Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
March, 2012

[Commentary] ©2012 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Two Sides to Labor in China, New York Times, B1.
    HONG KONG, China — The shorter workweeks and higher pay that Apple’s biggest contract manufacturer, Foxconn, has promised would mean fundamental changes to factory work in China... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. German proposal triggers intense debate over working hours, Today's Zaman via todayszaman.com
    ISTANBUL, Turkey - ...He suggested the government decrease the working time [per person], and by doing so, make employment [i.e., the number of money-earning persons and associated consumers] increase and then Turkey would be able to comply with European standards... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • A hit of kindness - "Cash mobs" target businesses to help out in difficult times,
    by Kathleen Pierce kmdpierce@gmail.com, Boston Globe, B5.
    MALDEN, Mass. - It was a mob hit in a cannoli shop. But cash not crooks descended on The Cannoli Guy Café here Friday at the city's first "cash mob." The café opened at 7 am, and by midafternoon, owner Clark Heighton could not turn out the treats fast enough. "A fantastic, fantastic day," said Heighton, who rang in as many sales - 400 cannoli - in eight hours as he does in an entire week... Customers found out about the event, organized by the city of Malden [northern suburb of Boston], days earlier on Facebook and Twitter, and they came out to support the six-month-old café..\.. Mayor Gary Christenson was among those offering support... "We are always thinking about new ways to invigorate the city. This is the most feasible and we can pull it off with limited resources," said Ron Cochran, director of online services...for the City of Malden. \The\ cash mob combines the buy-local movement with the power of a flash mob: getting strangers together on short notice...to infuse small businesses at a prescribed time with cash, credit, and community... It's less about nabbing a...bargain and more about sharing the wealth..\.. Globally, more than 200 organizers have surfaced since last fall, according to Andrew Samtoy, a Cleveland lawyer who popularized the concept. A thrift store in Cambridge MA in February [had] one of the region's first cash mobs. ...Some involv[e] one store, others a row of merchants -...more [are] being planned in Lowell and Malden.... Malden resident Cheryl Cadigan heard about her town's cash mob on Facebook and stopped by The Cannoli Guy Café on her way to work Friday. "I had never hear about this place," she said. Even though Cadigan doesn't eat cannoli, she dropped $30 on a dozen. "The economy is not good. I want to do my part."...
    [If cities can mobilize optional citywide cash mobs to help businesses with a one-shot burst of sales, maybe motivated can maximize their employment and optimize their balance of local consumer spending and local profitable investment by organizing optional citywide worksharing>>timesizing. After all, Cheryl Cadigan was willing to drop $30 on a food she doesn't eat to do her part to temporarily improve a bad local economy. Maybe she and others are willing to share some market-demanded working hours to do their part to permanently help a bad local economy.]



    Friday, March 30, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Best Buy, its business model undercut by Web shoppers, plans to close 50 of its big-box outlets and test remodeled store formats, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Credit warnings at big banks, NYT, A1 pointer to B1?.
    Moody's said it might lower credit ratings at 17 companies, including Morgan Stanley, Bank of America and Citigroup, a move that would raise their borrowing costs, and could hurt profits.
  • Junk bonds fed a hungry market, WSJ, A1 target article.
    [because far too much of the money supply coagulated among far too few people.]
    Junk-rated companies are piling into the debt markets, seizing on some of the lowest borrowing costs in history and strong investor demand, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:5.
  • The Brics group [Brazil, Russia, India, China, SouthAfrica] expressed concern over the slow pace of change at the IMF nand criticized Western policies for causing market instability, WSJ, A1 pointer A11.
  • Bernanke ended his college lecture series with a vigorous defense of the Fed's two rounds of bond buying, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    ["Methinks the lady doth protest too much."]
  • Autism diagnoses have risen sharply in the U.S. to one in every 88 children..., WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. China's iPad maker promises more pay, fewer work hours, Augusta Margaret River Mail via margaretrivermail.com.au
    [More pay goes with fewer hours because fewer hours per person means more jobs and less pay-cutting labor surplus.]
    SHENZHEN, China - Foxconn, which makes more than 40% of the world's electronics for companies such as Apple, Dell and Amazon, has promised to cut working hours in its Chinese factories and significantly increase wages... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Report: Postal Service work hours fell to historic low last year, Federal Times (blog)
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...For anyone needing yet another marker of the US Postal Service's condition, here you go: Total work hours last year fell to their lowest point since the mail carrier became an independent federal agency in 1971, That's according to the Postal ...... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, March 29, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • How we fight, NYT, A1 pointer to C1.
    In "Drift," Rachel Maddow argues that the nation makes war in ways the founders never intended.
    How war came home to stay - Book review of Rachel Maddow's "Drift: The unmooring of American military power",
    New York Times, C1 target article.
  • The never-ending cold war - Despite what Mitt Romney said, the U.S. has to work with Russia, editorial, NYT, A22.
    Mitt still considers Russia to be America's "No.1 geopolitical foe"...
    [Ah, the warmth and fuzziness of the familiar old enemy of our childhood.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Commodities, economic data pull stocks down, Boston Globe, B10.
    Stocks slipped - the S&P 500 fell a second day - as falling prices for commodities hurt materials and energy companies...
    Stocks dropped for the fifth day in seven, with the Dow industrials shedding 71.52 points on 0.5% to close the session at 13126.21, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C4.
  • The House defeated 382-38 a bipartisan budget plan to cut the deficit by over $4 trillion, a sign of how far apart the parties remain on the issue, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
  • Chaos over a plunging note - Complex securities loses 60% of its value in past week - SEC is on the case, WSJ, C1.
    ...VelocityShares 2x Long VIX Short-Term Xchange note, managed by Credit Suisse Group AG, which had about $700 million in assets before the decline... [total or just this 'security'?]
    [All the new 'complex securities' are vulnerable to this type of swing cuz "there's no There there" - they're just designed to prevent the zillions of dollars that the labor surplus is funneling to the Onepercent from escaping out of Wall Street and getting back into circulation outside in the real world.]
  • Still seeing peril in the size of banks, NYT, B1.
    [in] an annual report from a regional Federal Reserve Bank...Dallas...
  • An international panel of climate scientists warned nations to prepare for an unprecedented onslaught of weather disasters, with poor, highly populated regions the most vulnerable but no area immune, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Layoff-avoidance program keeps Washington businesses afloat, Employment Security Dept. via Access Washington State via esd.wa.gov
    OLYMPIA, Wash. – ...“The Shared-Work Program is one of the most effective tools offered by any government agency to save jobs and save businesses,” said Employment Security Commissioner Paul Trause. “Our economy would have been in worse shape, and our recovery would take longer, without this program.” In 2011,  3,176 businesses and more than 38,000 employees were approved to participate in Shared Work, the second-highest year on record, after the peak in 2010. The program also saved an estimated 26,000 jobs and more than $42 million in unemployment-benefit payouts in 2011. The estimate comes from information on the employers’ original Shared-Work applications combined with their actual use of the program.
    Currently, 2,100 employers and 23,000 employees are enrolled. “Shared Work is the main reason we’ve been able to hang onto our skilled employees and keep our doors open,” said Belinda Roberts, co-owner of Blue Crown Dental Arts in Kennewick. “I recommend it to any business considering layoffs”
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Q&A: Apple-Foxconn raises bar on US firms in China - auditor, Reuters via Moneycontrol.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - ...Q: Would reducing overtime hours impact volume?
    A: ...They need to obviously hire a lot more workers to make up for the reduced hours
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [That's the function of Timesizing Phase Two and Phase Three = to convert overtime and overwork (overtime per person from all sources such as part-time jobs at different employers +/- self-employment) smoothly and continuously into jobs - and training wherever needed.]
  3. Are Your Biggest Earning Days Over? US News & World Report via ChicagoTribune.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...Keep working full time. One reason women experience such a steep pay gap compared to men is that they tend to take job breaks and work shorter hours after having children... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This would give women a stronger incentive than men to get "full time" redefined downward to levels more appropriate to the Age of Robotics and cut this excuse for a shorter-hours-based gender disparity.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, March 28, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Newt Gingrinch is laying off about a third of his campaign staff..., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A8.
    [Here's a downsizing that's actually Good News.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • The U.S. isn't winning the war against hackers, the FBI's top cyber cop said, in a grim appraisal of efforts to keep corporate data secure, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Markets search for reasons to extend rally, Boston Globe, B10.
    Stocks slipped as economic data met [low?] expectations but failed to excite [or reassure] investors, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
    The Dow industrials lost 43.90 points to 13197.73.
  • Vital Signs - Americans' confidence in the economy slipped in March... - Consumer Confidence Index fell to 70.2 from 71.6 in February, WSJ, graph caption, A1.
  • Home prices hit new lows in January, but the rate of decline appeared to be easing..., WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [Whoopeedoo.]
  • An MF Global official, as part of a possible immunity deal [=plea bargain], has given investigators details about transactions that dipped into customer funds, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Violation of the sanctity of contract spreads from the-.01%-vs-the-99% to the-.01%-vs-the-1%.]
  • The case for raising top tax rates - Could Americans [ie: Onepercenters] stomach a tax rate of 80% or more?, NY Times, B1.
    [If they can't, they'll continue coagulating and decirculating the money supply and destroying their economic habitat.]
    ...More than two thirds of families earning a quarter of a million dollars a year or more [still] tell Gallup's pollsters that their taxes are too high...
    [and thus are still bringing America down...]
  • The Supreme Court's momentous test [in ruling on the constitutionality of requiring most Americans to obtain health insurance] - The justices must accept limits on their own power..., editorial, NYT, A24.
    ...to overturn well-founded acts of Congress...
    [What's so well-founded about basing universal health insurance on mandatory car insurance and Massachusetts' pathetic health plan, instead of on Medicare, or Hawaii's successful pre-1991 health plan that everyone liked, including small business?]
  • Greece's fringe parties surge amid bailout ire, WSJ, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Quincy City Commissioners Meet about Budget, WCTV.tv
    QUINCY, Fla. - ...You need to cut your payroll expenses and there are other ways to do that then to lay people off. Cut hours, reduce salaries, but don't lay people off and don't raise taxes... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The No-Hour Workweek: Reinventing Employee Expectations For The Modern Economy, Co.Exist via fastcoexist.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...The No-Hour Workweek means our team is constantly in contact. Two-thirds of our team takes customer calls on weekends, and our development team frequently works into the wee hours of the morning. We monitor social media, catch up on emails, and work on projects at night and over the weekends, and we’re constantly attending industry and networking events... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's a major bit of naivete - no set working hours means you're accessible 24/7 = all the time - so the zero-hour workweek is indistinguishable from the ALL-hour workweek = all 168 hrs/wk. No "stifling" "constraints" means no boundaries, no limits ... no life.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, March 27, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Banks are pressing the Fed to explain how it arrived at "stress test" results which differed from some of their own estimates, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Press the Fed, upset the coverup of all your bankster corruption, and "You'll be soorr-ryyy!"]
  • Fed doubts that big[?] US jobless fall[?] will last,
    Financial Times, p.1.
  • As Dutch economy slides [1.1% in 2H11], euro woes spread to the core [ie: strongest EU economies], WSJ, C12.
    ...shrank...largely from weak consumer demand. Austerity will...deepen the problem...
    [1.1% in halfayear is well within a non-problematic steadystate oscillation, especially given such a noisy indicator as the "GDP".]
  • US World Bank nominee faces flak over critical book on growth, by Robin Harding, Financial Times, p.1.
    Jim Yong Kim, the US nominee to head the World Bank, is coming under fire over a book ["Dying for Growth" published in 2000] he co-authored which criticizes "neoliberalism" and "corporate-led economic growth," arguing that in many cases they had made the middle class and the poor in developed countries worse off...
    [The bad news here is just that (A) he's right - corporations are still trying to get upsizing (growth) by downsizing and coagulating evermore megabucks in the pockets of their CEOs, which are already so tightly stuffed they can hardly get their hands into them - and if this is so good (or even neutral) for the middle class, why is the middle class shrinking? - and (B) our zombie CEOs are STILL criticizing him, STILL downsizing to get upsizing, and STILL cannibalizing their own foundations by converting active consumer spending power into inactive superrich investing power >>> no circulation, no economy.]
  • Job crisis - Employment is now seen as a central national security issue, says Abeer Allam,
    Financial Times, Arab1 pointer to Arab4.
    [Don't tell me the superrich sheiks are waking up before us/US?!]
    Jobs top the list of national priorities - The [Arab] region's governments will have to create more than 85 million jobs in 10 years, Financial TImes, Arab4 target article.
    [The most powerful, gradual, flexible and market-oriented way to do that is... quick-start worksharing and permanent Timesizing.]
    - Small enterprises - Abeer Allam explains the hopes that lie in entrepreneurs, subhead.
    [Dream on. There's no way small business can create that many 40-hr/wk jobs in 10 years in the Arab region unless we're talkin' about good ol' "self-employment with no clients." Better idea: Drop the strain to "create jobs" (40hr/wk), however artificial, for everyone, and just share and spread the natural, market-demanded employment (and wages!), however short a workweek it takes. As money is redistributed UP the income scale, it changes from spending power to investing power and slows down its velocity of circulation. But cutting worktime per person redistributes money DOWN the income scale and changes it back from investing power into spending power - circulation speeds up, the economy takes flight - and incidentally, everyone has more time to shop. "But cutting hours cuts pay!" No it doesn't. Labor surplus cuts pay. Cutting hours creates labor shortage and labor shortage RAISES pay - and centrifuges the black hole of money among the Onepercenters.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Public v private sector pay: who earns more? The Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    [Business good, government bad??]
    LONDON, England, U.K. - Public sector workers are more skilled, work shorter hours and earn more money than their private sector counterparts, according to a new analysis of the differences in pay out today... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Notes on 28-hour week (56 hours biweekly) campaign, Australian Multicultural Union via australianmulticulturalunion.org
    PERTH, Western Australia - By reducing the days required to attend to work from 9 per fortnight (2wks) to 7 per fortnight, there would be an immediate saving to the worker [or rather, employer?] of 2/9s of the fuel bill as well as maintence costs, a 22.2% saving in fuel costs... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Saskatchewan Archives cuts hours and staff, Regina Leader-Post via leaderpost.com
    REGINA, Sask., Canada - ...The result is four fulltime and 10 part-time staff members will lose their jobs out of a total of 49 employees. In addition to the job cuts, the two archivists' offices in Regina and Saskatoon have also reduced their hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [which avoided even more jobcuts.]
  4. Homestart 12th birthday celebration, ThisIsTamworth.co.uk
    TAMWORTH, Staffs., U.K. - ..In her Annual Report, Senior Co-ordinator of Dawn Candy said that over the past year, Homestart had been forced to cut hours for staff after reductions in funding, but had been able to find more funding and most cuts had been put right... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, March 25-26, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Industries fear ripple effect of proposed Postal Service cuts, New York Times, B1 pointer to B3.
    [La la la, let's just let the supermegarichest cut the Postal Service (instead of restoring the graduated income taxes of wartime prosperity 1942-45) and funnel even more of the money supply to themselves - and then see if there's anything at ALL left for them to invest in!]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Cuts to European arts budgets are being felt in United States, 3/25 Boston Globe, A4.
    European governments are cutting their support for culture [whose culture? whose tastes? whose hobbies?], and American arts lovers [poor little rich folk?] are starting to feel the results...
    [As the officially denied global depression deepens, much makework unravels, especially government makework based on charity forced, by self-serving taxcutting Onepercenters, from taxpayers, increasingly the 99% (or in Québecois, "nous autres").]
  • Why is college so expensive? A new study points to a disconcerting culprit: financial aid, by Paul Kix, ESPN Magazine via 3/25 Boston Globe, K1.
    If a college economics class does it job, students will soon realize that even their professors don't understand why their schools are so expensive.
    [Or why their college years are better at keeping them out of the job market than at getting them a good job.]
    Over the past three decades, college tuition has increased at more than double the rate of inflation. Outstanding student loan debt in the United States now exceeds $1 trillion, a national burden even greater than that of credit cards....
    [Onepercenters have shifted their global control strategy from war to debt, pushing small countries into impossibly big debt (see John Perkins' "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man") and now they're doing it to their fellow Americans, expecially the young. Boy, are they cruisin' for a bruisin'!]
    A recent paper, by economists at Harvard and George Washington University...found that the colleges receiving federal grants and loans set their tuition roughly 75% higher than those institutions that go without government support.... The National Bureau of Economic Research published the paper in February.... The authors of the study caution they researched the for-profit sector only, and haven't tried to test the hypothesis among traditional four-year colleges....
    College tuition wasn't always a national crisis. As recently as the 1970s, the price of tuition actually declined by 17% at public universities, and 13% at private ones....
    [But that was when the labor surplus of the Great Depression was just being replaced by the entry of the babyboomers into the job markets, so we didn't need the makework as desperately as later.]
    In their 1998 book, "The Student Aid Game," economists Michael McPherson and Morton Schapiro said public colleges and universities tended to increase tuition by $50 for every $100 in aid...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Post Office debate triggers lobbying, NYT via 3/26 Boston Globe, B7.
    The Post Office, which is losing $36 million a day, has proposed closing 3,700 post offices; shutting 250 mail-processing centers; cutting Saturday delivery; and increasing postal rates. (photo caption)
    [How about just diverting a tiny fraction of our grotesque military-industrial makework budget. We'd have tons of budget freed up for constructive stuff like the USPS if, for example, we got our sorry asses out of Afghanistan so our over-the-edge soldiers wouldn't be racking up these kinds of costs -]
    The United States gave $50,000 to each of the families of 16 Afghan villagers who were killed in a rampage blamed on a lone soldier, 3/26 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A4.
  • Facility shut down after meth lab fire, 3/25 AP via Boston Globe, A13.
    Ashtabula, Ohio - ...Park Haven [Nursing] Home.\.where a methamphetamine lab fire in a resident's room...killed a man who police say was not a resident or employee...closed Friday.\. Six others were hurt. ...Park Haven...had more than 30 residents [and] had been found to be violating federal regulations...

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • For homeless families, hotel is a life in limbo, by Kathleen Burge atkburge@globe.com, 3/25 Boston Globe, A1.
    [Anyplace is a life in limbo if you're not connected to everyone else via The Market via a good job.]
    ...At the Home Suites Inn...the hotel's main rooms are nearly all occupied by 90 homeless families with children placed there by the state, both the working poor and the unemployed.... The Home Suites Inn on Totten Pond Rd in Waltham...now holds far more homeless families than paying guests; 133 children live there..\.. The state [of Massachusetts] pays $80 a night per room because traditional emergency shelters cannot handle the surge of families who have become homeless in the past few years.
    [and digging deeper, because we have frozen a 1940 concept of "full time employment" through the ages of mechanization and automation and deep into the age of robotization. So it's just going to get worse and worse and worse until we wake up and resume our 1840-1940 reduction of the workweek and once again restore something approaching full employment (in 1944, we had "wartime prosperity" with 1.2% unemployment) and maximum consumer spending, marketable productivity and stable investment.]
    As recently as 2007, the state placed almost no homeless families in hotels or motels. But the next year, as the economy faltered, the number of homeless began to climb. In Massachusetts, it peaked [for the moment] at 1,793 families living in hotels and motels in July 2011, and the state created HomeBASE, a program to help qualifying famlies pay rent [bandaid alert!].
    But even as that program moved 1,600 families into apartments, it wasn't enough: 1,442 families still live in hotels. More than 2,000 more families are living in shelters....
    Homeless families [in Massachusetts per fiscal year, in terms of total emergency assistance caseload daily averages],
    graph data from Mass. Dept. of Housing & Community Development, 3/25 Boston Globe, A15.
    2008 1,983; 2009 3,215; 2010 3,857; 2011 3,979; 2012 4,960

    [4,960 in fiscal 2012 to date (and that's only one of the 50 states!) compared to less than 2000 just four years ago, because the state is still ignoring its antique 72-year-old concept of "full time employment" and the solution potential of its worksharing program. How bad does this have to get before we get our outdated workweek into the crosshairs? "D. D. & H." ... downsizing, disability, and homelessness...]
    Last fiscal year, the state spent about $29 million on motels and hotels, out of about $154 million total for housing homeless families.
    [Ironically, motels and hotels are sounding relatively inexpensive!]
    Families - mostly mothers with children - are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population in the country. Three decades ago, families made up just 1% of the national homeless population. Now they account for 37%, according to the National Center on Family Homelessness in Needham.
    [So just as we now have millions of people working for our huge, bloated military-"defense" industry with a self-interest in blocking diplomatic solutions, now we're moving toward millions of people working for our huge, bloated "hospitality" industry with a self-interest in blocking employment solutions.]
    ...Rashita Clark...shares a room with her two younger kids.... She doesn't earn enough at ther part-time job to cover the rent....
    [Shorter hours is happening anyway but not the best way. The American public in general, and the Massachusetts public in particular, need to wake up to *workweek regulation as full-employment strategy.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Worries over Europe [& Asia & higher oil prices] push Dow down [152 pts to 13081] for week, 3/25 Boston Globe, G5.
    ...worst in a month...
  • The rich get even richer - The top 1%* take in 93% of additional income [created in the U.S. in 2010, compared to 2009 = $288 billion], op ed by Steven Rattner, New York Times, A23.
    [* "top 1%" of taxpayers = those with at least $352,000 in income. Imagine what our economic growth figures would be like if we implemented a simple mechanism that got these billions to the 297,000,000 Americans who actually spend their money instead of the 3,000,000 who have so cannibalized their own consumer base, they can't even find stable investments for it. That's almost $1000 for every American! Imagine the multiplier effect! (But with current 40-hr job shortages, it would be back to the 1% in two weeks anyway.)]
    ...As a result, the top 1% has done progressively "better" [our quotes - dysfunctional "more" is "better"?] in each economic "recovery" of the past two decades. In the Clinton era "expansion," 45% of the total income gains went to the top 1 percent; in the Bush "recovery," the figure was 65%; now it is 93%... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So, ah, where's the recovery?]
  • A buildup in inventory of Treasurys could become increasingly troublesome for the banks compelled to sop up unwanted government bonds, 3/26 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C3.
    [Sooo much of the money supply crushed into the anesthetizedly supermegawealthy richest 15,000 households that US Treasurys can't even find enough buyers now?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Libraries Could Restore Slashed Hours, 3/26 WRTV Indianapolis via theINDYchannel.com
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - ...Budget cuts forced the library to cut hours about 18 months ago, sparking protests from community groups. But due to a change in law, the library will get more money from county option income tax revenue, which may be used to restore slashed hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Businesses need help, but is the health care reform law the solution? 3/25 Detroit Free Press via freep.com
    ST.JOSEPH, Mich. - ...He also must decide whether to cut the hours of some part-time employees to an average of no more than 30 hours a week, so he does not have to provide insurance for them that would be required by the law... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • The Richer Sex: How the new majority of female breadwinners is transforming sex, love and family, by Liz Mundy (Simon & Schuster, 327 pp.), 3/25 Boston Globe, K6.
    [Will female breadwinners have the sense to thaw our frozen 1940 concept of "full time employment" and let the unemployment rate adjust the workweek to lower levels more appropriate to our higher levels of superproductive technology? Will they have the sense to stop the splitting of our societies into overworkers and dependents, and let everybody participate in the job market with more financially secure free time? Will they have the sense to veer away from those who want more? - more imports, more immigrants, more births = more population in the age of planetary overpopulation? Will they have the sense to help shift our basic social unit from the reproductive pair to the productive person, and from the procreative couple to the creative individual? - to facilitate the trends from quantity to quality, and from violence and drama to gentleness and diversity?]
  • Enclave must go, Israeli court rules, AP via 3/26 Boston Globe, A3.
    Jerusalem - On Sunday, Israel's Supreme Court rejected the state's request to postpone the dismantling of a large, unsanctioned[? - then why request for postponement?] West Bank settler [ie: squatter] enclave until 2015...because it was built on private Palestinian land..\..dealing a blow to [squatters'] hopes to keep dozens of rogue outposts standing.... Migron, home to 300 [land thieves], is one of the largest unauthorized enclaves and a symbol of [squatter] defiance...
    [And what a disgrace and embarrassment to Judaism they are! And how quick the USA is in dismantling Occupy Wall Street encampments across the country, but how slow they are to net that yahoo, Netanyahu, and rub his bullying nose in his own sacred writings, like say, "Let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an everflowing stream!" (w'yiggal ka-mmayim mishpat uw-ts'dhaqah k'nachal 'ethan) Amos 5:24.]
  • Research monkey deaths spark protests - Activists seek end to Harvard facility, 3/26 Boston Globe, B2.
    'If they can't even keep those animals alive, what kind of science can they do?' Laura Ray, who helped organize the Harvard Square protest



    Saturday, March 24, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • U.S. stocks rose on Friday, but the Dow industrials and the S&P500 had their biggest weekly drop this year, as investors shifted focus to slowing growth in China..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B4.
  • Crisis held lessons, Bernanke says - 'This outpouring of research [WHAT outpouring of research?!] will help shape future central bank doctrine.' Ben Bernanke, 3/24 Boston Globe, B6.
    [Very clever. Advanced spindoctoring reaches into the Fed: Drop the language of (urgently needed) "investigation" (and cleanup), and substitute (optional, scientific-sounding) "research" and claim there's an outpouring of it and ... you can continue your coverup and self-exculpation! Take that, Bill Black and any other honest regulators, you dinosaurs!]
  • Taking aim at loopholes in theory - Under [Rep.] Paul Ryan's plan, the rich could actually take a hit,
    by James B. Stewart, New York Times, B1.
    ...As I worked on my own taxes this week and realized I may be paying even more than I did last year when I paid 24% of my adjusted gross income in federal income tax and 37% in combined federal and state - more, as I've reported, than the average 18% paid by the top 400 taxpayers "earning" [our quotes] an average of $270 million a year - I found it hard to believe anyone would seriously propose cutting the already-low tax rates of the ultrawealthy.
    [Especially when that just pressures up taxrates on the non-wealthy who spend, and thereby cuts consumer spending and profitable investment opportunities in terms of marketable productivity.]
    With millionaires like Mitt Romney paying just 13.9% of his $21.7 million of adjusted gross income in federal tax, how much lower can their rates go?...
    [Zero? They're just making it harder and harder for their spindoctors to keep covering up what a yawning depression we're spiraling into compared to the boom we'd have with timesizing-maximized employment and consumer spending.]
  • Japanese regulators said a scandal-tainted Tokyo asset manager [AIJ Investment Advisors] that lost $1.3 billion in client money had been hiding its trading losses for nearly a decade, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [And Wall Street?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Love beyond working hours, Postnoon.com
    HYDERABAD, India - Together yet apart, this seems to be the constant woe of women who are married to men clocking long hours at work. But even a day in each other's company can do wonders. If love is the tie that binds couples together, time is often the wrench that pries them apart... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Shorter hours, staff changes may be coming in Winter Haven library, NewsChief.com
    WINTER HAVEN, Fla. - The Winter Haven Public Library may have to shorten its hours and make staffing changes soon... The city, like others in the county, is getting substantially fewer county dollars to support the library than expected for the current fiscal year... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, March 23, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge MA from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from Kate's Kaffé in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Fedex said it would park some aircraft and reduce its work force [with unspecified jobcuts] as the company scaled back its forecasts for the global economy, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
  • GM plans to close one of two European factories as part of a cost-cutting plan to resuscitate its money-losing Opel/Vauxhall unit there, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Resuscitating a unit by busting its best customers and their dependents?]
  • T-Mobile will cut 5% of its work force [#jobs unspecified: WSJ getting sloppy or glossing over bad news?] and close seven call centers as part of a broader restructuring that will stretch for the next three months, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [What should they be doing? Instead of a traumatic 5% workforce cut as T-Mobile alienates & defunds its own best customers (employees) and their dependents, it should be trimming 5% of their workweek (24 minutes a day for everyone, including executives), re-investing any overtime advantage in OT-targeted training & hiring, & keeping all employees together working, earning & buying 95% as many of its products & services as usual.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • AMR said it would ask a bankruptcy judge to reject [ie: void] its labor contracts so it can impose its own [CEO mega"compensating"?] terms in pursuit of $1.25 billion in savings, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [What about voiding the compensation contracts with top executives? Capitalism is finished ahywhere its most fundamental principle, the sanctity of contract (which is the basis of private property) holds only among the Onepercent.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • New jobless claims fell to a four-year low last week [cuz fewer eligible employed to downsize?], but a broader gauge continued to suggest that improvement in the labor market is slowing, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Global growth fears rattle blue chips, WSJ, C1 target.
    New signs of slowing global "growth" [our quotes] rattled investors, sending Dow industrials down 78.48 points...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Paranoia strikes deeper, op ed by Paul Krugman, New York Times, A25.
    Stop, hey, what's that sound? [ Everybody look what's going down! = 1966 song by Buffalo Springfield]
    Actually, it is the noise a [once-]great political party makes when it loses what's left of its mind...when Mitt Romney bought...the claim that high gas prices are thanks to an Obama administration plot...
  • A key gauge of Europe's business sentiment...a survey of purchasing managers.\.falls unexpectedly...,
    NYT, B1 pointer to B4.
    European business activity weakened in March, raising concerns that improved sentiment about the region's debt crisis isn't leading to expansion, WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    [The investor sentiment of the Onepercent who are concerned about the debt crisis (but spending much less than 1% of their mega-income) is irrelevant to recovery compared to the consumer confidence of the 99% who spending much closer to 99% of their lesser and mini incomes.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Vermont House OKs budget ending courthouse shutdowns, BurlingtonFreePress.com
    MONTPELIER, Vt. - ...Vermont’s court system saw some of the most obvious impacts from the budget cutting of recent years. When upper-level executive branch employees took a 5% pay cut in fiscal 2009, the judiciary sought to follow suit... But Vermont judges’ salaries are set in law and couldn’t be lowered. Instead, the Supreme Court, which directs judiciary operations, began ordering furloughs — brief, wholesale shutdowns of the court system. Since then, the court system has shut down for one day each month, saving about $1.2m annually but creating big headaches in scheduling multiday trials and hearings... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Board to consider canceling furlough, The Tennessean via tennessean.com
    GALLATIN, Tenn. - ...The 3-day furlough was approved by the board in last year's budget as a measure to avoid eliminating jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • The IRS expanded audits of people "earning" [our quotes] over $500,000, with a big jump for those making more than $1 million, WSJ, A1.



    Thursday, March 22, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Commerce Banc[shares of Worcester MA] to buy Mercantile [Bank & Trust of Boston for $26.5m], Boston Globe, B6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks slip [a second day] as rally raises questions on "growth" [our quotes], Boston Globe, B10.
    Sagging energy shares pulled the Dow industrials to a second straight loss, down 45.57 points [or 0.3% to 13124.62],
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to CD4.
  • Investors seek junk [bonds],
    Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.13.
  • The U.S. housing market, a notable soft spot in the weak economy for the past four years, is becoming less of a drag on the "recovery" [our quotes], Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A3.
    Real-estate markets are showing signs of life. [= Pathetic. "Damned by faint praise."]
  • A unanimous [Supreme] Court curbed the government's power to enforce the Clean Water Act, ruling for landowners, WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Guess where a country is headed whose supreme judicial body is unanimously in favor of...national suicide.]
  • The University of Massachusetts lowered its estimate of the state's economic growth for 2011, putting the rate at 1.8% [instead of 2.9%], Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    [You can't get UPsizing alias growth by DOWNsizing, and though Mass. has a state worksharing program, it still hasn't upgraded it into a timesizing program by (A) switching the funding from the unemployment insurance fund to a 100% tax on chronic overtime with a prorated exemption for investment in overtime-targeted training&hiring, and (B) stepwise lowering the threshold where "overtime" begins in order to spread around existing market-demanded employment, and wages, deconcentrate the state income beyond those who have far more than they can spend, and thereby reactivate more and more of the state's former consumers who have been deactivated by downsizing (thus providing more instate marketable productivity and stable investment opportunity).]
  • Foreclosure activity in Mass. jumps in February [to 1,394, more than double previous Feb.] - Rise in petitions, deeds comes after a slowdown in '11, by Jennifer McKim, Boston Globe, B7.
    ...Last year's lull...was prompted by nationwide scrutiny into lenders' home-seizure practices...
    [Now that our suicidal fishermen have wiped out their food-fish stocks, our suicidal home lenders are starting on their home-borrower stocks.]
  • Australia feels drag, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.6.
    ...by its strong currency and consumers' desire to pay down debt...
    [The bad news here is the proliferation of perverse economic indicators that give demerits for constructive developments, as here, and give brownie points for destructive developments, f.ex., a longer average workweek = less human freedom. See first goodnews story below.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Two for the Price of One: The 60 hour work week, OpEdNews.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...From the early 1900s to the 1970s (except during the Second World War), the numbers of hours worked per week declined for most Americans..\.. It was during the late 1970s that a trend toward a decline in work hours ended. ...In the late 1970s, the share of employees working more than 40 hours per week began to increase.... [After that,] I was teaching Business Strategy in Fordham's MBA program in the early 1980s that I first noticed terminations as a business strategy in a textbook. "Downsizing" as it was called soon appeared in all business schools' strategy textbooks and [was] accepted as sound business practice... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Aha, here's the first history we've seen of how we replaced timesizing with downsizing (while still paying lip service to upsizing, alias growth). Even mentioned is Juliet Schor, who followed Ben Hunnicutt in asking why progress on financially secure free time was reversing in recent decades, and management strategy's growing slide toward the self-destructive.]
  2. Marion school district cuts teachers to balance budget, KFVS via kfvs12.com
    MARION, Illin. - ...The school board decided to cut 14 certified teach positions, 15 non-certified teaching positions, and cut hours for 33 non-certified positions. That is out of approximately 230 teachers in the district... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And without those hourcuts, there'd be a lot more jobcuts - until Marion's wealthy taxcutters come to their senses...]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, March 21, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Payments to Raytheon suspended - Air Force holds [back] $621m due to late deliveries, Boston Globe, B5.
    [Flutterup in conservative(!) Government-Makework Land?! But what's a mere bagatelle like $621,000,000 of taxpayers' money (or now, just part of a $17,000,000,000,000 national debt) to the metastasizing American mil-ind complex? Whoo-eee, when the once-great USofA finally implodes, it'll go with a BANG, not a whimper. And if it comes before we're "pushing up daisies," we'll make our escape to marginally less dangerous Canada and back across the Ottawa-St.Lawrence river system to safer, "Proroguer"-Harper-resistant, Europe-In-America, Québec.]
  • Heart of darkness - A war that was already toxic grows even more poisonous,
    op ed by Maureen Dowd, New York Times, A19.
    ..."We are spending $10 billion a month that we can't even pay for," said Congressman Walter Jones, that rarest of birds, a Southern Republican dove. The Chinese are lending us the money...that we are spending in Afghanistan"... A war that long ago reached its breaking point has gone mad... Korans were burned by [US] military personnel..\.. Afghan security forces...murdered some American troops... An American soldier walked out of his base early one morning and began....murdering Afghan innocents, leaving seven adults and nine children in one small village dead...
    [Timesizing can provide jobs for the millions of Americans who need to get OUT of their jobs in the maggotty military-industrial corpse of corporations.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Roxbury MA church to file for [Ch.11] bankruptcy - Charles Street AME members OK plan to avert foreclosure,
    Boston Globe, B5. ...African Methodist Episcopal...
    [Quite a large and respected denomination in these parts.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Worries about China waylaid the stock market rally, with the Dow industrials falling 68.94 points or 0.5% to 13170.19,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Two nominees to the Fed said it must support a still-weak economy..., WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Never mind a still-weakening economy because the key cause of recession is still intensifying without limit = the money supply is still concentrating and congealing without limit in an unlimitedly small population, for example, the wealthiest 0.01% = the richest 30,000 Americans - who can't possibly spend it, or even sustainable invest it since that would require marketable productivity to invest in - and the consumer base (consumer markets and spending) is being downsized daily via the employment basement.]
  • House Republicans unveiled a budget blueprint that would turn Medicare into a system of private insurance plans, reduce programs for the poor, and cut the tax code to two levels [10 & 25%], Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Oh yeah, let's see how far we can shrink consumer spending and still have an "economy".]
    The careless House budget - To keep taxes low for the rich, Republicans would cut everything else, editorial, NYT, A18.
    [Yeah, why don't we just give the WHOLE money supply to the retards at the top, shut down the economy and all starve?!]
    Democrats dismissed GOP Rep. Ryan's budget, saying it promised drastic savings without specifying cuts or raising taxes on the wealthy, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
  • Flawed U.S. schools are increasing[ly] causing a national-security risk, a thinktank report warned, WSJ, A1 pointer A3.
    [Never mind schools whose flaws take 10-20 years to manifest - what about the standard self-mutilating U.S. business policy of downsizing instead of timesizing, like we're going to get stronger by constantly weakening ourselves.]
  • Restaurant wage suit gaining steam - Back Bay [Restaurant] Group toyed with hours, [more than 300 current and former] workers say, by Jenn Abelson, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...failing to pay minimum wages and overtime to servers, bartenders and other staff...
  • Italy plans the major labor overhaul in bid to help youth, by Galloni & Meichtry & Zampano, WSJ, A8.
    ...a domestically controversial effort that anchors the economic revival Italy promised the European central bank last year as it was pulled into the [southern] Continent's debt crisis. The measures...aim to usher millions of young Italians into the job market and help the country's struggling companies manage economic downturns by cutting jobs -
    [Apparently the lessons of Kurzarbeit are lost on the Italians.]
    - but also create a wider safety net for the jobless...
    [- sounds replete with Republican-style self-contradiction.]
    Only 57% of working-age Italians have jobs, while two million people are unemployed.
    [Out of a population of ?? - googling...61 million est. July 2011]
    The unemployment rate for people 15-24 years old stands at 31.1%, compared with 7.8% in Germany, according to the European statistics agency Eurostat... At the same time, despite its reputation for having a generous welfare state, Italy has one of the lowest levels of unemployment benefits in Europe, spending some 3.1% of GDP on such services in 2010, compared with 4.1% in Germany and 8% in Denmark and Belgium, according to estimates by the OECD...
  • Germany is the big engine that can't, WSJ, C1.
    ...do much about...the economic divide between Germany and souther Europe...
    [Solution: Greece back to drachma, Italy back to lira, etc. - currency union was way premature, especially with southern Europe.]
  • Inequality undermines democracy, by Eduardo Porter, NYT, B1.
    [= the understatement of the century, and it applies between Northern and Southern Europe too.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Stabilizing Employment and the Economy Even During Tough Times - Work-Sharing Provision in Payroll Tax Extension Will Support Workers, Businesses, and the Economy during Recessions, Center For American Progress via americanprogress.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - A little-noticed provision of the payroll tax cut extension signed into law by Pres. Barack Obama in February encourages states to adopt so-called “worksharing” programs as part of their unemployment insurance systems. Worksharing is a policy that provides an alternative to businesses facing the prospect of having to lay off workers. Instead of laying off a single worker, a business instituting worksharing could, for example, reduce the hours of 5 employees by 20% while partially supplementing the workers’ lost wages with unemployment insurance money. The idea is to help businesses avoid layoffs during down times by giving them the option to spread the cut in hours among a larger group of employees... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sincerity needed with the change in official working hours: CSC, HaveeruOnline via haveeru.com.mv
    MALÉ, Maldive Islands, Indian Ocean - ...“The official working hours has been reduced by one hour, without making any changes to the salaries. Hence, I call on all government employees to be more diligent and sincere in their work and to refrain from wasting official hours unnecessarily,” Fahmy said... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Apple: We're Making Progress to Reduce Excessive Working Hours [in China], PC Magazine via pcmag.com
    SHENZHEN, China - ...Daring Fireball first reported Apple's update and noted that February's reduced work hours likely occurred while production of the new iPad was in full-force. As part of its supplier code of conduct, Apple limits factory working hours to a maximum of 60 work hours per week and requires at least one day of rest per seven days of work, barring emergencies or unusual circumstances... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Oh now, that's REAL progressive. By making massive use of Chinese working hours "reduced" to the U.S. level of ca.1900, Apple is concentrating robot-diminished market-demanded working hours in China (and doing nothing for the U.S.], stifling shorter-hour job creation and wage spreading, making zero contribution to either economy's consumer spending and stifling its own markets. In short, Apple is being just as stupid and suicidal as Microsoft.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, March 20, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Amazon is buying Kiva Systems, which makes robots used in shipping centers, as it continues to spend to help fuel its business, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1?.
    [Quite antithetical to the Hopi kiva, from which they stole the name.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • House Republicans will introduce a 2013 budget Tuesday that cuts tax rates and provides for two individual brackets of 10% and 25%, WSL, A1:2 pointer to A1:6.
    [Great - more Republican moronity relying on government more while funding it less.]
  • The states get a poor report card - Few can be trusted with the antipoverty programs Republicans want to give them, editorial, New York Times, A22.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Jack Reed's push for 'work-sharing' praised in The New Yorker, WPRI-TV 12 (blog) via blogs.wpri.com
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. - ...And who had the kind of idea...Obama should have pushed for to make the stimulus more effective? None other than Rhode Island’s own U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, who finally got Congress to approve his cherished work-share program just last month... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- and actually it was after Jack Reed consulted with conservative Kevin Hassett of the American Enterprise Institute who had been praising the German version ("Kurzarbeit").]
  2. Apple's working hours in China down to 48 a week [8 hrs/day x 6 days/wk], within 1 hour a day of the US average [7.1 hrs/day x 6 days/wk], TheNextWeb.com (blog)
    [ - IF you're still working full time, that is. But Americans probably mess this up by working 8.52 hrs/day for five days a week.]
    CUPERTINO, Calif. - Apple’s ongoing reporting of its efforts to address excessive work hours has been updated with new information. The latest numbers show that the average work-week has fallen to an average of 48 hours per week, that’s within 1 hour a day of the U.S. average, which sits at 42.6 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt #1 - Human costs of Taiwan's long working hours, by Cindy Sui, BBC News via bbc.co.uk
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - As one of the world's key exporters, Taiwan has a reputation for being highly efficient in manufacturing and production. But it seems this success has come at a high price. A recent string of deaths have been caused directly, or indirectly, through overwork. It is raising concerns in Taiwan about the long hours some workers are putting in. "...The government said last year more than 40 people died of overwork, four times as many as the year before..."
    [Whoa, karoshi in Japan, then China, now Taiwan! This is the effect of unregulated workweeks oozing longer and longer causing labor surplus, job insecurity and low wages in a diagonally downward vicious spiral.]
  4. BONUS excerpt #2 - Jackpot bus drivers facing cuts to working hours, Telegraph.co.uk
    CORBY, Northamps., U.K. - A syndicate of bus drivers who won a ''life-changing'' £38 million EuroMillions jackpot have spoken of their joy - and revealed that they had been facing cuts in their working hours...
    [Hopefully now they'll buy the company, keep the hourscuts to create more jobs, increase pay and shopping and start rebuilding the economy, instead of continuing the current coagulation of money just so the 1% can thump their chests and stuff their mattresses with it - while the economy shrinks around them. Time for Work Time Regulation as Sustainable Full Employment (& market-maxing!) Strategy.]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, March 18-19, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books - updating from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Why do nations fail? - Lessons from Venice provide cautionary clues to the future [or present?] of the US, review by Gareth Cook of book "Why Nations Fail" by Acemoglu & Robinson, 3/18 Boston Globe, K9.
    ...Acemoglu has a one-word answer: "Politics." What this means, he explains, is that nations succeed when they are able to share power broadly. They either develop inclusive institutions or "extractive institutions," designed to plunder wealth for the few [or better, funnel an unlimitedly large percentage of the money supply to an unlimitedly small percentage of the population - OK, limited only by 1]...
    [Gee, isn't that exactly what's happening in the US and Canada today?!]
  • Local economists question usefulness of jobs reports [or rather, initial job estimates], 3/18 Boston Globe, G1.
    Initial estimate of jobs added in 2011: 40,700
    Revised estimate of jobs added in 2011: 9,100
    [Political influence corrupting stats agency?]
  • Barriers to change, from Wall Street and Geneva - How world trade pacts could impede financial reform,
    3/18 New York Times, Bu1.
    [So the unaccountability of the supposedly uncontrollable sloshing occasioned by the simplistic religion of Free Trade has finally metastasized the unaccountability and uncontrollable sloshing in the international financial industry - who could have guessed?!]
  • The sharp selloff in Treasury's last week is prompting some analysts on Wall Street to rethink the trajectory of interest rates 3/19 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    And at least one firm is daring to voice the big question: Is the decades-long bull market for Treasury's finally over?
  • Apple said it would hold a conference call on Monday to disclose what it planned to do with its stockpile of roughly $100 billion in cash, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
  • Surprise increase in rates is credited to signs of recovery, by Nelson Schwartz, 3/19 NYT, B1.
    ...bond market's sharpest move last week caught some traders by surprise...
  • Nothing set in stone for 'this time is different' economy, by Justin Lahart, 3/19 WSJ, C8.
    ...history of financial crises written by Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff..\.."This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of financial folly" [=] economic performance tends to be subpar in the years that follow financial crises..\.."We live in a Reinhart-Rogoff world" [elicits] sage nods...
    [Sure it's set in stone - Lahar's just being naive - because the concentration and coagulation of the money supply continues unabated. "Normal" gets reperceived and redefined downward, expectations fall, the powers that be get better at ignoring and externalizing the problems or spinning the situation as positive...]
  • Greek deal highlights flaws in default swaps, 3/19 WSJ, C1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. What's a standard workweek? 3/18 BusinessManagementDaily.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Q. What's the definition of a standard workweek? One of our employees claims that overtime is defined as anything over eight hours per workday. Is he correct? A. No. Generally under federal law, overtime is to be paid for hours worked over 40 in a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And that hasn't been adjusted in 72 years despite wave after wave of worksaving technology, ergo concentration of work and wages resulting in decreasing consumer spending despite increasing production, ergo falling prices, rising dependency and permanent and deepening recession and depression, eliciting more and more creativity in ignoring it or spinning it as "jobless recovery" or "slower growth."]
  2. How Many Hours Do You Work Per Week? (Hint: If It's Over 40, You May Have a Problem, Lifehacker.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..."For every four Americans working a 50-hour week every week, there's one American who should have a full-time job, but doesn't."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Neat way to think about it! And it's getting to the point where: For every three Americans working a 40-hour week every week, there's one American who should have a full-time 30-hr/wk job, but doesn't."]
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, March 17, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • 1,700 Ford [factory] workers take early retirement deal, AP via Boston Globe, B5.
    ...and will leave the company by June 1... The automaker says it will bring back about 250 laid-off employees and hire some replacements at lower wages.
    [American management's new strategy the last generation = dump and impoverish its own best customers and quit funding its own consumer base via its employment basement, leaving only taxpayers to fund consumer spending, but then they cut taxes... Third World, here we come!]
    Ford offered the buyouts to all 41,000 factory workers last fall in an effort to cut its skilled trades and production workforces... The company has about 9.000 skilled tradesmen, which it says is too many.
    [But then, what's with management's constant whining about the "shortage of skilled workers"?]
    .\.It offered skilled trades workers like electricians and plumbers $100k to retire. Production workers were offered $50k...
    ...Ford won't replace all of the retiring workers. New factory hires will be paid around $16 per hour...little more than half the wage of a longtime union worker. Skilled tradesmen make above $30 per hour, but changes in factory equipment in recent years have cut the number of workers needed.
    [So much for the objection that newer technology takes just as many employees as older technology because it has to be designed, installed and maintained. And so much for the promise that newer technology makes life easier for everyone. This is not an automatic "given" when employers respond to technology with downsizing and when there is no macroeconomic timesizing mechanism in place to force the transfer of the additional worksavings to the general public in the form of increase job-secure and financially-secure leisure instead of job-and-financially insecure un(der)employment.]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Untouchable pensions may be tested in California, New York Times, B1.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Direct Air parent in bankruptcy, by Samantha Bomkamp, AP via Boston Globe, B5.
    Just three days after abruptly stopping [Direct Air] service and leaving travelers stranded...Southern Sky Air & Tours LLC filed for Chapter 11 protection late Thursday in Worcester MA [with] $10-50m in debt and just $1/2-1m in assets...
  • Bank of America adds to closings - 4 more in Bay State [Massachusetts]... - We project that 'the number of banking centers we have nationwide will continue to decline.' Christina Toth, BofA spokeswoman, by Todd Wallack twallack@globe.com, Boston Globe, B5,B6.
    ...on top of two other local MA branch closings announced last month by the Charlotte NC-based bank...another indication that US banks are shrinking branch networks to trim expenses, absorb acquisitions, and take advantage of [or rather, adapt to] customers moving to online banking...
    [Again, so much for the objection that newer technology takes just as many employees as older technology because it has to be designed, installed and maintained. General conclusion: American manufacturing, newspapers and banks are gradually disappearing, and what's left of the banks are getting bigger and more corrupt. Or maybe what's left of manufacturing and newspapers is getting bigger and more corrupt too as Onepercenters try to persuade themselves that they can continue downsizing with no cumulative or lasting effects.]
    ...BofA...plans to shutter branches of St.James Ave. in Springfield and West St. in Ware on June 15
    and...Cochituate Rd. in Framingham and Pleasant St. in Malden on June 22...
    BofA told investors last year it plans to close 750 of its 5,700 branches in the next few years...
    Separately, BofA has been selling its office buildings across the country "to further streamline its operations"...
    ["Streamlining" is not growth and a "jobless recovery" is just a recession coverup.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Is a concentration of wealth at the top to blame for financial crises? The Economist, p.87.
    [Well, well, the conservative Economist Magazine of London is finally asking the most important question of all, next to "What do we do about it?" Timesizing's answers are Yes, and, We centrifuge the concentration of wealth via market forces responding to an employer-perceived labor shortage. How do we get the labor shortage? The smart way (converting overtime into jobs & cutting the workweek) instead of the stupid ways (war, plague).]
    In the search for the villain behind the global financial crisis, some have pointed to inequality as a culprit [e.g.,] Raghuram Rajan of U.Chicago.\.in his 2010 book "Fault Lines"...
    [Oops, we've already slipped away from the actionable metaphor of a hyperconcentration of the money supply to the unactionable metaphor of a widening inequality gap. We will henceforth replace the latter with the former.]
    Mr Rajan's story was intended as a narrative of the subprime crisis in America, not as a general theory of financial dislocation. But others have noted that [income hyperconcentration] also soared in the years before the Depression of the 1930s. In 2007, 23.5% of all American income flowed to the top 1% of earners - their highest share since 1929.
    In a 2010 paper Michael Kumhof and Romain Rancière, two economists at the IMF, built a model to show how inequality can systematically lead to crisis. An investor class may become better at capturing the returns to production [for example, by incentivating labor surplus via preferentially buying the shares of downsizing corporations?], slowing wage growth [or actually depressing real wages?] and raising [monetary concentration]. Workers then borrow to prop up their consumption. Leverage grows until crisis results... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Wow, right there in The Economist! But little or no followup since then? (as of 4/17/2013)]

    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Jobless proposal would benefit workers, firms, 3/16 (late pickup) YumaSun.com
    PHOENIX, Ariz. - ...Companies would be able to use jobless workers for up to six weeks at 32 hours a week without paying them — as long as they agreed to give them job training. The jobless workers would still get their unemployment benefits from the state during this time period, so they would not be working for “free.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Yes, they would, because the employers getting the benefit would not be doing the paying. Who's checking on the abusable definition of "job training" here? and do you really need six weeks of training to flip a burger? and is there a job at the end? and aren't people on unemployment benefits supposed to be looking for paid work = paid by the employer not the taxpayer? and isn't this just passing more costs onto taxpayers at a time when wealthy decision-makers are cutting taxes, especially on themselves who can most easily afford taxes?... Sounds like Marx was right. Socialism IS inevitable - in the form of corporate socialism. This certainly isn't capitalism, and in fact, capitalism may need timesizing to survive.]
  2. Financial Inclusion Adviser - Camden Futures, Manchester Guardian Jobs via jobs.guardian.co.uk
    CAMDEN, U.K. - ...Contract: Permanent. Hours: Part Time. Salary: £25000 pro rata (28 hours per week)... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Today's theme is the number of less-than-40-hr/wk jobs there are anyway: 32-hour weeks in Arizona even when employers are getting work for free, 28-hour weeks in Britain even for permanent "financial inclusion" officers to whom presumably no "full time" benefits are paid, 35-hour workweeks in Canada even for fast-food joints where health insurance is provided not by employers but by the provincial government (and taxpayer) -]
  3. BONUS excerpt - Toronto school uses hockey to offer cool taste of Canada [to immigrant kids], by Sean Fitz-Gerald, National Post via sports.nationalpost.com
    TORONTO, Province of Ontario (provides "OHIP" = Ontario Health Insurance Plan), Canada - ...It is on the subway that he does a lot of his reading for school. He works up to 35 hours a week at the fast food restaurant...
    So shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, March 16, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from the café car of Amtrak Train 68 southbound from Montréal, & the Starbucks @ State & Pearl, Albany NY -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Cisco to buy video tech company [NDS Group for $4B], AP via Boston Globe, B6.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • iRobot [of Bedford MA] expands a line of floor washers, Boston Globe, B8.
    ...The company is also [besides consumer robots for tight spaces like bathrooms and kitchens] upgrading its iRobot Scooba 390, a floor-washing robot for bigger jobs...
    [Great, now our down-periscope CEOs can downsize employees and consumer spending even further - unless a sudden attack of perspective leads them to timesize with no adverse effects on growth instead of downsizing and plunging themselves further away from upsizing alias...growth.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • The U.S. is boosting its presence in the Persian Gulf, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A9,A14.
    The navy is doubling the number of minesweeping ships and adding mine-hunting helicopters to bolster U.S. "defenses" [our quotes] in the region amid tensions with Iran over its nuclear ambitions...
    [More "Do as we say and not as we do."]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • American Airlines parent AMR fears an extended stay in bankruptcy heightens its risk of being taken over or broken up, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [But maybe that's exactly what it needs.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Wall Street losing its allure - Tough economy [to which the Street has contributed so much toughness], scandals tarnish image on campus, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...College students once attracted to big banks are increasingly turning to other industries. (photo caption)
  • IMF OKs $36.6b for Greek bailout, AP via Boston Globe, B9.
    The IMF approved a new bailout for Greece [referring to the 2nd bailout again?] despite deep doubts within the fund about the likelihood of the program's success, WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
  • Chevron said that oil was seeping from the ocean floor near its operations off the coast of Brazil, the second such leak in recent months, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. College Introduces New Academic Scholarships, Limits Work Hours, The Houghton Star via houghtonstar.com
    HOUGHTON, N.Y. - ...Starting next fall, Loper has asked students “to limit your work to average 10 hours a week. If you work multiple jobs, the total number of hours should not exceed 10. I am sure this will not be easy for some, but we are trying to be fair and give an opportunity for all to work.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So worksharing is happening at all sorts of levels.]
  2. GMH reevaluates 32-hour workweek plan, KUAM.com
    [See original story 1/01-02/2012 #2.]
    HAGATNA, Guam - ...But interim hospital administrator Rey Vega confirms that management is reevaluating the 32-hour workweek plan they had developed for administrative personnel. Vega attributes that to increases in overtime, departing employees and an increasing workload... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Chamber of Commerce to cut hours at welcome center, Lewiston Sun Journal via sunjournal.com
    FARMINGTON, Maine — ...Hours for the Wilton Road Welcome Center will be reduced but the chamber's 24-hour visitor kiosk remains available... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, March 15, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from *Holiday Inn, Plaza Chaudière, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Why be afraid of robotization? (Pourquoi avoir peur de la robotisation?), by Didier Bert, La Presse of Montreal, affaires8 (B8).
    [It's management reaction to technology that's the problem, not technology itself, which could go either way depending on the reaction. If management reacts by downsizing (cutting the workforce), it downsizes its customers' customers and everything gets worse. If management reacts by timesizing (downsizing the workweek and keeping everyone employed), it maintains its customers' customers and consumer spending, and everything gets better because empoyees are not only still employed and spending normally but also more rested and loyal.]
  • A dramatic end to Goldman's code of silence, Toronto Globe, B11.
    Goldman Sachs, the Muppets and a 'toxic' culture, by Boyd Erman, Toronto Globe, B1.
    Banker Greg Smith's resignation...laid bare a culture he called "toxic"... He said Goldman's clients were viewed at "muppets" to be taken advantage of. One way to ensure quick promotion, Mr.Smith wrote, was to "get your clients...to trade whatever will bring the biggest profit to Goldman..."
  • How to spot a crooked advisor, Toronto Globe, B11.
    Allen Stanford is just one of several high-profile financial gurus who have recently been revealed as con artists. (photo caption)
  • New [Canada] telco rules: 'Total disaster' - Limiting access to wireless spectrum will starve smaller players and spur takeovers, Wind Mobile says, Toronto Globe, B1.
  • Green light for the spending of 39 billion euros [for Greece's 2nd bailout], La Presse of Montreal, affaires10 (B10).
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The 40-Hour Workweek: Coming to Save America - 150 years of experience says too much overtime sucks for you, your boss and the economy, TakePart.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...In Wednesday’s Salon, Robinson explores the causes and consequences of America’s ever-expanding cult of...overtime. Rampant job insecurity is cited as the engine powering a trend toward an all-too-common 55-hour workweek. The downside: Quality-of-life hits to individual workers, profit loss to employers, and economic stagnation to the country as a whole... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Manitoba paramedics want cap on number of working hours, CBC.ca
    VIRDEN, Man., Canada - Paramedics in rural Manitoba are calling for a mandatory limit on the number of consecutive hours they can work, as they say fatigue is jeopardizing their safety. "Lack of sleep can be very scary for paramedics," says paramedic Wayne Chacun... In an interview with CBC News, Chacun said the longest [one-day] shift he has worked continuously was 20 hours long... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Work hours linked to nurses' drinking, New Zealand Doctor Online
    CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand - ...Long work hours have been linked with harmful alcohol use in Kiwi nurses, a trans-Tasman study shows... The study results show nurses and midwives working more than 40 hours a week are likely to engage in harmful daily drinking, and, the longer the hours worked the more likely they are to drink... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, March 14, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from *Holiday Inn, Plaza Chaudière, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Direct Air [U.S. discount airline] shutdown [for at least two months with little hope for quick refunds] strands passengers, Toronto Globe, B9.
  • Shutdown looms [in April] for two of three [Nicholas] Hoare book shops [Ottawa & Montreal but not Toronto], Toronto Globe, A10.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • A bull market? Investors aren't so sure - Low trading volumes and lack of risk appetite suggest big gains may be in the past, Toronto Globe, B12.
    [What about big losses?]
  • 'Banks are back' as Wall Street finds new footing -
    [yeah, just like Japanese masseuses = on the backs of taxpayers]
    - Stress tests showing most big U.S. banks are healthy fuels optimism for markets and economy -
    [How convenient that the Fed, which devised the stress "tests," is just as interested in coverup as the banks. And even so -]
    - Four U.S. financial institutions fail to meet stress test thresholds, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [or maybe they thought, geez, SOMEbody better flunk this or it's gonna look fishy. Notice also CBC Ottawa 4pm radio news item today that Goldman Sachs employees joked about fleecing their clients, whom they referred to as "muppets."]
  • The cost of going cold turkey on cheap money, by Ian Campbell, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B12.
    Another quarter of a million U.S. jobs created in February - excellent [or at least marginally positive] news that markets are hardly celebrating...
    [Why should they when it takes a third of a million just to keep up with population growth?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. LAUSD Finalizes Budget Plan To Avoid Cuts Of Teachers, School Programs; CBS Local via losangeles.cbslocal.com
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. — The Los Angeles Unified School District board approved a budget-balancing plan Tuesday that would save the majority of school programs if furlough and salary agreements can be reached with labor unions and if voters support a $298 parcel tax... One thing Deasy would like to cut is the number of district layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Bring back the 40-hour work week - 150 years of research proves that long hours at work kill profits, productivity and employees; Salon.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - If you’re lucky enough to have a job right now, you’re probably doing everything possible to hold onto it. If the boss asks you to work 50 hours, you work 55. If she asks for 60, you give up weeknights and Saturdays, and work 65... And it hurts the country, too. For every four Americans working a 50-hour week, every week, there’s one American who should have a full-time job, but doesn’t..\.. The most essential thing to know about the 40-hour work-week is that, while it was the unions that pushed it, business leaders ultimately went along with it because their own data convinced them this was a solid, hard-nosed business decision... And it may sound weird, but it’s true: the single easiest, fastest thing your company can do to boost its output and profits — starting right now, today — is to get everybody off the 55-hour-a-week treadmill, and back onto a 40-hour footing... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, March 13, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from *Holiday Inn, Plaza Chaudière, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Metals M&A deals on the upswing - Rising costs, uncertainty of supply has companies scrambling to consolidate,
    Toronto Globe, B5.
    ...Nippon Steel...the world's No.2 steel maker, and Sumitoto Metal tied up last year. (photo caption)

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • WTO orders halt to Boeing aid - Both U.S. and European Union claim victory in long-running dispute over subsidies, Toronto Globe, B14.
    [But the U.S. claim is just lame face-saving.]
    "Today's ruling vindicates the EU's long-held claims that Boeing has received massive U.S. government handouts in the past and continues to do so today." Karel De Gucht, EU Trade Commissioner
  • Ottawa poised to bend rules to spur credit for companies, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [And thus it begins. Arbitrary and market-distorting government makework takes many forms. Let's cut the crap, leave taxpayers out of this foolery and just share and spread the vanishing unautomated employment - and consumer-base funding.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Aveos headed for bankruptcy? Buyout or merger possible - Company having trouble paying suppliers, some workers look to jump to competitors, Montreal Gazette, B10.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Fed[eral Reserve] fights sobpoena on Bernanke in civil suit, by Fitzpatrick & Hilsenrath, WSJ via Toronto Globe, B14.
    ...from lawyers...for the six plaintiffs, which include the State Teachers Retirement System of Ohio and the Teacher Retirement System of Texas.\.who want the central bank's chairman, Ben Bernanke, to testify about conversations he had with Bank of America Corp. executives before [BofA] completed its purchase of Merrill Lynch & Co. The three-year-old class-action suit alleges that [BofA] and Kenneth Lewis, then its CEO, misled shareholders about ballooning losses at Merrill before the $19.4-billion acquisition was approved [by the Fed]. The government provided $20-billion in U.S. aid after BofA officials told Mr. Bernanke and then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson in December, 2008, that they might abandon the deal because of the losses...
    [Great! These high-placed crooks hook taxpayers for $20,000,000,000 and only need $19,400,000,000 for the acquisition, leaving a tidy $600,000,000 stolen from taxpayers to divvy up among themselves. This isn't even arbitrary government makework. It's just financier theft on a supercolossal scale, and the resulting additional coagulation of the money supply among people who couldn't possibly spend it or invest it in job creation would be tantamount to government breakwork, not makework. Past time to replace and arrest Bernanke, Paulson and Geithner.]
  • IBM chief paid $31.8-million in 2011, Toronto Globe, B10.
    [The gravitational collapse (into a kind of massive monetary black hole) and sequestration (into economic irrelevance) of the nation's and the world's money supply continue unimpeded by anything like wartime levels of labor shortage. The antidote? Labor "shortage" via the rationing of market-demanded working hours = workweek reduction.]
  • Manufacturing's jobless "rebound" [our quotes] - Exports on rise, not employment, Toronto Star, B1.
    [Are they beginning to "get" it? Or is it still, who needs employment? Who needs private-sector funded consumer spending? Who needs marketable productivity to provide stable, maybe even profitable, investments? Oh, the Onepercent? If they needed to "get their money right back to work creating jobs," they'd be doing it regardless, but if they're doing it, where are the jobs? Timesizing replaces this failing and capricioius nonsystem with automatic grassroots market-determined job creation based on the incidence of chronic overtime throughout the economy. And if our arbitrarily, culturally regulated 40-hour workweek does not provide enough chronic overtime to provide full employment and sufficient consumer spending and marketable productivity and profitable investment, we deregulate the workweek and hand over control of it to whatever market-determined index bothers us, whether the unemployment rate on one end or the profitable investment rate on the other, and resume our 1840-1940 workweek reduction till it does provide sufficient overtime-to-training&hiring conversion.]
  • The fertility implosion, op ed by David Brooks, New York Times, A27?
    [Here, believe it or not, a NYT columnist argues for Bigger Population! This flies in the face of the pessimism of every single ecologist about the human future at current rates of population exponentiation, not to mention Arthur Dahlberg's observation that capitalism always runs well under an employer-perceived labor "shortage" - as during World Wars I and II (remember "wartime prosperity"?) - and poorly under a labor surplus - as in the Great Depression. But there are always plenty of people around with 'big microphones' to provide life-support for old policies like "Humans should go for quantity!" long past the time when those policies, once adaptive and survival-enhancing, have become species-suicidal. We think of Easter Islanders clearcutting their trees, cod fishermen factory-fishing their whale and cod stocks, dambuilding vs. salmon stocks, dams vs. fertile resedimentation, sheep&goat grazing, freon, automobiles, "cute" species introductions... on&on.... The background problem is human population pressure and genius Brooks thinks we need more of it - and the once-reliable NY Times is providing the podium so we can all live in favelloidal Rio or Mexico-City conditions. Can Brooks spell s-q-u-a-l-o-r (not to mention h-a-b-i-t-a-t  c-o-l-l-a-p-s-e?]
  • Transportation stocks flash warning, Toronto Globe, B16.
    A fall in the Dow transportation average often precedes a wider market decline (photo caption).
  • Italy falls into recession, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Technical Tuesday - Your 5-Hour Workweek, Tycoon Report via tycoonreport.tycoonresearch.com
    DELRAY BEACH, Fla. - ...This comes down to the famous 80/20 rule, where 80% of your productivity comes from 20% of the work you do... Here's the secret to a 5-hour workweek: Technical Analysis... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's another Tim Ferriss with another version of The Four-Hour Workweek.]
  2. Poverty and Newt - Gingrich’s rhetoric was clumsy, but he was right about work and the poor, City Journal via city-journal.org
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...A less sunny way of putting Blow’s initial point, however, is that fully half of poor working-age adults work less than 35 hours a week, the Labor Department’s current definition of “full-time,” and that a quarter don’t work at all... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, March 11-12, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from *Holiday Inn, Chaudière & updating from UQO-Brault, Gatineau, Québec -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Canadian army to lose 700 civilian support jobs - Cuts are being done in secret, 3/12 Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [The usual B.S. from the totalitarian Harper government.]
  • A tale of woe - The curtain falls on Vancouver Playhouse as Stratford announces drop in attendance...,
    3/12 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to Globe Arts.
  • Charter school's layoffs [of the principal and five other mostly administrative employees] raise ire - Parents decry timing of cuts tied to budget deficit, 3/12 Boston Globe, B1.
    ...Smith Leadership Academy.\.Dorchester MA...

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • He [Ralph McQuarrie] designed...spacecraft...Darth Vader's mask for George Lucas - He was 82,
    3/12 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to R10.
    [So much for wasting people after some arbitrary retirement age "to make room for younger workers." Room is much easier made by resuming our 1840-1940 reduction of the workweek to levels more functional in an age of robotization, if only because there have to be lots of people with money to buy all the stuff the robots churn out.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • U.S. soldier kills 16 Afghan[s, half of them children] - "This is...an intentional killing of innocent civilians and cannot be forgiven": Pres. Hamid Karzai, 3/12 Ottawa Metro, 06.
    ["Collateral damage" in USA's increasingly desperate, increasingly costly military-industrial makework campaign?]
    Afghan outrage after US soldier's killing spree [it's not a lightspun "spree" - it's a premeditated massacre] - Officials scramble to ease tensions in wake of attack..., Toronto Star, A1.
    [These are not just "tensions" and it's long LONG past time for big, casually murderous USA to quit propping up military jobs in Afghanistan and just get the hell out of there and everywhere else. Nation building begins at home and the U.S. has more and more urgent need of it - and jobs - stateside.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Lessons from viral [Joseph Kony] video - The slickest video doesn't always promote the biggest need,
    3/12 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A3.
    [OK, so what's our candidate for Biggest Need? -]
  • Dow closes down for 2d consecutive week [down 55.55 pts or 0.4% to 12922.02],
    3/11 Boston Globe, G5.
  • Apollo Global paid CEO Black about $104 million in "compensation" [our quotes, like, exactly what terrible thing is is this $104,000,000 "compensating" for?] and distributions for 2011..., 3/12 WSJ, A1 pointer to C5.
    [The Biggest Need is to design and implement a mechanism to keep the money supply less concentrated and sluggish and more centrifuged and dynamic. Is it possible these guys are not aware that THEY are creating the recession because they can't possibly SPEND all this dough? And draining off the spending power for all the marketable productivity they need for their necessarily huge sustainable investments, they can't possibly INVEST it sustainably either. Here's another example -]
    Allstate chief Tom Wilson saw his "compensation" for 2011 rise 20% as his cash bonuses more than doubled, 3/12 WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
    [This while 18 Americans per second are losing their homes? Truly the problem is the hyperconcentration of the money supply in The Onepercent of Americans - worse, the 0.01% = the richest 30,000 of the 300,000,000 countable Americans. What mechanism do we suggest? Engineer a market-harnessing labor shortage acute enough to get employers bidding against one another for good help so that rising wages for the 99% prevent the pooling and coagulation of unlimíted chunks of "M1", the money supply, among the richest 1% and even worse, 0.01%. How? Resume our 1840-1940 workweek reduction and recycle that chronic overtime into training and jobs.]
  • Banks win a handful [OK, maybe a basketful, or maybe a dumpsterful] of concessions in the landmark [you can say that again, OK, landmark] $25 billion settlement of alleged foreclosure abuses, as federal officials struck a balance [LOL] between their desire to be tough [or just honest] on lenders and the "need" [our quotes] to provide immediate "relief" [ie: more unsustainable megaprofits] to the housing market [ie: the bankers], 3/12 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Uh, isn't government's job to just regulate rather than "provide relief" for The Onepercent and bring us all further down faster?]
  • Minority banks face steep odds - $12m: Amount in bailout funds OneUnited owes US,
    by Beth Healy, 3/11 Boston Globe, G1.
    OneUnited Bank [of Boston MA], the nation's largest black-owned bank [has] threaten[ed] to foreclose on Charles Street African Methodist Episcopal Church, one of the most revered black churches in Boston, which, like many borrowers, fell behind on its loans during the recent recession. [Why does a church have loans?] Community leaders vow to organize a national boycott of the bank if it fails to renegotiate the church's loans by Thursday. \Hence\ a painful question: What purpose can a minority institution serve when its own community is turning against it [after it turned against its own community]?... The controversy is raising broader questions about the role of minority-owned banks and whether, in an era of widely available financial services, they are still viable - and needed. ...Several minority-owned banks across the country...have struggled since the financial crisis of 2008, relying on federal bailout money to survive and finding themselves constrained in doing what they were established to do: lending to minority communities...
  • Voter suppression "problem" [our quotes - how about "outrage"?!] - Canadians want independent inquiry - Public not confident Elections Canada will be able [ie: be given the funding] to root out truth, poll finds, 3/12 Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [And so it begins in Canada, as scumbag Harper absorbs more and more lessons from the Bush team. Next target = paper trails.]
  • Stimulus - Weak economic data build case for China to loosen credit, 3/12 National Post, FP1 pointer to FP2.
    [Hey, WE're in debt aren't we? and "misery loves company"! But who says zero-growth/steady-state is weak economic data? Wall Street's take -]
  • China's trade sector fell deeply into the red last month [now that they've bankrupted everyone else's consumer base by grabbing their jobs], raising questions about whether the nation's economy is tailing off more rapidly than anticipated, WSJ, A1 pointer to A7.
    [And China has a HUGE job shortage/jobseeker surplus holding down wages and spending for the 99%, but apparently France's job shortage/jobseeker surplus is rising scarily too -]
  • Sarkozy said France will withdraw from a pact allowing free movement in the E.U. unless immigration is curbed,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    [Free trade and free migration are just sooo naive, like, how can we clobber our kids' living standards within one generation, max?]
  • Worry [that] grants may stifle innovation, 3/12 National Post, FP1.
    [A well-founded worry: The economic savior of Japan, W.Edwards Deming, worried that merit pay would stifle productivity, let alone creativity, and excluded it from the prescriptions that grounded Total Quality Management in Japan.]
  • West [of Canada] seeks immigration sway - Western premiers want Ottawa to give them more power over immigration to help cope with shortages of skilled labour, 3/12 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A4.
    [How about TRAINING the zillions of unemployed Canadians who are already here? With everyone insecure despite CEO-perceived labour shortages, the real shortage is citizen watchdogs to prevent this kind of nonsense -]
  • Secret committee pumped oilsands - Ottawa [Harper], Alberta [western province] joined with lobbyists to head off environmental backlash, 3/12 Toronto Star, A1.
  • Missing money - Head of NGO [a Burundian with Canadian residence heading Cercle de Formation, Recherche, Economique et Sociale (CFORES) ] flees with Canadian aid for Mali: [newly released] documents, 3/12 Ottawa Metro, 04.
    [Isn't there enough of a third-world situation in Canada's North without flushing $30,000 of taxpayers' hard-earned moola down the totally unpredictable sink of Africa? "Charity begins at home."]
  • Loonie support growing in Iceland - Choice of 70%: poll, 3/12 National Post, FP1.
    [Hooboy - as long as they don't expect us to bail them out if a couple more of their hotshot bankers decide to make off with the treasury, like we're Germany and they're Greece.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. SXSW [annual interactive festival]: Work at home, play at office? 3/11 Asheville Citizen-Times (blog) via http://blogs2.citizen-times.com
    AUSTIN, Tex. - ...Timothy Ferriss became a business guru at SXSW with his best-selling book “The 4-hour Workweek”... Ferriss also argues that new technology such as email and instant messaging is sucking our time and energy. Working smarter and delegating more efficiently can lead to more leisure and time. Easier said than done. The room in the Hilton is packed today for a panel “The Four-Hour Workweek is B.S.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And it is B.S. in an ever-deepening labor surplus with job insecurity for the employed and job desperation for the "un-".]
  2. Hollande's sins more those of omission, Reuters UK via blogs.reuters.com
    PARIS, France - ...Meanwhile, various rules and privileges prevent the labour market functioning efficiently or add to labour costs, notably the 35 hour week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Anything that "adds to labour costs" adds to domestic consumer spending and marketable productivity and sustainable investment - as long as it gets to sustainable investment via the 99% and doesn't go directly to The Onepercent via executive pay and perks. The Onepercenters are already spending all they care to and now have well beyond the percentage of the money supply that can even be invested sustainably, because they just haven't left a big enough percentage in the consumer base via the employment basement. That means a growing chunk of the money supply is being used, not for spending power or investing power, but merely for pecking-order power. As such, it is undermining itself, because it just ain't circulating quickly or fully enough. The 1% take ever longer to find attractive investments and as a result, the 99% take ever longer to find attractive (or ANY) jobs, and the population splits into underpaid overworkers and on-the-edge dependents, such as unemployed, welfare, disabled, incarcerated, homeless and, oh yes, "self-employed" with no clients. If we keep concentrating the money supply in the top 1%, or is it 0.1% - or is it, as Krugman claims, 0.01%? - we're spiraling down to the sordid savagery of the third world, where there's loads of money = all in the hands of tiny groups at the "top." How centrifuge the black hole of wealth among the wealthiest by market forces, gradually and flexibly? How about decontrolling our current frozen workweek and switching to market-determined workweek fluctuation via an unemployment-countering definition of job-convertible overtime?]
  3. Swiss turn down more holiday - but say yes to sex boxes, 3/12 metro.co.uk/news/world
    ZÜRICH, Switzerland - Voters in Switzerland have proved they have fully embraced the new age of European austerity by rejecting proposals to increase minimum annual holidays by 50%... Business leaders hailed the prudence of the Swiss people after they rejected a union's call for the minimum amount of paid annual leave to be raised from four to six weeks... - see whole article under today's date.
    [They call their current minimum FOUR weeks' vacation legislation AUSTERE? Not by retarded North American standards! The holiday part of this story is on p.07 of today's Ottawa Metro.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, March 10, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from le Couche-Tard, Plaza Chaudière, & updating from *Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Mazda plans U.S. buyouts, job cuts, Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B10.
    ...The company has 701 U.S. employees..\.. Dismissals are possible if too few workers leave voluntarily...
    [No clue to how few is "too few."]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Bankrupt Hostess [as in Hostess DingDongs] replaces CEO Driscoll with CRO* Rayburn], Toronto Globe, B10.
    *Chief Restructuring Officer
  • A bankruptcy-court examiner threw Dynergy's debt-restructuring plants for its main subsidiary into doubt, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • GE's Immelt sees period of instability, Reuters via Toronto Globe, B10.
    "...The environment is continuously unstable [so] we have entered a new economic era... It could remain this way for a long time." In the face of that forecast, the world's largest maker of jet engines and electric turbines aims to cut costs - and to reverse a trend of outsourcing manufacturing operations in order to run its factories more efficiently.
    [Start of a new fad - to actually save the American economy?]
  • U.S. jobless renew hope - [But] unemployment rate sticks at 8.3% despite "massive" hiring [our quotes], Le Devoir de Montréal, C1.
    U.S. jobs picture likely better than payroll survey suggests [or not], Toronto Globe, B8.
    [Doesn't matter cuz if non-agro employers only added 227,000 jobs in Feb., we still need 300,000-400,000 a month just to keep up with population growth.]
  • The [national capital] region adds jobs on eve of budget [casting suspicion on the data] - Rest of Canada loses ground on employment as economy 'struggles to post meaningful growth' - ...'5-month string of disappointing data, Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    Canada [unemployment down 0.2% to 7.4% but] the job market is deceptive: the nation [actually] lost 2800 jobs, discouraging the jobless a bit more, Le Devoir de Montréal, C1.
    Young leading job market exodus - Fall in unemployment rate the result of fewer people looking rather than pickup in job creation, Statscan says, Toronto Globe, B8.
    "This generation of younger workers are our future labour force...and they are facing some pretty unique pressures that other generations didn't have to go through" Francis Fong, TD economist (graph caption)
    [One word: timesizing. Quit straining for 40-hr/wk job creation in the age of robotics and just share the vanishing not-yet-automated employment to regain full employment and marketable productivity and sustainable investment, however short a workweek it may take. There's no downside here, because any companies that cut pay along with hours will soon be raising pay again because the flood of resumes for 40-hr jobs will be absorbed by enforcing and reducing the 40-hour workweek with overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
  • Tory worker scrubs meetings with Elections Canada investigator [probing fraudulent robo-calls in Guelph, Ontario that directed non-Conservative voters to the wrong voting locations)], by Steve Chase, Toronto Globe, A12.
    [More evidence that the Canadian dictator is taking lessons from the autocratic Republicans across the border. A vote for Harper is a vote against voting, and a vote against voting is a vote against timely feedback of the most important sort, the kind that indicates necessary change = negative feedback.]
    On the advice of his lawyer...
  • Iceland's speedy recovery offers case for reviving drachma, by David Parkinson, Toronto Globe, B11.
    ...Some of Iceland's top business leaders have been quietly lobbying for Iceland to drop its 137-year-old currency [the krona] and adopt the Canadian dollar instead.
    [Now there's a wild and crazy idear! Maybe we can git ourselves an eleventh province out of this and claim Bjorn as one of our own!]
    ...The Icelandic government's official position...is to join the EU and drop the krona in favor of the euro, a currency that comes with plenty of baggage of its own.
    [What timing! It only took a cupla nutty bankers to bring 'em down. Now the whole government wants a replay!]
    Yet the krona may very well have been pivotal to Iceland's economic resurrection...
    [And the drachma would be pivotal to Greece's economic resurrection because then they could print and spend their own money instead of drinking the hemlock of euro austerity, which even repels the likes of Larry Summers -]
    Lawrence Summers cautions on the drawbacks of austerity, New York Times, B1 pointer to B2.
    [But Merkel still doesn't get it -]
    German leader [Angela Merkel] and I.M.F. chief [Christine Lagarde] split over debt - Merkel sees austerity..., NYT, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Budget Crunch May Force Winter Haven Library to Shorten Hours, TheLedger.com
    WINTER HAVEN, Fla. - ...The Winter Haven Public Library may have to shorten its hours and make staffing changes soon, city officials said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. HR Daily Advisor Week in Review 3/05-09/2012 — Layoff, Furlough, Pay Cut: Which Is Best?, compensation.blr.com
    BRENTWOOD, Tenn. — Is your organization struggling to contain costs? When labor costs are a major factor, companies have to choose between freezes, layoffs, furloughs, and pay cuts. Here's an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of these options... Furloughs do produce predictable savings, however. And you are less likely to lose top people... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Zurich mulls garages for prostitutes, Agence France-Presse via Toronto Globe, A17.
    [An unpuritanical headline would sound more like "Zurich approves drive-in rooms for sex workers."]
    Residents of the Swiss city of Zürich will vote Sunday on whether to build dedicated garages where prostitutes can ply their trade ["the oldest profession"], in a proposal aimed at moving streetwalkers away from residential zones.
    Proponents for the Zürich referendum want a parking zone built for prostitutes by 2013 at the entrance to the city.
    [There's only one?]
    The site would be open 7pm-5am...fitted with showers and toilets and feature a gynecologist for any medical problems...
    [So who takes care of male prostitutes? Sex workers of the world, unite! Presumably this will enable Swiss cops to focus on real crimes.]



    Friday, March 9, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Holiday Inn, Terrasses de la Chaudière & updating from UQO-Brault, Gatineau, Québec -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • RIM [maker of BlackBerry's] buys frequency technology firm [Paratek Microwave Inc. for $?], Toronto Globe, B8.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Women targeted by public service cuts, MP [Irene Mathyssen, NDP] says, by Joe Lofaro, Ottawa Metro, 04.
    About 50 female public servants paid a visit to the Prime Minister's office to give Stephen Harper his "pink slip."...
    [Would it were that easy to dump him - before he completely dumps democracy in Canada.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Ottawa woos 'high-value' entrepreneurs - Conservatives hope new program will attract immigrants who can create more jobs than someone 'running a kiosk,' [Immigration Minister Jason] Kenney says, Toronto Globe, A6.
    [Nasty talk and distant cherry-picking doesn't excuse "conservatives" indulging in jobseeker-increasing, wage-depressing, taxpayer-bashing. Immigration everywhere needs to be steady-state (one out, one in) and arrogant, tax-intensive and minuscule job creation needs to switch to massive and systemic worksharing and timesizing, which is worksharing plus sustainable funding and market-determined training.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Tip from Tori's mother was the break police needed, murder trial told, by Adrian Morrow, Toronto Globe, A6.
    ...Documents filed with the [Woodstock, Ont., Canada] employment centre indicated [the co-killer] had been out of work for six months, had few job contacts and was working toward a GED. She checked off a box that read, "I tend to become easily angry."...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The numbers get starker for the 99%..., by Chrystia Freeland, Toronto Globe, B2.
    ...Prof. [Emmanuel] Saez and his long-time collaborator, Thomas Sanchez...gave us the notion of the 1 per cent of income earners and the evidence that they are pulling away from everyone else. ...New Saez research [says that] in the 2010 "recovery" [our quotes], 93% of the gains were captured by [or rather, defaulted to, in the general wage-depressing labor surplus] the top 1 per cent. ...Top incomes grew 11.6% in 2010, while the incomes of the 99 per cent increased only 0.2%. That gain is particularly painful because it comes after an 11.6% drop in income for the 99 per cent, he reports, the largest fall over a two-year period since the Great Depression. That decline more than erases the income gains since the last downturn...BR>
  • Marred by corruption [and tax evasion], future of Greece uncertain, Ottawa Epoch Times, A1.
    [Ditto USA.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Parents, drivers seek restoration of busing, Press-Enterprise
    LAKE ELSINORE, Calif. - ...The district also has reached a cost-cutting agreement with its teachers' union to have three unpaid furlough days this year and nine unpaid days next year, Landon said. Administrators also will take the furloughs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. There Are No Weekends in China - How Asia's Biggest Dragon Is Driving Growth, MBA50.com via Forbes.com
    SHANGHAI, China - China is the driving force of Asia, and you can't get 9% GDP growth every year by working a 35 hour week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Sure you can, but you can't even with an 80-hour week if you don't have machines, automation and robotics. People still don't understand that we have entire factory networks with ZERO-hour weeks because there are NO HUMANS THERE. It's called "lights out" manufacturing cuz they don't even need the lights on. But as Reuther retorted to Ford's provocative "Let's see you unionize these robots!" - "Let's see you sell them cars."]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, March 8, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, Québec -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The Treasury launched a sale of as much as $6 billion of AIG stock..., WSJ, A1 pointer to C2.
    [Since when is it the role of government to sell private-sector stock in a capitalist economy?!]
  • Women still struggling to find a seat in the corporate boardroom - ...The rate of female public board membership [is] stuck at 10%..., Toronto Globe, A1.
  • Joining forces in the fight against poverty, Toronto Globe, (B)Info2.
    [Still trying to fight poverty without mentioning jobs?]
  • Japan's misleading recovery, by Wayne Arnold, Toronto Globe, B16.
    ...The economy bounced back more quickly than expected after [last year's] March 11 earthquake, tsunami and resulting nuclear leak. But the government flunked the bigger test by failing to push through painful reforms. Now Japan is a year older, deeper in debt and facing the same economic downward spiral it was in before the catastrophe...
    [The same times four could be said about America's misleading recovery: The economy bounced back more quickly than expected after the 2008 housing, financial and moral collapses. But the government flunked the bigger test by failing to push through painful reforms. Now the U.S. is four years older, much deeper in debt and facing a worse economic downward spiral it was in before the catastrophe.]
  • Greek debt threat won't trigger Armageddon, Toronto Globe, B16.
    [No debt threat will trigger Armageddon unless it is covered up instead of wound up - and unfortunately almost all these debt threats are getting covered up instead of wound up.]
  • Fresh signs of economic weakness in Brazil added to worry that the emerging markets that have boosted growth in recent years are slowing, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. City inside workers closer to work stoppage - Management also at impasse with library workers, CBC.ca
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ..."For full time members there is a proposal to cut hours by five hours a week, which means a cut in income of nearly 7%," Maguire said. He added that the city has also proposed cutting the overlap time between caregiver shifts.... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. International Women Day - Not Yet Uhuru for Nigerian Women, AllAfrica.com
    ABUJA, Nigeria - ...Historically, women's oppression and inequality started the debate that led to a 15,000-woman march through New York City in 1908, demanding shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, March 7, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Hasbro cuts 55 jobs in Rhode Island [Pawtucket], AP via Boston Globe, B8.
    Toy maker...laid off 55...on Tuesday, part of a larger downsizing that comes just months after announcing an expansion into Providence RI. ...About 170 workers are being laid off worldwide because of the underperformance in Hasbro's US and Canadian divisions, which are under new leadership...
    [Underperformance or weaker demand = deepening, rosydefinition-castrating recession?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Lehman leaves bankruptcy with little left but vast debts to creditors, NYT, B1 pointer to B4.
    [A. Isn't the purpose of bankruptcy to erase debts? B. So this group of Onepercenters has losses, just as they should have because they took the risks, while most of the Onepercenters, via government bailouts, greatly multiplied their risk by passing their debts on to their foundations in the consumer base and employment basement. Dumba dumb dumb.]
    Lehman Brothers selling off last assets, by Pallavi Gogoi, AP via Boston Globe, B9.
    The Ritz-Carlton Kapalua hotel in Hawaii, a luxury ski resort in the Rockies, and a Manhattan boutique hotel are among the last holdings of Lehman Brothers, the investment house whose spectacular bust triggered the worst of the 2008 financial crisis. The bank said Tuesday that it will begin unloading its stakes in those properties in April as it prepares to exit Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and finally meet its end.
    Lehman's $639 billion bankruptcy remains the largest in US history. It went under on Sept.15, 2008, the same week that the government rescued AIG and the $$700 billion bailout for major banks was conceived.
    [They should ALL be bankrupt now, instead of the papered-over, taxpayer-bashing, consumer-foundation-undermining corruption we currently calling our "financial industry."]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow's steady[?] streak ends,
    WSJ, C1 target article.
    Sell-off wipes out a quarter of Dow's 2012 gain [of 745 points since Jan.1], Boston Globe, B11.
    Stocks suffered their biggest losses in three months, the first hiccup in 2012's rally, as traders fretted about the economy and waited as Greece pressured the last investors to back its [second?] bailout...
    The Dow industrials shed 203.66 points amid investor worries about Greece and global economic growth - The retreat was the biggest since November and the first triple-digit decline of the year..., WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Young people entering the job market are taking the brunt of the downward pressure on wages caused by high unemployment..., WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    [There's the closest the world's most conservative newspaper has come to echoing Karl Marx's observation that shortsighted capitalists depress wages by fostering unemployment.]
  • Kaptur beats Kucinich in redrawn Ohio district, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, A12.
    [Kucinich was a good guy. Met him a few years back at a macrobiotic B&B on Mt.Desert Is.]
  • Rush [not Limbaugh] is on in EU to learn German, AP via Boston Globe, A3.
    Spaniards, Portuguese, and other from countries hit hard by the debt crisis are flocking to learn German in hopes of getting jobs in Europe's biggest and strongest economy, according to...figures from Germany's culture and promotion agency, the Goethe Institute... Other official data show immigration to Germany from Spain, Greece and Portugal is up sharply...
    [Germany better disunite the unified currency fast or it's going to be the next desperately overpopulated China or India. Don't even think of unifying your currency if you don't have a common language. And then, at a bare minimum, you need a common unemployment-offsetting fluctuating workweek with an automatic overtime-to-training&hiring converter...]
  • Extreme poverty has fallen, [World Bank] report finds, NYT via Boston Globe, A3.
    [But what would the filthyrich World Bank know about poverty? - especially when they have an acute conflict of interest in reporting on it, since they justify their rapacious 3rdworld-megadebt-inducing policies with claims of reducing poverty - see John Perkins' "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man."]
  • Web sites shine light on petty bribery worldwide, NYT, B1.
    ...[eg] website ipaidabribe.com... [egs -]
    Hyderabad, [to] claim a legitimate tax refund: [takes bribe of] 10,000 rupees
    Nairobi, get a child who has passed entrance exams into high school: 20,000 shillings
    Karachi, get a driver's license after passing the test: 3,000 rupees
    [So what are we doing? We're turning the U.S. and Canada into the third world as fast as we can with "free" trade, way beyond steady-state immigration, outsourcing, and a kneejerk downsizing response to technology instead of timesizing.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Dividends Emerge in Pressing Apple Over Working Conditions in China, New York Times via nytimes.com
    CUPERTINO, Calif. - ...Worker suicides at Apple’s main Chinese supplier, Foxconn, in 2010, followed by reports of forced overtime, child labor, minimum wage violations and unsafe working conditions at its suppliers, have contrasted with Apple’s status as creator of hallowed devices and its spectacular $13 billion in profit — 30% of sales — in the first quarter.... Activists bemoan the fact that even when they persuade brands to press their suppliers to improve working conditions, victories turn to defeat when suppliers try to pass-on the additional cost of higher wages, shorter hours or increased benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. centrotherm photovoltaics restructures after posting loss in 2011, PV-Tech.org
    BLAUBEUREN, Germany - ...Management said it had started short-time working in the production area, as well as significantly reducing costs across the entire Group with the planned reduction of 400 jobs by mid-2012... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Moldova orders [chemical] castration for child abusers, AP via Boston Globe, A3.
    [So, a chemical solution to a biochemical problem?]
    CHISINAU, Moldova - ...Parliament approved the law by a majority after lawmakers said the impoverished nation was attracting pedophiles from the West. It will become effective July 1... Valeriu Munteanu, a Moldovan Liberal Party lawmaker, said the measure was necessary after public outrage over several cases involving Americans and West Europeans... The measure has broad support in Moldova, one of Europe's poorest nations, where many believe that the country has an international reputation as a top destination for sex tourists..\..
    The move was immediately criticized by the Council of Europe, the pan-European human rights group, which said chemical castration should involve consent, and offenders should be properly informed about the procedure, while the law should have been preceded by a public debate...
    [But sounds like there was a lot of public debate about it in Moldova. This "human rights" group is strangely insensitive to the human rights of Moldovan children. In fact, their insensitivity verges on tolerance for the sexual abuse of children - kinda helps you understand the Vatican... Why don't these "human rights" groups get refocused on decriminalizing victimless "crimes" and spinning drugs and prostitution as recreational drugs and patronizing sex workers? Maybe that would take the pressure off kids -]
    N.Y. says prostitution ring had lofty ties, NYT via Boston Globe, A2.
    [Or how about this -]
    In suit, 8 women say military lets rape, harassment occur, AP via Boston Globe, A7.
    [...the hypocrisy rolls on...]



    Tuesday, March 6, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • A wave of leveraged-buyout debt is bearing down on Europe, with some $550 billion of loans to European firms maturing over the next five years, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C3.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Yahoo may be "forced" [our quotes] to cut staff, Boston Globe, B6.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Companies' pension plea, by Kristina Peterson, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    Business groups are urging Congress to let employers put less money into their pension funds,
    [and why, you ask, can companies break contracts with employees while inflating contract benefits with executives?]
    saying that exceptionally low interest rates are forcing them to set aside too much cash...
    [But what about all the cash for executives, bad times notwithstanding? What about all the lower-taxed stock ops?]
  • A pension fund for Texas teachers buys into a hedge fund, WSJ, B1 pointer to B7.
    [Stupidity rampant.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Judge backs Jefferson County, by Katy Stech, WSJ, C10.
    A Birmingham AL judge [Judge Thomas B. Bennett] ruled that Jefferson County can move forward with its Chapter 9 bankruptcy case - the largest municipal case in U.S. history - against the efforts big Wall Street banks that argued it should be thrown out because of fine print in Alabama state law...
    [Wall Street is sooo determined to keep squeezing 99percenters and destroying its own foundations in consumer spending! "Oh nuthin little ol' us could do would evah really HURT anyone!"]
    ...letting county leaders move forward with their efforts to trim the county's multibillion-dollar debt load...
    [It was one thing when the US was doing this to third-world countries via the IMF and the World Bank (see John Perkins' excellent 2005 book, "Confessions of an Economic Hitman"), but now, a lot more onepercenters are trying to do it to their own fellow Americans = crapping where they eat.]
  • Apple accuser [Proview Electronics] faces bankruptcy threat, Boston Globe, B6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - U.S. businesses that generate services rather than goods slowed their pace of hiring in February from January, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    The Institute for Supply Management's seasonally adjusted Services Employment Index was 55.7 in February, down 1.7 percentage points from January. Readings above 50 indicate expansion. Hiring gains also slowed among U.S. factories in February.
  • You hear that? It's quiet...too quiet, by Cheng & Benoit & Das, WSJ, C1.
    For many, this year's stock market rally has been really something. But investors and bankers on Wall Street worry it may be based on a whole lot of nothing [it is!], which is why they aren't doing anything...
    [This is another rebuttal to the carfefully spread 'wisdom': "Give any huge percentage of the money supply to us onepercenters and it will get right back to work creating jobs!" The concentration of the money supply did it in the late 1920s and has done it once again: gone far beyond what the onepercenters can spend, gone beyond what the one percenters can invest, and is being used only as pecking-order power, not investing power and not spending power.]
  • The Dow industrials lost 14.76 points after a steady rally failed to overcome morning losses tied to concerns over global growth, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
    Stocks fall on China [non-]growth, US factory [non-]orders, Boston Globe, B9.
    Stocks fell as China pared its economic growth target and orders to US factories decreased by 1% in January for the first time in three months...
    China cuts its growth target to 7.5% [in 2012 from 8% in 2011],
    Financial Times, (A)1.
    Beijing teaches a masterclass in macro[economic] political strategy, by Stephen Roach, Financial Times, (B)24.
    ...classic central banking at its best...
    [and other economies can just "get over it!"]
  • Scramble to sell corporate debt as yields hit lows, Financial Times, (B1)15.
    [Yeah, where's the incentive to risk the dough? But if you just keep it under the mattress, the non-recovery gets harder to re-coverup.]
  • It's time for Wall Street to clean up its kitchen, by Francesco Guerrera, WSJ, C1.
    ...Last week, Wall Street's kitchen doors were thrown wide open by a shareholder lawsuit on a deal involving Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley: the $21.1 billion sale of the energy giant El Paso Corp. to Kinder Morgan Inc., a pipeline operator. The resulting sight was less than appetizing. Leo Strine, Delaware's top business court judge, found a process riven with conflicts of interest and half-truths that runs contrary to banks' constant refrains of being all about clients.
    [Wow, when even lax Delaware is freaking out, the US financial industry must really be crap! But hey, the Delaware judge didn't actually DO anything about it - he let the deal go through on the usual excuse: stopping it would do more harm than good to shareholders. Meanwhile -]
    But his 33-page opinion has become an instant classic on Wall Street...
    [Yea, bind it in gold and stick it on a shelf somewhere. Then back to shortcuts as usual and seeing how long we can put off how BIG a day of reckoning! And it ain't just Wall Street -]
  • $8 billion fines, but drug fraud continues - Pharmaceuticals keep business: they're sole suppliers, USA Today, 1A.
    [But there's more than one of them, so they ain't a monopoly. There's more than two of 'em, so they ain't a duopoly. How about just a pluropoly? Anyway, how can we possibly make things worser faster? Ooo, here's a great way! = How about a bunch of onepercenters dissing our immigration laws and stuffing a bunch more desperate 40-hr/wk jobseekers into our labor surplus? -]
  • A group of Silicon Valley technology leaders is funding efforts to help undocumented youths attend college, find jobs and remain in the U.S., WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:6.
    [Laws? What's THAT? ... Every large organism has a skin, including economies, but there's still lotsa dumb 'Mercans, even "leaders," flaying ours.]
  • There may be more than one answer to the question of what happens when the irresistable force of recession meets the immovable object of fiscal discipline, Financial Times, (A)1 pointer to (A)4.
    [But fiscal discipline is not that immovable (or well-advised when spending is already way down anyway) -]
    Austerity under fire, Financial Times, (A)1 pointer to (A)4.
    Lazlo Andor, European commissioner for social affairs, is no longer alone in arguing against the policy of harsh austerity measures for highly indebted eurozone countries.
  • Europe's cars lose traction, by Vanessa Fuhrmans, WSJ, B1.
    ...rows of unsold cars in factory lots and idled production lines across Europe...
    The future of the car - Electronic age forces wholesale rethink - Manufacturers are facing up to the risk of their products becoming increasingly marginalized, Financial Times, (C)1.
  • Madrid [stocks] retreat continues amid service sector gloom,
    Financial Times, (B)26.
  • Slow road to recovery the year after the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan's northeast coast, many businesses are struggling to get back on their feet, Financial Times, (A)1 pointer to (A)5.
  • India bans all cotton exports - Restriction sends prices soaring - Move to protect domestic supply,
    Financial Times, (B1)15.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Pa. shared-work program now available, Central Penn Business Journal via CentralPennBusiness.com
    HARRISBURG, Pa. - ...The voluntary shared-work program allows employers to reduce employee hours by 20-40% per week, while allowing employees to receive unemployment compensation benefits for their lost time. The total shared-work plan cannot exceed 52 weeks, and no employer will be permitted to take part in shared-work plans for more than 104 weeks out of a 156-week period... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This would make Pennsy the 25th state with a worksharing program, we believe, giving us 50% of the states.]
  2. Updated: MUT disputes report showing teachers’ hours among lowest in the EU, TimesOfMalta.com
    VALLETTA, Malta - ...The availability of Maltese teachers in public and private schools in the 2010/11 scholastic year stood at 28 hours a week – one of the lowest in the EU, a report issued by Eurydice, a European network of Education, found...
    [So maybe Maltese kids are the smartest! Maybe they're best at learning on their own! Maybe they're best at handling the most basic freedom, free time! Does "Eurydice" (a misnomer for such a busybody-troublemaker if ever there was one) honor the highest hours per week? That for kids would be great preparation for long meaningless workhours and wage slavery. Truly the EU has no idea what it's doing right in terms of shorter working hours = hours on other people's agendas.]
    In a reaction, the Malta Union of Teachers [MUT] said this morning that working hours for teaching grades in Malta are on par with most other EU and Mediterranean countries
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, March 4-5, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • A labor force faces the ultimate in downsizing - Herbert Jenkins heads Detroit union with a single member = him, by Matthew Dolan, 3/05 Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ...Assistant Supervisors of Street Maintenance & Construction Association... Such incongruities keep turning up in Detroit's disordered government, which, like the city itself, is shrinking fast...
    [Compare -]
    A government bailout "saved" [our quotes] the auto industry, but the city of Detroit was left behind -, editorial observer by David Firestone, 3/05 New York Times, A16.
    - The city is losing its cash, and probably control of its budget
  • States of depression - How local cuts are hobbling recovery, op ed by Paul Krugman, 3/05 New York Times, A17.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • China's rising military spending tops $100b, 3/05 Boston Globe, A3.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - stanched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Digital sign company seeks bankruptcy - BroadSign International Inc. of Wilmington DE, 3/05 Boston Globe, B7.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - Americans had a little less money to spend in January, 3/05 Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    Inflation-adjusted per capita personal disposable income, which is measured after taxes, edged down a bit in January from December, the Commerce Dept. said...
  • Stocks end week lower despite milestones,
    3/04 Boston Globe, G5.
  • A 'good night' from boss builds good will, 3/04 BG, G2.
    [No it doesn't. What's the boss doing in your evening?! And in similar vein -]
  • With its new privacy policy, Google is tracking your online moves, 3/04 BG, G5.
    [So it's really a privacy invasion policy. Time to try out some other search engines. Let's see. DEC's good old Alta Vista still exists, and isn't there a Yahoo search engine? Need reader suggestions - to ecdesignr@yahoo.ca ]
  • How the center fell out - Once, a moderate Republican battled conservatives for the soul of the party - His name was Romney, George Romney, 3/04 BG, K1.
    [Turning and turning in a widening gyre,
    The falcon cannot hear the falconer.
    Things fall apart - the center cannot hold...
    (from The Second Coming, 1921, Yeats]
  • Old debt could lead to tax bills - Cancelled debt seen as income, by Sandra Block [any relation to H&R?], 3/05 USA Today, 1A.
    Billions of dollars in credit card debt that was charged off during the Great Recession [as if it's over?!] - some of it decades old - is coming back to haunt borrowers in the form of unexpected tax bills...
  • Winning makes you mean, book review of D.Muller et al's "Are People More Agressive When [Worse] or Better Off...?" (forthcoming), 3/04 BG, K2.
    Conventional wisdom about competition suggests that losers may become angry and aggressive, while those who win can afford to be more gentle and big-hearted.
    ["Can afford to be" but aren't -]
    A new study suggests just the opposite. In several experiments with American and French students, researchers found that those who were led to believe that they had done better than a competitor on a mundane test were subsequently more aggressive towards the competitor - blasting the competitor with loud noise or putting hot sauce in the competitor's drink - than those who were led to believe they had done worse...
  • Killer tornadoes aftermath - Amid tragedy, 'thank God' - Storms raked the nation [US] and left an apocalyptic path of destruction, 3/05 USA Today, 1A.
    [Thank God for apocalypse? But we haven't been 'raptured'! Or maybe we in Boston have accessed Rapture with Schadenfreude feature.]
  • Grim soundings from northern deep - 20 years after the Newfoundland cod fishery was shut down, the fish have not come back and a way of life [dba death for fish] is gone..., 3/04 BG, A1.
    [Timesizing-solvable job insecurity makes us a LOT less sensitive to signals than sustainability (and perhaps even our survival) requires. And still the suicidal fostering of labor surplus & resource depletion goes on and on -]
  • Gloucester, Mass. - Local fishermen resist lower quotas, 3/04 BG, A11.
    ["When will they ever ... learn?
    When will they e.... ver  learrrn?"]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Keep Getting Paid for Fewer Hours? How a Provision Congress Just Passed Could Help Rebuild the Economy - Tucked in the small print of the payroll tax bill is a work-sharing plan that could save more than a million jobs this year, by Dean Baker, 3/04 AlterNet.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The provision, which is based on a bill introduced in the Senate by Jack Reed and in the House by Rosa DeLauro, would reimburse states for money spent on work-sharing programs that are part of their unemployment insurance system... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Made men: Dockworkers with mob ties earn more than $400K for 'working' 24 hours a day (but only show up 30 hours a week), 3/05 DailyMail.co.uk
    [Hey, if 30 hrs/wk is good enough for the mob, it's good enough for 99percenters!]
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...These longshoremen are being paid for working 24 hours a day, seven days a week -- even though they only show up at work as little as 30 hours a week for their cushy gigs. These huge, inexplicable salaries come as the Port Authority shells out hundreds of millions of dollars in public money to upgrade the ports so goods can continue to flow into and out of the New York area... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Kimberly Cuts Hours, 3/05 CBS42.com
    KIMBERLY, Ala. - The city of Kimberly is facing a potential 10% budget shortfall. Reporter Chris Womack shows how one department is being forced to do more with less. It worries Police Chief James Belding, who's forced to cut his five hourly officers time to 32 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Warehouse Workers Allege Walmart Suppliers Understated Work Hours, 3/05 HuffingtonPost.com
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. - ...A class-action lawsuit filed against three Los Angeles-area based companies that handle Walmart's goods alleges that the firms pressured supervisors to understate the number of hours employees worked so that they could pay them less, according to MSNBC... - see whole article under today's date.
    [In a timesizing-engineered labor "shortage" (as perceived by employers, actually a labor-employment balance at last), these employees could just assume, and take at their pleasure, comp time and keep the scores even. Absolute power corrupts absolutely, but timesizing relativizes employer power.]
  5. WA women want more work hours, The West Australian via au.news.yahoo.com/thewest
    PERTH, Western Australia (WA) - Almost 40,000 women with part-time work across WA want more hours and could solve some of the staffing problems facing local businesses. Figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveal there are more than 66,000 people in the State who are now "under-employed"... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["Under-employed" only with reference to a frozen pre-automation definition of "fully employed" = a different angle on skewed worktime from Down Under.]
  6. Want uniforms, less working hours: Rural job scheme workers, 3/05 TwoCircles.net
    VELLANAD (Kerala), India - ...Chandamma is among the women who feel that the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act should be extended beyond 100 days and its working hours reduced. "Working hours should be reduced. Women have to manage their households, get their children to schools," she said... - see whole article under today's date.
  7. Govt to help boost wages of those in cleaning, security sectors, 3/05 ChannelNewsAsia.com
    SINGAPORE - ...The government is also studying how to shorten working hours and cut down overtime work for the security industry... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Maine company ready to install tidal power unit - Portland's Ocean Renewable Power Co.,
    3/05 Boston Globe, B8.
  • Local firm pulls ad from Limbaugh, 3/05 BG, B2.
    The Boston MA-based data backup company Carbonite... AP reported Sunday that a total of seven advertisers [up to nine as of 3/06] have withdrawn their spots from the radio program...
    [OK, enough experimenting with Power to the Primitives.]



    Saturday, March 3, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm(archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • For stroller maker [Maclaren's US unit], bankruptcy is latest setback, New York Times, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • U.S. stocks slipped lower, with the Dow industrials posting their first weekly loss in three weeks... - Blue chips lost 2.73 points or 0.02% to 12977.57 and fell 5.38 points on the week, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B4.
  • Copper market's problems are starting to pile up slowly,
    NYT, B16.
  • Texas authorities say they wouldn't release irrigation water to farmers in three key rice-growing counties,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
  • Nigeria's central bank has added the equivalent of $500 million in Chinese yuan to its reserves and plans to buy seven times that amount, WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
    [Does that mean we'll stop getting emails offering the "opportunity" to help Nigerians transfer millions of US dollars?]
  • Storms ravage [US] heartland - Another swath of deaths and destruction,
    WSJ, A1 photo-caption pointer to A3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Police Dept. personnel see cut in workweek, Massillon Independent via indeonline.com
    MASSILLON, Ohio - ..The clerks and Animal Control Officer Vicki Davis have had their hours reduced from 40 to 32 hours a week, according Safety-Service Director George Maier. Parking Enforcement Officer Rhonda Smith’s hours have been trimmed from 25 to 20 hours a week, Maier said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing, not downsizing!]
  2. Working mothers more happy, healthy, East African via theeastafrican.co.ke
    CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - ...After repeatedly interviewing hundreds of mothers over the course of a decade, the researchers found that those who worked 32 hours a week or less were more sensitive to their children’s needs, less likely to have symptoms of depression, and more likely to split household duties with their spouses than mothers who were not employed... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. 'Government job gives me time to study', TheNational.ae
    DUBAI, U.A.E. - ..."The shorter working hours [from 7.30am until 2.30pm] gave me an opportunity to enrol myself in a well-known professional certification course related to human resources," said Mr Al Hashemi. "Since the classes are in the evening, I have time to go home, relax and spend time with my family before leaving again to attend the classes." He is also finishing an online bachelor's degree in HR management... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, March 2, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • MCG Capital to chop [up to 17 (46%) of] staff, Washington Business Journal via Washington Examiner, 17.
    ...It expects to cut its current work force of 37 employees to a level of 20 to 25 by the end of the year..\..as it works to return its lending operations to profitability...
    [What should they be doing? Instead of a traumatic 46% workforce cut (17 of its 37 jobs) MGS should be trimming 46% of their workweek (3 1/2 hours a day for everyone, including top people), re-investing any overtime profits in overtime-targeted training & hiring, & keeping everyone together working, earning & buying 54% as many banking & other services & products as before.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Jobs picture brightens, but income weak,
    AP via The Washington Examiner, 17.
    Bernanke cites harm from unemployment, AP via The Washington Examiner, 17.
    ...chronic long-term unemployment threatens to reduce the nation's supply of skilled workers. ...More than 40% of America's unemployed - 5.5 million people - have been out of work for more than six months. ...If the problem persists, more of the long-term unemployed will lose job skills and struggle to regain them.
  • Where the jobs are, the training may not be, New York Times, A1.
    [When overtime targets, triggers and funds training and hiring, the training is always where the jobs are.]
  • Economic reports showed the U.S. [recoverup dba] recovery is moving on to firmer ground but perils persist,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A2,B2.
    Investors' sell signal: surging [= inflating] stocks, by Joe Light, WSJ, C1 target.
    ...Many individual investors, chastened byl the dot-com collapse, the 2008-09 financial crisis [the housing bubble-pop, the bailout bubble-pop,] and volatility since then have viewed the latest rally not as a "buy" signal but as an opportunity to take profits [or...break even]. According to mutual-fund flow tracker EPFR Global, individual investors have pulled $8.3 billion out of U.S. stock funds since the beginning of the year and sunk almost $10.6 billion into bond funds...
    [And so it goes, down the spiral staircase of bubbles and pops...]
  • As the stock market has surged [viz., inflated] this year, many individuals investors are sitting on the sidelines,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Despite backlash, banks pursuing fees,
    AP via The Washington Examiner, 17.
  • China is diversifying away from the dollar - U.S. Treasury data show the percentage of dollar holdings in China's foreign-exchange reserves is falling, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:6.
  • The euro-zone jobless rate hit a 15-year high [10.7%], while inflation accelerated..., WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    [Better a little inflation than Depression-style deflation?]
  • Greek crisis may test the value of swaps, NYT, B1.
    [Zip?]
  • Serbia won official candidate status for EU membership, in a boost to the nation's pro-Western government,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [It's a time for the EU to be dropping weak economies, not adding them.]
  • Bloomsday clock - Will the D.C. cherry blossoms peak too soon for this year's centennial festival?,
    Washington Express, p.1 pointer to p.8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. TDIA Office To Cut Hours, Trenton Republican Times via RepublicanTimes.com
    TRENTON, N.J. - The director of the Trenton Downtown Improvement Association is cutting his office hours and going to part-time employment. ...By reducing office hours, he can remain in the position for a longer period of time... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing, not downsizing - on a one-employee basis!]
  2. Argentine Port Workers Prolong Strike, Halt Soy, Corn Barges, Bloomberg.com
    ROSARIO, Argentina - ...Workers at Argentina's grain ports continued a strike over working hours for a second day, delaying barges transporting corn and soybeans... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, March 1, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Auto bailout helped Obama's friends, at taxpayers' expense, The Washington Examiner, p.2.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Taking just about anything they can find - In a tough economy, nothing is safe - Thieves are stealing everything from diapers to catalytic converters..., Washington Post, LL14.
  • Metro's crime rate tops N.Y., L.A., Philly - [Washington subway] system's robberies exceed Big Apple's, The Washington Examiner, p.1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Bernanke strikes cautious tone on recovery, Washington Post, A1.
    [What's the matter, Ben? Coverup slipping?]
  • Mortgage giant Fannie Mae reported a $2.4 billion loss for the fourth quarter and is asking the federal government for nearly $4.6 billion in aid, Washington Post, A1 pointer to A14.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Reduction to four-day work week at Stanfields no cause for concern, company president says, Truro Daily News via trurodaily.com
    TRURO, Nova Scotia, Canada - A reduction to a four-day work week in some operations at Stanfields Ltd., is a "short-term" measure aimed at bringing inventory in line, company president Jon Stanfield says... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. German Businesses Unwelcome in Postwar Libya - Paying for UN Abstention, Spiegel Online via spiegel.de
    BENGHAZI, Libya - ...If the company hadn't had a source of natural asphalt in a lake in Trinidad, some of which was used to resurface a major road in the western German state of Hesse, things would have been bleak for Ungewitter. Instead, it only managed to avoid bankruptcy by cutting back employees' working hours under the German government's Kurzarbeit (short-time working) program...
    [But things are unstable for Libyans too -]
    ...For example, the 30-hour workweek in government-owned businesses is now subject to negotiation... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Top-Paying Part-Time Jobs, San Francisco Chronicle via sfgate.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - ...Not all part-time jobs are equal, but good paying jobs at less than 30 hours a week do exist. Here are the top picks for those with a little less time on their hands... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Unemployment In America Is There A Solution? Oye! Times via oyetimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Changes could include awarding reemployment bonuses to people who find a job quickly, offering wage insurance payments to people who accept a job that pays less than their previous job, using UI benefits to temporarily place unemployed workers with private-sector employers so that they can gain experience in a new occupation or industry or supplementing the earnings of workers who agree to accept shorter working hours rather than being laid-off (short-time compensation)... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Changing terms and conditions, FT Adviser via ftadviser.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Naturally employees will work shorter hours as a result. Once I have purchased the company can I go ahead and change the terms and conditions?... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.