied how other countries handle standard working hours. "For example, Australia stressed work-life balance while the European Union and Japan have legislated on maximum hours for work, using occupational safety as their priority," Cheung said... - see whole article under today's date.
  8. BONUS update #1 - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of trillions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  9. BONUS update #2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Lehman is selling apartment giant Archstone to rival landlords Equity Residential and AvalonBay for $6.5 billion in cash and stock, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C3.

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Dunedin, New Zealand: 25 jobs saved, 25 redundant [=lost], by Simon Hartley & Vaughan Elder, Otago Daily Times via odt.co.nz.
    Twenty-five people have lost their jobs at Mosgiel benchtop manufacturer O'Brien Group. The factory was bought by Fletcher Building in 2006 and has just been sold back to the O'Brien family. All 50 staff at the factory were made redundant on Friday, with 25 immediately offered jobs under the O'Brien ownership... The job losses are the latest in a slew of southern redundancies, which include 90 job losses at Hillside engineering workshops in Dunedin last week and more than 200 redundancies from Alliance's Mataura meatworks... Fletcher Building general manager for investor relations, Philip King, said in a statement yesterday Fletcher had sold the O'Brien Group to O'Brien Benchtops Ltd... O'Brien's Benchtops Ltd changed its name on November 23 to Owns the Assets Ltd. Its directors are Barry O'Brien, Margaret O'Brien, Peter O'Brien and Phillip O'Brien, all of Mosgiel, according to Companies Office records. Peter O'Brien said yesterday it was his understanding more jobs would have been lost had the family not bought the business back...
    [You can't get profitable by cutting your own best customers & impoverishing their dependents. What should O'Brien Group be doing? Instead of a traumatic 50% workforce cut (25 of its 50-person workforce) as it alienates & defunds its own best customers (employees) and their dependents, it should be trimming 50% of its workweek (4 hrs/day less for everyone, including executives, down to a 20-hour workweek), re-investing overtime profits & earnings in OT-targeted training & hiring, & keeping all employees together working, earning & buying 50% as much as usual of their own and their customers' products.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials cooled off...dropping 42.31 points to 12967.37, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • "Vital" signs [our quotes] - U.S. income stalled this year after rising toward the end of 2011, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • The "fiscal cliff" [R qotes] has revived the idea of gradually raising the Medicare eligibility age to 67 from 65, WSJ, A1 squib.
    [Aha, another leak of the real agenda behind the cleverly confused, trumped-up spook of the dread Fiscal Cliff (oh nooo Mr.Bill!). Honestly, the dumbadumb wealthy Tenth of Onepercent of this country are bound and determined to kill the goose (monetary circulation) that lays the golden eggs and bring down their host-economy plutocracy = Suicide, Everyone Else First. But here's a slice of good news about the famed and fatuous Fiscalcliff -]
    White House warns on middle-class taxes, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.7.
    The White House warned that the failure, in the "fiscal cliff" talks [R qotes], to avert higher taxes on the middle class would sharply cut [marketable] economic output next year. A report released yesterday says [raising] taxes on the middle class could reduce consumer spending by $200bn.
    [And that, my friends, is (or was) 70% of the economy that the Onepercenters are talking about reducing.]
  • Toronto's mayor was ordered out of office after a judge ruled he had violated conflict-of-interest rules, WSJ, A1 pointer to A11.
    [But but but, that's my Home Town they're talking about! That that's Toronto The Good! Don't tell me it's just as stupid as Ottawa, with Ott's repeatedly dropped implementation of light-rail extension and direct bridge to secteur Gatineau despite million$ blown on surveys and plans (which Ott really ought to do LOL)!? Toronto is the place where the brilliant builder of the Humber River Bridge in 1919(?) anticipated a three-decades-later subway, built the extra clearance and saved taxpayers zillion$!]



    Sun.-Mon, November 25-26, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours cuts or furloughs -
  1. Rick Wilson: Work sharing should be considered, 11/25 Charleston Gazette via wvgazette.com
    CHARLESTON, W.Va., USA -- When the Legislature assembles Monday for interim committee sessions, one measure under consideration could be a winner all the way around. It's about something called work sharing, which is a new -- for us anyhow -- way of dealing with cyclical downturns in the economy while avoiding the negative consequences of layoffs. With work sharing, employers would have the option to reduce hours instead of workers...- see whole article under today's date.
    [yyyYES!!!!]
  2. Standard working hours could cost employers HK$55b, 11/26 South China Morning Post via scmp.com
    [And no standard working hours will cost them their domestic markets and spell the start of costly social unrest.]
    HONG KONG, China - Employers will need to pay out up to HK$55.2 billion more a year in wages if standard working hours are introduced in Hong Kong, a long-awaited government report says... Meanwhile, the report shows that Hongkongers work 47 hours a week on average. Of the 2.81 million workers in the city, 23.4% have worked overtime but only 51.8% of these have been paid for the extra time... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So Hong Kong employers are getting free labor from their employees and STILL they're complaining!? = Pathetic! And btw, how do you even define "extra" time when there are no standard working hours?!]
  3. Union has golden opportunity to save jobs with Hostess purchase; forum contribution by Brad J. Morris, 11/26 Journal Star via pjstar.com
    PEORIA, Illin., USA - I think the Hostess situation presents a golden, cream-filled opportunity for unions in the United States. And not just for the bakers union, but for all unions... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And for your own sake, get back on your power issue, shorter hours. Your two historic goals are shorter hours and higher pay, and If you can just get one of them and it's shorter hours, you wind up with both because you're cutting the surplus of, and even creating an employer-perceived shortage of ... YOU, and harnessing market forces which reward shortages with higher prices, in this case, LABOR price = wage. But if you can just get one and it's higher pay, you wind up with neither because you're bucking market forces to pin an artificially high price on a surplus commodity ... YOU ... and market forces will eventually prevail, as they have since you allowed management to distract you from your power issue since World War II, and that's why you're less than 13% of the workforce now. Get back On Issue!]
  4. Oregon's Manufacturing Workweek Keeps Growing, 11/26 AlbanyTribune.com
    ALBANY, Ore., USA - ...The growth in hours is a clear indication that manufacturing firms are working their existing employees longer hours, even though these key employers haven’t increased headcounts much over the past year. Seasonally adjusted manufacturing employment is up [only] 2,700 jobs, or 1.6%, in the 12 months ending in September... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Employment would be up a lot more and a lot faster if Oregon implemented automatic overtime-to-jobs conversion. In fact, this jump to 40.8 hours could be the basis of a real economic recovery for Oregon, and mean massive savings on Oregon's state budget on unemployment, welfare, homelessness, prisons... State legislators and taxpayers would be off the hook as the private sector took over responsibility for recycling its own disposable employees. And there'd be more savings if the point of overtime-to-jobs conversion was adjusted below 40 hours a week.]
  5. BONUS update #1 - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of billions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  6. BONUS update #2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • H-P takes hit on Autonomy [merger] deal, Bloomberg News via 11/25 Boston Globe, G4.
    [Let that be a lesson to all would-be murgerers!]
  • United Bank completes merger [with New England Bancshares], Bloomberg News via 11/25 Boston Globe, G4.
    United Financial Bancorp Inc. [is] the holding company for United Bank...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • U.S. is pushing to keep 10,000 troops in Afghanistan.., 11/26 Wall Street Journal, A1:2 pointer to A1:6, A12.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Weak revenue is new[?] worry for investors, 11/26 WSJ, C1.
    [They've got no one to blame but themselves because of all the "rightsizing" and "leansizing" they backed with stock purchases, and who's left with job earnings to buy all the productivity they want high-revenue investments in? And here they go again -]
  • New 'friends and family' plan: Cut them out - 60% of IPOs in 2005..offered shares to employees [and customers.. - only] 33% so far in 2012, 11/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [And again-]
  • More than 40% of the nearly 5 million Americans who receive unemployment benefits are set to lose them.., 11/26 WSJ, A1.
    ...if federally backed emergency programs adopted as a temporary supplement to state-level programs expire as scheduled at year-end.
    [Oh yeah! Drop the benefits for the millions of unemployed would-be earners but keep the taxcuts for the thousands of unearning hoarders and let's see how fast we can slow the once-dynamic American economy!]
  • The White House tapped departing Treasury Secretary Geithner to lead deficit talks with Congress in an effort to avert the "fiscal cliff", 11/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [So the 'Bamster moves a fox to a different henhouse. How is this different from what the Mitten (Romney) would do?]
  • Fighting fiscal phantom - Does the fiscal-crisis[/cliff] story even make sense? op ed by Paul Krugman, 11/26 New York Times, A23,
    [No. Restoring taxes on the rich would flatten the cliff. Cutting government spending would heighten the cliff. Because the cliff/downturn is from weak markets and lack of consumer spending. And a lot of that was caused by transferring costs and taxes from low%-spending "investors" of unearned income to high%-spending "consumers" of earned income.]
  • The color of money - Nonprofits anxious: Cutting tax breaks for donations could end up harming the nation's charities, 11/25 Boston Globe, G1 pointer to G4.
    [A nation doesn't need haphazard, capricious charities. It needs design solutions for its problems. Any system that depends on charity for vital functions is lethally flawed. Cut the rhetoric. Tax those who have the most inactive money (the wealthy). And get it back in circulation creating jobs because the unprecedentedly wealthy onepercenters certainly aren't doing it, else WHERE ARE THE JOBS???]
  • Black commuters face longer trips to work- Disparity particularly bad on buses, averaging 80 minutes more per week, 11/25 Boston Globe, A1.
    [Because poorer neighborhoods, which need public transportation more, have less frequent service. Same in Canada's Capital Region. Gatineau has less money and fewer buses to serve a wider area than Ottawa across the river, and Ottawa City Council keeps spending millions of bucks on studies about extending the O-train ... and canceling implementation. Result: the most awesome mass of buses you've ever seen blasting along the transitway at rush hour, many of them double-buses and now some of them double-deckers. But the blasting ain't the problem. It's the huge line of them at each stop waiting to get into position to pick people up, and then severally pulling out, or too squashed to pull out, awaiting the ones ahead to pull out - and then there are still some that pump out pollutants...]
  • A free-trade deal between the U.S. and Europe gains momentum, 11/26 NYT, B1 pointer to B2.
    [Here we go a-ga-in = sacrificing 70% of our economy (domestic consumer spending funded by domestic employment and wages) for 17% (international trade regardless of destruction of domestic employment and wages).]



    Saturday, November 24, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world is doing right - and our latest ranking of leading countries: The core solution is so obvious, no one's noticing it. Usually it's just one item on a list with few realizing it's the ink & paper of the list itself. It's our closest candidate to the "Holy Grail" of economic design, the Single All-Sufficient Regulation, and despite *dismissal by 'experts,' it's the world's most common (but least publicized and yet-to-be fully exploited) response to downturn and it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses and governments. In each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours cuts or furloughs -
  1. Detroit mayor announces furloughs to avoid bankruptcy - City Council balks at next step in state plan to restore financial stability to embattled city, delaying $30m infusion of state funds, Christian Science Monitor via csmonitor.com
    DETROIT, Mich., USA - In order to make up for a $30 million shortfall expected by year's end, Detroit Mayor Dave Bing announced on Wednesday that city employees will take unpaid furloughs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. New uniform work week at Air India - Plans afoot for better inflight feel, IndianExpress.com
    NEW DELHI, India - Five years after the merger of Air India and Indian Airlines, the employees of both the erstwhile carriers will finally have same working hours and weekly holidays beginning December. Hitherto, Indian Airlines employees had to follow a six-day working schedule while their Air India colleagues worked for five days a week, and were off on weekends... “All non-operational employees now will have to now work for five days and 44 hours in a week and those involved in operations will have a six day and 44 hours working schedule,”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So instead of 44-hours different-workweeks in different companies, they've now got 44-hours different-workweeks in the same company. This is a "uniform" workweek??]
  3. BONUS update #1 - Check out these four short videos -
    a. Washington State Dept. of Labor explains the benefits of switching from downsizing to first-stage timesizing,
    alias *'shared work'.
    b. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    c. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    d. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of billions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update #2 - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Judge pens new bankruptcy chapter, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    Judge Thomas Bennett..is overseeing the biggest municipal bankruptcy case in U.S. history [Jefferson County AL] (photo caption)
    ...Its elected leaders are playing tug-of-war with the brightest lawyers hired by Wall Street banks to protect their $3.23 investment in the county's sewer system...
    [Wall Street has not yet realized that THEY are the only ones with any money - they drained all the rest out of everyone else. There's NO ONE to pay these massive debts to themselves - except themselves. And city sewer systems are NOT appropriate investment targets. We need a much better way to spread around the money supply and keep it spread around, because these robopaths on Wall Street are just dumb financial parasites that are killing their host economy. The more money concentrates, the slower it moves. The more it spreads around, the faster it moves. The whole simple-minded concept of unlimited wealth as an appropriate human goal is invalid, violates economic system requirements and is system-destructive.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • U.S. interest groups are launching ad campaigns to pressure Congress to avert "fiscal cliff", WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [For example, unions for job creation, a good effort because jobs mean earned income and consumer confidence. Also, AARP for preserving Medicare and Social Security, a good effort because it maintains consumer confidence. Also, "Defend My Dividend" against dividend-tax restoration, a bad effort because it's unearned income and means more coagulated money supply and less consumer spending. The slimey Fed has combined the good (higher taxes on the rich who won't spend any less anyway) with the bad (cutting government spending during a downturn) and called both bad ("cliff"), as if we need again to sacrifice the whole economy (consumer base = the 99%) to save one of its parts (the financial sector and the richest one percent), a temporary salvation at best when it brings down its host economy. The wealthy Onepercenters have become what biologists call "dumb parasites." That's the kind that kill their host.]
  • Their problem with Elizabeth Warren, editorial, New York Times, 18.
    ...Some bankers, their lobbyists and their Republican allies on the Senate banking committee reportedly would like nothing better than to keep Ms. Warren off the powerful bank panel - where she could do the most harm to the [suicidal] status quo, and the most good for the country...
  • EU leaders ended a two-day summit with no deal on a budget for the block,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
  • Indonesian wage protests threaten to hinder spending on the countries' overburdened infrastructure, WSJ, A1 pointer to A7.
    [Unlikely. Higher wages would mean more tax revenues and more money to spend on infrastructure.]
    ...Jakarta's governor agreed to a 44% increase in the minimum wage...
    [Wage levels should be flexibly raised by engineering an employer-perceived labor "shortage" via workweek reduction, not by a wage minimum, which just rigidly jacks up the bottom and creates both a gap at the bottom of the wage ladder against new entrants into the job market, and a black market in low-wage labor.]



    Friday, November 23, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Surprise: PA College Slashes Instructors' Hours to Avoid Obamacare, Breitbart TV via breitbart.com
    PITTSBURGH, Pa., USA - Pennsylvania's Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) is slashing the hours of 400 adjunct instructors, support staff, and part-time instructors to dodge paying for Obamacare... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= cutting hours, not jobs. Now cut hours deeper and create enough jobs to employ the wage-depressing flood of desperate resumes.]
  2. More views sought on standard working hours - Welfare minister hopes to get more feedback from union and bosses on working week, South China Morning Post via scmp.com
    HONG KONG, China - The administration is seeking more feedback from employers and unions on its scheme to create standard working hours, sending its key study report to the Labour Advisory Board next week, the welfare secretary said yesterday... - see whole article under today's date.
    [China's still struggling with the basics.]
  3. BONUS update - Check out these three videos -
    a. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    b. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    c. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of billions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Hostess secured permission to go out of business, putting thousands of employees out of work after a failed last-ditch mediation session, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The cost of dropping out - Millions struggle with high college debt and no degree,
    WSJ, A1.
  • 'Made in America' has its limits, WSJ, B1.
    The Made in America store in Elma NY hasn't been able to find anything electric or electronic to stock. All of those things are made abroad. (photo caption)
  • Fed stands on the edge of 'monetary cliff' [of its own creation], WSJ, C1.
    [Neither the Federal Reserve nor the rest of the financial sector have admitted their own role in creating and deepening the downturn because: the more money you redistribute up the income brackets to fewer people, the deader your economy; but the more money you redistribute downward to more people, the more alive everything gets.]



    Turkeyday (U.S.), November 22, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below if you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Bing plans furloughs if state pact isn't approved, The Detroit News via detroitnews.com
    DETROIT, Mich., USA - ..."We believe unpaid furloughs will do it. We've designed a cost reduction program to allow us to meet our objectives with the furlough approach."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Cut hours, not jobs!]
  2. Towanda Public library cuts hours by 24 percent, Towanda Daily Review via thedailyreview.com
    TOWANDA, Pa., USA - Due to a lack of available funds, the Towanda Public Library is cutting the hours it is open by 24 percent, the library's treasurer said. The cut in hours follows a "drastic" reduction this year in the amount the library is spending on new items for its collection, including books, DVDs, and audio books, said Ruth Tonachel, treasurer of the library... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Cut hours, not books?]
  3. Business chambers voice concerns over working hours - Chambers say it will harm the growth of the city as democrats call for 40- to 44-hour work week, South China Morning Post
    [Buuut, that's the same as what business chambers have said every step of the way down from 80 hours a week. "The sky will fall! The sky will fall!" But it didn't. Things got better. They're not chambers of commerce, they're chamber pots, full of it, and ignoring their own history of what has worked well-better-best.]
    HONG KONG, China - ...Pan-democrats have called for a 40- to 44-hour working week and want people who put in longer hours to be paid 1-1/2 times their usual wage rate. In a poll of retail workers in the summer, most respondents said they worked more than 54 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So Hong Kong hasn't even made it to 1938-40 yet!]
  4. BONUS update - Check out these three videos -
    a. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    b. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    c. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of billions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  5. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Steward to cut jobs at three area hospitals, by Robert Weiman, Boston Globe, B6.
    Managers at three community hospitals owned by Steward Health Care System have notified representatives of Local 1199 of the Service Employees International Union that they plan to eliminate up to 35 service and technical jobs, union leaders said Wednesday. The said Steward officials alerted them of its intention to cut 15 union jobs at Norwood Hospital, 12 at Carney Hospital in Dorchester and 7 or 8 at Morton Hospital in Taunton...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Citibank will close nine of its 31 branches in Massachusetts in March.., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    ...six years after it aggressively entered the Boston market.
  • A federal bankruptcy judge approved Hostess Brands' plans to wind itself down.., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B6.
    ...a step that spells the almost certain end of the 82-year-old company.

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Once-homeless seniors give their thanks - Public, private efforts address a widening plight, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Poetry in a subhead!]
    Liliam Alvarez became homeless after her husband died and she lost her job. (photo caption)
    [Nice-looking woman!]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Drought conditions worsen across US, AP via Boston Globe, A2.
    ST. LOUIS, Mo. - The worst US drought in decades has deepened again after more than a month of encouraging reports of slowly improving conditions...Wednesday's weekly US Drought Monitor report..showed.\.as scientists struggled for an explanation other than a simple lack of rain.
    [Resonance with non-trickle-down from US Onepercenters?]
    ...More than half of the continental United States has been in a drought since summer. [The] weekly..report..showed that 60.1% of the lower 48 states were in some form of drought as of Tuesday, up from 58.8% the previous week. The amount of land in extreme or exceptional drought - the two worst classifications - increased from 18.3% to 19.04%.
    [Giving thanks while Americans roast turkeys and drought roasts Americans?]



    Wednesday, November 21, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Employers Need to Reconsider Working Hours, TopNews New Zealand via topnews.net.nz
    BRISBANE, Qld., Australia - A team of researchers from the Griffith University has revealed that resource workers, who are not allowed fewer hours of work, often become vulnerable to stress, fatigue and different illnesses. The team says that managers need to be aware as well as keep in mind the findings. Almost 4,500 mining and energy workers as well as their partners were assessed by the team, and the Australian Coal and Energy Survey found that more hours of work was leading them to be dependent on sleeping tablets... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Jerry Brown Fights Unions on Furloughs, breitbart.com
    SACRAMENTO, Calif., USA - ...Brown has appealed a lawsuit that would pay state unions some $12 million because Brown furloughed them thanks to the $16 billion state debt... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Unions' self-destructiveness rolls on and on with a selfish focus on money for themselves, however over-available their skills, instead of a focus on shorter hours for all workers - to reduce the general surplus of labor and raise everyone's pay by market forces as during the wartime prosperity of World Wars I and II when the labor surplus was reduced by the worst available means: death.]
  3. BONUS update - Check out these three videos -
    i. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    ii. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    iii. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of billions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston sectour-Somerville MA New England -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • H-P says duped, takes $8.8 billion charge, Wall Street Journal, A1 target article.
    H-P said it was duped into overpaying for U.K. software maker Autonomy, one of its largest acquisitions, contributing to a $8.8 billion write-down and a huge quarterly lose, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    [Probably one of the most disastrous-ever M&As, and not done by current female CEO a la Carly Fiorina, but by previous male CEO, Leo Apotheker.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • More than 40 to bid for [10] shuttered pizza shops, by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...the Upper Crust pizza business, according to Mark DeGiacomo, the trustee overseeing the Boston-based restaurant chain's bankruptcy proceedings...
  • Hostess will continue down the road to liquidation after a last-ditch mediation session with its striking bakers union failed to save the company, Wall Street Journal, B1 pointer to B2.
  • Bonuses in bankruptcy get tougher to collect, WSJ, C1.
    [Oh good. It might just be remotely possible that it's more conducive to an economy's survival if directors, CEOS, and other executives don't have quite so many incentives to kevork their companies - Chainsaw Dunlap's of the world, take notice.]

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Storm bared a lack of options for the homeless in New York, NYT, A1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials declined 7.45 points [or 0.1% to 12,788.51], weighed down by H-P.., WSJ, A1.
    HP's news, fiscal cliff weigh down stocks, Boston Globe, B8.
    Falling oil prices, HP's surprise news of accounting irregularities at its recently acquired Autonomy unit, and the Fed chairman's fiscal cliff warning weighed on stock...
  • The cost of a stronger economy - Some Boston area business leaders favor taxes on high-income earners and paring government spending [ie: going over the "fiscal cliff"] to resolve a looming budget crisis.., Boston Globe, B5.
    Robert Pozen...Darryl Settles...Stephen Pagliuca...Rosabeth Kanter...Jay Hooley (photo captions)
    [When can we stop linking these conflicting ideas? Taxes on high-income earners would reactivate the circulation of some of their lethargic hoard and strengthen the economy. But paring government spending would deactivate some current monetary circulation and weaken the economy.]



    Tuesday, November 20, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays with higher technology and shorter workweeks, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Infineon details shorttime work regime, Electronic Engineering Times via eetimes.com
    LONDON, U.K. – German chip company Infineon Technologies AG (Munich) has provided more details of the short-time work regime referenced during the presentation of its Q4 financial results. ...The production capacity for high power modules at its Warstein production site in Germany is the only site so far asked to adapt for lower demand. ...Infineon said that working hours' cuts of 10-30% were being made at that site... - see whole article under today's date.
    [More Timesizing, less downsizing!]
  2. Monitoring Squad For Compliance With Working Hours Should Take Off - Info Ministry Sec-Gen, Malaysian National News Agency via Bernama.com
    KOTA KINABALU, Malaysia -- ..."Although there may be tasks to be done outside without coming to the office, the existing public service regulations require us to be in the office during working hours, so we should adhere to it... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Hey, this could come in real handy when Malaysia gets enough robotics to need to downsize "full time" employment in order to have any semblance of domestic consumer spending. Compare France's "overtime police." Turun padang, everybody!]
  3. BONUS squib - Tribe plans employee furloughs as money-saving action, White Mountain Independent via wmicentral.com
    [Better to trim hours for all, than jobs for a few, & a few more, & a few....& a...&..]
    WHITERIVER, Ariz., USA – Some form of furloughs are planned for employees of the White Mountain Apache Tribe, but at press time exact details had not been worked out...
  4. BONUS update - Check out these three videos -
    i. A college English class at *Santa Clara U. explains how Timesizing raises wages, reverses the funneling of funds to the
    wealthiest wedge of society and gets the money supply back in circulation for a real and not-just-rhetorical recovery.
    ii. Here *Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI) explains why states should jump on board the Worksharing Express as immediate
    economic first-aid.
    iii. The Economics Toy Box in Watertown MA *nails the fact that as we redistribute the money supply upwards, it circulates slower because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage of it you spend, or donate, or even invest...in job-creating productivity. It all becomes mere economy-miring bragging rights. And a Timesizing-led labor "shortage" centrifuges that black hole of billions and gets it back into rapid circulation - by flexible Market Forces.
  5. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA New England -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • As coal mines shut, 'big iron'gets dirt cheap, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [eg: three 100-ton rock trucks for $1m instead of $3m]
  • Hostess and its striking bakers union agreed to a bankruptcy judge's call for a mediation session to avoid closing the company, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Tax talks raise bar for the richest - Smaller bite on income of $500,000 or less, New York Times, A1.
    [Uh, since it was lower before ($250k?), isn't this making it "easier" for the rich (as if they or the economy needs that) and therefore LOWERING the bar for the richest?! Frontpage editor! So, a step back from taxing the rich, more monetary circulation and a real recovery as during the superhigh taxes on the rich during the wartime prosperity of World War II. And here's another one -]
  • A step back from derivatives regulation, editorial, NYT, A20.
    ...Last week, the administration moved to weaken new rules on derivatives...
    [So you see, Romney really won after all... The policy of Onepercenters is Suicide, Everyone Else First.]
  • 20 States Where People Spend More On Childcare Than College, by Mandi Woodruff, BusinessInsider.com
    At more than $234,000, the cost of raising a child in the U.S. is higher than ever, according to a recent report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Out of families' budgets, childcare ranked as the second-largest expenditure, taking up 18 percent of their spending. It's not hard to see why. "Nearly half of children under the age of five in the U.S. are in some form of childcare center or family childcare home for an average of 35 hours a week," according to Good.is. "But in a period of slow economic growth, paying for this service is increasingly difficult for parents all across the country." In some states, childcare actually costs more than a college education...
  • France was stripped of its triple-A rating by Moody's, which delivered a stinging critique of efforts to boost the nation's economy, WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    [All they have to do is more of what they're already doing: Cut the workweek to maintain current employment and domestic consumer spending. Cut the workweek deeper to get more employment and consumer spending. And try and get employers, complaining loudest (about labor "shortage") but suffering least (as during wartime prosperity), to take a moment now and then to cultivate the mgmt skill of the future = suturing shorter and shorter shifts.]



    Sun.-Mon, November 18-19, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Montgomery City Employees Forced to Take Furlough Day by February, 11/18 WNCF.com
    MONTGOMERY, Ala., USA - Montgomery city employees will have to take an unpaid day off to save the city money. Mayor Todd Strange says the furlough should save Montgomery about $450,000 in savings already included in the city's budget for the fiscal year... - see whole article under today's date.
    [More Timesizing, less downsizing!]
  2. State closures set this week, 11/18 Statesman Journal
    SALEM, Ore., USA - State offices will be closed Thursday for Thanksgiving, and Friday for unpaid furloughs for many state workers. State courts, which are housed in county buildings, also will be closed... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Notice Period required after short-time working past 3 years? 11/19 Employment & Redundancy Forum via redundancyforum.co.uk
    WATFORD, Herts., U.K. - ...Yesterday I handed in my written notice with my current employer, giving them two weeks notice that I intended to take up a new position on the 26th November... Am I being perfectly reasonable (as well as legally right) to expect two weeks notice as sufficient when working under short-time arrangement?... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. For a European-wide struggle to defend auto jobs, 11/19 World Socialist Web Site via wsws.org
    LONDON, U.K. - ...MAN has sent 15,000 workers home for four weeks and is planning further short-time working at the end of the year. Plant closures, short-time working and wage cuts are being presented as a necessary means to cut back on so-called overcapacity and make the European auto industry competitive once again... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Setting maximum work hours first, 11/19 (11/20 over dateline) ChinaDaily.com.cn
    HONG KONG, China - Workers' unions have been pressing for a statutory, standard work week in terms of hours of work for quite some time. A proposal to regulate working hours however was defeated in the Legislative Council (LegCo) last month. Still, the debate is alive and well and the Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong) government is expected to forward the report of a study on standard work hours to the Labour Advisory Board soon. The government then will report back to the LegCo's Panel on Manpower in December...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  6. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Montréal RR station & & updating from the café car of Amtrak Train 68 & the Starbucks @ State & Pearl, Albany NY -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Military [Canadian] gives private air firm $600K freebie [to take care of a 1950s era jet] - Concerns raised over complimentary services, explosiives for Vintage Wings [not to mention liability issues], 11/18 Ottawa Citizen, A1.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • GameStop will close 200 stores [by next year], 11/18 Boston Globe, G6.
    ...The Texas-based video game retailer...heads into the holidays weighed down by a two-year industry slump as players gravitate to mobile and online play from console-based games. It runs 6,650 stores worldwide...
  • Hostess, maker of Twinkies, is set to present a plan to shut down 36 plants and sell off the business - even as the union holds out hope that a buyer will salvage bite-size pieces of the company, 11/19 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    Hostess unwrapped - The company prepares for liquidation.., 11/19 WSJ, B1 pointer to B5.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • A crime without punishment - Every year, hundreds of thousands of Americans are duped in telephone scams, which rarely get prosecuted, 11/18 Boston Globe, North1.
    Vivian Mandell of Swampscott...was told that her grandson was in legal trouble and that she had to wire money immediately to the Dominican Republic. (photo captions)
    Take the money and run - Reported scam activity in 2011 for Massachusetts (blowout stats):
    5,059 scams reported to FBI
    $6.18m total reported losses from scams
    71 complaints per 100,000 people

    WHAT HOMELAND SECURITY? - even at the highest levels - while we're still threatening people's livelihoods, and little negative feedback is getting to decision makers -
  • ...Jeff Jacoby on perma-incumbents.., 11/18 Boston Globe, K1 pointer to K10.
    Unhealthy devotion to incumbents, op ed, 11/18 Boston Globe, K10 target article.
    John Kerry has been a senator for nearly 28 years; Ted Kennedy held his office for 46 years. (photo caption)
    [And all that can be said for them is that they weren't as horrible as Republicans, many of whom are also perma-incumbents.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • As retailers approach the holiday shopping season, some see worrisome signs that Americans are starting to tighten their purse strings, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    ["Some" seem oblivious to the fact that Americans don't have any money to put in their purses.]
  • If you've got the skills, she's got the job [Traci Tapani, Minn. Dept. of Employment & Economic Development] - Good paying jobs are there for those with the right training and education, 11/18 New York Times, SR1.
    [But employers, spoiled by floods of resumes for every job opening, have got pickier and pickier about EXACTLY the "right" training and education, and then, of course, they aren't going to pay a cent to help train or educate you - it's all on your tab, no matter how long you've been unemployed or how many student loans you already have. And they're still looking for "consumer confidence" and economic recovery?]
  • Dow logs fourth straight weekly decline [down 227.08 points or 1.8% to 12,588.31,
    11/18 Boston Globe, G6.
  • Investment falls off a cliff [even before the bogus "fiscal cliff"?!] - U.S. companies cut spending plans amid fiscal and economic uncertainty, 11/18 WSJ, A1.
    [That's OK - they were already creating the economic uncertainty anyway by reinvesting so little in their customers' customers via their own employees, and the fiscal uncertainty by wangling corporate welfare while cutting corporate taxes. So naturally, the financial sector finds itself -]
  • Looking for value in a 'zombie economy', WSJ, B7.
    [So where'd all the value get diverted to? Hedge funds! And what are the hedge funds doing with it? Screwing up the real world even worse -]
  • U.S. hedge fund declares war on Agrium - Jana Partners launches push to elect five new directors, including a former agricultural minister, in a bid to break up the Calgary firm, WSJ, B1.
    [Never mind the Canadian nationalism, what's this group of investors doing poking their big know-it-all nose into factory management?]
  • How to live without irony [impossible these days!] - Life has become a competition to see who cares the least - That's a collective misstep, 11/18 New York Times, SR1.
    [But a counsel of survival given the collective tolerance for overwork and burnout next to ever-lengthening and -increasing unemployment.]
  • 'Chatter' - ... 'The Postal Service is facing a fiscal cliff of its own', 11/18 New York Times, Bus2.
  • Austerity measures bring out the crowds in Europe, 11/18 WSJ, photo caption, A1.
  • Stumbling block in Greece, 11/18 New York Times, A1 pointer to Bus1.
    Privatization of industry is viewed as one of Greece's last hopes for luring foreign money. But the effort has been sputtering.
    [Money, foreign or domestic, solves nothing when there's no cap on how much the wealthy can vacuum into the increasingly irrelevant financial sector. It's all about funding more consumer spending by employing more consumers, regardless of how short a workweek it takes. And that should be a market call, mediated by unemployment. Too much unemployment? Too high a workweek! TRIM IT!]
  • UN Security Council debates what to do about rise in piracy, AP via Montreal Gazette, A14.
    [Simple: Make it easier to earn an honest living than a dishonest one, by backing Timesizing downsizing.]



    Saturday, November 17, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A 35 hour Workweek would create Millions of Jobs - Economics & Finance: Replies; Peak Oil Forums via peakoil.com
    [A sample of current e-discussions about shorter hours so employers to duck benefit costs -]
    MONROE, Mich., USA - ...Having lost my full time job of 15 years and being on the lookout, I was astounded how few full-time positions are being posted compared to the large number of 24- to 28-hour-a-week jobs being posted, at least in Northern Ohio and Southern Michigan.... SInce companies have to start paying Obamacare taxes for employees working more than 30 hours a week, suddenly companies don't have many full time jobs anymore.... There are 2.5 clerks per physician in the US... But you can't have reform, because that would put hundreds of thousands of people out of work... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours is happening anyway, but not the best way. Shorter hours are happening not only so employers can duck benefit costs, but also due to job desperation.]
  2. NBC to Cut Jobs, GM's Opel Working to Save Jobs: Consumer Business Recap; Wall St. Cheat Sheet via wallstcheatsheet.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y., USA - ...General Motors Company’s Opel division does not see the type of sharp pullbacks such as were experienced by Ford Motor Company’s closure of three factories and similar pressures facing Peugeot and Fiat. Opel works council Chairman Wolfgang Schaefer-Klug is attempting to make a deal regarding the future magnitude of its workforce in Germany before the year’s end, commenting that, “I don’t expect that it will come to some huge number of job cuts as part of the restructuring; rather the opposite, much fewer than many believe.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And the reason? Worksharing, or in German, Kurz-arbeit!]
  3. Cold shock at Bosch Solar, Photovoltaik.eu
    ARNSTADT, Germany - ...A complete phase-out of photovoltaics is no longer out of the question... The group has already ordered short-time working at several locations. At Bosch Solar Energy in Arnstadt, 700 staff are employed; production there should be reduced 20% by the end of December. Since October, short-time work has been in effect... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way.]
  4. Why we need to demand a shorter work week, Workers World via workers.org
    DETROIT, Mich., USA - In February, the Detroit Free Press reported that the United Auto Workers union was preparing “arguments over the 30-hour workweek, perhaps the most widely discussed union demand of the current labor era.” If Detroiters reading this are wondering how they missed the news, there is a reason. The quote is from the Free Press of Feb. 21, 1937... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Please step away from your keyboard! Step away from the keyboard now! Toronto Globe, A2.
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ...I know you don't have a problem with pills or booze. Your problems are much worse, because you're a new kind of addict. You can't step away from the goddamn computer!...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  6. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Ottawa's Globe Mags&Cigars, & updating from Chaudière *Crown Plaza, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • As Hostess winds up, who will bite on Twinkies?, Toronto Globe, B4.
    The shutdown of its U.S. operations, which Hostess blamed on a strike, will throw 18,500 employees out of work (photo caption)
  • Government [of Canada] cites job cuts, changes tone on deficit, by Bill Curry, Toronto Globe, A10.
    The federal government announced it has cut 10,980 public-sector jobs since March as the "Conservatives" [our quotes] ended the week with a much more hawkish fiscal message than they had delivered just a few days earlier...
    [Ya cain't git UPsizing alias "Growth"...by DOWNsizing.]
  • The growth of cans threatens production jobs, by Isabelle Massé, La Presse de Montréal, Aff9.
    The use of a production line of beer cans requires fewer employees than a production line of beer bottles...
    [UNLESS you cut workhours for all instead of jobs for a few, and a few more, and a few more...   Keep up this downsizing of your own and your customers' customers and eventually, NO CUSTOMERS.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • As Hostess winds up, who will bite on Twinkies? - ...Brands such as Wonder Bread, Ding Dongs and Drakes are up for grabs in the U.S. .\. though Canadian market is unaffected.., Toronto Globe, B4.
    The shutdown of its U.S. operations, which Hostess blamed on a strike, will throw 18,500 employees out of work (photo caption)

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Government [of Harper in Ottawa] backs bill limiting inmate complaints, by Kim MacKrael, Toronto Globe, A4.
    ...would allow corrections officers to sideline some inmates' complaints despite concerns the move could exacerbate - rather than fix - backlogs in the prison grievance system...

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Tax the rich to bail out Uncle Sam? It's not as simple as it seems, Toronto Globe, F5.
    [Yes, it is, cuz they's the only ones thet's got any MONEY!]
  • Two years after "I"PO, GM is piling up cash - The symbol of U.S. industrial might [LOL] is thriving again.., Toronto Globe, B10.
    [Since when does hoarding = thriving? More likely, hoarding = depression, and GM the symbol of "the U.S. disease." In view of which -]
  • The dubious logic of a tax on the stock market, Toronto Globe, B12.
    [- shouldn't this headline read "the obvious logic of a tax on the stock market"? At a time when the financial sector can't seem to get enough of its trillions "back to work creating jobs" and enough consumer and non-financial business markets to provide itself with enough marketable productivity to invest in, wouldn't it make sense to make more use of its "spending arm" = government, to help get these trillions sprung out of their hoarded coagulation and back in play? Their attempt to run consumer spending on the basis of consumer debt instead of employment wages is unsustainable on the face of it, and currently hitting all the credit caps. Maybe it's time for genuine conservatives to go back to what works. And for the latter-day phoney "conservatives" to realize what a whacky, irresponsible experiment they've been backing = switching the basis of the consumer base from its own employment basement (however short a workweek it takes to achieve full employment and maximum consumer spending) to the financial industry's credit attic cum debt addicts.]
  • Flares of fear - Oil output is surging in North Dakota's prairie, giving rise to a U.S. energy renaissance - and new worries about Canada's oil patch, Toronto Globe, B1 photo spread pointer to B6.
    'Canada has a real problem', Toronto Globe, B6 target article.
  • BP secures deepwater exploration rights off Nova Scotia, Toronto Globe, B8.
    [How suicidally stupid must the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board be to grant these rights to Brutish Petroleum, poisoner of the Gulf of Mexico, whacked by a record-breaking fine and with executives under indictment for murdering their own employees with irresponsible management?! Prepare for the blackening of your coasts, dumb bluenosers, and build the gibbets to hang, preferably slowly, every member of your Petroleum Board. And speaking of real problems -]
  • Parti Quebecois crafts budget to reflect fiscal credibility, Toronto Globe, A3.
    Pauline Marois [new Quebec premier] hopes to signal to anxious investors that the PQ will control spending and create an environment for investment (photo caption)
    [Quebec doesn't need investment; it needs jobs. And jobs in the robotics age don't need more straining for enough artificial makework to maintain the pre-automation level of 40 hours a week; jobs today only need the resumption of our history of lower workweeks as we inject higher technology.]
  • Corruption - The daily shame of Quebec's rotten state, by Jeffrey Simpson jsimpson@globeandmail.com, Toronto Globe, F9.
    ...Not a day goes by that some new evidence [fails to] emerge of corrupt practices in government. And not just in the municipal governments of Montreal and Laval that have both lost mayors to resignation...
  • Ontario puts Ottawa 'on notice' it seeks more immigrants, Toronto Globe, A10.
    "We [speak for yourself, Jason!] believe immigration is not just about addressing regional labour-market needs [uh, wouldn't that be TRAINING?!], it's also about nation building." Jason Kenney, Federal Immigration Minister [blowout quote, but not by Ontario]
    [When does nation building quit the "further fields are greener" delusion and notice its huge population of unemployed, welfare, disabled, homeless, incarcerated... not least of whom are among the First Nations whom we dispossessed to do this "nation building"? Nation building now takes training our own people and sharing the vanishing unautomated employment, not cherrypicking poorer nations' best and brightest. The 2d-greatest stupidity of the rightwing is unregulated "free" trade dba imports. The 2d-greatest stupidity of the leftwing is virtually unregulated immigrants. The greatest stupidity of both is perpetuating a pre-automation workweek forever. Timesizing solves that in Phases 2, 3, and 4, and solves imports and immigrants in Phase 5.]
  • New Democratic Party's Andrea Horwath: Big on niceness, short on policy, Toronto Globe, A15.
    [The nicest, and most market-oriented jobs policy is timesizing, not downsizing. Let the market control the workweek via the unemployment rate instead of trying to freeze the workweek forever at the pre-automation level. As long as unemployment is too high, the workweek is too high for current levels of technology. Trim it every year for as many years as it takes to nix unemployment and max consumer spending and marketable productivity to motivate investors to invest in. It's no longer a lifestyle option. It's an economic operating-system sys req = system requirement. We can't keep coagulating our greatest vanishing resource, natural market-demanded unautomated employment, and the wages it yields, forever. Why is the economy slowing and slowing and slowing? Because we're funneling and concentrating and coagulating: employment and income and wealth... and the more money we give to the wealthy, the slower the circulation of our money supply and the deeper our officially denied recession.]
    Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath says her biggest priority is consultation on jobs. (photo caption)
    With timesizing, she'll have something to contribute to the "consultation" besides niceness with no policy.]
  • Canada a global 'laggard' in 'environmental markets', by Gloria Galloway, Toronto Globe, A7.
    ...when it comes to using market systems to protect its natural capital..says..Sustainable Prosperity, a Canadian environmental think tank whose steering committee includes such people as former Reform Party leader Preston Manning...
    [Don't tell me Preston Manning has seen the light?!]
  • Foreign markets - Britain 2.8% down, Bloomberg News via Toronto Globe, B16.
    British stocks declined to their lowest in more than three months as U.S. President Barack Obama and Republicans discussed how to resolve the country's fiscal crisis and conflict escalated in Israel. BP and Royal Dutch Shell each fell more than 2 per cent. The FTSE 100 retreated 1.3 per cent to 5,605.59, its lowest since July 26. The measure fell 2.8 per cent this week.
  • Mexico growth slows on farming slump, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B11.
  • Argentina shows almost zero growth, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B11.
  • The hidden face of the German "miracle", La Presse de Montréal, Aff1 pointer to Aff2.
    Strong in its relative economic health, Germany presses its European neighbors-in-crisis to imitate it in reducing their public spending and reforming their job markets. However, German talking heads pass over in silence the social consequences of their economic model.
  • Hong Kong seizes $1.4-million in ivory, AP via Toronto Globe, A21.
    ...No arrests have been made. Wildlife activists blame China's growing presence in Africa for an unprecedented surge in poaching elephants.
    [For that intelligent a species? The word should be "murdering"!]



    Friday, November 16, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. CCAC cutting hours to avoid health-care mandate, Pittsburgh Post Gazette via post-gazette.com
    PITTSBURGH, Pa., USA - Community College of Allegheny County will trim hours for about 400 of its part-time workers to avoid having to provide them with health insurance coverage, the school's president, Alex Johnson, said Thursday. Mr. Johnson told members of Allegheny County Council that complying with the requirements of the federal Affordable Care Act, informally known as Obamacare, would have cost CCAC $6 million annually for part-timers who have been working at least 30 hours per week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way.]
  2. Feeling Resentful? 6 Hard Facts About Shared Work, PsychCentral.com (blog)
    NEW YORK, N.Y., USA - One obstacle to happiness is feeling resentful when another person won’t do his or her share of the work. In Happier at Home, in my description of the three kinds of “happiness leeches,” this kind of person is a “slacker.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- could be relevant in the age of economywide worksharing or Kurzarbeit?]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *La Belle Verte, Eddy & Papineau, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Gloom from U.S., Europe... - Sandy paralyzed manufacturing, triggering layoffs, by John Shmuel, National Post, FP7.
    ...Storm damage boosted requests for unemployment benefits by 78,000 to 439,000, the highest in 18 months...
  • [But why do we keep lamenting Layoffs and jeering Jobcuts! when there's this going on? -]
    Chrysler to add 1,250 Michigan workers, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B7.
    [Why? Because every day there's much more of this going on -]
    Procter & Gamble planning more job cuts, AP via Toronto Globe, B7.
    ...On top of its plan to cut 10% or 5,700 jobs by the end of its fiscal year in June 2013, it plans to continue to reduce its non-manufacturing jobs by 2-4% [say 3%] between 2014 and 2016...
    [You can't get profitable by cutting your own best customers & impoverishing their dependents. What should P&G be doing? Instead of a traumatic 10%+3% workforce cut (5700+1710 of its 57,000 workforce) as it alienates & defunds its own best customers (employees) and their dependents, it should be trimming 13% of its workweek (1 hr & 2 mins a day less for everyone, including executives, down to a 34.8-hour workweek), re-investing overtime profits & earnings in OT-targeted training & hiring, & keeping all employees together working, earning & buying 87% as much as usual of their own products.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Adults recruit teen thieves with opiates - Fantanyl: parents warned to watch for pinpoint pupils, slurred speech and fatigue, Ottawa Metro, A1.
    [Ah the criminalization of drugs, a great source of makework the world over. And of slushfunds for secret services. And mafiosi -]
    An honest businessman who won a construction contract in Montreal received a sympathy card from the Mob, warning: "Your family will get a card just like this one", Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Hmm, did you ever wonder why, if secret services are really so omnipotent as they appear in 007 movies, they haven't cleaned up the mafia? It couldn't be that they've found a use for them, could it? And that they've evolved a symbiosis?]
  • Harper government's Pork Barrel Polka, by Terrance Corcoran, National Post, FP11.
    ...spending programs that are...subsidies to business and pandering to local communities. Example, Nov. 14: "Harper Government Invests [$125k] in Canadian Pet Food Industry" [gov't news release]... Why can't pet food makers fund their own expansion plans? Other releases Nov. 14 and 15 [and earlier in the month] include:
    • "Harper Government Helps Gluten-Free Bakery Deliver New Product Line" [with taxpayer money of] more than $1-million...
    • "Harper Government Invests [$1.2m] in New Marketing Opportunities for Canadian Canola Industry..."
    • "Harper Government Helps Potato Farmers Boost Exports" [with taxpayers'] $36,000...
    • "Harper Government Invests [$1.28m] in Jet Engine Technology"...
    Not only does Ottawa announce projects, it announces that it will be announcing them...
    [- all at taxpayer expense, from a self-styled "Conservative" government, LOL - example: an agricultural ministry release announcing a Friday announcement of a forced taxpayer "investment" in Canada's wild blueberry industry - what colossal arrogant hypocrisy - grotesque corporate socialism while dissing other countries as "socialist."]
    Thousands of similar announcements are produced annually by the Harper government, distributing billions of dollars in subsidies, grants and loans to [cronies in] all sectors of the economy, from farms to food to high tech industries and local communities through scores of programs and agencies, many created by the Harper government...
    [Why not favour all alike by cutting all sales taxes, since as Milton Friedman says, "You get less of what you tax"? And by cutting obsolete but still current concepts of "full time" employment? Governments are getting desperate because since 1940, they've been overlooking the quietly hard-regulated pre-automation "full time" workweek that is freezing more and more consumers out of healthy and sustainable funding from job earnings. Governments have been pretending that the twice-removed lending-oriented financial sector has replaced the earning-oriented consumer base as the basis of economic sustainability. This will only bring Harper-cursed Canada and similar feedback-proof plutocracies, nee feedback-rich democracies, down to Greece's current undeniable-depression-paved skidtrack into the third world.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Set of unfortunate events brings investor pain, National Post, FP1.
    439,000 U.S. jobless claims rise to the highest level since April 2011 in wage of superstorm Sandy...
    [and with Global Warming there's gonna be a lot more Sandy's!]
    US$668B value of U.S. tax [increases on rich?=good!] and spending cuts [bad during slump] scheduled for January 2013.\.
    o.4% contraction of European Union GDP, year over year
    Markets stumble as investors lose confidence -
    [Consumer confidence is a prerequisite for Investor confidence.
    And job security is a prerequisite for consumer confidence.]
    - Problems in Europe and a budget stalemate in the U.S. are contributing to a slide that seems to have no end, Toronto Globe, B4.
    [Why is there a stalemate when the Dems have the Senate and the Presidency, and the President has Executive Privilege, exercised on an unprecedented scale by the previous Republican p-resident?!] ...Wall Street slips...down 28.57 or 0.23% \to\ 12,542.38, Toronto Globe, B12.
    TSX [=Toronto Stock Exchange ="Bay Street"] now down 4.4% in 7 days, National Post, FP8.
    Bay Street retreats, Toronto Globe, B12.
    Canadian stocks dug further into negative territory for the year [S&P/TSX Composite down 118.41 or 0.99% or 1.20% YTD to 11,811.38] as traders continued to sell of stocks amid a lack of confidence that lawmakers can stop the U.S. economy from going over the so-called fiscal cliff...
    [As for the fiscal cliff, I'm beginning to think that what most people are hearing = US mega national debt&deficit crisis, is not what Wall Street is trying to get this scare tactic to mean = "Don't restore taxes on us rich or it will be the end of the world!" - in which case, the truth is exactly the opposite.]
  • S&P charts a worrisome path, by David Berman, Toronto Globe, B4.
    Even the charts are weighing down stocks these days. Earlier this month, the S&P500 crossed a key technical threshold that was serious enough to set off bearish alarms among some technical analysts. The benchmark index fell below its 200-day moving average - or its average closing level over the past 200 days - on Nov. 8 and has been languishing below that ever since...
  • Fed will help boost housing: Bernanke - Changes come six years after home prices plunge - Increase the willingness of lenders to make new loans, National Post, FP6.
    [The problem is not a six-year delay. The problem is the assumption that the Fed has any responsibility for, or capability of, boosting housing or Increasing the willingness of lenders to make loans. Then there's the assumption that Bernanke wants to do anything but continue the coverup of the massive continuing corruption in the banking culture of the USA, and his integral role in the 2008 fiasco. Then there's the assumption that it's all about lenders rather than employers, and about borrowing money rather than earning money, and the follow-on assumption that the financial sector is the economic base and not the consumer base, built upon (& funded by - details, details) the employment basement.]
  • U.S. Post [USPS] reports record loss [$15.9B FY ending Sept.30],
    Toronto Globe, B7.
    [And nevermind the Post Office - what about this in the runup to Xmas?! -]
  • Tough economy leading to trying times for toy makers, Toronto Globe, B8.
    ...Mattel...Hasbro...
  • New ideas to power the drilling industry - Calgary oil firms experiment with fuelling rigs with natural gas - the very resource they are seeking, Toronto Globe, B10.
    [It's gettin' weird: depletion to expedite depletion - of nonrenewable resource.]
  • U.S. firm to launch NAFTA challenge to Quebec frack ban - Lone Pine Resources demands $250-million in compensation for lost permit [What a colossal nerve! Definitely time to trashcan NAFTA and all other delusions of Free Trade as opposed to Fair Trade and states' rights/sovereignty.]
    In September, PQ Natural Resources Minister Martine Ouellet said she 'cannot see the day when the extraction of natural gas by the fracking method can be done in a safe way.' (photo caption)
  • Eurozone back in recession - Second since 2009 - Germany and France expected to succumb, National Post, FP6.
    A man walks past a newspaper displayed in central Athens Thursday featuring a photograph of Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras, slumped on his desk. While the eurozone is contracting, Greece is suffering an outright depression. (photo caption)
    [Not Netherlands? -]
    In euro zone, the return of recession bites like depression - Netherlands sees most dramatic decline, Toronto Globe, B1,B8.
  • Energy literacy cuts both ways - Energy executives fall short on trust[worthiness], by Yadullah Hussain, National Post, FP1,FP12.
      The energy industry and Canadians opposed to its [eco-ignoring] plans seem to be speaking in different tongues.
    • One side is focused on economic climate, the other on climate change.
    • One brandishes impressive employment numbers, the other embarrassingly high CO2 emissions.
    • One talks about federal and provincial permits, the other highlights the absence of a 'social licence.'
    A common gripe among industry executives is that the average Canadian doesn't comprehend the economic benefits [mostly to the industry executives] and job creation [as long as you move to Alberta like the Halifax family in tomorrow's Toronto Globe, B12] the industry brings to the table, nor does he or she trust the safety of the technologies deployed...
    [And the average industry executive doesn't comprehend economy-destroying power of global warming and the crucial business benefit of climate change legislation. Let's review the editorial cartoon in the 11/05/2011 Boston Globe -]
    Hurricane Sandy = title on sign floating sideways down center, editorial cartoon by Matt Davies, 11/05 Boston Globe, A10.
    On left side of frame, partially submerged telephone poles, tree, and a semi-sunk billboard proclaiming: "Climate change legislation: Bad For Business"
    On right side of frame, partially submerged building is labelled: "BUSINESS," with stranded businessman standing on roof.
    [It's time Canadians who are opposed to energy executives' plans disarm the executives and use immediate worksharing and sustainable Timesizing to strip energy executives of their impressive employment numbers and job creation arguments. And doubtless these untrustworthy but indubitably honourable parasites oops gentlemen will be asking Harper to force taxpayers to subsidize them once tomorrow's story breaks - about their looming bankruptcy thanks to surging oil output from North Dakota and the U.S. energy renaissance.]



    Thursday, November 15, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Free Safety and Health Consultation + Shared Work Programs, Brentwood Library's Career Development Center Site via brentwoodcdc.wordpress.com
    BRENTWOOD, N.Y., USA - ...Shared Work – The Dept. of Labor can help businesses avoid layoffs by allowing employees to continue to work while collecting partial unemployment benefits... Trabajo Compartido – El Departamento de Labor puede ayudar negocios evitar despidos (por razones de falta de trabajo) dejando empleados continuar a trabajar durante el tiempo que están recibiendo beneficios de desempleo parcial... - see whole document under today's date.
  2. John Metz, Denny's CEO to cut Hours and Charge 5% Obamacare Surcharge, Huffington Post via Z6Mag.com
    SPARTANBURG, S.C., USA - With the CEO of Papa John’s recently..saying that he will cut employees hours to avoid paying the high costs of..Obamacare, other business owners seem to be playing “follow the leader” and..doing the same... John Metz, CEO franchise owner of Denny’s restaurants...said that, “because of Obamacare, we are cutting hours to under 30 hours, effective immediately.” He added that, “Everyone’s looking for a way to not have to provide insurance for their employees. It’s essentially a huge tax on all of us business people.”... Though he wants to cover his employees.., his current coverage has costs of $5-$6,000 annually for full-time employees. Metz said, “Obviously, I’d love to cover all our employees under that insurance. But to pay $5,000 per employee would cost us $175,000 per restaurant, and unfortunately, most of our restaurants don’t make $175,000 a year...” - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way.]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Starbucks [is] announcing plans to pay $360 million for Teavana, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B9.
  • Buffett's firm [Berkshire Hathaway] to close D.C. paper [Manassas News & Messenger that it bought from Media General earlier this year], AP via Toronto Globe, B13.
    [See also entries under Downsizing and Closings below.]

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Buffett's firm [Berkshire Hathaway] to close D.C. paper [Manassas News & Messenger that it bought from Media General earlier this year], AP via Toronto Globe, B13.
    ...The Manassas (Va.) closing will eliminate 33 jobs. An additional 72 corporate positions that Berkshire acquired with the Media General deal will [also] be eliminated...
    [And Buffett thinks he's going to compensate for this kind of post-acquisition downsizing with charity?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS(archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Buffett's firm [Berkshire Hathaway] to close D.C. paper [Manassas News & Messenger, which began publishing in 1869], Toronto Globe, B13.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do so - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only drone warfare could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Wall Street sinks [185.23 or 1.45%] to new low [12,570.95 Dow], Toronto Globe, B23.
    ...a fresh three-month low...
  • Riding the recovery: a long haul strategy, Toronto Globe, B24.
    [No kiddin', especially when the "recovery" is a mirage as long as downsizing trumps timesizing and jobcuts swamp hourscuts.]
  • Obama stands firm on tax hikes [good] - ...Says making wealthy pay is 'not going to break their backs' [or banks, but] 'Fiscal cliff' rhetoric has sent markets falling, by Kevin Carmichael, Toronto Globe, B1,B14.
    ..."Fiscal cliff" is the term coined by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke to describe more than $500-billion in temporary tax cuts [on the wealthy who aren't using it anyway] that are scheduled to revert to previous [higher] levels at the start of 2013, and some $100-billion in across-the-board spending cuts that the government is legislated to implement next year.
    [The tax cuts on the rich were an insane experiment that funnelled more of the money supply to a tiny population who didn't spend it, donate it or invest it in job creation, thus making the "recovery" slower. Restoring the higher taxes on the rich would make the spending cuts unnecessary, which if implemented, would make the "recovery" slower. So Bernanke is just spreading fog here, grouping together apples and oranges, to help coverup his and Geithner's lethal role in the 2008 financial collapse. We need higher taxes on the wealthy because they have far more than they know what to do with, and we need more spending to get the money supply circulating more and faster again. That's what a real recovery is all about.]
    If allowed to occur in full, the impact of those measures would dramatically alter the upward trajectory of the U.S. budget deficit - hence the cliff.
    [Is this journalist, Kevin Carmichael, braindead stupid or getting paid off? If the government takes in more money from the wealthy again, the U.S. budget deficit will obviously go DOWN and there will be less "cliff" to the tune of $400 billion (500-100) even if the $100 billion in spending cuts are NOT implemented.]
    It also could, over time, trigger a recession [no the higher taxes on the wealthy could PREVENT a recession]
    because the U.S. economy is growing to slow to make up for the lost demand.
    [There is no lost demand by taxing the wealthy because they spend a smaller percentage of their money than ANY OTHER BRACKET and THERE ARE FEWER OF THEM than in any other bracket. Wake the hell up and stop spreading this misinformation from hacks of the suicidal rich like Bernanke!]
    The Congressional Budget Office estimates that going over the cliff would reduce GDP by 0.5% [this must derive solely from the $100B spending cut - or has the CBO now been dragged into this alternative universe of scare-tactic lies?] and cause the unemployment rate to jump to 9.1% by the end of 2013.
    [Untaxing the rich has not caused the unemployment rate to fall, so why would retaxing them cause it to jump? Quite the contrary!]
  • Morbid oops Vital signs - Americans are spending less, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    Retail sales fell 0.3% in October from September...
    [All part of the financial sector's attempt to switch the basis of the economy from the consumer base funded by the employment basement to the financial attic funding consumers with loans on the silly idea this is sustainable. Here's an example from Canada -]
  • Auto industry - Dealerships fearful of backlash as car loans grow longer, by Greg Keenan, Toronto Globe, B1.
    ...Loans of longer than six years have shot up to 57% of new vehicle loans in Canada amid fierce competition by auto makers offering low-interest rate incentives and consumers anxious to keep their monthly car payments as low as possible. But the longer terms are causing problems at dealerships as drivers shop for new cars and discover their vehicles have so-called negative equity, where the amounts remaining on their loans exceed the [trade-in] value of their [old cars]... "Negative equity has become an epidemic," said Robert Varga...of Walkaway Canada [disemployment] insurance...
    [So the epidemic of negative equity has now spread from real estate to the auto industry...]
  • Some highfliers of the stock market descended into official correction territory, drilling home a sudden shift in investor sentiment, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    The Nasdaq Composite and Russell 2000 are now down by more than 10% since highs hit in mid-September.
  • The FHA is expected to report this week that the agency could exhaust its reserves because of rising mortgage delinquencies, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
  • National Philanthropy Day, Toronto Globe, AFP1.
    Canada is the first country to officially recognize November 15 as National Philanthropy Day, a day to celebrate the power of philanthropy to change lives, communities and our world.
    [Any economic system, of whatever size, that relies on capricious philanthropy alias charity (instead of system design modification) for vital functions such as currency centrifugation and circulation is lethally flawed.]
  • Religious and gender rights collide as woman [Faith McGregor] denied haircut - Muslim barbers' refusal to provide service prompts complaint to [Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario], Toronto Star, A1.
    [This is the result of a naive immigration policy that assumes people are just in different geographic spaces around the planet and ignores the fact that they are often also in different evolutionary time ranges. All such barbers in advanced economies should have their licences revoked and be channeled into occupations (if any) where their primitive mindsets can do no harm. If they refuse, they must be sent back to their countries and evolutionary time ranges of origin where their mindsets are acceptable and often required. The extreme reaction to overpopulation and food shortage in a desertifying ecosystem resulted in various taboos upon women in some Muslim sects. This extreme of diversity was never forseen in the establishment of western freedom of religion and bankrupts tolerance.]
  • Industrial production plunged across the euro zone in September, suggesting that Europe's economic downturn is gathering pace, WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.
  • Across crisis-weary Europe, striking workers take to the streets, WSJ, A1 pointer to A11.
    ...Italy...Spain...Portugal...Greece...
    [Southern Europe needs fine-tuning currency control that is not available within the unified currency because: the wider the unification, the less decentralized control. Example: the more globalization, the less national economic-policy controls; the more federal-government power in the Union, the fewer and weaker states rights.]
  • Wind power faces slowdown, Toronto Globe, B13.



    Wednesday, November 14, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Shared work - An alternative to laying off employees, labor.mo.gov/DES/Forms
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., USA - ...The Shared Work Unemployment Compensation Program is an alternative to layoffs for employers faced with a reduction in available work. It allows an employer to divide the available work among a specified group of affected employees instead of a layoff. These employees receive a portion of their unemployment benefits while working reduced hours... - see whole document under today's date.
    [Missouri Div. of Employment Security has come out with an info pamphlet on the state's shared work program!]
  2. Chipmaker Infineon plans drastic cost-cutting, Agence France-Presse via google.com/hostednews/afp
    BERLIN, Germany - ...Cost-cutting measures would include "temporarily switching off underutilised equipment, reducing the temporary workforce and the selective use of short-time work," the firm announced...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Some big U.S. firms are making plans to slow investments, lay off workers and pay lower dividends if a deal to avoid the [fiscal] cliff isn't reached, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A6.
    [Oh that'll sure help cushion the landing - not.]
  • Sun Media [Canada's largest newspaper chain] cuts back as ad sales fall - 500 jobs cut, two presses closed, paywalls added as revenue slides at company's newspapers, Toronto Globe, B4.
    ...Ottawa Sun...Kingston Whig-Standard..."This is a terrible day for quality journalism in Canada," said Paul Morse, president of the Southern Ontario Newspaper Guild...
    [Quebec version -]
    Sun Media newspapers - Québecor abolishes 500 positions,
    La Presse de Montréal, A1.
  • Citigroup cuts 100 staff on Long Island, Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B9.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Canada: Retirements set to rattle economy - Biggest transfer of economic control in country's history around the corner, Ottawa Citizen, C1.
    [Bigger than Indian to French? Bigger than French to English? Recent track record is easy to outdo anyway - maybe quit hiding the federal worksharing program? maybe upgrade it from emergency transfusion to ongoing diet and exercise program?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS(archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • AMF Bowling sought bankruptcy-court protection after being squeezed by a cash crunch and failing to find a buyer for the business, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Fiscal cliff looms large before Wall Street, Toronto Globe, B16.

    U.S. stocks closed lower as worries about Greece's debt crisis and the U.S. 'fiscal cliff' took the shine off strong quarterlyl results from..Home Depot...
    Blue-chip stocks fell to a more than three-month low, withe the Dow industrials losing 58.90 points or 0.5% to end the session at 12756.18, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • In pursuit of predictability, Toronto Globe, B17.
    [Impossible with current levels of contradiction in the high theory of economics, such as trying to get growth (UPsizing) by downsizing, and ignoring/denying that upward monetary redistribution slows the economy...]
  • Lying down on the job - More people bring the office to bed [via electronic gadgets], WSJ, A1 pointer to D1.
    [Never off-duty = no downtime next to mounting unemployment, welfare, disability, homelessness, prison, self-"employment" ...]
  • "Fiscal cliff" fears were cited as eclipsing concerns about Europe's debt crisis by business leaders at a Wall Street Journal conference, WSJ, A1.
  • Surprise $7-billion Canada deficit surge - Commodity prices helped drive up estimate 38%.., Toronto Globe, A1.
    [And probably Harper gov't secrecy enhanced the "surprise" -]
    ...Finance Minister Jim Flaherty...released a fall economic update Tuesday that - for the second time in two years - pushed back Ottawa's timeline for erasing the federal deficit. That is now expected in 2016-17...



    Tuesday, November 13, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 35 hour week, by Robert Nielsen, robertnielsen21.wordpress.com
    DUBLIN, Ireland - Back in 1930 Keynes predicted that in the future people would only work 15 hours a week... Instead we are in a world of extremes. Some are lost in a sea of despair and hopelessness, ashamed that they cannot find work. Others are on the verge of burnout from overwork and stress, with no time for their friends or family... The solution is to reduce the working week, initially to four days and then after several years to three days... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Opel cuts won't be as severe as Ford's, union says, Reuters.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...If market conditions worsen, Schaefer-Klug said, Opel could manage by further using "Kurzarbeit", a government-subsidized short-time work scheme that was used widely by German industry during the global financial crisis in 2009... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Leucadia [National] to buy Jefferies [Group].., Reuters via Toronto Globe, B18.
    ...paying $2.76-billion in stock for the 71% of Jefferies it does not own...
    A canny - if unconventional - Wall Street deal, by Antony Currie, Toronto Globe, B21.
    Jefferies is putting a clever new spin on Wall Street mergers and acquisitions...
    [There is nothing whatsoever canny or clever about M&As, unless you're one of those who think Canadian usurper Harper is canny and clever for starting a fad of shutting down system feedback via damping democracy via proroguing Parliament, cf. recessing Congress.]
  • For Leon's, a Brickload of debt, by Sean Silcoff, Toronto Globe, B2.
    [See yesterday's merger section.]
    ...The market [ie: investors] should be cautious about the wisdom and timing of [Leon's] biggest outlay yet - the acquisition of its much larger rival Brick Ltd. for $700-million...
    Leon's will use a new $500-million credit facility to pay for the Brick chain. (photo caption)
    [And how much will be drained off by lawyers, Leon executives (CEO Terry Leon...) and "investment" bankers? But the futile exercise dba grand show of activity goes on -]
  • Sherwin-Williams..., Toronto Globe, B9.
    ...the top U.S. paint maker, said it will buy Mexico's leading paint company Consorcio Comex for about $2.34 billion...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS(archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Kodak has financing to exit bankruptcy, Ottawa Citizen, D3.
    ...$793m...as a commercial-printing company...
    [A commercial-printing company now??]

    JOB- OR JOBLOSS- RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • Suicides prompt Spanish shift on evictions, by Nigel Davies, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B18.
    ...Banks have repossessed close to 400,000 homes in Spain since a property bubble burst in 2008 and the nation subsequently sank into recession, throwing millions out of work and leaving them unable to keep up mortgage payments to the banks. Last Friday's suicide of 53-year-old Amaia Egana has inflamed a public already angered by...Spanish banks, many of which have benefited from taxpayer-funded bailouts organized by the political elite. Ms. Egana, a former Socialist councillor in northern Spain, jumped to her death from her fourth-floor flat as bailiffs were trying to evict her under foreclosure laws...in the Basque town of Barakaldo... Ms. Egana's death, and another eviction-related suicide in October, have intensified a popular backlash with many accusing the banks - some of which will receive part of an up to E100-billion ($127B) European bailout - of callous disregard for the effects of unemployment, which has hit 25% [=the worst of the Great Depression in 1933]..\.. Facing accusations that politicians and banks are complicit in de facto "murder," Spain's banking association..members [will] suspend eviction orders for two years for those borrowers hit hardest by economic crisis and record unemployment... Protesters say this will not fo far enough, given that thousands will face difficulties in the next few months... However, a number of banks themselves are in dire straits because of the failure of many borrowers, ranging from small homeowners to major property developers, to repay their debts...
    [Luxury for everyone else is called "dire straits" by the deeply-self-cushioned One Per Cente in the financial sector, who suffer least but complain loudest, and whose failure to perform on their promise to "get that money right back to work creating jobs" or their promise that "new technology will make life easier for everyone" by cutting workhours instead of jobs has created their own housing crisis and recession in the first place.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • All quiet in markets amid fiscal cliff woes, Ottawa Citizen, D5.
    Monday's markets - ..Wall Street struggles for direction..as the Dow lost 0.31 of a point \to 12,815.08, and\ Bay Street declines 5.34 points to 12,191.46, Toronto Globe, B23.
  • Ad vet decries misleading attack ads - Suggests U.S. election ad damage ad industry's credibility, Toronto Globe, B6.
    [What credibility?]
  • After Sandy, recovery stutters - Thousands are looking for shelter, or living without power two weeks later, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer headline to A18.
    [Nobody's noticed the massive natural makework here?]
    A neighbour walks past burned-out homes Monday in Queens, N.Y. More than 100 homes were lost in a fire when Hurricane Sandy hit. (photo caption)
  • Under pressure - The financial crisis's toll has been more than merely monetary: Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B21.
    Financial institutions and health surveys are finding pervasive public anxiety as complacency sets in [eg: Wall St bonuses are back] and the economy shrinks.
  • How do borrowers spell relief? CLO [collateralized loan obligations], by Boyd Erman, Toronto Globe, B2.
    [Don't count on it: "birds of a feather, flock together."]
    One resurgent corner of the so-called shadow banking system [huh?] is proving[?] that not all the financial [scams dba] innovations that got much of the blame for the credit crisis were toxic after all.
    [It wasn't primarily a credit crisis. It was, and still is, a monetary overconcentration crisis. Credit is just the major (lame) way the 0.01% use to justify their circulation-slowing share of the money supply.]
    The meltdown of 2008 seemed to spell the end [and definitely should have] for the alphabet soup of investment products -
    CDOs [collateralized debt obligations],
    non-bank ABCP [asset-backed commercial paper],
    RMBS [residential mortgage-backed securities] -
    that defined the shadow banking system, a world of lending that took place away from banks and funnelled money directly from investors to creditors.
    [It was not away from banks - the big banks were intimately involved thanks to the huge openings for conflict of interest made possible by the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Banking Act of 1938 under Clinton in 1999. And there was nothing direct whatsoever about all these multipley-nested derivative repackagings of loan packagings, else why the big subsequent and ongoing accounting chaos.]
    The days of the crisis, and the years that followed, were the very definition of throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
    [No, they were the very definition of coverup, with only a few piranhas fished out of the septic tank with maximum distracting publicity. The pupper piranhas (Bernanke and Geithner) are still in charge of the septic tank and nothing fundamental has changed. The crisis has been pushed into a strained and unstable shadow "remission." Just ask Bill Black, who helped really clean up the S&L crisis in the early 90s.]
    Investors sold everything, especially anything with the taint of association with the business of structured [=pyramided] credit or [in]securitization. The idea that securitization was a reasonable method for spreading risk seemed to be dead, replaced by a belief that it was simply alchemy, a way to turn weak assets into ones that appeared strong.
    [and it was and is just that, because the only sustainable justification for monetary concentration is the assumption of risk, and if that risk is spread, it is not assumed by those with the monetary concentration to absorb it without circulation-deceleration.]
    In many [no, all] cases that was true: CDOs for instance were subprime mortgages repackaged as triple-A-rated bonds. However, CLOs - packages of mostly[?] high-yield corporate debt that are sliced up and sold - have been resilient, with few [def'n?] defaults...
    [Real high-yield corporate debt doesn't need slicing and repackaging. Only useless Wall Street middlemen, desperate to further retard the flow of money funnelling to the 0.01% in its onward flow to the real economy need the slicing and repackaging. And their resilience is just further evidence of investors' suspension of disbelief in their desperation to "get their (new surges of untaxed) money back to work" with or without "creating jobs."]
  • Canadian economy - The uncertainty mounts, La Presse de Montréal, Aff1 pointer to Aff4.
    Canada sees risk in U.S. oil boom - With American output set to surpass Saudi Arabia's, Canadian exporters feel the pressure, Toronto Globe, A1.
    [Oh dear, Canada just got left in a more sustainable position at the expense of its wealthy oil exporters!]
  • Money stress catches up with Canadians - After years of weak economic growth, a general sense of financial angst is emerging - Our propensity to overspend isn't helping, Toronto Globe, B21.
    In a health-related survey by Sun Life Financial, 72% of participants said they were experiencing 'excessive' levels of anxiety. (photo caption)
    [Our propensity to overspend is the only thing currently maintaining the illusion of any growth whatsoever. Desperate high-risk lending on the part of the "Suicide, Everyone Else First" One Percent is the only thing giving their unlimited coagulation of the money supply any appearance whatsoever of circulation. They have backed downsizing (dba rightsizing or leansizing) instead of timesizing on the ridiculous notion that they can get UPsizing (dba Growth) by DOWNsizing. They have fostered the fallacy that the twice-removed, 90%-parasitic financial sector (themselves) are the economic base, not the consumer base via the employment basement. These honourable gentlemen have arrogated to themselves a function which did not belong to them, namely Saint Schumpeter's "Creative" Destruction, and only emergency worksharing and permanent Timesizing can restore common sense let along sustainability.]
  • Small-box Wal-Marts tailored to urban cores - Quick conversions of tired Zellers..., Toronto Globe, B15.
    [Economic carcinogens come in all sizes.]
  • Japan's changing fortunes - Export king flails to next recession, by John Shmuel, National Post, FP1.
    If five recessions in 15 years [=since 1987] isn't a record for a country, it has to be close, and that prospect is now facing Japan...
    3 = global rank of Japan's economy ... 3.5% = contraction of Japan's economy in Q3 2012 on an annual basis (blowout stats)
  • Egypt sees initial IMF deal this week, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B14.
    ...$4.8-billion loan...
    [The International Monetary "Typhoid Mary" Fund strikes again.]



    Sun.-Mon, November 11-12, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Papa John's pizza cuts employees' hours supposedly due to Obamacare, 11/11 AMERICAblog.com
    LOUISVILLE, Ky., USA - ...As the CEO of Papa Johns...he claims that charging 11 to 14 cents more per pizza (his estimate of what Obamacare will cost his company) is simply too much — so he’s going to cut his employees’ hours and pay instead, so the law won’t apply to him... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours are happening anyway but not the best way.]
  2. Activist Lilly Ledbetter to speak at Union on Monday, 11/12 The University Daily Kansan via kansan.com
    LAWRENCE, Kans., USA - ...The Department of Labor considers full-time employment to be 35 or more hours per week.
    [But overtime only starts above 40??]
    Men are more likely to work more hours, while women are more likely to work less than 35 hours per week. In 2009, 66.6% of American workers working less than 35-hour workweeks were women. In comparison, just 45.1% of workers logging more than 35 hours a week were men."
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [These data have been way outdated in the last three years. Scan down to article "A part-time, low-wage epidemic - The jobs gained recently by the U.S. economy are disproportionately low-paying, insecure ones" on 11/06/2012 #2. This is not about the "battle between the sexes" - BOTH would be much better off with a workweek automatically adjusting to achieve and maintain full employment and the maximum consumer spending that results.]
  3. BONUS squib #1 - Go ahead, give in to procrastination, The Big Think/You Tube via 11/12 Toronto Globe, B7.
    Give yourself five minutes every hour to procrastinate by spending time on Facebook or surfing the Internet, says Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit. If you try to ignore that procrastination urge, the desire will erupt anyway [and] you'll actually waste a lot more time than if you had recognized the urge and limited it to five minutes...
    [= micro workweek reduction? = pathetic! but another sign that's it's happening anyway, just not in the best way.]
  4. BONUS squib #2 - The hands-off site for the workaholic, Lifehack.org via 11/12 Toronto Globe, B7.
    Donothingfor2minutes.com will test your patience and give you a chance to take a break at the same time. The site has a pleasing image of waves and the sun, along with sounds of surf. But if you touch your mouse before two minutes expire, the word "fail" flashes in red on your screen and the timer is reset for another two minutes.
    [= nano vacation lengthening = workyear reduction? = pathetic! but another sign that's it's happening anyway, just not in the best way.]
  5. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Leon's [Furniture buys, for $700m,] arch-rival The Brick as Canada's top furniture retailers join forces to take on U.S. rivals, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • How Sandy revealed the follies of the federal flood insurance programs, by Barrie McKenna, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B1.
    ...Decades of counterproductive policies have encouraged millions of Americans to build [and rebuild, and rebuild...], and live, where they should not - in the direct path of storms such as Sandy...
  • The mad max economy - In the business of disaster-preparedness, boom times [thanks to more consumer spending] always come amid gloom [thanks to disaster-cleanup necess-ity], 11/11 New York Times, Bu1.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS(archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Despite market woes, Washington optimistic for fiscal cliff deal, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B3.
    [But then, Washington is always optimistic...for public consumption.]
    ...Tax increases and spending cuts [=austerity] worth a combined $607-billion are scheduled for Jan. 1. The CBO, the Fed, the IMF and others say the fragile U.S. "recovery" [our quotes] is too weak to absorb such a blow.
    [Notice here that good and bad are combined and confused: tax increases on the wealthy, good; spending cuts by government = the spending arm of the wealthy, bad. The only path to real and strong recovery is Timesizing to deconcentrate and recirculate the money supply on the basis of market forces, with transitional emergency tax increases on wealth=hyperconcentrated money, but in the media, tax increases are constantly mentioned together with spending cuts, called only in the European context by their other name, austerity, and often rightly identified as suicidally money-decirculating (and concentration-maintaining).]
    Going over the cliff would cause a recession...
    [So we're still in denial that we're IN a recession and that it's constantly deepening as the money supply continues to concentrate and coagulate in the top brackets without limit. And that going over the cliff would actually force the realization and admission by the wealthy/financial sector/media narrative that we're in a depression compared to where wé'd be with full employment, however short a workweek that might require in the context of pervasive automation and robotization.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Folly of ignoring the fiscal cliff - Even optimistic investors who have faith in U.S. politicians reaching a solution [LOL] should prepare for a market correction, 11/12 Toronto Globe = "Bay Street Journal," B10.
    [= a market correction in response to gov't trying to get more money from the only ones who have it = wealthy investors? But they're already ignoring the existing recession that they've put everyone else in - why disturb their nap?]
  • Bank of Montreal's chief economist [Sherry Cooper] sticks neck out, says housing will boost U.S. economy, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B11.
    [We've still got a looong way to go to real structural change when saying what everyone else has said is still billed as "sticking neck out."]
  • It's not just doctors and nurses we need - Paramedics, radiation technologists and other health-case occupations in demand, too, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B13.
    [But doctors and nurses etc. aren't born, they're TRAINED, so bust the bottlenecking of these skills and the defunding of training or just SHAAADDAP!]
  • Airlines face acute shortage of pilots, 11/12 WSJ, A1.
    [Ever heard of training? ... apprenticeships? ... higher pay to lure back the disgusted? ... aND Here's the last straw -]
  • Market research skills in short supply, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B14.
    [Big-company CEOs are so insulated and isolated, they don't care about what people want. They're going to shove whatever will give themselves an extra $50-100 million down our throats. Same-size cashew tins less cashews, six-pack of jellos shrunk to same-price four-pack, check yourself out, charging for bags, be your own travel agent, charging for food on airlines, pump your own gas, be your own bank teller, try to find a $10-20 pair of flipup sunglasses, try to get GMO foods labelled, try to find a Montreal-Ottawa train after 7:15pm, try to find a café car or sleeper between Toronto and Montreal... - it goes on and on and on, the Market be damned...]
  • Sandy slapped the bond issuers, too, 11/11 NYT, B1.
    ...The fact is, disasters are good business in Waukesha WI...
    [And everywhere else. And that's why we need a constant moderated "disaster" that we're used-to to keep business good. Say something that employers love complaining about = a wage(&spending)-raising shortage of labor, furnished not by war but by a workweek cap slowly adjusting automatically against unemployment. So that we match our lip service to deregulation and Let The Market Decide by deregulating the 72-year-frozen workweek, and let The Market's need for full employment and maximum consumer spending shorten it as much as those two goals require in the age of automation and robotics. Management must adjust by accommodating this profoundly healthy and sustainable change and acquiring the skills it demands, such as smoothly suturing shorter and shorter shifts. This strategy is common in nature, from the transition to lifeforms powered by that high-energy toxic gas known as oxygen, to the harmless constant little adjustments of the Pacific and North American tectonic plates as they grind past each other at Hollister, Calif., never stuck long enough to build up a destructively big adjustment such as the earthquakes elsewhere.]
  • Montreal Vision - $500 to talk to elected reps, 11/12 La Presse de Montréal, A1 pointer to A6.
    [Plutocracy goes into high gear?]
  • Japan's economy shrank by a 3.5% annual rate in the third quarter, reversing its strong burst of growth at the start of the year, 11/12 WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.
  • Recessionary gusts buffet EU's biggest economies, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B2.
    [Oh, but not USA, oh no!]
    "(The French decline) confirms our assessment that the economy is entering another sharp downturn, having never fully recovered from its slump in 2008-09." Carl Weinberg of High Frequency Economics (blowout quote)
    [Oh but the USA has COMPLETELY recovered from its slump in 2008-09 OF COURSE!   NOOO WAAAY are WE entering another sharp downturn! (But keep distracting onto Europe just in case.)]
  • Sweden's escalating household debt: A not unfamiliar story, 11/12 Toronto Globe, B8.
    ...now stands at 173% of disposable income, following a steady climb from just 90% in the mid-1990s, according to..the Riksbank...
    [Not unfamiliar? You bet! -]
  • Real estate in freefall - A bad taste in the low countries, 11/12 La Presse de Montréal, Aff1 pointer to Aff2.
    Drunk on credit?..., 11/12 La Presse de Montréal, Aff2 target.
    - The Netherlanders carry on their shoulders the biggest debtload in Europe, with a cumulative balance equivalent to 110% of the size of their economy
    - Like others, the Danes have succumbed to credit mania - So much that they constitute today the more indebted people in Europe
  • Greece passed an austerity budget needed to unlock further funding..., 11/12 WSJ, A1.
    [They don't need more funding for the rich. They need more jobs for everyone else, however short a workweek it takes. More funding will do zilch, except needing still more funding...]
  • Mozambique boom skirts poor, 11/11 NYT, A1 pointer to A5.
    In Mozambique, the rural poor are not sharing in brisk growth driven by the boom in coal and natural gas. Many, in fact, are worse off than before.
    [Change "rural poor" to "middle class" and "boom.." to "recovery" and you've got ... America.]



    Saturday, November 10, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Is The 29 Hour Work Week Coming As Employers Seek To Escape The Obamacare Mandate? CNSNews.com
    ALEXANDRIA, Va., USA - ...A little-known section in the ObamaCare health reform law defines “full-time” work as averaging only 30 hours per week, a definition that will affect some employers who utilize part-time workers to trim the cost of complying with the ObamaCare rule that says businesses with 50 or more full-time workers must provide health insurance or pay a fine. ..\..Companies can potentially avoid being subject to Obamacare's insurance requirements by limiting employees’ weekly hours to less than the 30 hour level defined by Obamacare as “full-time.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shorter hours are happening anyway but not the best way.]
  2. Fiat Panda plant gets lean award – but is on short time work, AutoIndustryInsider.com
    POMIGLIANO D'ARCO, Campania, Italy - ...Since then the demand has softened, to the point that so far this year – given production effectively commenced in April 2012 – the plant has spent a total of 5 weeks out of action so far over and above planned shut-downs... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS squib - Taking a break from digital overload - We have to find a middle ground on the tech front that not only saves our sanity, but also benefits business, by founder Leah Eichler of Femme-o-Nomics.com, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Lately, I fantasize about taking a holiday. Not a destination holiday - which are [sic] hardly relaxing now that my Android phone and iPad accompany me everywhere - but a digital one. I crave a break where I can go for an hour or two without checking one of my digital devices. It's more complicated than it sounds, given that I have been sleeping with my iPad for more than a year. Before that, my BlackBerry never left my side...
  4. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 1st-largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Iberian Airlines wants to drop one job in four [=25% =4500 positions], Agence France-Presse via Le Devoir de Montréal, C3.
    You can't get profitable by cutting your own best customers & impoverishing their dependents. What should Iberian be doing? Instead of a traumatic 25% workforce cut (4,500 of its 18,000 workforce) as it alienates & defunds its own best customers (employees) and their dependents, it should be trimming 25% of its workweek (10 hours a week less for everyone, including executives, down to a 30-hour workweek), re-investing overtime profits & earnings in OT-targeted training & hiring, & keeping all employees together working, earning & buying 75% as much as usual of their own & others' services and products.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Fiscal worries temper markets,
    Ottawa Citizen, H3.
  • The nephew [George P.] of George W. Bush launches himself into politics, Le Devoir de Montréal, C1.
    [Oh no-o-o, Mr. Bill!]
  • Stephen Harper on the race to get the immigrants Canada wants, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Hopefully this is just a machiavellian "conservative" spin (actually really conservative this time for once) to cut immigration to steady-state = one-out one-in, because no country should be "wanting" immigrants in the age of multidimensional ecological constraints and global overpopulation.]
    "This government is very pro-immigration...believes Canada needs immigration, benefits from immigration and that those needs and benefits willl become even greater in the future if this is done correctly." (blowout quote, A4)
    ["Methinks the lady doth protest too much." But he might really mean it, in which case this would be yet another reason for getting rid of him (besides his secret government, closures of Parliament, alignment of Canada's laws with suicidal USA's...]
  • Harper predicts turbulence, 'deepening disconnect' for China, Toronto Globe, A4.
    ..."between economic wealth and freedom on the one hand and lack of political freedom on the other," he said...
    [And with Harper's government-secrecy and popularization of proroguing (shutting down) Parliament as a mere political strategy, Canadians too are losing political freedom - while also losing economic wealth and freedom thanks to rising underemployment and monetary concentration, and falling domestic consumption per capita.]
  • The feminine deficit costs the world dearly, by Éric Desrosiers, Le Devoir de Montréal, C1.
    ..."Pardon my bluntness, but the subprime financial crisis was a crisis caused by men," emphasized Aude de Thuin. "This crisis, which has plunged the entire world into recession, would not have been produced if there had been more women at the head of the banks and financial services, because women would never have granted credit to people who could not repay." Entrepreneur and author, the French woman was receiving a prize at the 5th World Enterprise Forum being held at Lyon, France, two weeks ago...
    "Women are a bulwark against chronic corruption." Aude de Thuin (photo caption, C7)
  • Looking for the upside of Down Under, by Josh O'Kane, Toronto Globe, B14.
    As goes China [lately, down], so goes Australia (graph caption)
    ...Australia [is] a natural-resources-driven country like Canada...
    [ie: exploitable, unrenewable, unsustainable...thirdworldable]
    If China bursts out of its slow growth rut [how possible, without creative accounting?]...Pavilion Financial expects [it] will fuel more growth in Australia..\..
    [ie: more exploitation of Australia's unrenewable resources = unsustainable]
    Thanks in large part to China's insatiable demand for coal and iron ore.\.for more than two decades...Australia now enjoys a prosperity [unsustainable] that North Americans can only envy[?]. It has a jobless rate of just 5.4%. [How much really?]. Unlike other developed countries, which have slashed interest rates to multidecade lows to stimulate their economies, the Reserve Bank of Australia has been able t keep its benchmark interest rate at a relatively lofty [LOL] 3.25%. The "high" rate [our quotes] means that Australia has a ready solution to [its] problem of a slowing China - it could cut rates [further] to boost growth.
    [Funny how cutting interest rates, a way of demotivating saving and incentivating spending, is a mainstream admission that more saving dba funneling money to the low-population high-brackets isn't working, yet the prevailing mainstream "wisdom" still maintains, contradictorily, that we can funnel any large percentage of the money supply to any small percentage of the population and things will only get better because "that money will get right back to work creating jobs."]
    Lower rates would help tame the rapidly appreciating Australian dollar, which has priced the country's non-commodity exports out of global markets...
    [So Australia and Canada are demonstrating how some first-world economies become third-world. They sacrifice their present consumer base and future sustainability for one industry, their export industry, and not even for their whole export industry but just for their commodity exports. So, slipping consumer base, slipping sustainability, and now, daa dada daaaa, slipping non-commodity exports.]
    <



    Friday, November 9, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. If you are in danger of laying-off employees due to Hurricane Sandy: Tumblr.com
    ALBANY, N.Y., USA - 1. Enter employees into The Shared Work Program: The Shared Work program gives you an alternative to laying off full-time employees when you have to deal with temporary business downturns... Instead of cutting staff, you can reduce the number of hours of all employees or just a select group, and the employees would receive Shared Work Benefits to help offset the lower wages. Apply today at bit.ly/sharedworkprogram... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Moscow Zoo shortens working hours for winter, TheMoscowNews.com
    MOSCOW, Russian Federation - The Moscow Zoo is to shorten its working day by three hours starting from Nov. 13 for the winter season, the zoo's administration announced. Closing time is now 5 p.m., while entrances and ticket offices are to close one hour prior to that... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Seasonal hours adjustments instead of seasonal personnel adjustments, via firing +/- rehiring, ie: layoffs and unemployment = Timesizing not downsizing. The animals need the same amount of care anyway.]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Fast-food giants - Tim Hortons [in US too!] and McDonald's tighten their belts as customers scale back their spending, Toronto Globe, A1.
  • Let's not make a deal - How should Obama deal with an unchastened G.O.P.? op ed by Paul Krugman, New York Times, A27.
    [As curtly as possible while setting up the world's most modern, binding, auditable, thorough, issue-oriented public referendum system along the lines that Buckminster Fuller called for forty years ago or more.]
  • The Dow industrials fell for a second day, losing 121.41 points or o.9% to 12811.32..,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C4.
  • New pressure on fiscal crisis [=US national debt & budget deficit] - White House lawmakers try to push "ahead" [our quotes] amid new warnings over inaction, WSJ, A1.
  • Trump's [and the wealthy's in general] sad slide from finesse to farce, Ottawa Citizen, F1.



    Thursday, November 8, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Strapped EU Bosses Can Nix Vacation to Keep Jobs, Courthouse News Service via courthousenews.com
    LUXEMBOURG - Europe's highest court on Thursday upheld vacation-reduction agreements between struggling companies and unions. The dispute rose after German auto industry subcontractor Kaiser GmbH announced plans to lay off workers because of financial difficulties in 2009. To forestall the layoffs by a year, Kaiser and its union reached a deal that handed workers a "zero hours short-time working" plan, giving them a government unemployment allowance rather than a salary paid by Kaiser... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing not downsizing.]
  2. ECJ: Paid annual leave can be reduced for social plans, Europolitics.info
    PASSAU, Germany - An 8 November ruling by the EU Court of Justice concluded that the right to paid annual leave may be reduced proportionally to the reduction in working time agreed under a social plan. Answering a question brought to it by the Passau Labour Court, Germany, the ECJ said that the situation of an employee on a short-time working scheme (working time reduced as a result of an agreed social plan) is comparable to that of a part-time worker...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from Chaudière *Crown Plaza & *Couche-Tard, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Law firms SNR Denton [US-UK], Fraser Milner Casgrain [Canada] and Salans [France] are working on a three-way tie-up amid a spate of cross-border mergers in the industry, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B8.
    [Oh God yes, spread the toxic money-funneling far and wide so there are no prosperous economies to show what fools are setting policy in souring executive suites.]

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Boeing plans to cut executive jobs and consolidate several defense divisions, aiming to save $1.6 billion over the next two years, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
    [For what? So they can funnel it to the 16,000 richest households and keep it out of rapid circulation, for deeper recession?]
  • Activist investor Nelson Peltz has taken a 1% stake in Danone, the French yogurt maker, with plans to push for changes to boost efficiency, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [For what? So he can funnel more to himself and keep it out of rapid circulation, for deeper recession?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS(archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • More than two dozen companies [almost a third of total] in the past five years didn't disclose Chapter 11 bankruptcy preparations to investors [in advance], WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [So the Onepercent itself is fragmenting into whorls and vortices and eddies within eddies of corruption and mutual betrayal and thievery. They've broken faith with employees, act surprised when employees have no loyalty to them, and drop their jaws when the faithlessness creeps into their own "class."]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • The Dow Industrials slid 312.95 points or 2.4% to 12932.73 in the wake of the tumultuous U.S. election, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1,C2,C4.
    as Wall Street began to focus on the looming "fiscal cliff" while grappling with bad economic news out of Europe. Bank-stock investors were handed their biggest single-day loss in a year...
  • "Vital" signs - Americans cut back their credit-card use in September, WSJ, A1 graph caption pointer to A12.
    Revolving credit, which includes credit-card debt, dropped a seasonally adjusted $2.9 billion, or 4.1%, from August to $852 billion...
  • What happens next - In victory Obama seeks the seeds of solution - GOP hints of dealing to avert fiscal cliff, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Forget the GOP. They have no purchase and if they don't avoid falling over the fiscal cliff, they're screwing mostly themselves. Ram through wealth-taxing solutions on executive privilege and quit dreaming of a sane opposition party. The GOP is washed up, their policies nothing but Suicide, Everyone Else First - but we'll all enjoy watching them, suffering little but complaining much, when they hit the bottom of the fiscal cliff.]
  • The EU cut its growth outlook, forecasting deeper recessions in austerity-battered nations and lower growth in France and even Germany, A1 pointer to A16.
    [This is not forecasting deeper recessions. This is CAUSING deeper recessions with braindead austerity. You can't get growth alias upsizing by austerity alias downsizing. These high-paid morons don't have a grain of common sense. Even in Greece -]
  • Greece approves austerity measures amid rioting, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B8.
    Greek lawmakers narrowly approved a multibillion-euro austerity package in an effort to secure additional bailout funds, WSJ, A1 pointer to A16.
    [So to get more billions for their Onepercent, their wealthy investors, to hoard for bragging rights, Greek pols are driving their consumer spending and monetary circulation down to zero. This clutch of greasy geeks is creating their own lynch mob.]



    Wednesday, November 7, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Tombstone voters will pick city's mayor, Sierra Vista Herald via svherald.com
    TOMBSTONE, Ariz., USA - ...“The furloughs have allowed the city to continue operations without turning to employee lay-offs,” Schmidt said...- see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing not downsizing.]
  2. Bosch introduces further solar scale backs, PV Magazine via pv-magazine.com
    ARNSTADT, Germany - Bosch has announced shorter working hours for around 3,500 of its solar employees... Now it has been reported in German media, including the Stuttgarter Zeitung and RSP, that Bosch has introduced shorter working hours at several of its production locations. Meanwhile, production in Arnstadt, where 700 workers are employed, will be cut by 20% by the end of December. Shorter working hours have been in place there since October...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • France unveiled plans to cut labor costs [bad for currency circulation] & raise taxes on consumption [also bad for currency circulation], a set of measures that reneged on some of Hollande's promises, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A21.
    [Contemporary economists, whether right or left, are geniuses at creating recession.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Not everyone was happy to see political ads end - For voice-over actors [& political "advisors," & ad agencies & sign makers & newscasters &...&...] elections are paydays.., WSJ, A1.
    [= desperate private-sector makework at a time when employers themselves have regulated worktime to a rigid precomputer minimum of 40 hours a week per "full time" job.]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Republicans face struggle over party's direction, NYT, A1.
    [Quit struggling and just (1) get out of people's private lives (family planning, recreational drugs), (2) quit giving the private sector incentives to foster crime (privatized prisons), (3) get back to your most successful historic economic strategy (higher technology and lower workweeks) and (4) keep pushing for sustainable immigration (one out, one in). Simmmmplllle!]
  • Question for the victor: How far do you push [in your second term]?, NYT, A1.
    [Answer for the victor: Farther than Bush's 356(?) exploitations of executive privilege that dragged us down this far this fast - but in the opposite direction.]
    The President - Hope and history, NYT, A1 pointer to P1.
    Becoming the first African-American president has never been enough for Barack Obama. He has long aimed to be counted among the greatest presidents, a transformative figure who would heal the country's divisions.
    [= an inadequate, impossible and undesirable aim UNLESS it applies strictly to the country's disparities...in worktime per person, income per person, wealth per person, credit per person... - and those call for Timesizing and its successor programs... That is the easiest way to be counted among the country's greatest presidents, and lordknows there'll be plenty of risks and resistance on that path too. But Lincoln made it through, based on Preserving The Union and Abolishing Slavery. Teddy Roosevelt made it based on Leading The Rough Riders and Taming The Big Trusts. FDR made it based on Ending the Depression and the War. It can still be done, but there are an number of unsuccessful attempts to learn from: Wilson's, Hoover's, Truman's, Ike's, JFK's, LBJ's, Nixon's, Carter's, Reagan's, Clinton's, First-Term Obama's... But solving The Economic Problem in terms of Jobs for the 99% and Stable Investments for the 1% (which requires designing out an unsustainable concentration of the money supply!) is certainly the challenge of Obama's lifetime, and the dots-to-connect between them are Full Employment (without runaway inflation) and Maximum Consumer Spending (without environmental degradation). Timesizing & successors handle all these aspects.]
  • A group of Goldman executives recently pocketed a total of 21.8 million by cashing in stock options awarded in the afterglow of the firm's IPO, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein (photo caption)
    [Note pattern: Jewish last name plus ambitious parents = British first name.]
  • What's gone wrong with HP?.., WSJ, B1.
    [Dunno, but it all started with Carly Fiorina and her macho 15,000 layoff.]
  • The Northeast prepared for more harsh winter, even as the region scrambled to recover from superstorm Sandy, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
  • French banks try a [toxic] import from the U.S., WSJ, C1.
    ...packaging loans into securities to be sold to investors to boost profits...
    [with zero gain in productivity or jobs]
  • In France, an effort to "compete" [our quotes: toxic goal alert!] - A plan to cut payroll taxes by $25.6 billion in a 'cultural shift', NYT, B1.
    [Funny how so many of these cultural shifts merely wind up concentrating more of the money supply in the richest one percent where it is wasted. When the wealthy start attacking their "spending arm" = government, even the inefficient spending that government does diminishes, and/or the national debt dba 'fiscal cliff' rises higher. As we used to say about billions, "a trillion here, a trillion there and pretty soon you're talking serious money! Cutting payroll taxes will worsen France's situation unless they are replaced by overtime taxes on employers and overwork taxes on employees, with exemptions for reinvestment in OT/OW-targeted hiring in both cases (and training whenever needed).]



    Tuesday, November 6, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. ArcelorMittal cuts workweek at SBQ mill, American Metal Market via amm.com
    EAST CHICAGO, Ind., USA — Responding to market conditions, ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor has placed about 155 hourly employees on a 32-hour workweek... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing not downsizing.]
  2. A part-time, low-wage epidemic - The jobs gained recently by the U.S. economy are disproportionately low-paying, insecure ones, opinion by chairman & editor Mortimer Zuckerman of U.S. News & World Report, Wall Street Journal, A15.
    [It's a miracle! A sane article on the WSJ editorial/opinion pages!]
    WASHINGTON, D.C., USA - As Americans head to the polls, they face a disastrous new normal: For the first time, the U.S. economy has shifted in the direction of a part-time, low-wage workforce. The number of Americans now working part time has soared to 8.3 million—up 313,000 in the past two months alone. With economic growth declining or stagnant for quarter after quarter, many companies feel it is too risky to take on people full time.
    [All together now: "Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way."]
    This has created an army [Marx's word!] of "underutilized labor." America's narrow unemployment rate is 7.9%, but it is 14.6% when accounting for involuntary part-time workers... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And RIGHT THERE we have the mechanism by which our money supplies are being concentrated and decelerated and decirculated and deactivated, without limit, in a small population that soon acquires way way more than it spends, way more than it donates and even more than it quickly reinvests and "gets right back to work creating jobs" despite using this constantly as their self-justification = that is, the mechanism by which THE WEALTHY THEMSELVES CREATE RECESSION.]
  3. France Braces for Review Urging 'Shock' Reforms, CNBC.com
    PARIS, France - ...Employees in the rest of Europe often look on in wonder at France, with its enshrined 35-hour working week, and a recent move to lower the retirement age to 60, for some, as the rest of the continent gloomily eyes an ever-increasing pensionable age... - see whole article under today's date.
    [France is leading the world with the shortest official workweek, and give me a break, 35 hours is not that short considering the U.S. Senate passed a 30-hour workweek in 1933 and some of our most conservative industries had 35-hour workweeks back in the 1960s (insurance, academe...). A frozen workweek in the age of robotics is a ticket to floods of desperate resumes, falling wages and consumer spending, transferring the entire money supply to the richest onepercent, and complete economic shutdown. The French are going to complain no matter how good they have it, but their language sounds so nice, who cares?]
  4. I'm all for switch-off week, BelfastTelegraph.co.uk
    BELFAST, Northern Ireland - National Prune Week (I think that's about promoting the fruit, not highlighting wrinkly faces), Take Your Daughter To Work week, Take The Bus To Work week, Take A Week-Off Work week... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • largest economy, USA, faces a new normal, for the first time shifting in the direction of a "part"-time workforce
    [meaning we should definitely be redefining "full" time downwards to suit (& benefit from) our automating & robotizing economy]
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs&*consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Drop in financial deals spurs one, Wall Street Journal, C1 target article.
    Stifel Financial a-greed to acquire [for $575m] smaller rival KBW, a financial-services merger adviser whose business has been hurt by a drop in bank deals, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [What goes around comes around.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS(archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Bankruptcy for U.S. Suzuki unit [American Suzuki Motor Corp...Chapter 11], NYT, B3.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Service sector growth eases, NYT, B8.
    ...Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its service index eased to 54.2 last month from 55.1 in September...
  • Proposition 13 is the real villain, letter to editor by Daniel Lynch of Los Angeles, WSJ, A16.
    ...That 1978 [California state] constitutional amendment sests the maximum property tax rate at 1% and limits assessed property value increases to no more than 2% per year...
    [Wasn't this the one that picked up on "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it any more!" in the 1976 movie "Network"? This letterwriter wants to leave it to Calif. state legislators.]
  • Banks fall behind - Global financial reform efforts are behind schedule, regulators said as they gave the biggest banks extra time to write "living wills", Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.4.
    [Living wills for the living dead = zombie banks? - and a week after Hallowe'en?!]
  • IMF warns France to reform its economy or trail Italy and Spain, Financial Times, p.1.
    [Like Typhoid Mary IMF would know anything about economic sustainability! Evidence? - see preceding headline.]
  • Spanish battle misery - For millions of Spaniards, the country's recession is a fact of daily life, reflected in crushing personal debt, slipped mortgage payments and the threat of eviction, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.4.
    [Sounds like USA, but we have better media control here. Good lord {Brit accent}, we're not suggesting censorship, Heavens No! ... merely shouting the smallest goodnews and whispering the biggest badnews...]



    Sun.-Mon, November 4-5, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. CTA unions trade work-rule changes for no-layoff guarantee, 11/05 Chicago Sun-Times via suntimes.com
    CHICAGO, Illin., USA - ...And a so-called “work sharing” agreement will allow different trade unions to work together on projects, without regard to union jurisdiction. In exchange, members of a dozen trade unions get a five-year job guarantee. There will be no layoffs for the duration of the contract... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Resisting the crisis: short-time work in Germany, 11/05 Emerald International Journal of Manpower Vol.33, Issue 8 via emeraldinsight.com
    NUREMBERG, Germany - ...In the multivariate analyses with the IAB Establishment Panel, the paper aims to identify the determinants of short-time work and its intensity in Germany. Thus its goal is to contribute to the discussion of the modified and amended legislative framework for short-time work... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Ambiguity prevails over working hours of teachers, 11/04 IndianExpress.com
    [Or rather, resistance prevails over longer hours for teachers - the French aren't the only ones rightly resisting ludicrous longer hours during the age of robotics = an economy-killing combo.]
    AHMEDABAD, Gujarat State, India - Govt had issued a notification in February 2011 to increase working hours from six to eight... This was met with strong opposition from the teaching community. Result: The decision supposed to be implemented from the 2011-12 academic session continues to be suspended... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Meanwhile in Afghanistan, it's going the opposite way. An intelligent shorter hours law is getting ignored by longer-hours workers, but not by the workers themselves cuz they're just kids -]
  4. Nearly 1900 children doing hard labour in Torkham, 11/04 RAWA News via rawa.org
    TORKHAM, Nangarhar Prov., Afghanistan - ...Under the labour law, a child should not work more than 35 hours a week, but they toil more than 14 hours a day, he said. “Our minors are doing hard labour, in addition to being insulted and beaten.”... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs & *consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Book looks at those whose 'retirement' plans include work, 11/04 Boston Globe, G5.
    [which virtually means all young people in the 99% who aren't vesting in government pensions in capital cities - and even they....]
    .... "Great Jobs for Everyone 50+: Finding work that keeps you happy and healthy...and pays the bills," \by\ Kerry Hannon ....
    [And how long a job search would that take?]

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Tens of thousands were left homeless by hurricane Sandy..., 11/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    [And another angle -]
    Hurricane Sandy = title on sign floating sideways down center, editorial cartoon by Matt Davies, 11/05 Boston Globe, A10.
    On left side of frame, partially submerged telephone poles, tree, and a semi-sunk billboard proclaiming: "Climate change legislation: Bad For Business"
    On right side of frame, partially submerged building is labelled: "BUSINESS," with stranded businessman standing on roof.
    [And another -]
    Much of Haiti's agriculture was destroyed by Sandy, putting a million and a half people at risk of hunger,
    11/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to A11.
    [Like they weren't before?]

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Health law spurs shift in hours - Some low-wage employers seek to avoid overhaul's insurance requirements with more part-timers, 11/05 WSJ, B1 target article.
    Some low-wage employers are moving toward hiring part-time workers instead of full-time ones, 11/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    ...to mitigate the health-care overhaul's requirement that large companies provide health insurance for full-time workers or pay a fee
    [So shorter hours are happening anyway - but not the best way.]
  • Wall Street pay will rise in 2012 from last year's levels...,
    11/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
  • G-20 financial ministers plan to warn of dangers facing the world economy, including the euro-zone debt crisis and the U.S. "fiscal cliff", 11/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to A14.
    [Like we need them to tell us.]
  • Flex jobs can be found in bad economy, 11/04 Boston Globe, G2.
    [Oh yeah? Again, after how long a search?]
  • Even with fiscal cliff concerns, balance is key to investing, 11/04 Boston Globe, G3.
    [Oh yeah? What does individual investor balance matter in an economic edifice that is tipping over a cliff, especially when it's the grotesque surplus of coagulated investing power that's created the cliff and doing the tipping?!]
  • China slowdown - Weak demand for Chinese exports was evident at the Canton Fair, China's largest industrial bazaar, 11/05 Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.13.



    Saturday, November 3, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Reform of short-time working procedures, Meritas.com
    PARIS, France - ...The statutory short-time working allowance (allocation spécifique de chômage partiel) paid by the French state amounts to €3.84 per hour not worked - below 35 hours per week - per employee. This amount is reduced to €3.33 in companies employing more than 250 employees.The statutory short-time working allowance (allocation spécifique de chômage partiel) paid by the French state amounts to €3.84 per hour not worked - below 35 hours per week - per employee. This amount is reduced to €3.33 in companies employing more than 250 employees... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Vallejo teachers demonstrate for Proposition 30 on furlough day, Vallejo Times-Herald via timesheraldonline.com
    VALLEJO, Calif., USA - Motorists honked and cheered Vallejo teachers on Friday as they demonstrated during the district's second consecutive furlough day... Vallejo City Unified School District campuses were shut down Thursday and Friday during the first two of five negotiated furlough days this school year. The agreement was part of the district's effort to plug a $5.7 million deficit caused by ever-decreasing state funding... The teachers were encouraging the passage of Proposition 30, Gov. Jerry Brown's measure on Tuesday's ballot that would maintain education funding by raising income tax on the wealthiest Californians and the state sales tax for everybody... The furlough days -- often called "paycut days" by teachers -- also reduce the school year and instruction time... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And also save teaching positions - or would they prefer jobcuts instead of hourcuts?]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs & *consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Blue-chip stocks gave back most of the week's gains - the Dow lost 139.46 points, or 1%, Friday, to 13093.16, WSJ, A1 pointer to B5.
  • Labor market inches forward [or just backward & forward?] - In final pre-election count, nation adds 171,000 jobs in October amid lackluster economic recovery, WSJ, A1.
    [They've stopped mentioning we need 300,000 just to keep up with population growth.]
    October's report[ed] unemployment edged up [to 7.9%] as more sought work...but jobs were added at a faster rate (graph caption)
    [Part-time jobs at lower pay?]
    Jobs are growing, not stagnating - The trend in unemployment is promising, but the politics [and economics] of job creation remain clouded, editorial, NYT, A22.
    [Then how can they possibly know jobs aren't actually continuing to shrink?]
  • In New York City's public housing, the fear creeps in with the dark,
    New York Times, A1.
  • Japan may avoid its own 'fiscal cliff,' as lawmakers opened talks on a bill lifting the country's debt ceiling, WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.
    [Raising the debt ceiling does not avoid the cliff - just postpones and worsens it.]



    Friday, November 2, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Stock Market Today: U.S. Economic Calendar Event Update - Nov 2, Stock Market News via TveNews.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y., USA - ...Average Workweek for Oct are scheduled to be released at 8:30 AM. Analysts are estimating a result of 34.5. The prior period for Average Workweek had a result of 34.5. This event has a major effect on US markets... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. German public services trade union Verdi agrees to wage cuts, World Socialist Web Site via wsws.org
    BERLIN, Germany - ...In 2007 Praktiker took over its competitor, Max Bahr, and simultaneously expanded into Eastern Europe. When profits failed to live up to shareholder expectations, the company was the first German retail company to introduce short-time working for its staff...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs & *consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-reversing DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Martha Stewart Living [Commodities] plans to stop stand-alone production of two of its four magazines and lay off 12% [70] of its nearly 600-person staff, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C3.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • Tax report withdrawn at request of G.O.P. - A nonpartisan study appears to undermine a Republican tenet, by Jonathan Weisman, New York Times, B1.
    A Congressional Research Service has withdrawn an economic report that found no correlation between top tax rates and economic growth, [vs.] a central tenet of conservative economic theory, after Senate Republicans raised concerns about the paper's findings and working...
    [But try as they might, money-hoarding tax-shedding Republicans' deadly effect on the economy is leaking out -]
  • Economic data show more growth under Democrats than GOP, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    Taking stock of past races - Despite a view that the GOP is the party of prosperity, Democratic administrations have produced more economic growth, according to a new analysis, Boston Globe, B7 target article.
    ...Median GDP growth since 1949 [photos title]
    Democratic administrations 4.2% [photos of Truman, JFK, Johnson, Carter, Clinton, Obama]
    Republican administrations 2.6% [photos of Ike, Nixon, Ford, Reagan, Bush CIA, Bush 9/11]...
    ...Stock market results by party, 1913-2012...
    Democratic administrations 12.1%
    Republican administrations 5.1%.\.
    (Obama administration 12.3%)
    ...Annual increase in corporate earnings, 1936-2012
    Democratic administrations 10.5%
    Republican administrations 8.9%.\.
    (Obama administration 51.8%)...
    [Republicans are experts at killing the goose that lays the golden eggs. How? By trying to grab it all. And the more they succeed, the less the currency circulates furiously among the hundreds of millions and the more it pools lethargically among the hundreds of thousands. Democrats don't know much about how the economy works, but Republicans these days know absolutely nothing. Both parties would be long gone if they hadn't passed protectionist anti-fusion laws against new party entrants in the 1890s.]
  • Jobless and hopeless in America - Lingering unemployment poses a long-term economic risk, NYT, B1.
    [It's not lingering. It's becoming more but getting counted less.]
    Staying out of work longer - The amount of time that people remain unemployed has been hovering around 40 weeks, the longest stretch recorded since at least 1948. (Graph caption)
  • A jobs report with many interpretations, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [...most of them wishful thinking by cheerleaders.]
  • The junk is back in junk bonds - As institutional investors pull back, individual investors need more warning and protection, editorial, NYT, A24.
  • Jobless total in bloc hits high [EU 11.6% in Sept. from 11.5 in Aug.], Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.7.
  • Forecasts dash hopes for Greek debt goals, Financial Times, p.1.
  • ...Italy risks a 'vicious circle' of weak growth and lack of confidence, the governor of the bank of Italy warned as unemployment rose to its highest level for 13 years, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.6.



    Thursday, November 1, 2012, as the light dawns that today's Great Depression Revisited is not just a 'stumbling recovery' after a mere 'recession,' we first bring you the small beginnings of a real recovery (but see doom du jour below in case you still think current re-coverup is real re-covery) -

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting scifi novels or plays within shorter-hours scenarios, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Ayrault flip-flops over 35-hour week - News Headlines, The Riviera Reporter via forum.rivierareporter.com
    PARIS, France - French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault stirred up a hornet's nest on Tuesday when he called for the scrapping of the 35-hour week, a landmark economic experiment adopted by a previous socialist government... The gaffe-prone premier startled the French by saying the once untouchable 35-hour working week may be reconsidered as France battles to boost competitiveness and kickstart its struggling economy. (The Local) - see whole article under today's date.
    [Kickstarting your export industry as "competitive" in a downward race to the bottom where China dwells, is the OPPOSITE of kickstarting your whole economy upward toward prosperity, which takes a MAXIMUM of well-employed people and confident consumer-spenders, however short a workweek that may require. Why is this so hard to grasp? (Why did it take me this long to come up with this dropdead obvious articulation that they were opposites?)]
  2. Attack on the 35-hour week may mean French PM not working at all - Jean-Marc Ayrault plunges government into crisis by challenging Socialist article of faith, (10/31 late pickup) One News Page via The London Independent via independent.co.uk
    PARIS, France - ...Government sources suggest Mr Ayrault had been trying to appear like a reasonable and open-minded man. There was no question of repealing the 35-hour week, which remains broadly popular with both middle- and working-class voters... - see whole article under today's date.
    [What's reasonable and open-minded about working longer and harder as you roll automation and robots into your economy?]
  3. BONUS update - Recent developments on timesizing path to real recovery, by Phil Hyde, Timesizing.com
    • 5th-largest economy, Germany, saved by cutting hours (Kurzarbeit), not jobs & *consumer spending & markets
    • 6th-largest economy, France, saved by electing 35-Hours-friendly Hollande & dumping workaholic dinoSaurcozy
    • 9th-largest economy, California, moving to one furlough day a month to avoid layoffs
    • Michigan and Ohio getting state-level worksharing = cutting hours, not jobs&mkts, giving us 50% of the states
    • US Postal Service recently saved by cutting hours, not locations, as in 1932 when cut from 48 to 44 hrs/wk
    • SWT (shorter worktime/person) has advocate with econ PhD in DC: Dean Baker - publicizes Kurzarbeit constantly
    • SWT has 2nd econ PhD in DC: American Enterprise Institute's Kevin Hassett - forms bipartisan team with Dean Baker
    • SWT has 3rd econ PhD in DC: EEOC's Bob LaJeunesse, penned "Worktime Regulation as Full Employment Strategy" in 2009
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and *vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour above) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Porter Sq. Books in Cambridge MA & updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • PVH a-greed to acquire Warnaco in a $2.9 billion deal.., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.

    spreading RECESSION (archives) tho' officially defined-away by media ownership by the 0.01%, who violate system requirements in coagulating ever more of the money supply, constantly expanding the already oversized "crow's nest" (financial sector) and tearing planks off the "hull" (consumer base) to do it - historically solved by plaguetime- or wartime-prosperity (if only modern war could kill off the wage&spending-sinking surplus of jobseekers), or the intelligent way, timesizing -
  • ...The Dow industrials closed the session down 10.75 points [or 0.1% to 13096.46],
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
  • GM posted a 13% drop in profit on Europe woes and weaker earnings in North America.., WSJ, A1 pointer to B4.
    [And "as goes GM, so goes America"?]
  • Barclays faced a double-barreled assault from U.S. authorities, as the federal energy-market regulator sought a record $435 million in penalties for the bank's alleged manipulation of U.S. electricity markets, and the lender disclosed that it faces a U.S. anticorruption probe, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Americans are increasingly asking their banks for mortgages but banks are wary of lending money to buy homes, a Fed survey shows, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Same ever since the financial collapse of 2008, regardless of $700B bailout forced from taxpayers. So more collapses coming.]