Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
April, 2012

[Commentary] ©2012 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in writing a scifi novel or play set in a shorter-hours scenario, 617-620-6851 x.Phil Hyde)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. New Venezuelan Labor Law reduces working hours - Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez specified that a maximum term of one year would be given for all companies to fit, 4/30 El Universal via eluniversal.com
    CARACAS, Venezuela - Venezuela's President Hugo Chávez on Monday announced the shrinkage of working hours from 44 to 40 hours a week, upon the entry into force of the Labor Organic Law.
    [Just like South Korea in seven steps by company size, largest first, from 2004 to 2011, and just like the USA in two steps, two hours at a time, from 1938 to 1940.]
    He specified that a maximum term of one year would be set so that companies can make the appropriate adjustments. Under a legally binding provision, employees will continue to have two days of weekend leave... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Ernest Callenbach, 'Ecotopia' author, dies, 4/30 San Francisco Chronicle via sfgate.com
    BERKELEY, Calif. - ...The workweek is 20 hours. Marijuana is legal. Energy is solar, food is organic and locally grown, and every home and restaurant has recycling bins. The head of state is a woman. It is "the way I would like to live if I could," the author told NBC News in a 1989 interview... "Ecotopia" was rejected by about 25 publishers... - see whole article under today's date.
    [A 20-hour workweek? Just what Arthur Dahlberg was calling for in 1932 ("Jobs, Machines and Capitalism") while the Technocrats were calling for four 4-hour days and the U.S. Senate was about to pass a 30-hour workweek. Note that Timesizing.com offers free consulting to any writers who want to write a novel or play set in a shorter-hours scenario: email Phil Hyde at ecdesignr@yahoo.ca  - So how's the U.S. doin' on this mainline of progress? Not so hot, according to our next story -]
  3. Talk to boss about burnout, 4/29 (4/28 late pickup) Hire Standards via AZcentral.com
    PHOENIX, Ariz. - When I was hired as a restaurant manager, my salary was based on a 40-hour, Monday-Friday workweek. It has been more than four months, and I have been working 55 hours a week plus helping with events on the weekends. I don't mind the hard work, but I'm getting burned out. Is there anything I can do?... - see whole article under today's date.
    [On the other hand, there are some shorter-hours situations, but the ones in our next story are still regarded as part time instead of downward-adjusted full time, and they're in government so they're resented -]
  4. Full salaries for Albany part-timers makes for gross pay - Six-figure salaries for Skelos advisers, 4/30 New York Daily News via nydailynews.com
    ALBANY, N.Y. - ...Most of the 271 total are year-round “part-timers” who still qualify for salaries and benefits that top those of many full-timers in the private sector. Others are considered full-time, but work just 30 hours a week. Only one has a six-figure salary: Marc Kronenberg, who earns $107,703 a year as Brooklyn Democratic Assemblyman Dov Hikind’s chief of staff; he is required to work 30 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Hollande offers tax hikes and 35-hour week to promote growth, DigitalJournal.com
    PARIS, France - ...Hollande says he would like to bring back the 35-hour work week and roll back pension cut backs at a time when the whole region and most of the world is attempting to increase productivity... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Increasing productivity while weakening markets for it is pointless - as is expecting exports to compensate when other economies are following the same consumption-clobbering policies - also, decrements in the workweek tend to produce increases rather than decreases in productivity anyway, probably because of the "dawn" of the practice of prioritization.]
  2. The Next Pension Crisis - Union plans are taking on water fast, The Weekly Standard via weeklystandard.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...In late March, the union forced the paper to drop its proposal to extend the workweek at the Times to 40 hours—any work over 35 hours and the paper has to pay overtime... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 11-30 hours per week optimal for cancer workers, OncologyUpdate.com.au
    BRISBANE, Queens., Australia - Cancer workers who have 11 to 30 hours of direct patient care per week are the happiest, a Queensland survey shows. The first reported cross sectional study to investigate the subjective well-being (SWB) of cancer workers found workers with less than 10 hours of direct patient contact had the lowest levels of SWB... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Nurses demand abolition of overtime loophole, Focus Taiwan News Channel via focustaiwan.tw
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - A group of nurses protested outside the Council of Labor Affairs Friday against harsh working conditions, demanding the abolition of an article of the labor law that means medical staffers can be made to work long hours of overtime. Wang Yun-hsu, a member of the preparatory group for the Taiwan Radical Nurses Union, urged the government to abolish Article 84-1 of the Labor Standards Act, which effectively makes long hours of overtime legal... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Postal rescue passes Senate, Wall Street Journal, A2.
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Senate approved a bill that would avert closings of post offices and distribution centers for two years and continue Saturday mail delivery. It also would trigger early retirement for as many as 100,000 postal workers, as part of a plan to save $20 billion a year at the financially distressed U.S. Postal Service... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= saving jobs by sacrificing worktime per person, though work life cuts à la early retirement aren't nearly as effective as work week cuts.]
  2. Loy Yang power workers prepared to strike, ABC Online via abc.net.au
    LATROBE VALLEY, Vic., Australia - ...The Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union says workers at the Loy Yang A power station, in Victoria's south-east, are seeking a 35-hour week, in line with the industry standard... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The agenda - Evan Soltas on Kurzarbeit and the Changing Sector Composition of the US Economy, National Review Online (conservative blog) via nationalreview.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - We’ve often discussed kurzarbeit — Germany’s short-term work initiative designed to mitigate rising unemployment — in this space, and I’ve endorsed pursuing a similar strategy of channeling resources into keeping workers engaged that would otherwise go to unemployment benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The Galling Misuse Of The German Example, The New Republic (liberal blog) via tnr.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The Germans did not implement a giant stimulus package, equivalent to our own $787 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. That’s because they had in place a massive Keynesian[??] program of a different sort, one that was, it’s now clear, far more effective in providing counter-cyclical stimulus than anything we or other Western countries tried. Namely, kurzarbeit, or “short work,” a work-sharing program under which the government subsidized private employers to keep workers on the rolls, typically at reduced hours but only slightly reduced pay, rather than laying them off. ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Since when has worksharing been Keynesian? Keynes was unfortunately into makework, not sharework. If he had been into shared work, we'd all be A LOT better off by now!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Ron Paul Solves Jobs Crisis - 4-Day Work-Week! TheSpoof.com (satire)
    DETROIT, Mich. - In a flash of insight he calls divine inspiration, presidential hopeful Ron Paul singlehandedly discovered the solution to the nation's current job crisis: scaling down the work-week from five days to four. "It's so obvious!" exclaimed Paul to joyful supporters in Detroit, Michigan. "In fact, it's incredible no one's thought of it before. We'll have more than enough jobs if people work only four days a week."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [ Just like we thought the idea of men flying was - let alone men standing on the Moon. Just like we'd have thought about the idea that people would walk or ride around with the ability to talk to one another no matter how far apart and have things in their ears that let them choose from thousands of different musicians to listen to. But all these "ridiculous" things are now reality.]
  2. Mayor proposes more money for schools, Richmond Times Dispatch via www2.timesdispatch.com
    RICHMOND, Va. - ...In an address to the City Council, Jones rejected two major task-force recommendations: eliminating health benefits for the school system's pre-Medicare retirees and implementing a three-day furlough for all school employees. That would have saved about $5.1 million, Jones said. "The task force did exactly what I asked them to do in their first short-term phase. They identified the efficiencies and strategies without harming the classroom," Jones said. "[But] I have scrubbed the numbers on the city government budget and have a plan for how we can find an added $5.1 million."... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A Nation Overworked: Abandoning Happiness and Health for Paychecks: PART 1, 4/22 WashingtonTimes.com
    LANSING, Mich. - ...European countries such as Germany, Norway, and the Netherlands boast the lowest average work hours per week, working just 27 hours per week. In Denmark and Sweden , the average work week is just 31 hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Researcher suggests: 35-hour workweek [maximum] for parents, 4/23 EurekAlert.org
    GOTHENBURG, Sweden - ...Personally, I'd like to see a voluntary 35-hour workweek for parents of small children... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - Sarcozy fights for survival, 4/23 WSJ, A1.
    PARIS, France - Hollande wins first presidential round, putting euro-zone pact in question
    [A double win - The world's first nationwide 35-hour workweek in France is getting closer to restoration and protection, and shorter-hours, high-quality-of-life, northern Europe is getting farther from getting flushed down the toilet of financially corrupt, tax-evading southern Europe.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 21 LEUSD Jobs Saved Under Tentative Agreement - Friday’s news comes less than 24 hours after the LEUSD governing board voted to approve layoffs for 73 district employees, Patch.com via http://lakeelsinore-wildomar.patch.com
    LAKE ELSINORE, Calif. - ...Friday’s news comes less than 24 hours after the Lake Elsinore Unified School District governing board voted to approve layoffs for 73 district employees. With today’s tentative agreement, however, 21 of those pink slips will not be handed out... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Voting for yesterday in France - The candidates and the citizens agree: Repeal the 21st century, op ed by Olivier Guez, NYT, A19.
    [Another European who has zero clue what Europe is doing right.  Better France should vote for "yesterday" when unemployment was 8.6% (spring 2001) before the U.S. recession hit France and Sarcozy started weakening the 35-hour workweek, than voting for "the day before yesterday" (1997) when France still had a 39-hour workweek and unemployment was 12.6%, or voting for a century and a half before yesterday when like everyone else, France had unregulated workweeks, tons of wasted consumers with no jobs or earnings or spending power, and beaucoup d'unmarketable productivity and unstable investment.]
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...The French [dislike of] the 21st century...has its roots in...the rejection, by other European nations, of building a Europe à la française — France on a bigger scale... - see whole article under today's date.
    [On the contrary, France entered the 21st century leading the world with the lowest nationwide workweek - the ONLY nation that realized you couldn't stay at 40 hours a week forever into the age of automation and robotization. And this can't-see-the-obvious commentator has apparently completely missed the fact that all the successful economies of Europe - all of whom have shortened worktime per person, including longer vacations and shorter workweeks - have followed France's lead - including powerhouse Germany with Kurzarbeit. Yet so blind are European leaders (and commentators) that both Sarcozy and Merkel criticize 35 hours and praise Kurzarbeit as if they aren't the same thing in different packages.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 'Doomsday budget' has Prince George's school officials considering cuts, Maryland Community News Online via Gazette.Net
    PRINCE GEORGE, Mryld. - ...Matthew Stanski, chief financial officer for the county school system, said his staff is working on various possibilities, including cuts to programs, and employee layoffs and furloughs, that could realize $51 million in cuts. Each systemwide furlough day saves about $5 million, officials have said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Authorised January lay-off working hours fall slightly, Agenzia Giornalistica Italia via agi.it
    ROME, Italy - INPS says authorised lay-off working hours fell slightly in January to just over 20 million. This corresponds to 37.08% of the almost 55 million hours authorised for the period. This is slightly down on January 2011 (when over 21 million hours were taken up, as against an authorised 60 million), and significantly down on January 2010, when 31 million out of a possible 80.5 million hours were used... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Commentary: China can’t save Europe. Only Europeans can - Outside help no solution to euro zone troubles, MarketWatch.com
    [Especially outside help from China where no labor standards make life not worth living -]
    BEIJING, China - ...For example, if a worker labors 20 hours a day continuously, something is wrong. Hence, there should be some regulation on maximum overtime. What should that limit should be? A law that doesn’t permit overtime, i.e., a 40-hour maximum work week, is obviously bad policy.
    [Not so obviously if it converts overtime into overtime-targeted training and jobs.]
    Many professions like medicine and retail inherently require longer working hours.
    [This guy has never heard about shifts?]
    Indeed, working hours should best be left to the market to decide, as long as workers are not coerced... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Germany, the miraculous machine - Europe's largest economy is a study in how to contain a crisis, Financial Times via ft.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - Encouraged by subsidies for Kurzarbeit, or short-time working, companies instead hoarded labour. As a result, domestic demand remained stable, allowing a quick rebound... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - French election, National Post, A1 pointer to A11.
    Defections latest setback for struggling Sarcozy
    [Let's get this enemy of the 35-hour workweek all nice and cozy in a political sarcophagus.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work sharing: The way for states to reduce unemployment in the US - Individual US states should implement a 'work sharing' policy of reducing worker hours rather than laying them off, Aljazeera.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Work sharing, formally known as "short work", is an arrangement whereby employers reduce the hours of their existing work force instead of laying off workers. For example, if an employer was going to lay off 10 workers, she can instead have the same reduction in labour time by reducing the hours of 50 workers by 20%... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Indio employees agree to more furlough to avoid massive lay-offs, The Desert Sun via mydesert.com
    INDIO, Calif. - City employees are doing their part to help the city balance its budget and avoid massive lay-offs. Members of the Service Employees International Union have agreed to continue furloughs for a third year, among other concessions, to help the city save almost $150,000... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Part-time Britain hits record high as unemployment falls, Telegraph.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - ...The number of people being forced to work shorter hours because they could not find full-time jobs has surged by 89,000 between Dec. and Jan. to reach 1.4m, the highest figures since comparable records began in 1992... Women bore the brunt of joblessness, with an extra 8,000 becoming unemployed in the three months to Feb., reaching 1.14m - the highest figure in 25 years... The figures cast doubt over government claims the labour market is recovering and on the right track, experts said... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, April 17, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Chaudière Holiday Inn & Couche-Tard - updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Old Age Security at 67: Too little, too late, National Post, FP11.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Military orders up in fiscal 2012: CAE International, National Post, FP4.
    ...flight simulator maker...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Wall Street wavers, Toronto Globe, B15.
    The DJIA rose on...retail sales data, but a 4.2% drop in Apple's share price pulled other major benchmarks into the red.
    Rally in U.S. retail stocks built on shaky foundation - Likely won't last, National Post, FP7.
    [Ya don't say!]
  • Bay Street stumbles, Toronto Globe [= "Bay St. Journal"], B15.
    ...finished just short of flat...
    Slumping miners drag down Toronto Stock Exchange,
    National Post, FP8.
  • Spain, Italy slide further into eurozone crisis, National Post, FP2.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Why not reduce work week? Toronto Star, A20 & via thestar.com
    OAKVILLE, Ont., Canada - It is very surprising that while cutbacks by the federal and provincial governments will result in thousands of lost good jobs, neither the governments nor unions are considering the simple concept of a reduced work week to avoid layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Even though Harper has been boasting about "his" worksharing program to do just that. So much for his sincerity.]
  2. Report: More employees taking their boss to court over work hours - Lawsuits over wage-and-hour laws up 32%,
    USA Today via WDIV Detroit via clickondetroit.com
    DETROIT, Mich. - You are not alone! According to a report in the USA Today, more workers nationwide are taking their employers to court over what they consider violations of wage-and-hour laws. The report says those types of lawsuits are up 32% compared to 2008... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Parents, students and teachers plead for reprieve from North Portland's Humboldt, Tubman schools closure, OregonLive.com
    HUMBOLDT, Ore. - ...School Board member Bobbie Regan said instead of layoffs, $1.4 million could be saved each day if teachers were furloughed. A seven day furlough for teachers and 10 days for central administrative staff would fill most of this year's budget gap... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, April 15-16, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Chaudière Holiday Inn & Couche-Tard - updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • When looking at retirement, don't plan on dying young [cuz retirement's getting more & more delayed],
    4/15 Boston Globe, G1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Questions arise from the world of university research, by Gwyn Morgan, Toronto Globe, B11.
    Canadian universities spend $10-billion annually on research. The federal government [ie: Canadian taxpayers] is the largest "external" funder of that research at $3 billion, but the bulk of trhe financing comes from provincial taxpayers who pay the salaries of professors, many of whom devote much of their time to research...
    [And many of whom don't. Not that research (or anything else) justifies a blank cheque on taxpayers.]

    JOB- OR JOBLOSS- RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • In downturn, suicides rising, 4/15 NY Times, A1 pointer to A6.
    In European countries like Greece, Ireland and Italy, "suicide by economic crisis" has increased among small-business owners and entrepreneurs.
    Increasingly, suicide 'by economic crisis' is a symptom of downturn in Europe, by Elisabetta Polvoledo in Treviso & Doreen Carvajal in Lahardane Eire, 4/15 NY Times, A6 target article.
    ...In Greece, the suicide rate among men increased more than 24% from 2007 to 2009, government statistics show.
    In Ireland during the same period, suicides among men rose more than 16%.
    In Italy, suicides motivated by economic difficulties have increased 52%, to 187 in 2010 - the most recent year for which statistics are available - from 123 in 2005.
    Researchers say the trend has intensified this year as government austerity measures took hold and compounded the hardships for many.
    While suicides has many complex causes, researchers have found that severe economic stress corresponds to higher suicide rates...
    [Note Krugman's 4/16 article mentioned below, "Europe's economic suicide."]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The market bears emerge from their lairs, [ <- pome ]
    Toronto Globe [= "The Bay Street Journal"], B8.
  • White House opens doors to big donors, and lobbyists slip in, 4/15 NY Times, A1.
    [So the cybernetics of the US system is still losing feedback.]
  • Income inequality [or more actionably, money-supply coagulation] - Taxing the rich is hardly akin to 'ethnic cleansing', column by Barrie McKenna bmckenna@globeandmail.com, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [It's more akin to conscience cleansing and economy re-activating.]
  • Waiting for the age of abundance, op ed by Neil Reynolds reynolds.globe@gmail.com, Toronto Globe, A13.
    [It ain't gonna happen as long as unlimited "abundance" can be stuffed into the landed estates and gated communities of an unlimitedly small population. And the easiest variable to start with in terms of spreading the abundance is market-demanded employment via a resumption of 1840-1940 workweek reduction. This naive op ed writer completely ignores the fact that we've already got unbelievable abundance right now, but it's essentially out of play, crushed into the hands not only of the top 1%, but much more so into the hands of the top 0.01%. When is this nitwit going to wise up to the sine-qua-non centrifugation-distribution issue? He has bought the B.S. of technological salvation, ignoring the lethal concentration of technology's benefits when we're downsizing in response to technology instead of timesizing. He has bought the B.S. of "wealthy technophilanthropists," ignoring the fact that the wealthy give away a much smaller percentage of their money than the poor, and ignoring the fact that the American wealthy are getting so nervous, they're talking about "the (Warren) Buffett tax" = a minimum tax on the rich -]
    Millionaires from Massachusetts join call to raise their tax rates, 4/15 Boston Globe, A1.
    ...*Patriotic Millionaires for Fiscal Strength...
    As part of his effort to give back, Philipped Villers has made an unusual request to the federal government: Raise my taxes, please...
    “I don’t want to be a rich guy in a second-rate country,’’ he said...
    [You already are, pal, but today's first-rate countries are keeping their mouths shut cuz we're such first-rate jealous bullies and we're still first-rate in carefully-cooked-to-make-&-keep-us-looking-first Gross Domestic Product, with emphasis on the Gross and quotes around the Product: quantity YES (quality externalized).]
    Hiatt echoed Paul Egerman’s sentiment, saying, “It is a myth that rich people create jobs. Good executives create jobs.’’...
  • 'On the ground, things have become a little less certain again': [Bank of Canada governor Mark] Carney,
    Toronto Globe, inside header, B11.
  • Europe's economic suicide - Trying for a second Great Depression, op ed by Paul Krugman, NY Times, A17.
    [by austerity, which downturn is already providing, instead of Krugman's solution (more government spending) or our much much better solution = Reduce the workweek as much as it takes to restore full employment, raise wages in response to resulting employer-perceived labor shortage (money comes from the money embolism among Onepercenters), and maximize consumer spending, marketable productivity and sustainable investment = Timesizing, not downsizing.]
  • Britain's woes have the rich looking abroad, by Li-Mei Hoang, Toronto Globe, A14.
    One in five Britons with more than GBP250,000 in savings (about $400,000) is thinking of living abroad because they are tired of crime, poor weather and the high cost of living, the wealth management arm of Lloyds BankingGroup said on Monday. Britain, facing the worst economic crisis in nearly a century, is grappling with how to preserve its image as a safe-haven for the international rich [why bother with that?!] while increasing taxes and slashing public spending. But the research from Lloyds TSB International Wealth showed that 19% of wealthy Britons were thinking of moving to euro zone countries like France and Spain [Spain??? - see next story below] or further afield to the United States, Australia, New Zealand or Canada...
  • Spain's sell-off of foreclosed houses hits high gear, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B8.
    ...Unemployment is at 23 per cent and still climbing...
  • GDP least of China's worries, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B8.
    [GDP is the least of ANYbody's worries. The biggest worry is weakening consumer spending due to rising official and unofficial unemployment, based on a braindead freezing of a dysfunctionally long pretechnology workweek in the age of robotics.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Building society to cut hours at eight offices, 4/15 Cambridge News via cambridge-news.co.uk
    CAMBRIDGE, England - The Cambridge Building Society is to cut the [business] hours of eight branches – but insists it is not closing any or axing jobs. From May 14, branches in Burwell, Cottenham, Milton and Chesterton Road in Cambridge will have their weekday hours reduced from 9am-5pm Monday to Friday to 9am-3pm... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sarkozy Says His Policies Have Killed 35-Hour French Work Week, 4/16 Bloomberg.com
    PARIS, France - ...French President Nicolas Sarkozy said his policies have effectively killed the 35-hour work week. “It has been abolished,” Sarkozy said in an interview on France 2 television, six days before the first round of presidential elections... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Great! This should finish him as a presidential contender.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, April 14, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Chaudière Holiday Inn, & Globe Mags&Cigars in Byward Mkt - updating from *Café Corsé, Hull, Québec -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Oil-spill emergencies - Fewer left to clean up the mess, by Gloria Galloway, Toronto Globe, A7.
    The unit at Environment Canada that responds to oil-spill emergencies will be dramatically scaled back and most of its regional offices will be closed to meet the cost-cutting demands [required by the new slice&grab, no-giveback strategies of US-wannabe, Harper-suckered Canadian wealthy]...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Rethinking the war on drugs \at the Drug\ Summit of the Americas... - Canada and the U.S. oppose legalization, but as major [drug-]consuming nations, they must propose alternatives to a tragically failed policy, Toronto Globe, A3.
    "The subtext is that the formula - the U.S. provides the money and Latin America provides the dead - is not working any more" - Daniel Pacheco, El Expectador News of Colombia [blowout quote]
    [But gee, criminalizing drugs is almost as good as war in Afghanistan as a "conservative" makework program!]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Bank earnings dismay some investors, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    U.S. stocks fell sharply to close a volatile week, WSJ, A1 pointer to B4.
    The Dow Jones industrials slid 136.99 points or 1.1% to 12849.59 on Friday as rising Spanish bond yields unnerved investors about European sovereign-debt woes. In their worst weekly decline of the year, the Dow lost 1.6%, the S&P500 shed 2% and the Nasdaq fell 2.6%.
  • Consumer prices rose 2.7% in March from a year earlier, WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
  • Magazines' ad pages fell 8.2% in the first quarter, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
  • Canada is in a housing bubble that just hasn't burst yet, watchdog says - But, Ben Jones warns complacent investors, it will, and violently - Toronto and Vancouver real estate is 'a disaster in the making', Toronto Globe, F1,F3.
  • Wringers of goop [=oil-sands] and frackers of vapour: How Canada is courting long-term failure, Toronto Globe, F3.
  • On the death of environmentalism, by Margaret Wente, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to F9.
    [Time to switch from hand-wringing list-making, to prioritization and deconcentrating insulated power, starting with deconcentrating employment?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Employee furloughs continue as Glendale cuts expenses, TucsonCitizen.com
    GLENDALE, Ariz. - ...Councilman Manny Martinez said, “The big elephant in the room is furloughs.” He said instead of the 6.5 unpaid days for staff in place during the current budget year, the city may have to go back to 13 days of furlough in the prior year. Martinez said that option was better than layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Lonely judges man empty halls of justice - Judges without staffs man their offices Friday, Topeka Capital Journal
    TOPEKA, Kans. - Except for piped-in music, the hallways of the third and fourth floors of the Shawnee County Courthouse were silent Friday, the first of five court furlough days... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - [French 35-hour-workweek saboteur] Sarkozy defends his record amid sagging opinion polls -
    [35-hour-workweek friendly] socialist Hollande solidifies lead in run-up to first round of presidential voting,
    Toronto Globe, A14.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Immigration - Entry to Canada to cost wealthy foreigners more [= $1.6m instead of just $800k], Toronto Globe, A12.



    Friday, April 13, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Chaudière Holiday Inn, Hull & Byward Market News, Ottawa - updating from *Café Corsé, Hull -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Valeant [Pharmaceuticals Int'l of Montreal] buys U.S. foot-care company [Pedinol Pharmacal], Montreal Gazette, B7.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Power Corp. of Canada crops huge board [of directors from 21 to 12], National Post, FP1.
    [Actually, this kind of downsizing is probably positive.]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Is 75 the new 65?, Toronto Globe, B14.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Air India set for huge bailouts, Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B7.
    ...The unprofitable state-owned carrier may get government bailouts totalling 300 billion rupees (US$5.8B), an amount about five times the market value of the nation's three listed airlines...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Economic "recovery" [our quotes] leaving middle class behind, column by Chrystia Freeland, Toronto Globe, B2.
  • U.S. - "Inflation" [ours] slows - Buying power weakens..., Agence France-Presse, La Presse de Montréal, Affaires9 (B9).
  • New claims for unemployment insurance jumped last week..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A5.
  • Costs [like mega CEO 'compensation'?] hobble banks' profits, WSJ, A1.
  • Cannibalize the future - Public works and the politicians who hate them, op ed by Paul Krugman, New York Times, A23.
  • Vital signs - Export growth has slowed amid a cooling economy, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • Scientists are starting to find a negative impact on sea life in the Gulf of Mexico from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill two years ago, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
  • Canadians rack up more debt, National Post, FP2.
  • Labour groups welcome [loosening] immigration rules for skilled workers [vs. training jobless already here], Tor.Globe, B15.
  • Industrial output in the euro zone slumped in February by the largest amount in over two years, adding to evidence that the bloc is in recession, WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
  • Greece mulls renting out police, helicopters by the hour, by Jack Phillips, Epoch Times, A1.
    ...a police helicopter with an accompanying crew...for 1,500 euros per hour...
    patrol cars...40 euros per hour...
    patrol boats...200 euros \an hour\
    police officers for 30 euros ($40) an hour, according to a report by the Proto Thema newspaper on Monday [citing] an internal report from the ministers of citizen protection and finance and call[ing] it a "desperate attempt to find money" while the country is still reeling from tough austerity cuts to secure a $170 billion bailout from the European Union.... In all, the public debt in Greece - which according to transparency groups is one of the more corrupt countries in the EU - has ballooned to 350 billion euros, with Greece needing to secure two bailout packages in recent recent years.
    [In our current primitive state of human evolution, the only course with Greece is to quarantine it and stop the scammers' tentacles from extending into and siphoning a much bigger organism. The idea that bailouts cure corruption is laughable, and indicates that current downsizing capitalism now shares with socialism the requirement that "all men be angels."]
  • China - Slowest growth in three years, AP via La Presse de Montréal, Affaires9 (B9).
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Parma service workers create independent collective-bargaining unit, Plain Dealer via cleveland.com
    PARMA, Ohio - ...When the city faced a budget crisis in 2009, it asked union workers to take unpaid furlough days as a way to cut costs. When service workers resisted furloughs, the city reduced their workdays from eight to seven hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Shorter working hours for public school teachers pushed, Sun.Star via sunstar.com.ph
    MANILA, The Philippines - The working hours of public school teachers may be reduced by two hours if Congress approves a proposed law pushing for a six-hour work day... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, April 12, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from *Chaudière Holiday Inn - updating from *Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Thousands of civil servants from 10 federal departments across Canada were served notice Wednesday that their jobs may be eliminated, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A5.
  • Barclays to cut 200 support jobs in U.K., Toronto Globe, B10.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Dear Sir, Madam,
    [letter that arrived today]
    ...The Government of Canada is proposing to raise the age of eligibility for the Old Age Security pension and the Guaranteed Income Supplement by two years, from 65 to 67...
    Thank you,
    Diane Finley...Minister of Human Resources...
  • The curse of the undead, by Christopher Swan, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B13.
    [First our sick economists and management schools turn the blessing of technology into a curse by pushing downsizing instead of timesizing. Now they turn the blessing of longer life into a curse -]
    ...Demographers keep expecting a slowdown in rising life expectancies that has yet to occur... Estimates by rich-nation statisticians have generally fallen shy of actual lifespans by around three years over the past several decades. Yet the number crunchers continue to forecast a stalling of the longevity escalator.
    [Sounds like these "scientists" have been cooking their figures to please their political employers.]
    This could prove an expensive blunder... Tying the retirement age - and benefits - to the escalating life expectancy is the simplest [solution]. Denmark and Sweden have already moved in this direction...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Gas prices collapse... - Price falls below US$2...,
    National Post, FP1.
    Natural gas slump hammers producers - Gas companies face credit woes, plunging stocks and poor revenue as commodity hits 10-year low amid glut and warm weather - ...Smaller energy companies hit hard by price drop,
    Toronto Globe, B1,B9.
  • Earthquakes linked to oil and gas extraction - Known as 'fracking,' the process used to break rock comes with side effects, Toronto Star, B1.
  • Housing - March sales take a drop, Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B4.
    Canadian realtors appear to have recorded their first year-over-year sales drop in 11 months...as the Vancouver market plunged...
  • The sacrificed generation... - With 1.04 million jobless among the 16-24 year olds yielding an unemployment rate of 22.5% which is one and a half times greater than the Canadian equivalent, never have so many young Britons been looking for work, La Presse de Montréal, Affaires1 (=B1).
    The next few weeks are emotional for the Brits, despite their phlegmatic reputation. In May come the hotly disputed elections for Lord Mayor of London. In June there's the culmination of festivities for the 60th anniversary of the crowning of Queen Elizabeth II. And in July there's the opening of the Olympic Games. But with a staggering economy, Brits are not in festive humour. Will the country plunge back into recession following Europe? Has the government of David Cameron pushed austerity too far?... {subhead)
  • ...'Pain in Spain' is likely to worsen...- Spain has lost control of interest rates and currency by being in the euro,
    Toronto Globe, B14.
    [And so have the other PIGS: Portugal, Italy and Greece. So, duh, GET OUT OF THE EURO.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Lynchburg councilman's part-time proposal set off heated debate, Lynchburg News and Advance via www2.newsadvance.com
    LYNCHBURG, Va. - ...“If someone said, Turner, you only have to work 32 hours a week and you’ll get the same pay, same health benefits and we’ll contribute to your 401(k), I’d be all over it,” Perrow said. “… The same pay for less work sounds pretty good to me. And it saves us money, which is the crazy thing about it.”... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The Future Workplace Is Killing You, Business Insider via articles.businessinsider.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...Research suggests that in general, the more we work, the worse our bodies fare. But how far does that wisdom go? Consider this a guide to help you answer the question: Is work bad for your health?... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, April 11, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines from *Chaudière Holiday Inn; L'Acceuil, Prom.dePortage; *Café Corsé, Hull QC; Globe News, Byward Mkt, Ottawa -
    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Anxiety stalks global markets, Montreal Gazette, B1.
    [Every newspaper in the world could save time and just run this headline daily without change.]
  • New Europe woes hit stocks - Investors dump Spanish bonds, doubting an austerity move,Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [...with good reason!]
  • Job notices go out to federal workers - Letters warning 'affected' employees expected today in at least 10 departments, Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    Cuts hit food-safety workers - Veterinarians and others responsible for food recalls are among hundreds of public servants who will be told this week if their jobs are at risk, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A4.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Deutsche Bank May Face Strikes on Postbank Comparison, Welt Says, Bloomberg via BusinessWeek.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - Deutsche Bank may face strikes at its four biggest subsidiaries as worker representatives demand more vacation and shorter working hours to bring them into line with staff at the lender’s Postbank unit... Postbank staff work 39 hours a week and are entitled to 30 days vacation, while workers at the Deutsche Bank subsidiaries have a 42-hour week and can take just 27 days off... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Young need not fear losing out, Malaysia Star via TheStar.com.my
    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - ...Finally, unlike younger workers, many older workers express a preference for working flexible hours; in some cases this can be shorter working hours, partial retirement, changes in shifts, longer leave, job rotation, and reduction in overtime or additional work responsibilities... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, April 10, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from *Café La Tierra Co-op, 53 rue Vaudreuil, Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Facebook to buy Instagram for $1B, cash deal,
    Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    Insta-rich: $1 billion for Instagram - Facebook inks its biggest deal ever; neutralizes threat from a hot photo start-up, WSJ, B1.
    [So much for free-market competition and the optimizing effects thereof.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Sony to axe 10,000 jobs, report says, Nikkei via Reuters-Bloomberg via Montreal Gazette, B7.
    TOKYO - ...about 6% of its workforce...as new CEO Kazuo Kirai looks to steer...back to profit after four years in the red... In "Japan Inc."...companies from cellphone maker Nec Corp. to electronics firm Panasonic Corp. are trimming costs [and employees are now just "costs"...] in the face of a strong yen and competition from rivals... The Nikkei said half of the latest round of job cuts would come from consolidating the firm's chemicals and small and mid-size LCD operations...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • For Feds, 'lying' is a handy charge, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    When federal prosecutors can't muster enough evidence to bring charges against a person suspected of a crime, they can still use a controversial law to get a conviction anyway... The law against lying, officially Title 18, section 1001 of the United States Code, is "a bread-and-butter" statute for Justice Department prosecutors, says Thomas O'Brien, the former U.S. Attorney in Los Angeles...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • U.S. jobs report weighs on markets, FP via Montreal Gazette, B5.
    ...Dow Jones down 130.55 or 1.00% to 12,929.59...
    The Dow industrials fell for a fourth consecutive trading session and the first since Friday's disappointing jobs report... - Treasury prices rose, pushing the 10-year yield down to 2.035%, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1,C4.
  • Fed Chairman Bernanke said that more regulatory action may be needed to safeguard the money-market mutual-fund industry, WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
    [It is not in a healthy government's "job description" to safeguard industries vs. market forces or their own corruption.]
  • The U.S. has seen demand surge for skilled-foreign-worker visas, a sign of the nation's improving economy, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    [Wrong, and wrong. There is a huge unmet demand for training domestic workers who are already here, or rather, for training the vast numbers of domestic unemployed, on-welfare, "disabled," homeless, incarcerated, self-"employed" who are already here, constituting wasted potential consumers functioning currently as parasites weakening the nation's economy... The surge in demand for foreign workers is a multiplier of wasted potential consumption and of parasitism, an absolute accelerator of the nation's weakening economy.]
  • "Vital" signs - U.S. companies scaled back their hiring in March, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    The Conference Board's Employment Trends Index, which is made up of eight separate gauges of the labor market, fell to 107.28 in March from 107.47 in February [clearly crafted to minimize declines]. That was the index's first decline since May 2011 and is consistent with a government report last Friday that showed a slower pace of hiring in March.
  • Ontario losing grip on its powerhouse status, by Mario Polèse, Montreal Gazette, B4.
    ...Mighty Ontario is finally [being] knocked off its pedestal. The figures are stark: Ontario's unemployment rate is now above the Canadian average. Toronto's unemployment rate now matches Montreal's [in Quebec], a dramatic reversal of past trends. Something has snapped. ...The prospect that Ontario may be heading into a long-term cycle of decline cannot be ruled out.
    [Well, period of decline, not cycle, because not cyclical -]
    If so, the called-for remedies will need to be structural. Ontario's problems are not essentially cyclical, a reflection of international business cycles and, more recently, the 2007 subprime fiasco.
    [Don't sweat it. Those aren't really cyclical either. And btw, wasn't the fiasco in 2008?]
    The data suggest a steady deterioration of Ontario's position, going back about 25 years. Ontario's GDP per capita has been systematically declining compared with the Canadian average since the mid-1980s...
    [So a previous story in today's Gazette rings a little hollow -]
    Business leaders [in Canada's capital] bullish on sustained recovery - Quarterly survey, Montreal Gazette, B2.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Williamsburg County Sheriff's Office donates computers to Hemingway library, www2.SCNow.com
    HEMINGWAY, S.C. - ...From closing on Wednesdays and having shorter hours on other days, to not having the funds to repair old equipment, the library has undergone some hard times... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But they've cut hours, not jobs.]
  2. Sheryl Sandberg [C.O.O. of Facebook] Leaves Work at 5:30 Every Day — And You Should Too, mashable.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...“I [atr first] was showing everyone I worked for that I worked just as hard. I was getting up earlier to make sure they saw my emails at 5:30, staying up later to make sure they saw my emails late. But now I’m much more confident in where I am and so I’m able to say, ‘Hey! I am leaving work at 5:30...' " - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Opinion: The average bank holiday costs the economy GBP2.3 billion - Do we really need so many? Fresh [ie: Stale] Business Thinking via freshbusinessthinking.com
    LONDON, U.K. - The average employee in the UK working full time works 1,647 hours a year... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Democrats plan to press the GOP over a millionaire tax, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    ...The so-called Buffett Rule...would impose a minimum tax on people "earning" [our quotes] over $1 million a year... Proponents say the Buffett Rule is necessary for fairness...
    [Nevermind squishy "fairness" - it is necessary for monetary circulation = an absolute system requirement, and the steeper the graduated income tax, the stronger the economy. But it's healthier to centrifuge the hyperconcentration of the money supply with worksharing and timesizing and let taxes evolve toward fees for service.]



    Sun-Mon, April 8-9, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from *Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, Québec -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Harsh cuts hit Texas schools, 4/09 NYT, A1 pointer to A10.
    ...multibillion-dollar budget cuts...
    "Savings" [our quotes] in the Hutto Independent School District include...the closing of Veterans' Hill Elementary School for two years... (photo caption 1)
    ...From the previous school year to the current one, districts across Texas eliminated 25,286 positions through retirements, resignations and layoffs, including 10,717 teaching jobs [with population still growing].
    ...Northside in San Antonio...eliminated 973 positions..\..
    ...Hutto, a district with 5,600 students and one high school...cut $4 million from this school year's budget, eliminating 68 positions...
    ["Hee hee!" cry the witches from Macbeth, rubbing bony hands in glee over their stew of entrails. "Now the boastful state of Texas is cheaping its children. Now dumbing them deeper. Now felling its future! Soon rich oilmen will find safety nowhere in their own state for they failed to make market forces spread profits by lowering workhours while raising output."]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Americans over 60 still over about $36 billion in student loans, according to research from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 4/08 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A8.
    and more than 10% of those loans are delinquent.
    [Presumably because so many fifty-somethings were fired just before pension-vesting and can't make the payments. So as today's Republicans would yell, "Bring back debtors' prisons!"]
    It's time to act to keep student loans from becoming the next 'debt bomb',
    column by Michelle Singletary, Washington Post via 4/08 Boston Globe, G5.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Reddy Ice is in the final stages of preparing to file for Chapter 11 with a plan to hand ownership to a hedge fund holding the company's debt, 4/09 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B2.
    [The toxic tentacles of ignorant hedge funds that know no qualities, only quantities, now melt Reddy Ice - who's next?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Taking credit where none is due - Having tried to block the recovery, House Republicans now claim they made it possible, editorial, 4/09 NYT, A18.
    [And we claim it's a mirage, because nothing fundamental has been investigated and redesigned. The nation's money supply, however much is printed, is still being funneled to a tiny population that is evermore insulated, isolated...and insecure.]
  • Emerging slowdown? Markets sputter after sharp rebound,
    4/09 WSJ, C1 pointer to C3.
    ["Rebound" as "false positive"? -]
    US stocks post worst week of the year, 4/08 Boston Globe, G5.
    [Or...]
  • The stock market is improving - Corporate profits [& cooking the books?] are up dramatically - But workers' wages don't seem to be rising, a study finds, 4/08 Boston Globe, G1.
    [So consumer funding via the 99% isn't rising either, while investor funding, via CEO-Onepercenters, skyrockets with Onepercenters spending a negligible percentage of their multimegazillions -]
    Weighty pay scales...- CEO compensation continued on an upward trajectory in '11,
    4/08 Boston Globe, G1.
  • Traders navigate a murky new world, 4/09 WSJ, A1.
    [Of course it's murky, with a declining percentage of confident consumers funded by declining amount of good jobs and real wages and an increasing percentage of nervous investors funded by a skyrocketing percentage of the money supply that used to spread out into wages and "go viral" in circulation via rapidly repeated exchanges.]
  • Vital signs - Americans dialed back their use of credit cards in February, 4/09 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    [So consumer spending took another hit.]
    Revolving consumer credit, mostly credit card debt, fell $17.3 billion to $794.84 billion - the second consecutive month of decline... Overall consumer borrowing, including car and student loans, grew in February by a seasonally adjusted $8.73 billion to $2.522 trillion.
  • Funds to train jobless in U.S. are drying up - Growing gap in skills [between what they have and those] sought by employers, 4/09 NYT, A1.
  • Big U.S. companies have emerged from the recession [what if it's not over?] more productive [what good is productivity without marketability?], more profitable [what good are unsustainable "profits" due to accounting tricks designed to let CEOs can grab bigger chest-thumping bankrolls?], flush with cash [that they're not doing anything with except boasting], and less burdened by debt, 4/09 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3, B1.
    [These big companies, ie: top executives and investors, are The One Percent. Too bad their customers, the 99%, can't say the same thing - so the One Percent won't stay better off for long. And here are more reasons they won't stay that way for long -]
    For big corporations, life is good - Large corporations emerge from recession leaner [=smaller =negative growth...SAY IT!], stronger [with smaller markets? ...SAY IT!] - and hiring overseas, 4/09 WSJ, B1 target article.
    [In short, for large corporations, "life is good" because they're committing suicide faster and in a greater variety of ways. Who do they think they're kidding? (The majority of terminally stupid Americans mayhap?]
    Wake up call for U.S. stocks - Lackluster profits for first quarter may rattle shares, 4/09 WSJ, C1.
    [So it's only a few big companies who are more profitable? The rest of American companies are less profitable and weaker? Gee, sounds just like American individuals = just a few making out like bandits and the rest flat or crashing.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Workzone: Pa. gets on work-sharing bus, 4/08 Pittsburgh Post Gazette via post-gazette.com
    HARRISBURG, Pa. - ...Say a worker who is paid $400 for a 40-hour week has his hours reduced by 20%. That person would be paid $320 by the employer and receive $80 in employment benefits, based on information on the department's website. Pennsylvania joins 22 other states and the District of Columbia in adopting work-sharing, which is a way to keep more workers on the job [and more consumers spending] during economic downturns [and prevent downturns from making themselves worse], said Neil Ridley, a senior policy analyst with the Center for Law and Social Policy in Washington, DC.  Mr. Ridley said California adopted the first work-sharing program in the 1970s and the concept has gradually gathered steam since then. Since 2009, Colorado, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania have instituted programs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Argentine port workers to cut hours, no strike - Union, firms fail to reach deal on staffing, hours - Dock workers to limit day to eight hours in grains ports, 4/09 Reuters.com
    BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Argentine dockworkers failed to reach a deal with agribusiness firms over working conditions on Monday, vowing to limit working hours but averting an all-out strike that could have severely disrupted grains exports... We're going to work to rule for no more than eight hours," said Ruben Arredondo, a union leader... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Employees should be working by the worktime rulebook anyway, because anything more than that spoils and corrupts employers, clobbers hiring and wages, and sinks the whole economy = the usual policy of Onepercenters: Suicide, everyone else first.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, April 7, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • U.S. labor market slows its stride [or, its stumble] - Employers notch 120,000 jobs, amid still-fragile economy, WSJ, A1.
    [Fragile, shmagile - any barely adequate set of economic indexes would would show a deepening recession-depression.]
    The weak jobs report renewed doubts about the economic "recovery" [our quotes], Wall St Journal, A1:1 pointer to A1:2.
    ...The jobless rate ticked down to 8.2% \but\ payrolls rose 120,000, [only] half the upwardly revised level of the prior month [and] fewer than Wall Street was looking for...
    [And Lord knows they have low expectations anyway cuz failure to achieve high expectations might reflect on them.]
    U.S. dollar slips and bonds rally after disappointing jobs data, NYT, B1 pointer to B4.
    [It's all about JOBS and the only way to get them in a robotizing economy is to cut the workweek down as far as it takes.]
  • Stock index futures fell after the jobs report, and Treasury prices rose in a shortened [Easter Thursday] session as the 10-year yield fell to 2.056%..., WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Bailout chiefs' salaries frozen, WSJ, A1.
    ...Three firms still haven't fully repaid their government bailouts...AIG...GM...Ally Financial... [Even so] all but one of AIG's top 25 executives were projected to "earn" [our quotes] more than $2.3 million in 2012, and nine of them will "earn" at least $5,000,000 [in this one year]...
    [Is there any doubt where the biggest waste of money is going in our current lethally flawed economic-"software" design? Without the discipline of a Market responding to a labor "shortage" enforced by as many step-by-step workweek reductions as it takes to restore and maintain full employment and maximum consumer spending, corporate executives are getting evermore insulated, isolated and stupid. Their policies amount to Suicide, Everyone Else First. And speaking of wasting money -]
  • A music video showing a GSA employee joking about wasting money has added to the agency's travails, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [If only we could spread some of the incredibly useful honesty and integrity from the General Accounting Office to the General Services Administration!]
  • Vladimir Putin will face a slowing economy when he returns to the presidency in May despite record oil prices, said a Russian forecast, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. USA Today requires most of its 1425 workers to take unpaid week off to offset weak ad sales, AP via WashingtonPost.com
    McLEAN, Va. — ...This is the fourth time in four years that the newspaper’s workers have been required to take a week off without pay. USA Today imposed a two-week furlough in 2009 and a one-week furlough in 2010. There were no furloughs last year... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So the nation's second-largest newspaper has been timesizing to avoid downsizing now for at least four years!]
  2. New light shed on Swiss working hours, swissinfo.ch
    BERN, Switzerland - The hours put in by Swiss workers have decreased by one third since 1950, according to a study sponsored by the Swiss National Science Foundation. The authors of the study, Michael Siegenthaler and Michael Graff of the Swiss Economic Institute (KOF), have used new calculations which show that in 1950, the average number of hours worked per year was 2,400, as against 1,600 today... The authors explain that employees have been able to obtain the reductions in their hours thanks to technological progress... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Ssssh, don't tell anybody, or jealous American economists who have stood by while U.S. working hours increased in roughly the same period (see Juliet Schor's "The Overworked American") will start digging for something, ANYthing, to whack the Swiss for, like, "Oh but their labor force is too rigid," or in a pinch, "The Swiss are getting lazy/unproductive/uncompetitive"/whatever - never mind they've declined to compete in the American-Chinese race to the bottom.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, April 6, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • A health-care thinktank started by Gingrich filed for bankruptcy..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A5.
    [And so be it with all the works of those who talk the talk of family values and walk the walk of delivering divorce papers to their wives sick in the hospital with cancer.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks mostly edged lower, capping the biggest weekly drop of the year, as the Dow industrials declined 14.61 points to 13060.14, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
    [Isn't it strange that however big the drop, stocks only "edge" lower, but however small the rise, stocks always "jump" higher.]
  • Low growth in [corporate] earnings is expected -
    [Oh goody, now results don't have to be great and they can still have "good" news à la "earnings growth is better than expected" cuz expectations were so low!]
    Some analysts say cost cuts may have reached their limits, New York Times, B1.
    [- not when consumers dba employees are still regarded as "costs" to be cut.]
  • Not enough inflation - Fed failure: not what you think, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A21.
    ...The right [wing] wants the Fed to obsess over inflation, when...we'd be better off if the Fed paid...more attention to unemployment...
    [How ironic that literally for centuries, "conservatives" have triggered depression after depression by ignoring unemployment and unemployment-weakened consumer spending in favor of funneling an unlimitedly large percentage of the money supply to an unlimitedly small percentage of the population.]
  • New strains surfaced in Europe as a slide in the euro forced Switzerland's central bank to intervene in currency markets and Spanish bond yields climbed (see next headline), WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Note good news that -]
    German and Swiss officials signed a deal that would force wealthy Germans to pay taxes on Swiss investment income,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
  • Vital signs - Spain's borrowing costs, which many investors consider a guage of the severity of Europe's sovereign-debt crisis, has jumped in recent weeks..., WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • Radioactive water may have leaked into the ocean from Japan's stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the plants operator said, WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
  • Israel's Netanyahu blasted writer Günter Grass for saying that Israel is a threat to world peace, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [He's just lucky Günter didn't really tell the truth and say that the current Israeli government is THE threat to world peace, and we should "net" the "yahoo" who's heading it.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Unemployment Insurance Faces Changes Across The Nation, HuffingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Worker advocates dislike the changes, but there is one thing they're happy about: new federal support for work-sharing programs, which help businesses reduce hours instead of laying people off. The payroll tax cut legislation Congress passed in February included nearly $500 million for work sharing... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Behind the Disappointing Jobs Report, New York Times (blog) via http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The average length of the workweek ticked down slightly, to 34.5 hours in March from 34.6 hours in February. The unemployment rate fell to 8.2% from 8.3%... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So here's a prima-facie corelation between de-facto shorter hours and lower unemployment, even without urgently needed unemployment-countering workweek reduction. And notice that for those punished by our frozen pre-automation 40-hour workweek, we have a different standard = a 30-hour workweek, because we accept the fact that a 40-hour workweek has become impossibly difficult for our entire population to find in the age of robotization -]
  3. What works for welfare reform - Ohio’s welfare rolls dropped by nearly a fifth in the last year because the state is cracking down on recipients of cash assistance, WKSU News via wksu.org
    COLUMBUS, Ohio - ...“84,000 Ohioans are receiving cash assistance from the state, down from 102,000 last year. 36% of those who lost their cash assistance benefits in the last year didn't meet a federal requirement that recipients work or participate in job training programs for about 30 hours a week for single parent families [and the "full-time" workweek is even less for traditional two-parent families, averaging 55/2= 27.5 hours per person -]
    and 55 hours a week for two-parent households... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So our partitioned minds already have already "been forced to" accept a shorter workweek for those suffering most from our frozen pre-automation 40-hour workweek.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, April 5, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Yahoo chief to cut 2,000 jobs - Thompson moves to shake up company,
    [Little did St. Schumpeter imagine when he made the mistake of coining "creative destruction," that corporate self-amputation and -disruption would become standard corporate strategies, taught in business schools across this once-great land.]
    - Focus shifts to core services to fuel growth, Financial Times, p.16 (=B1).
    [Core services are no good without markets, and if you're cutting 2000 of your own best customers.... And as for growth, how ya gonna get UPsizing aka growth, by DOWNsizing?]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Dilbert, 3-frame cartoon by Scott Adams, Boston Globe, B8.
    Frame 1: Dogbert, "Want some free software?"
    Pointy-haired boss, "What's it do?"
    Frame 2: Dogbert, "All it does is beg you for upgrades, and if you upgrade, then it begs you to upgrade again and so on."
    Frame 3: Dogbert, "And it makes all of your other software run slow."
    Pointy-haired boss, "And it's free?"

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Creditors of Hostess Brands are questioning large executive pay raises make prior to the banking company seeking bankruptcy protection under Chapter 11, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
  • Dynegy Holdings reached a preliminary pact with nearly all its creditor groups on a debt-restructuring plan,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
  • Hedge-fund manager Phil Falcone said he is considering seeking bankruptcy protection for LightSquared, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [In the twilight of frozen-workweek capitalism, we see bankruptcy as a normal corporate strategy for such purposes as appropriating pension funds - and further shrinking our consumer base going "forward."]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Markets fear end of stimulus - Global stocks sink on worries central bankers in Europe, U.S. won't act further, WSJ, A1.
    [But, but, government is the enemy, isn't it?]
  • Chrysler got legal shield in Chapter 11, WSJ, A1.
    ...which no other car maker has..\.. overruling state laws that give consumers the right to seek damages...
    [confirming the view that however they've spun it since as a "success," the government bailout of Chrysler was a mistake and yet another system-eroding development justified by the desperate need for JOBS in a frozen-workweek economy. Bailing out private companies, however large, is not a sustainable function of government. What is? Making sure there are plenty of jobs for downsized employees of uncompetitive companies to move to. How? By making sure that the workweek isn't not stuck at high levels appropriate to earlier, much less efficient and productive technologies, and making sure that persistent overtime is getting smoothly converted into OJT and jobs, and that sufficient overtime is getting coverted (to achieve maximum consumer spending via maximum employment) by making sure the workweek is adjusting downward fast enough to keep comprehensive dependence (CD) below referendum-set levels (CD=un(der)employment, welfare, workman's comp, disability, homelessness and incarceration - some may want to add self-employment with no clients and suicide +/-successful). So, this legal shield for Chrysler is another nail in America's coffin. But it's real simple: empires rise when the money supply spreads around (and gets spent/circulated by millions of people with thousands of dollars); empires fall when the money supply funnels and coagulates (and gets saved and deactivated by thousands of people with millions of dollars). Concentrate money = rise; centrifuge money = fall. WHY? Centrifuged money gets spent, gets circulated. Concentrated money, all the rhetoric to the contrary notwithstanding, deactivates and decirculates. Without circulation, money loses value because it's like a battery that is recharged by circulation = millions of people agreeing that this colored piece of paper is worth a designated chunk of their lives.]
  • The market for pools of loan to "junk"-rated companies, known as collateralized-loan obligations [CLOs], is staging a combo, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [They're BACK, just like Freddy or Jason or Dracula...a result of the high-end counterpart of job desperation = investment desperation. There is no longer enough marketable productivity to house the newly astronomical percentage of the money supply that is crushed, black-hole style, in a tiny 0.01% of the population, so what do Wall Streeters do? They rack their brains and come up with a whole palette of new (bogus) investments to soak up all that extra investing power: junk bonds, derivatives, hedge funds, CDSs, CLOs, single stock futures, NINJA loans, liars' loans...]
  • Capital flight from Russia accelerated in March despite [or because of?] Putin's election, which officials had hoped would allay concerns about political risk, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [Capital movements are irrelevant in a timesizing, economy, because money is based on time, not vice versa, and so timesizing creates and maintains a deeper-structure equilibrium that shrugs off would-be parasitic, currently disastrous, financial tsunami.]
  • European Central Bank exit 'premature' - Mario Draghi has dismissed as premature Bundesbank demands for an "exit strategy" to unwind the ECB's crisis-fighting measures, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.4.
    [And would that involve the exit of a few southern European basketcases? (Prob. not but "hope springeth eternal."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Samuel Gompers, 1850-1924: 'The Grand Old Man of Labor', program transcript, Voice of America via voanews.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...He led the fight for shorter working hours, higher pay, safe and clean working conditions and democracy in the workplace... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Now shortening working hours aren't just matters of progress or compassion but an urgent sys req in the age of robotization = a system requirement to have anywhere near sufficient markets to match the quantum-leap-higher volume of products and services churned out by robots.]
  2. LA councilman calls for shorter hours at city park, AP via Monterey County Herald via montereyherald.com
    LOS ANGELES, Calif.—In a move that seems designed to keep Occupy L.A. demonstrators from resuming nighttime protest at the park outside City Hall, a Los Angeles city councilman is calling for the park’s hours of operation to be shortened, and for rules regarding tents to be clarified... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. TNT to Cut Hours at Liège Sorting Facility on Slowing Business, Bloomberg.com
    LIÈGE, Belgium - TNT Express NV (TNTE), the Dutch express- delivery company that United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS) agreed to buy for $6.8 billion, plans to cut the hours of 1130 workers at its Liege, Belgium, sorting facility after business slowed... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. US DoL Launches Guam Wage & Hour Enforcement Initiative Focused on Island's Construction Industry, PacificNewsCenter.com
    HAGATNA, Guam - The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division has launched an enforcement initiative focused on Guam’s construction industry to increase employer compliance and remind construction workers, including those hired under the H-2B temporary nonimmigrant worker program, of their rights under the Fair Labor Standards Act [FLSA], the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts, and the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. The initiative aims to promote sustained compliance, particularly among contractors and subcontractors working on federally funded construction projects in Guam, but also will include investigations of other construction projects... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, April 4, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Steward Health Care System to acquire Stoughton MA's New England Sinai Hospital, Boston Globe, B7.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Fisker's CEO said the firm is looking at alternatives to a car-plant plan that had financial backing from the Obama administration, WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
  • Electric Boat of Hartford CT wins $25m in Navy deals, AP via Boston Globe, B8.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks fell as investors eager for more stimulus were disappointed, with the Dow industrials dropping 0.5% - Treasurys were hit hard, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Fed cool to more bond buying, but job fears grow,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • Men in black - At the high court, low political games, op ed by Maureen Dowd, NYT, A19.
    ...This court...accountable to no one...is well on its way to becoming one of the most divisive in American history. It has squandered the semi-illusion that it is the unbiassed, honest guardian of the Constitution. It is run by hacks dressed up in black robes...
    [As we said yesterday with reference to their decision that even people arrested on minor charges and by mistake can be humiliated with stripsearches: By becoming contemptible, the US Supreme Court is in contempt of itself. "The Supremes" are making America more brutish, humiliating and sadistic year after year, starting with poking their big nose into the 2000 election. This is a big step closer to the transformation of the Land of the Free into a police state.]
  • Chinese Premier blasts banks, by McMahon & Wei & Galbraith (= Andrew = one of John Kenneth G.'s sons?), WSJ, A1.
    ...Wen Jiabao told a national audience on Tuesday that China's state-controlled banks must be broken up. "...Our banks earn profit too easily. Why? Because a small number of large banks have a monopoly..."
    [Sounds like the state hasn't been controlling these state-controlled banks enough. Insufficient regulation sound familiar? And Bill Clinton started it with the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Banking Act in 1999.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Voters: No to electric franchise extension - City of Durango to see $900,000 hole in budget, DurangoHerald.com
    DURANGO, Colo. - ...City Councilor Sweetie Marbury predicted residents would feel the hardships with loss of jobs and shorter hours at city facilities... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sokoto civil servants spend four [instead of eight] working hours in office, Vanguard Nigeria via vanguardngr.com
    SOKOTO, Nigeria - ...“Measures will surely be taken against these workers,” Wali said even as Governor Wamakko had also warned that workers must adhere strictly to working hours, a directive that has been largely [ignored] by majority of civil servants... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, April 3, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Express Scripts, Medco seal [$29.1B] merger, Boston Globe, B6.
    Merger to mean more Rx by mail..., WSJ, B1.
  • Rocky start for marriage of brokers [- Citigroup's and Morgan Stanley's brokerage units], WSJ, C1.
    ...Three years later, Mr. James Dunaway is still waiting \for the\ "major technological upgrade [that] would soon make it easier for him to check the performance of his investments...

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Dow [Chemical] will cut 900 jobs, close plants, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...on 3 continents because of weakness in Europe; 4 years ago, Dow...the largest US chemical maker.\.cut more than 10,000 positions...
    [and that will just guarantee further shrinkage, whereas merely trimming hours a bit for all and keeping everyone employed and buying stuff would make recovery odds much better.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Pinnacle Airlines says it's bankrupt,
    Boston Globe, B6.
  • AFA Funds filed for Chapter 11, saying the controversy over a common filler for ground beef ["pink slime"] severely curbed demand for its product, WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
    [Good riddance.]
  • A shakeout in the storefront-loan business may make credit even tighter for millions of borrowers with less-than-stellar credit histories, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - U.S.-construction spending slowed in February...,
    WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • The Supreme Court ruled jails can strip-search all inmates, including those held on minor charges, in a case of a man arrested in error, WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    [By becoming contemptible, the US Supreme Court is in contempt of itself. "The Supremes" are making America more brutish, humiliating and sadistic year after year, starting with poking their big nose into the 2000 election.]
    ...Court is divided 5 to 4, NYT, A1.
  • Where housing once boomed, "recovery" lags [our quotes], NYT, A1.
    ...Prince George's County MD...Gwinnett County GA...Lake County FL...San Joaquin County CA...where housing booms were fueled by borrowed money may now become long-term laggards under the weight of those debts... The recent recession may have brought an enduring shift in the geography of American growth...
    [or actually an enduring reversal of American growth?]
  • Why people hate the banks - All you have to say is: credit card collection practices,
    op ed by Joe Nocera, NYT, A23.
  • CFTC deals out Royal pain, WSJ, C1 target.
    Royal Bank of Canada was accused by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission of making hundreds of millions of dollars in illegal futures trades with itself to reap tax benefits, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [So "nice" Canadians are now tying bows on self-dealing.]
  • Dire figures on unemployment and manufacturing activity in the eurozone's weakest members dimmed hopes for the bloc's growth prospects, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [But then, the premature common currency dims hopes for the weakest members cuz they need to inflate and they can't.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work Sharing Finds Breakthrough in New Federal Law - H.R. 3630 Provides $500 Million to States; First Federal Push for This Innovative Economic Security Program in 20 Years, TheJobMouse.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The law President Obama signed in February to extend payroll tax cuts and unemployment insurance (HR 3630) also provided a nearly $500 million expansion of work sharing, an employment strategy that helps businesses avoid layoffs during downturns and can dramatically reduce unemployment... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. ND Sec State shortens office hours, cites workload, AP via JamestownSun.com
    BISMARCK, N.D. — On Tuesday through Friday, the office will be open from 9 am to 4 pm. Usually it's open from 8 am to 5 pm. Jaeger says the shorter hours will allow staffers to finish paperwork more quickly... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, April 1-2, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffee in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Public workers' pension funds are trying riskier investments in a so-far futile attempt to reap higher returns,
    4/02 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B7.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Credit-card processor Global Payments said hackers stole account numbers and other data from up to 1.5 million accounts in North America, 4/02 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Confirming the worst, with figures.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Money makeover...- Credit card debt weighs on family finances,
    4/01 Boston Globe, G1,G3.
  • Hostess serves up new batch of cuts,
    by Jargon & Spector [we are not making this up! = Julie Jargon & Mike Spector], 4/02 WSJ, B1.
    Luigi Peruzzi has been delivering Twinkies and DingDongs to...grocery stores in Detroit for 25 years. When his employer, Hostess Brands, was in bankruptcy in 2009, Mr. Peruzzi agreed to give up half his weekly base pay [of] $209, forcing him to depend more on his commissions... Now...after Hostess filed for Chapter 11 again in January, [he and] 16,000 other unionized workers are being asked to give up yet more, or their jobs will cease to exist...
    [And thus 16,000 of Hostess' best customers, plus their dependents, have even less money to spend on Twinkies & DingDongs = vicious circle alert.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Banks call for Saturday afternoons and Sundays to be “ordinary working hours”, 4/01 SmartCompany.com.au
    CANBERRA, Australia - Australia's major banks are pushing for the definition of banking hours to be extended to include Saturday afternoons and all of Sundays... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We need to rely more on regulation in terms of shorter shifts (worktime per person = government call based on need for maximum # of shoppers funded by a maximum # of employees) and less on regulation in terms of shorter business hours (worktime per job = market call).]
  2. Seattle Council asks public to weigh in on library levy to restore cut hours, Examiner.com
    SEATTLE, Wash. – ...Due to funding cuts since 2009, the Seattle Public Library has been forced to close system wide for one week a year, close 26 branch libraries two days a week and cut its annual collections funds by more than 13%... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.