Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
February, 2012

[Commentary] ©2012 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Not your father's DMV - Cutting furloughs at motor vehicle offices is an early example of Mayor Hancock's effort to make city government more effective, DenverPost.com
    DENVER, Colo. - ...Add in the furlough days, which city workers have been taking for about four years, and the snowball was rolling right along. Administration officials now realize money saved on furloughs (about $55,000 annually for the DMV) is offset by overtime payments as they try to reduce backlogged cases... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But they avoided layoffs, so the experienced staff is still there to handle the backlog.]
  2. Red Ink Spilleth - Shortened School Year, 70 Layoffs Possible, Santa Barbara Independent via independent.com
    SANTA BARBARA, Calif. - ...The cuts on that list add up to $11.6 million, but some would affect others. Furlough days, for instance would undo the need for class size increases and teacher reductions... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. County worker furlough program inches ahead, DailyRepublic.com
    FAIRFIELD, Calif. - ...Janet Cory Sommer, a labor relations attorney, led Tuesday’s discussion. Six furlough concepts were presented:... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Court calls end to strikes at Frankfurt airport, Reuters.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...The GdF union, which said it would appeal the court ruling, is demanding higher pay and shorter working hours from airport operator Fraport (FRAG.DE) for the staff... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, February 28, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Cities borrow from pensions [in order] to pay for them - Costs of retirees soar - Critics say loans from New York fund just defer problems, WSJ, A1.
    [More evidence for Neil DeGrasse Tyson's contention that "some problems in the universe" or merely in New York "might be just too hard for the human brain. Maybe we're simply too stupid." P.17, Natural History Magazine Dec/2011. Or as another philoso-
    pher put it: "...People everywhere - when you strip away their superficial differences - are crazy." P.19, Dave Barry Does Japan.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Chip maker Elpida filed for bankruptcy protection, in the largest corporate failure among Japan's manufacturers since World War II, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Japan too - eaten alive by China's cheap millions - and its own dumb buy-in to suicidal but sacrosanct Free Trade.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Insider targets expanding - FBI is building cases on 120 people for alleged illegal trading...,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • A 'default' in Europe - S&P again cuts Greece's rating, WSJ, C1 pointer to C3.
    Greece became the first euro-zone member to officially be rated in default, WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
  • German lawmakers approved a second Greek bailout package but Chancellor Merkel didn't get full backing from her own coalition, WSJ, A1 pointer to A11.
    [Pols would have much easier lives if they made the tough but inevitable decisions sooner rather than later. But US pols have been putting them off too and here's a little sample -]
  • Bending the tax code for A.I.G., by Andrew Ross Sorkin, New York Times, B1.
    Last week, the American International Group reported a whopping $19.8 billion profit for its fourth quarter. It is quite a feat for a company that was on its death bed just a little over three years ago [and should have been allowed to die!], so sick that it "needed" [our quotes] a huge taxpayer bailout.
    [Charity forced by the rich for the rich from the non-rich taxpayer - nevermind the Onepercenters' declaration of class warfare here, mull over the mounting attacks on marketable productivity which requires, duh, markets - and which the wealthy require for profitable or even stable investment. More of their intensifying policy of Suicide, Everyone Else First.]
    But if you dug into the numbers, it quickly became clear that $17.7 billion of that profit was pure fantasy - a tax benefit, er, gift, from the United States government [i.e., Treasury under Time "Grafty" Geithner]. The company make only $1.6 billion during the quarter from actual operations. Yet A.I.G. not only received a tax benefit, it is unlikely to pay a cent of taxes this year, nor by some estimates, for at least a decade.
    The tax benefit is notable for more than simply its size. It is the result of a rule that the Treasury unilaterally bent for A.I.G. and several other hobbled companies a few years ago that has largely been overlooked [or covered up].
    This rule-twisting could deprive the government [alias the taxpayer] of tens of billions of dollars, assuming the firm remains "profitable" [our quotes]. The tax dodge, and let's be honest [oh nooo!], that's what it was, also will most likely help goose [or completely fund] the bonuses of A.I.G.'s employees [ie: executives], some who [sic] helped create many of the problems that led to its role in the financial crisis...
    [and that they'll continue to create until Congress gets rid of Geithner (and Bernanke) and stops Treasury (and the Fed) from incentivating their crisis-causing behavior.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Should a 21-Hour Workweek Be the New US Standard? PayScale.com (blog)
    SEATTLE, Wash. - Should the US ditch the standard 40-hour working week in favor of a 21-hour workweek? A report out of the New Economics Foundation argues that such a move would help the environment, boost the economy and promote social justice... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 'N.D.' v. State Department of Education, Leagle.com
    HONOLULU, Hawaii - ...The Department implemented the so-called "furlough Fridays" in order to avoid teacher layoffs in the face of budget cuts... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Simplot in Portage to cut hours as potato shortage looms, WinnipegFreePress.com
    PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE, Manitoba, Canada - ...As a result, some workers will see their hours reduced, Cuoio said, although no one will be laid off... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, February 26-27, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Sears will sell off [11] stores to raise cash, 2/25 Boston Globe, 5.
    ...The plans also follow news in December that Sears would close up to 120 stores to raise cash.
    [The Wall Street Journal said 1200 stores on Friday.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • How to fix executive compensation - For starters, don't link pay packages just to stock - Tie them to debt as well,
    2/27 Wall Street Journal, R1.
  • Mitt Romney and the other candidates can't admit that the auto bailout worked, editorial, 2/26 New York Times, revu10.
    [Yes but it opened the door for the Wall Street bailout which didn't.]
  • Vital signs - Sales of new homes slipped in January..., 2/27 Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    0.9% from December to a seasonally adjusted rate of 321,000...
  • G-20 snubs German pleas for IMF aid, 2/27 Boston Globe, B6.
    [When Germany starts asking for AID from FMI (tyFoid Mary International), they're getting suicidal.]
  • In Greece, watching a democracy fall apart, 2/26 NYT, revu1 pointer to revu8.
    [But they invented it!]
  • Special needs students on rise [in preschool facilities] - City schools strain to make room..., by James Vaznis, 2/26 BG, A1.
    [By what drifting definitions do schools have to make room for PREschoolers? In the 40s & 50s, us little kids went to the corner church (Knox Presbyterian, Harbord & Spadina, Toronto) for nursery school until age 5 when we qualified for school school = kindergarten (our first taste of the German language tho' most of us didn't know it and called it kindergarden) at Huron Street Public School some 7 blocks' walk away.]
    The number of preschoolers with disabilities in the Boston public schools has surged more than 50% over the last three years, an unanticipated increase that has prompted school officials to add...nearly two dozen [24] new preschool classrooms since September - far more than the 2-3 it usually adds during a school year to meet a federal mandate to teach children with disabilities as soon as they turn 3.
    [There's the source of the forward-drifting definition of school, but probably appropriate, since as Bucky Fuller pointed out, the most-determinative bad or good stuff happens to humans in their first couple of years. So spending, as we do - the most money on them when they're old, or on university education instead of preschool - is dysfunctional. But what about additional teacher jobs? And what about the upstream question: what's deteriorating faster for kids now? air quality? parents' jobs?...]
    In a dramatic move earlier this month to make space for up to 15 new preschool classrooms, the School Committee approved the immediate reopening of a Dorchester elementary school it had closed just 8 months ago as part of budget cuts.
    [So when do they raise taxes on the people with the most money, who suffer least but complain most and have the weightiest votes? Or are they going to continue unsustainably on debt?]
    So far, the School Dept. has nearly 700 students with autism or other disabilities in its preschool programs and is expecting to enroll about 75 more by the end of the school year. By comparison, preschool classes wrapped up three years ago with 482 students with disabilities...
    [700/482= a 45% increase in 3 years or a 15%/year increase. No wonder we have -]
  • Reeling men - Stressed out and beaten down, the male characters in this year's Oscar nominees are struggling to [cope] - and failing, by Ty Burr tburr@globe.com [sounds like Tiber], 2/26 BG, A1.
    ...Rather than obsess over the one film that will win the best-picture Oscar tonight...we might do better to sift the broad sweep of nominees (and beyond) for what they say, as a group, about [troubling developments] in our lives and our culture. More precisely, the lives of modern male providers, as these movies see them, are a minefield of anxiety, where one wrong move can bring the house crashing down. ..."The Tree of Life" [Brad Pitt], "The Descendants" [Geo.Clooney, "Take Shelter" Michael Shannon], "Moneyball" [Brad Pitt], "A Separation," and "A Better Life"...all feature middle-aged heroes running desperately in place as they try to hold it together in public, showing their game faces to spouses, children, and colleagues, while privately coming apart at the seams. ...I'd argue that "Win Win," with Paul Giametti as a stressed-out small-town lawyer whose nervous little lies become become panic-stricken whoppers [compare all the modern CEOs and loose-cannon traders whose nervouse little bottom-line lies become panic-stricken traders!], is a truer portrait of the "post"-downturn [our quotes] American male than most moviegoers care to admit.... The brilliance of "Take Shelter" isn't that something [our italx] is freaking the hero out. It's that everything is.
    Not at all coincidentally, the field of nominees [also has a] number of worried sons on display. The small central figures in "Hugo" and "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" struggle with the mysteries of their fathers' vanishings and with the enigmatic messages they've left behind...
    [Anyone seriously alarmed by these symptoms should take a half-hour to read-through a high-level solution outline that we've been suffering for lack of since 1933 when an uncomprehending Pres. Franklin Roosevelt sandbagged in the House a 30-hour workweek bill that had just passed the US Senate. If you get your time arrangements wrong, you mess up your whole society, cuz time permeates everything. And if you need a couple more anecdotes to get alarmed -]
    Port Royal SC - Naked man flees [in stolen firetruck], kills pedestrian, 2/26 BG, A11.
    Detroit MI - Attacked elderly man [with broken leg, carjacked,] gets no help [from at least 4 passersby as he crawls from pump to gas-station door], 2/26 BG, A11.
    [And it ain't just about humans -]
    Third monkey dies at Harvard research center, by Carolyn Y. Johnson cjohnson@globe.com, 2/27 BG, A1.
    A dehydrated squirrel monkey died at a Harvard Medical School research facility in December [in Southborough MA] - the third monkey to die at the New England Primate Research Center in 19 months - and additional animals there suffered a fracture and other harm over the past three months, according to a federal inspection report released yesterday...
    [A medical school? Isn't that supposed to be a school of mending, not murder? Is this typical of American "medicine" today? A gang of self-important, self-martyring, self-overpaying workaholics who dish as much death as health? And as for Harvard - how fast is it losing class? The current Poohbah in the prez' office better grab ahold on this - there's the world's biggest university endowment on hand to help - what is it now, $20-30 billion? And they're still asking alumni for money?! How about no more donations till they turn around the culture of the Primate Research Center? -]
    The most recent problems prompted the US Dept. of Agriculture to cite Harvard for three serious episodes of endangering animals.... The university could face fines or a warning because of failures to comply with federal animal welfare regulations.
    [Never mind "could face" - levy! They've got the money and the whole institution is riddled with the kind of snobheavy sado-masochism seen in the dysfunctional relationships at Vogue oops Runway Magazine in "The Devil Wears Prada" -]
    Harvard officials...attributed the Dec.27 death and the non-fatal dehydration of a second monkey to employees' failure to check a water dispensing system... Another squirrel monkey's leg was fractured in January when it was caught under a door. And a group of rhesus macaques escaped from their pen in December, resulting in an injury to one monkey's foot. ...Problems with management systems and the implementation of basic procedures were discovered through a review launched in the summer of 2010 after the first monkey died.
    [And nothing done until -]
    ...a change in the leadership team last September...
    [= over a year later! All the committees and inspections and investigations in the world don't matter. Harvard needs just ONE person in charge of animal care who really cares about the animals, that's all. So just fire the one who doesn't care and spend a tiny % of that $20-30B to find and cherish that one person.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The payroll tax law's best measure - Tucked in the small print of the payroll tax bill is a work-sharing plan that could save more than a million jobs this year, by Dean Baker, 2/27 The [Manchester UK] Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    [Hey, Dean made the Manchester Guardian!]
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - One of the little-noticed items attached to the extension of the payroll tax cut was a provision that would promote work-sharing as part of state unemployment insurance systems. The provision, which is based on a bill introduced in the Senate by Jack Reed and in the House by Rosa DeLauro, would reimburse states for money spent on work-sharing programs that are part of their unemployment insurance system. It would also provide funds for the states that do not currently have work-sharing systems to establish them... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Information Regarding Furloughs, 2/26 SEIU Local 1991 campaign news via seiu1991.org
    MIAMI, Fla. - ...Additionally, the parties agree that no employee shall be furloughed for more than 64 total hours from November 2011 through February 2012... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This makes sure that a furlough doesn't turn into a layoff; i.e., that a timesizing doesn't become a downsizing.]
  3. Women in Tabuk work in floristry, 2/27 SaudiGazette.com.sa
    TABUK, Saudi Arabia - ...Women are attracted to the jobs at Astra Agricultural Co. due to the shorter working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Bank officers' body calls for all-India strike tomorrow, 2/26 TheHinduBusinessLine.com
    MUMBAI, India - To press for its demands for regulated working hours, pay parity with State Bank of India officers, stoppage of cross mergers of regional rural banks, and five-day working week, the All-India Bank Officers' Association (AIBOA) has called for an all-India bank strike on February 28. The Association's move coincides with the strike call by central trade unions on the same day... Though clerical and sub-staff in banks have fixed working hours of 6.5 hours and 7 hours respectively, the officers don't have regulated working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Kimberly council cuts city workers' hours, North Jefferson News via njeffersonnews.com
    KIMBERLY, Ala. - ...But the council did vote to cut city workers' hours to 32 hours a week, in the wake of increased city expenses and declining revenues from business licenses and sales taxes... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, February 25, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Atrium Mall [Newton MA] loses another key store - The Gap is latest to leave upscale site, Boston Globe, B1.
    [Maybe upscale but we defy you to find your way in there from Rte.9, and toff Chestnut Hill Mall is practically nextdoor anyway.]
    ...After Gap closes, there will be just 14 retailers remaining. ...Home good store Decor Mantra said business has slowed since Borders left and as each store closes, fewer shoppers stop at the Atrium Mall...
    [Suuure there's a recovery - but sometimes the re-coverup slipsss...]
  • 2 Upper Crust Pizzeria franchises shut down [in Salem & Beverly, MA] - Were in process of repaying workers, by D.C. Denison, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...more than $80,000 in back pay [ordered in 2011] by the Dept. of Labor for violating federal overtime and record-keeping laws.... The company was ordered to pay more than $341,000 [in] 2009. ...The upscale chain forced some workers, primarily illegal Brazilian immigrants, to give back overtime payments by deducting money from their weekly paychecks...
    [Where to begin? For starters, how can any oxymoronic "pizza parlor" be upscale? Then the scuzzy management goes on and on. But who needs management skills in a deep structural labor surplus? - Just fire your costly experienced employees, hire desperate 20-somethings at minimum wage, cheat them all, and have your golden parachute and getaway plane ready to disappear to Jamaica (or the Caymans), like a string of two-bit Haitian dictators -]
    Retiring J&J chief to get bigger bonus for 2011, AP via BG, B5.
    Johnson & Johnson is bumping up the bonus of retiring chief executive Bill Weldon by 55% [to] $3,100,000, up from $2,000,000.... J&J has issued around 30 product recalls since late 2009.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Small companies create more jobs? Maybe not - Data shows big companies hire more, but small-business jobs are more stable, New York Times, B3.
    In both creating jobs and cutting them, large companies lead (graph caption)
    [It's a Don't Worry Be Happy day in the Wall St Journal today, so everything's from the NYT & its BG subsidiary.]
  • A steep roof over their heads -...More people spend more of income on income, Boston Globe, B5,B6.
    Working households with severe housing cost burden (graph caption)
    In Massachusetts: 24% 2008, 22% 2009, 24% 2010
    National average: 24%
    [So not surprisingly -]
  • Sales of new homes drop..., NYT, B7.
    [And newspapers continue their decline, taking our online-stressed eyes with them -]
  • Washington Post records 22% drop in income, NYT, B7.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Frankfurt airport hit by fresh strikes, Agence France-Presse via google.com/hostednews/afp
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...Some 200 apron control staff -- who direct aircraft in and out of their parking positions both from the control tower and on the tarmac -- have been striking since February 16. They want higher pay, increased bonuses and shorter working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Rockton facing deep staff cuts, BeloitDailyNews.com
    [Deeper without the cut hours...]
    ROCKTON, Wisc. - ...The Rockton School Board will cut 18 certified teaching positions, eliminate an assistant principal position and cut hours from the district in an effort to save $1.3 million... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, February 24, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Postal pullbacks spare [Boston] facility, by Casey Ross, Boston Globe, B5.
    The Postal Service's...plan unveiled yesterday will cut about 35,000 jobs nationwide...
  • Procter & Gamble to cut 5,700 jobs in cost-cutting,
    BG, B6.
    [Wall St Journal version -]
    P&G plans to cut more than 4,000 jobs and streamline its marketing budget in an effort to pare back a cost structure that has weighed on profit, WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
  • Sears reports 4Q loss; will close some stores [unspecified jobcuts], by D'Innocenzio & Anderson, AP via BG, B6.
    ...Sears will sell 11 stores to the real estate company General Growth Properties for $270 million [and] plans to cut inventory by about $580 million...
    [Excess inventory is a key symptom of (shhhhhh) depression. But Sears, eg: Burlington Mall branch, MA, has been absolutely chaotic lately - appalling anecdotes abound about acquaintances trying to buy stuff there - clueless clerks, wrong stuff delivered, wrong price, rightstuff outofstock, on&on&on...]
    Industry watchers...said that...the company has not invested in its stores.
    [Just in its CEO salary?]
    "We feel they're not doing enough to solve the problems for the future," said Michael Cipriani, senior VP of Rosenthal & Rosenthal...
    [Wall St. Journal version -]
    In retreat, Sears set to unload stores, WSJ, A1.
    ...more than 1,200...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Blowing the whistle? editorial, Boston Globe, A10.
    ...Lt.Col. Daniel L. Davis...a 17-year army officer...during a year-long deployment in Afghanistan...visited..."every significant area where our soldiers engage the enemy" and interviewed 250 US troops as well. After returning, Davis...collected his observations in a report and in a subsequent essay in Armed Forces Journal. He criticizes Army leaders for dissembling about the supposed success of the mission and called for a congressional inquiry into the decade-long war. "How many more men," asks Davis, "must die in support of a mission that is not succeeding?"...
    [Quite the contrary, When US troops can enrage the whole country by burning two copies of their most sacred book "by mistake" according to "Afghans protest burning of Korans at US base - Americans call it accidental - Try to quell growing anger" (2/22 BG, A3) and "Protests over Koran burnings expand across Afghanistan - At least 7 killed as lawmakers demand trials" (2/23 BG, A4), it's time to cut costs and ongoing damage and just get the US the hell outa there. Evidently we're way too dumb to learn from the Brits' debacle there in the 1920s and the Soviets' disaster in the 1980s. But it sure has been great for chest-thumpin' job creation and private-supplier profit - taxpayers be damned!]
    Davis deserves credit for speaking his mind.
    [Amen to that.]
  • Cost of $10 billion stimulus easier to tally than [value of its] new jobs, WSJ, A1.
    [Taxpayers are paying the tax-evading Onepercenters over a $trillion a year in interest and they're still being forced to shell out $10,000,000,000 to create enough artificial busywork to maintain a pre-automation 1940 workweek forever??? Time to quit straining to create new 40-hr/wk jobs and just share the yet-to-be-automated employment, however short a workweek it may take.]
    Top 5 wind-power recipients of funding through the Treasury Dept.'s 1603[??] program (graph caption)
    Iberdrola Renewables $1,500,000,000
    [This isn't even an American company - it's Spanish, or more specifically, Basque (much as we love the Basques!) - how did they get this much? by paying off a US Treasury official or two?]
    FPL/Nextera $982,000,000
    EDP/Horizon $667,000,000
    E.On $576,000,000
    Edison International $480,000,000

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Violent crime rise alarms activists, by Brian Ballou, Boston Globe, B3.
    ...has rocked several of Boston's communities.... Since Friday, there have been three fatal shootings, one fatal stabbing, and at least four non-fatal shootings and stabbings in Dorchester, the South End, and Mattapan...

    JOB- OR JOBLOSS- RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • Helicopter crash kills 7 Marines in Calif. - Two craft collide during training, by Julie Watson, AP via BG, A5.
    ...near the Chocolate Mountains along the California-Arizona border.\.during a nighttime exercise...no survivors in the latest in a series of crashes involving troops from Camp Pendleton...
    The crash in a remote desert was the fifth since March involving Marine aircraft in training in California. (photo caption)
    [How many lives do we want to use up in training? We put a lotta dough into those doughboys and they're supposed to be marines, not aviators. Boys, if they tempt you with mountains of chocolate, DON'T GO.]
    ..."It's an unfortunate consequence of the high tempo of operations".\.Retired Marine Colonel J.F. Joseph, an aviation "safety" [our quotes] consultant, said....
    [If we're killing our own Marines without even waiting to give "the enemy" the chance, maybe we should stop defeating our whole purpose and slow the tempo...]
    "They're out there working on the edge trying to exploit the maximum capabilities of the aircraft and their tactics.
    [Uh, can we wait till they're in a theater of war to exploit the absolute "maximum capabilities" of the aircraft and their tactics?!]
    "Just by the virtue of that, in becoming combat ready, these unfortunately are not uncommon occurrences."...
    [Well they damn well should be uncommon occurrences. If they're common, this ain't training, it's homeland insecurity. Here we have another organization whose culture has turned gratuitously and suicidally macho, just like the Boston University hockey team lately: "BU hockey needs to change jock culture" (2/23 BG, A15) and "BU to investigate school's hockey culture - Decision follows arrest of two stars [for sexual assaults on women]" (2/24 BG, B1). Maybe it's time for Camp Pendleton to grow up and start "Taming the Helicopter Parent" (2/23 BG, A1 pointer to G16). What are they trying to prove? that they don't need The Enemy in order to die for their country? They need some lessons from Mass. State Police Academy: "Real-world perils, reenacted safely - ...Trainees drill with 75 different scenarios, far more than in the past" (2/21 BG, B1): "Here is where you want to correct the mistakes..." - not make them.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Jon Huntsman [recent presidential candidate] calls for alternate party, by Shira Schoenberg, Boston Globe, A8.
    ..."to compete against the duopoly that is getting old and tired. ...We're stuck in a rut, we're not having the conversation in this country that we need to have."... Huntsman dismissed the presidential debates...as "dumbed down," saying people watch them for entertainment value... Huntsman said the recent debates over cultural issues, including birth control, are "a total waste of time."
  • EU forecasts mild recession, with 0.3% contraction in region's economy, Boston Globe, B6.
    [But they can make it a deep one just by clinging to the euro and more bailouts for the rich.]
  • European Central Bank chief Draghi warned eurozone nations that there is no escape from tough austerity measures - , [There certainly IS an escape from tough austerity measures = discipline employers and Onepercenters into spreading the ultramassive black hole in the money supply out into consumer spending by paying higher wages in response to a systemic labor "shortage" engineered by converting overtime into training&hiring to stop the deterioration and then trimming the workweek as much as it takes to restore wartime levels of full employment and monetary circulation and prosperity - without the war.]
    - and that the Continent's traditional social contract is obsolete, Wall Street Journal, A1:1 news pointer to A1:3.
    [What utter defeatist nonsense! Austerity, as Krugman points out, is just a quick ticket to lessening consumer spending and total economic collapse, and renegging further on the weakened social contract for the 99% in order to further enrich Onepercenters with increasingly unspendable, uninvestable and insecure zillions is just nuts - for everyone including the Onepercenters. Draghi and all the rest of these fat-brained stuffed shirts need a whack on the side of the head to wake them up to worktime economics. They don't even realize what Europe (or less so, America) is doing right! Brain-partitioned Draghi needs to get in touch with whatever EU dept. issued the following downgrade, or read the news pointer about it RIGHT BELOW this one in today's Wall St Journal -]
  • The E.U. sharply downgraded its growth outlook for the region's economies, raising new questions about the virtues of austerity, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8,A9.
    [It's time to scale back the E.U. - there's no consistent message, there's no consistent foreign policy, there are no consistent economic-policy needs - and it all starts with a more consistent, conservative, and thorough common-language policy&education, workweek (and vacation) policy, skills-training policy, immigration policy (in that order) - and then and only then can they even begin to think responsibly about a unified-currency policy. They have already backed into a non-ideal common-language policy, with lots of expectable resentment, but non-ideal speakers of this non-ideal language (English, but don't say it out loud) are basically speaking German and French, the two biggest languages on the continent, badly. One third of English vocabulary is Germanic (from Anglo-Saxon) spoken two thirds of the time, and two thirds of English vocabulary is French (from Norman French when them francophones kicked our butt in 1066) - and it doesn't hurt that Fries and Dutch are our linguistic siblings and we've got a lotta Anglo-Dane overlap with Scandinavian on the north, and the other six Latin-derived languages on the south - not to mention scientific- & Biblical-vocab tentacles into Greek. Oops, here's another reason for central-banker Draghi to wake up or shut up till he fixes his own "glass house"-]
  • Three big European banks reported hefty losses, highlighting how the crisis is inflicting a toll on lenders that are in retrenchment mode, WSJ, A1 pointer to C2.
    [We need a structural adjustment. Lending is non-structural or at best, surface-structural. What we need is deep-structural and that means a permanent shift of ownership and entitlement, not just the temporary shift that lending confers. The ONLY WAY to get such a permanent shift of ownership and entitlement on a market-determined basis is to reposition the people who support economic dynamism aka currency circulation aka consumer spending as a scarce commodity instead of a surplus commodity. This means switching capitalism from running on a chronic scarcity of jobs and surplus of jobseekers, to an automatically guaranteed surplus of jobs and shortage of jobseekers - as we had in World Wars I & II along with their wartime prosperity. How to do this without war? TRIM THE WORKWEEK, which has been untouched in America now for 72 years despite wave after wave of superproductive technology. We can't continue the downsizing response and still have an economy left, because as Reuther replied to Ford's "Let's see you unionize these robots!" - "Let's see you sell them cars."]
  • America is Europe - Economic stagnation through the back door, op ed by David Brooks, New York TImes, 23.
    ...The U.S. does not have a significantly smaller welfare state than the European nations. We're just better at hiding it.
    The Europeans provide welfare provisions [sic] through direct government payments - we do it through the back door via tax breaks.
    For example, in Europe, governments offer health care directly. In the U.S., we give employers a gigantic tax exemption to do the same thing...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Push work sharing to soften impact of joblessness, People's World via peoplesworld.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - A plan to promote work-sharing arrangements, where firms suffering from the recession would keep all present workers on board, but cut their hours - with unemployment benefits partially making up for lost pay - was inserted into the payroll tax cut-jobless benefits extension law that President Obama signed Feb. 22... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Work Less, Help Economy And Environment, HuffingtonPost.com
    LONDON, England - ...In addition to longer hours, both the U.S. and U.K. have higher unemployment rates -- above 8%, compared with 5% in both the Netherlands and Germany. "There seems to be some relationship. Shorter working hours make it easier to create more jobs," said Mike Harris of the New Economics Foundation and lead researcher on a 2010 report that advocates a 21-hour work week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Shades of Anders Hayden's book, "Sharing the Work, Sparing the Planet."]
  3. Frauenthal AG Is Considering Short Time Work, Austrian Business & Financial News via FRIEDLnews.com
    VIENNA, Austria - The Austrian component supplier is experiencing the first signs of the economic crisis. As orders go down by 10-15%, short time work [= Kurzarbeit = worksharing] becomes an option again... - see whole article under today's date.
    [At last, some worksharing news from Austria! Speak up, you guys! We'll polish your translation on our homepage.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, February 23, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from a cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Cable ad venture [Canoe Ventures in New York] is shutting down, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    The largest cable TV companies are shutting down most of a venture that let viewers interact with TV ads and laying off 120 employees...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Fuller Brush seeks court protection, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...less than two months after saying it had "completely rebooted itself"..\.. ...Founded in 1906 and known for its door-to-door salesmen....
    ...Founder Alfred C. Fuller, born in Nova Scotia in 1885 [same year as Phil Hyde III's grannie Louise Elizabeth Reppen Hyde was born in Nottingham, England] moved at age 18 to Boston, where he eventually sold brushes door-to-door...
    [So no relation to Margaret Fuller or Buckminster Fuller?]
    At 21, with a $375 investment, Fuller started making brushes based on feedback from customers [=following The Market] and hired crews to help with sales nationwide.
    [Compare door-to-door sales by Collier's Encyclopedias and "Avon Calling"...]
    For advertising, he managed to get Donald Duck and the Big Bad Wolf case as Fuller Brush men in cartoons, and the icon appeared in the comic strips Blondie and Mutt & Jeff. The company also was highlighted in the 1948 Columbia Pictures comedy "The Fuller Brush Man."
  • Cable ad venture is shutting down, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    The largest cable TV companies are shutting down most of a venture [120 of 150-155 employees] that let viewers interact with TV ads.... Four-year old Canoe Ventures [so they did wait more than the first "terrible two" years] let viewers of 8 cable networks...request info by mail from advertisers by pushing a button. But the technology didn't catch on with advertisers.
    [or viewers?]
    Canoe will close its New York H.Q...but keep 30-35 employees in Denver to work on ad systems for video-on-demand services...

    JOB- OR JOBLOSS- RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • Walmart employee shoots manager, kills self, AP via Boston Globe, A2.
    DINWIDDIE, Va. - ...distribution center... 32-year-old man... shot his...manager in the shipping dept. in the leg... Her injuries were not life-threatening. ...There was no evident dispute between the shooter and the wounded woman... The man had worked at the center for nine years, the woman 18 years...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Housing data, troubles abroad agitate market, Boston Globe, B8.
    Stocks fell [27.02 pts or 0.2% to 12938.67] after sales of previously owned houses in the United States rose less than forecast and data from Europe and China worried [Wall] Street's traders. China's manufacturing may shrink for a fourth month, and European services and manufacturing output unexpectedly contracted.
    [If they quit covering up the deepening depression, they'd quit with the unrealistically rosy expectations and forecasts.]
    Fitch lowered Greece's credit rating and said a default is highly likely.
    [So much for the Onepercenters' repeated, taxpayer-whacking, Bail-Us-Out scam!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Furloughs not needed after all, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    DALLAS, Tex. - Because of worksharing and other steps, American Airlines won't have to furlough 500 flight attendants... Yesterday, the company and the Association of Professional Flight Attendants said furloughs won't be needed because so many workers signed up for worksharing and voluntary leaves... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= timesizing, not downsizing! So there ARE some unions who realize this is their power issue - forget the small stuff like pay and benefits!]
  2. Monte Paschi seeks measures to contain staff cost, Reuters.com
    MILAN, Italy - Italy's third-largest bank Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena said on Thursday it was seeking to keep staff costs under control, by cutting work hours without resorting to lay-offs... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= more timesizing, not downsizing! So there ARE some CEOs, even banksters, who realize the near-panacea potential of this agenda!]
  3. President signs helpful new work-sharing provisions into law, The Progressive Pulse via pulse.ncpolicywatch.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...One of the best and most under-reported aspects of the bill is a provision that encourages employers to promote work-sharing as an alternative to layoffs. Such programs have worked well in Germany and other countries... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Economic Intelligence [oxymoron alert] - Don't Destroy Unemployment Insurance in the Name of 'Reform', U.S. News & World Report (blog) via usnews.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Last week in this space, Dean Baker pointed to the work-sharing provision in the payroll tax/unemployment insurance bill Congress passed Friday as a rare victory of common sense and bipartisanship in Washington—and it was... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, February 22, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and in case you think this recoverup is a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • People's United Bank [of Bridgeport, Connecticut] will close three branches in Massachusetts and Bank of America Corp. will shut two, part of an industry streamlining, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    [So hey, don't call it a recession. Call it a streamlining!]
    Two banks set to close 5 branches in Mass. - Bank of America, People's reveal consolidations - Overall, the number of US bank branches has declined by nearly 1,350, or about 1 percent, over the last two fiscal years [per FDIC], by Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, B5 target article.
    ...The closings come as banks across the country shrink branch networks to cut expenses,
    absorb acquisitions,
    [In the most competitive future economies, acquisitions will be banned except in cases of bankruptcy.]
    and take advantage of customers shifting to online banking...
    [More work for consumers, less work for employees. But don't cut the workweek or anything intelligent. Cut the employees and all the consumers they support, so we can keep closing banks and everything else. Then we can keep concentrating the money supply and pyramiding the stock market! 15000 here we come, just like Sept/1929!]
    People's United...plans to eliminate 15 of its 372 branches [4%] this year, including three [of 59=5%] in Mass. over the next month:
    one in Salem (6 Paradise Rd) and
    two in Andover (20 Central St and 342 N.Main)...
    In Mass. alone, People's...bought Butler Bank of Lowell, the parent of RiverBank of North Andover, and Danversbank...over the past two years...
    Nationally, Bank of America has "pledged" [our quotes] to close 750 of its 5,700 branches in coming years..\..
    ["Pledged"? like this is something Good? Like they're swearing off drugs or alcohol? "I signed The Pledge." Yeah, right.]
    ...BofA, the largest bank in the state...plans to close two of its 270 Mass. branches on June 1,
    one in Montague's Turners Falls village and
    another on Rockdale Ave in New Bedford...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • New fears over credit-default swaps,
    New York Times, A1.
    [New fears, or just some publicity for old ones?]
  • Dow's reach exceeds its grasp, Wall Street Journal, C1.
    ...fails to hang onto...13000...
    Economic hopes propel Dow to near 13,000 mark -
    [Vain hopes: this isn't a re-covery, it's a re-coverup.]
    'There are a lot of pent-up reasons for the market to go up.' Jennifer K. Silver, Redwood Investments, Newton MA, Boston Globe, inside head, B9.
    [Yeah, trillions and trillions of dollars getting funneled to the Onepercenters so they can throw up another hollow stock pyramid while ensuring declining consumer spending, marketable productivity and solid investments.]
  • Dell reported an 18% decline in profit amid...weak demand from public-sector customers, WSJ, A1 pointer to B6.
    [No surprise when America's in the midst of dismantling its public sector with only primitive worksharing, and no timesizing yet, to replace the jobs and consumer spending.]
  • Population growth in U.S. rural regions slowed over past decade, reflecting a drop in available jobs in often-isolated areas, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    [Just like in China - no jobs in the country so everybody moved to the city - where there were no jobs either. Btw, what's an "often-isolated area"?]
  • Greece's bailout and debt-restructuring deal spawned some relief, but the overriding reaction was one of unease that the tough agreement, which has already generated huge opposition among Greeks, is bound to fail, WSJ, AS1 pointer to A8,A9.
    [As St. Paul Krugman said on 2/20 (NYT) "Pain without gain - The utter failure of austerity economics" i.e., toughness on all-else-supporting consumer spending.]
    For Greece, a bailout, for Europe, perhaps just an illusion, NYT, A1.
    [What good's bailing without plugging the leaks?]
    Doubts shadow a debt reprieve - Greece's ability to repay is questioned, NYT, B1.
    [No kiddin'!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Tax-Cut Bill Includes Updates to Jobless Benefits System, New York Times via nytimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. — ...The bill additionally expands “work sharing” programs that can help reduce layoffs at big businesses. In effect, businesses would have the option of cutting the hours of five workers by 20% each, say, rather than laying off one worker. The business could then use unemployment insurance money to help supplement the workers’ wages to make up for the lost hours... “Work sharing is an incredibly smart thing to do,” said Heidi Shierholz of the Economic Policy Institute, a research institution in Washington... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Frankfurt airport strikes to end Wednesday night, Reuters UK via reuters.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...The GdF, which wants higher pay and shorter working hours, said it would end the strike at 9 pm and hoped to start new talks with Fraport on Thursday... The union has said the workers' jobs have become more complicated since a fourth runway came into operation... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, February 21, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Hanscom [Air Force Base] contract workers face cuts - Base to lose portion of its US funding, by Brian Bender, Boston Globe, A1.
    ...The cost-cutting measures at the base's Electronic Systems Center, set to take place over the next four years, will affect most of the 1,250 contractors now providing management, engineering, and other private-sector services. A separate change in Hanscom's military status will mean the loss of nearly 380 government positions...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • A top U.S. security official has warned that the hacking group Anonymous could have the ability within the next year or two to bring about a limited power outage, WSJ. A1 pointer to A3.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Some doubt a settlement will eliminate mortgage ills - Homeowners are often unable to get through to the bank representative, NY Times, B1.
  • The U.S. and Mexico reached an agreement that would allow oil and gas drilling on more than 1.5 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico, Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Haven't quite turned it into the Dead Sea yet - gotta keep trying.]
  • Europe agrees on new bailout to help Greece avoid default [no matter how much it needs one] - More austerity and strict conditions set, NYT, A1.
    [The austerity will kill the Greek economy, such as it is - then it'll need sturdy coffins, not strict conditions.]
  • Top European banks are stashing increasingly large sums of money at central banks around the world in a collective flight to safety, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Like rats leaving a sinking current-see?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Wonkbook: Muddling along in Europe, Washington Post (blog) via washingtonpost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The bill will expand a program known as 'work sharing' that uses unemployment-insurance funds to supplement the paychecks of employees whose hours have been reduced as part of a company's cost-cutting. Supporters credit the program, used in Rhode Island and several other states, with encouraging companies to keep workers in part-time jobs rather than resort to layoffs."... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Budget cuts equal cut hours at downtown Lynchburg library, WSLS via http://www2.wsls.com
    LYNCHBURG, Va. - ...But starting Tuesday, nearly half the library’s operating hours will fall prey to budget cutbacks, leaving it open just two afternoons a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, February 19-20, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • The nonprofit Chicago News Cooperative will suspend operations, 2/20 New York Times, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Survey highlights burdens of black women in recession - Willingness to aid family adds to financial strains,
    2/19 Boston Globe, A7.
  • Money changes everything - Why does it matter how rich our politicians are? Science is offering some unsettling answers, by Britt Peterson, 2/19 Boston Globe, K1.
    The mere hint of money, researchers found, makes people less likely to ask for help, less helpful, significantly less generous to a made-up charity, and far less likely to look for teammates.
    ...As a mounting body of research is showing, wealth can actually change how we think and behave - and not for the better. Rich people have a harder time connecting with others, showing less empathy to the extent of dehumanizing those who are different from them. They are less charitable and generous. They are less likely to help someone in trouble. And they are more likely to defend an unfair status quo.
    If you think you'd behave [better] in their place...you're probably wrong: These aren't just inherited traits, but developed ones. Money, in other words, changes who you are...
    [Milton Friedman said you get more of what you subsidize, less of what you tax. WE WANT LESS RICHPEOPLE - so T A X  them!]
  • Not poor, but relying on the safety net, letter to editor by Warren Hyer of Lawrenceville NJ, 2/20 NYT, A16.
    Re "Even critics of safety net increasingly dependent on it" (see below, Feb.12, 2012).
    ...Somehow an assumption has invaded our thinking that people must take all the government subsidies they can get. In past generations, it was...considered an embarrassment...
    [Maybe we finally found out how much our wealthy leaders take all the government subsidies they can get.]
  • Pain without gain - The utter failure of austerity economics, op ed by Paul Krugman, 2/20 NYT, A17.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. One-sided view ignores the flaws, 2/19 Fundweb.co.uk
    [Another article straaaining to find fault with the Boche and save face for ol' Blighty.]
    LONDON, U.K. - ...Germany’s performance in relation to unemployment is also much better [than Britain's]. According to figures from Eurostat, the unemployment rate in Germany was 5.5% in December 2011, compared with 8.4% for Britain. [A big] part of the reason for Germany’s lower figure is its short-time working schemes (Kurzarbeit) that keep workers in employment when times are tough..\..
    [And let's just rub it in good, here - from this guy's own article where practically every bit of data he presents contradicts his general conclusions -]
    The German economy grew by 3.6% in 2010 and 3.0% in 2011, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) while Britain only managed 2.1% and 0.9% respectively..\.. - see whole article under today's date.
    [But this shlemiel wants to just ignore the diff and say...]
    Britain and Germany share similar weaknesses, including low growth...
    [Wudda putz!]
  2. Du Opens a new Call Centre in Fujairah Staffed 100% by Emirati Nationals, 2/20 PRNewswire via COMTEX via MarketWatch.com
    ["Hey man, 'Du' is what us cool Emiratis call Dubai, our 2nd-largest Emirate state after Abu Dhabi, our capital!"
    "But 'Du' iss vut us Germans call You (singularisch), as in 'Du bist wie eine Blume' !"]
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - ...Financial incentives and shorter working hours are some of the strategies companies across the UAE are using to lure national employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, February 18, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Partners' gain is hurt by drop in swaps - Down 24 percent from 1st quarter in previous year, by Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, B5.
    Partners HealthCare System Inc. reported that its [fiscal?!] first-quarter financial gain [1FQ12] fell 24% from a year earlier [1FQ11] as a drop in investment earnings offset higher operating income for its hospitals and doctors in the three months ended Dec.31...
    [What's a healthcare system doing fooling around with the shakiest no-'there'-there investments ever dreamed up = CDSs/collateralized debt swaps, and the whole termite-ridden hedge-fund industry?]
  • A deal but no deal on foreclosures, by David Reilly, Wall Street Journal, B16.
    ...An old trick for burying bad corporate news: play up the good stuff in the earnings release and stick unpleasant details in the quarterly securities filing which many investors overlook. More than a week after the government trumpeted a $25 billion settlement with banks over mortgage abuses, investors and taxpayers [not really] are left to wonder if the government isn't playing the same kind of game...
    [Here's hopin'!]
  • Prices largely rose in January, fueled by increases on a range of items,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Unwed mothers now a majority before age of 30 - New threshold in U.S. - Most rapid growth has been among white women in 20s, NYT, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work Sharing Provision an Essential Part of Payroll Tax Cut Bill, by Dean Baker, USnews.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - This week, Congress passed the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 that carried the essential provisions of work sharing bills proposed by Sen. Jack Reed and Rep. Rosa DeLauro. The bill would have the federal government pick up some of the expenses associated with state work sharing programs, thereby giving them more incentive to promote work sharing. This is a rare victory of common sense and bipartisanship in Washington. The existing unemployment insurance system tends to encourage layoffs, since unemployed workers can typically collect benefits equal to half of their wages. Work sharing, or short-time compensation as it referred to in the bill, allows workers who had their hours reduced to receive benefits equal to half of their reduction in pay. From the standpoint of the worker, the employer, and the economy as a whole, it is likely to be a better outcome if workers can be kept on the job, working shorter hours rather than being laid off... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Fabulous! The biggest economy now has federal worksharing. It's not a fully independent program like Germany's Kurzarbeit because it seems to be supplemental to the worksharing programs that half the states have, but it's a big advance for the whole approach of switching from job cuts to hours cuts and ultimately for automatic adjustment of the workweek against unemployment and automatic overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
  2. Strike hits flight services at Frankfurt for 2nd day, TheHinduBusinessLine.com
    BERLIN, Germany - ...Around 200 traffic controllers...have been demanding between 40 and 50% increase in their average annual salary of €45,000 and around 10% cut in their working hours to compensate for what they claim a “sharp increase in their workload” since the airport opened its fourth runway... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Where homies can heal - Reforming gang members - A Jesuit priest [Greg Boyle] is running an impressive anti-crime programme, The Economist magazine of London, p.32.
    ..."Nothing stops a bullet like a job," as its motto says..\.. Homeboy Industries...was founded in 1992, when gang crime in Los Angeles peaked, by Greg..\.. [It's] a haven for former gang members who want to turn their lives around - roughly 12,000 of them a year, mostly male. ...It counsels former "homies" on law, drugs, and mental health, and teaches them basic skills such as maths, reading and speaking without using slang. Homeboy Industries also employs over 300 of them.
    [So let's quit the pusillanimous, mealy-mouthed, mock-scientific, don't-rock-the-boat, play-it-safe, beating-around-the-bush, prison-job-protecting, issue-fogging, simplicity-blurring obfuscation and just say it: UNEMPLOYMENT CAUSES CRIME* but as impressive anti-crime programme Homeboy Industries of Los Angeles proclaims (in case you missed it above)...]
    ..."Nothing stops a bullet like a job"...
    [*and since unemployment also causes war, nothing prevents a war like a (non-"defense") job.]



    Friday, February 17, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass., from *Porter Sq. Books & updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • General Motors outlined new cost cuts and restructuring plans even as the auto maker posted the largest annual profit in its history, Ottawa Sun, 2.
    [This common policy explains how some companies can be doing better while the overall economy does worse. This and accounting slight-of-hand.]
  • Qantas to cut [500] jobs, Financial Times, p.13 pointer to p.16.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • A group of traders and brokers successfully managed to manipulate an interest rate that affects loans around the world, one of the banks being investigated has told Canadian regulators, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Move to lift trigger on derivatives rules, by Gregory Meyer, Financial TImes, 1.
    US "regulators" [ha! - our quotes] are poised to increase 20-fold the amount of derivatives a company can sell before it is subject to strict new rules for the biggest traders, softening [ie: nuillifying] a significant plank in financial market reform...
    [Here we go again, and so soon! And when even the conservative Economist Magazine of London had a whole article on p.68 of its 1/07/2012 issue titled: Rich managers, poor clients - A devastating analysis of hedge-fund returns. Basically we need to take a flame-thrower to the whole of hedge row.]
  • Chrysler withdrew its application for a $3.5 billion low-interest loan from the U.S. Energy Department, saying the terms were too restrictive, WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
    [Sooo many questions. We thought Chrysler was now successful? Why does it "need" more taxpayer money? Why is a huge "successful" American "capitalist" company still coming to taxpayers for help? - nevermind the arrogance of biting the hand that feeds with criticism about over-restrictive terms! Why don't we quit fooling around and just pay our taxes directly to the richest CEOs and Wall Street vultures? Why doesn't the 99% just drink hemlock and achieve quickly the mass suicide and system crash that these monsters seem to be aiming at? What's the US Government doing still bailing out companies in the context of a $17 trillion national debt and a $1.3 trillion interest payment in the first place? Why have our "leaders" gone insane? It gets worse -]
  • US taxpayers set to [be forced to] subsidize banks' mortgage abuse payments, Financial Times, 1.
    [or rather, be forced to subsidize... - why is the government still pulling this crap when they KNOW how unpopular it is with the public and they've SEEN from experience that it solves nothing and in fact makes things worse??? What banks, you ask? Five of the biggest =]
    ...BofA, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Citigroup, and Ally Financial...
    [The actions of today's leaders of both finance and government amount to a huge conspiracy to destroy capitalism.]
  • Spain feels the pain of rising debt, by Richard Barley, WSJ, C8.
    Spain and Italy have spent months swapping places on the front line of the crisis. Now it again may be Spain's turn in the cross hairs...
    [But what's the good of their being repeatedly in the cross hairs if the trigger never gets pulled, their corrupt financial system's never get their corruption exposed, and they never get to take their medicine and get stabilized? But China is the future, right? Wrong -]
  • Chinese cities suffer water shortages, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.6.
    More than two thirds of cities in China are affected by worsening water shortages.
    [And according to colleague Kate, it's only going to get worse as global warming melts the Himalayan glaciers that are the source of at least three of the really big Chinese rivers: the Yangtse, the Mekong, the Yellow... But soft, here's something GOOD about China -]
    China said the next president of the World Bank should be chosen on merit, challenging a tradition that it be a U.S. citizen, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.6.
    [Wow, someone other than a nice, obedient, corruptible American to do the bidding of the "conservative" US military-industrial makework program!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. No job losses but shorter hours coming for American Samoa hospital staff, Radio New Zealand International via rnzi.com
    PAGO PAGO, American Samoa - Staff at American Samoa's LBJ Hospital are to have their hours of work cut back in a couple of months' time... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Commentary: A work-sharing program would help save jobs, The Detroit News via detroitnews.com
    DETROIT, Mich. - When you are in a hole, stop digging. When you have a deep cut, stop the bleeding. And when you are pulling yourself up from an economic depression, stop the downsizing. Work sharing is a proven, bipartisan approach to do just that, and it is time for Michigan to add this tool to its economic recovery tool box. The idea works like this: During a down period in which businesses may need workers for fewer hours, work sharing allows them to reduce their hours while tapping into funding that would keep workers' wages whole... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Germany vs. the Rest of Europe, New York Times, B1.
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...The German labor system, with its incentives to move workers to part time rather than lay them off, does appear to have been critical in keeping the country’s unemployment rate from rising more than it did during the credit crisis... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Czech TPCA car plant to cut output, shorten work week, Reuters.com
    PRAGUE, Czech Republic - TPCA, the Czech car assembly plant jointly owned by Toyota Motor Corp and PSA Peugeot Citroen, will cut its working week to four days and reduce the number of shifts from three to two as of May due to weak demand in Europe... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, February 16, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the café car of Amtrak train 68 southbound from Montréal, & Starbucks, State & Pearl, Albany NY -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Kellogg swooped in to buy Pringles for $2.7 billion after P&G's deal with Diamond Foods collapsed, looking to expand in snacks and grow overseas, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Buying other companies' market share is not systemic expansion.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Ottawa prepares to fill void caused by federal layoffs \-\ Diversity key to survival, Ottawa Sun, 2.
    ["Luring more tourists" and government "strengthening local businesses" is not diversity. Diversity is the proliferation of new jobs you get by converting overtime into training and hiring. Diversity is the greater amount of overtime conversion you get by cutting the workweek and creating as many new jobs as it takes to have full employment and full markets, no matter how low the workweek may get, or how loud employers may complain as they're forced to switch their skills from "restructuring" = layoffs, to suturing shorter shifts. Diversity is what people come up with when they have more free time and more spending money, thanks to the end of wage-depressing labor surplus and the kind of job insecurity that makes you feel like you have to be the last to leave the office at night.]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • GM freezes pay of U.S. workers, will cut pension contributions, WSJ via Toronto Globe, B13.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials posted their steepest decline of the year, giving up 97.33 points or 0.8% to 12780.95, the biggest tumble since Dec.28, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C4.
    Greece turmoil weighs on Wall Street, Toronto Globe, B17.
    ...renewed concerns that Greece was veering toward default after a debt bailout hit fresh turbulence...
  • A Greek exit from the euro would offer no easy way out, WSJ, C12.
    [Sure it would, cuz it would pave the way for smoothly exits by Italy and Spain and Portugal... and letting investors take their medicine now when it's transparent and comparatively small instead of doing a US-style coverup that just let's the meds build and build and build and build and build and build and build and...]
  • Investors' belief that the worst is over for the U.S. housing market is fueling renewed interest in once-toxic mortgage bonds, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Uh, shouldn't that be "still-toxic mortgage bonds." And uh, when will they ever learn? - except there's so few places to park their megazillion$ today they figure they have to do SOMETHING with their overproportion of the money supply along the lines of "we get it right back to work creating jobs!" but the jobs ain't there cuz Wall St's just duping them into one innovative-but-baseless (but hopefully pyramiding at least for awhile) investment instrument after another.]
    Toxic? Says who? [uh, anyone with a memory] Taste for 'subprime' returns, WSJ, C1 target article.
  • An SEC proposal to shore up money-market funds is getting a cool reception from investors worried about access to their money, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Since when is shoring up funds an SEC responsibility? Isn't this a conflict of interest with stopping fraud?]
  • Gloom'n' doom - Massive cuts needed [in Province of Ontario government], Ottawa Sun, 5.
    [but only because the wealthy are pulling back. And why? Add to a frozen 1940 workweek some 2012 robotization and a constant CEO response of downsizing the workforce (and consumer base) and the national income defaults up the income scale to the highest levels, where the wealthy get further and further away from eve ryone else and more and more nervous. And the more nervous they get, the tighter they grasp what they have and the worse the whole situation becomes.]
    This is gonna hurt - Ottawa Sun, 4.
    [But only because the wealthy are getting more and paying out less.]
    - And it'll hurt a lot more unless province stops its spending
    [No, "it'll hurt a lot more unless the province" raises taxes on the wealthy. If the province stops its spending, the provincial economy will contract accordingly and everything will get worse, including the personal isolation and insecurity of Ontario's wealthy. And stuff like this will hurt too -]
  • Hoosiers, not hosers, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    Indiana tries to lure auto parts makers south, hoping to take advantage of Ontario's struggling manufacturing sector.
    [But Ontario has one big advantage - real employer-nonclobbering health insurance.]
  • Portugal: No growth, no way to repay debt - Economy sinking despite bailout, Montreal Gazette, B6.
    [Bailouts are irrelevant to any but Onepercenters. The real solution lies in workweek regulation and overtime-to-jobs-conversion for full employment and maximum consumer spending.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Sheboygan Piggly Wiggly officials say union cuts were in response to growing competition, SheboyganPress.com
    SHEBOYGAN, Wisc. - ...Piggly Wiggly Midwest officials said Thursday that they were responding to growing competition in the grocery business last fall when they cut hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Pullman porters' stories kept alive - Museum chronicles African-American labor movement, Chicago Sun-Times via suntimes.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...In it, families tell of inhumane treatment of the porters before the union won them shorter hours and better wages and treatment... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Labour reform in Spain - Spanish practices - A change that may be more radical than it seems at first, (2/18 early pickup) The Economist of London via economist.com
    MADRID, Spain - ...Whereas unions and employers previously imposed terms from above, companies can now break free of them. This means employers can negotiate shorter working hours or lower wages... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, February 15, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines fm Holiday Inn & Couche-Tard, Terrasses de la Chaudière & updating fm Café Corsé, Hull, Québec -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Hackers reportedly infiltrated Nortel for over a decade - Spyware was placed so deep into some employees' computers it escaped detection, Toronto Star, B1,B2.
    [Hacking and sys security, virus writers & checkers, adware writers & blockers, spyware writers & extractors: all are non-governmental creation of artificial employment due to a frozen overlong pre-tech workweek. Here's the Globe & Mail's "take" -]
    Reported hacking of Nortel fuels concerns, skepticism - Former senior systems security adviser at company says hackers 'had access to everything' for almost a decade, Toronto Globe, B5.
    Security experts wonder whether stolen intellectual property might have led to Nortel's downfall. (Photo caption)
    [Naaa, it was really bad management starting years ago -]
    Nortel trial - CFO ordered entry changes, court told, by Janet McFarland, Toronto Globe, B5.
    Nortel Network Corp. chief financial officer Douglas Beatty ordered a staff member to make accounting changes in July, 2003, that would have transformed the company's loss to a profit for the second quarter that year, a Toronto fraud trial heard Tuesday...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Toronto Stock Exchange down [44.22 points to 12,354.47] amid Greek bailout snag, Canadian Press via Toronto Star, B3.
    ...also pressured by a worse than expected reading of U.S. retail sales...
    Commodities drag down TSX - Canadian stocks ended at their lowest level in nearly a month as mining and energy issues slid on a fresh round of euro zone credit downgrades and on concern about U.S. retail sales, Toronto Globe, B17.
  • Ontario medicare faces painful cure - Blueprint for cuts includes 'sweeping, controversial' changes, [Finance Minister] Duncan warns, Toronto Star, A1.
  • Toronto Transit Commission cuts hurt everyone, column by Joe Fiorito, Toronto Star, GT2.
  • Air Canada dodges pilots in low-cost venture - As labour dispute continues, airline seeks to set up discount unit with foreign partner, Toronto Globe, B1.
  • Slowing Chinese construction market hurts B.C. lumber sales, Toronto Globe, B4.
    B.C. lumber sales to China were down 36 per cent to $67-million. (photo caption)
    [Foreign markets are out of our control. A sustainable future lies in the direction of using exports, like overtime, only for emergencies and not in the direction of chronic dependence.]
  • Setback puts Greece and euro zone in danger - Finance ministers cancel emergency bailout meeting, demand Athens take firm action on austerity cuts - "It is now patently and painfully clear to everyone involved that the Greek problem is not only of the legacy debts, but the structural insolvency of the entire Greek economy" Constantin Gurdgiev, Trinity College, Toronto Globe, B13.
    ["Structural insolvency"?? Sounds like code for fraud everywhere you look. Is this a preview of looming slippage in Bernanke's and Geithner's massive coverup of the termite-riddenness of the U.S. finance-industry?]
  • Japan's central bank surprises with fresh easing - BOJ unexpectedly expands asset purchase program in effort to battle deflation, by Fujikawa & Hilsenrath & Blackstone, WSJ via Toronto Globe, B14.
    The world's major banks are opening up the monetary spigots once again, pumping new money into their economies to bolster growth.
    [Doomed to failure because that money, in a labor surplus, just funnels to The Onepercenters by default. So central banks are just pumping the new money to people who were already spending all they cared to, and consumer spending never surges at all. In fact, it keeps shrinking and with fewer and fewer of the 99% with any money to buy stuff, prices keep falling = deflation.]
    The...Bank of Japan...announced a sizable 10-trillion-yen ($129B) expansion [on its existing 65-trillion-yen program] by purchasing more [of its own freshly printed] long-term government bonds. Also, for the first time the bank set what amounts to a numerical target for inflation...
    [Ah, the return of the target NAIRU?! = non-accelerating-of-inflation rate of un(der)employment alias labor surplus = controlling inflation by raising unemployment to depress wages (and spending and growth)? Isn't it time they switched to the NADPFE, non-accerating-of-deflation proximity to full employment? or NADRO, non-accerating-of-deflation rate of overemployment alias labor shortage?]
    The BOJ action followed the Bank of England's vote last week to increase its [freshly printed] government-bond purchases and the European Central Bank's move last week to [make more] cheap three-year loans to European banks. These announcements followed the U.S. Federal Reserve's signalling last month that it could hold interest rates near zero through 2014 and is considering another round of [freshly printed] securities purchases to support the U.S. "recovery." [our quotes]
    [There is absolutely NO recovery and central banks have NO tools to create one. It takes legislative action to increase orgchart- and grassroots-based private-sector reinvestment in overtime-to-job conversion by decreasing the levels where weekly straight-time stops and overtime starts; that is, by capping and cutting the workweek. This is the ONLY effective, market-oriented, gradual, flexible way out of the global "economic crisis" alias "disappointing recovery." Falsely comforting buzzword =]
    ...The central bank bond purchases, called quantitative easing, or QE, generally are meant to drive down long-term interest rates and spur spending and investment...
    [Why would it spur spending by the wealthy at whom it is directed? And why would it spur investment when there's no MARKETABLE productivity to incentivate investment?]
    The measure can also have the effect of weakening a country's currency, making its exports more competitive on world markets.
    [But "U.S." and "Japanese" manufacturing has moved to China so there's not much to export, and even if there was, all economies and economists are time-blind fosterers of depression-creating labor surpluses and so there's not many robust foreign consumer bases to "competitively" export to.]
  • Markets shrug off rating downgrades, Toronto Globe, B15.
    [That's because investors have soooooooooooooooooooooooooo much of the money supply, many feel they HAVE to do SOMETHING with it so they throw it into stuff, creating pyramid after pyramid ... until the inevitable collapse. We're on a downward spiral staircase of popping bubbles.]
  • A quest for quality (read big, stable profits), by David Parkinson dparkinson@globeandmail.com, Toronto Globe, B18.
    [Not without consumer spending aka "retail" which requires spending money which takes paypackets which require jobs which require shorter hours and overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
  • Do big mergers call for a big number of banks? Toronto Globe, B15.
    [Well, ANY mergers call for a sufficient number of banks left to merge. And that number keeps shrinking as desperate CEOs try to fake growth by buying other CEOs' (probably also shrinking) market share.]
  • Honk if you're optimistic about Canada's outlook - but keep that seatbelt fastened, by David Rosenberg of Gluskin Sheff & Assocs.Inc., Toronto Globe, B16.
    [Not until Canadians quit voting against voting (= for Harper) and put some beef in the federal worksharing program and sustainabilize it into timesizing.]
  • Branson's call: A new role for capitalism - Abandon business as usual and help create a better world, the head of Virgin Group urges, book* review by Harvey Schachter harvey@harveyschachter.com, Toronto Globe, B21.
    *Screw Business as Usual, by Richard Branson....
    [Clearly some Onepercenters are getting nervous. Remember Bill Gates' call for billionaires to give away half their lucre? and Warren Buffett's call for higher taxes on the rich? And Soros has been calling for a more "open society" forever. But nothing's going to change until we lose our frozen 1940 pre-automation workweek as we go deeper into the age of robotization. Henry Ford: "Let's see you unionize these robots!" Walter Reuther: "Let's see you sell them cars." It's about jobs, jobs, jobs, and there ain't enuf taxpayer credit to keep inventing enuf busywork to occupy an expanding population for a rigidly controlled 35-to-40 hrs/wk as wave after wave of worksharing technology keeps rolling in. Quit straining for taxpayer-clobbering artificial job creation and just relax into sharing the vanishing still-unrobotized market-demanded human employment.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Mendte: America's Unemployment Rate, KPLR 11 via kplr11.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...You see in a recession, demand goes down, so company profits go down and production goes down. This forces companies to cut the workforce from 10-20%. The German Government says instead of doing this, keep workers and cut hours by 10-20% instead... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. ANALYSIS - German boom casts shadow over French election, Reuters Africa via reuters.com
    PARIS, France - ...Under German law, union members sit on the supervisory boards of bigger companies, leading to shared responsibility, fewer strikes and a tradeoff between temporarily shorter working hours and job preservation -- known as Kurzarbeit...- see whole article under today's date.
  3. Britain's "Real Unemployment Rate" Approaches 7m, Sky News viA blogs.news.sky.com
    [Fine except that 7m is number unemployed, not unemployment rate.]
    LONDON, U.K. - ...They fail to include the millions of people who want to work but are either shut out from the labour market or are working shorter hours than they’d like to... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Or rather, have the income they'd like to, the shorter hours the better.]
  4. Unemployment lower than expected but highest for 16 years, The Independent via independent.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - ..."Any job is better than no job at all, even if it's on far lower pay and shorter hours, but people cannot afford to do this indefinitely.
    [Unless it's done companywide, citywide, shire-wide or countrywide, so that the flood of desperate resumes gets absorbed and employers have to bid against one another for good help - raising wages to levels such as 40 hours pay for 30 hours work.]
    We desperately need more full-time jobs paying decent wages."
    - see whole article under today's date.
    [No, you desperately need to redefine "full time" downward to levels appropriate for the age of automation and robotics. Perpetuating a 35-40 hour workweek in such conditions is ridiculous.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Engineers on the rise in leadership ranks, study finds, by Wallace Immen, Toronto Globe, B21.
    ...Company founders and chief executives are far more likely to hold advanced engineering degrees than MBAs, according to the analysis by online recruitment site Identified.com.
    [Maybe there IS hope, if these engineers will only stop listening to business schools and economists. Arthur "20-hour workweek" Dahlberg was an engineer.]
    ...They're also getting younger, with the average age dropping to about 33, from 36 in 2008...



    Tuesday, February 14, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines fm Holiday Inn & Couche-Tard, Terrasses de la Chaudière & updating fm Café Corsé, Hull, Québec -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Book City to close in [Toronto's] Bloor West Village, Toronto Star, B4.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • The future of the retirement system - Quebec must conclude "a new social contract", Le Devoir de Montréal, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • More bad news for News Corp., Toronto Globe & Mail, B1 pointer to B7.
    As five Sun journalists are arrested, an editor suggests Rupert Murdoch's company has left loyal workers out in the cold.
  • Ottawa's softening downtown office market, Toronto Globe, B10.
    [No wonder, in a 3rd-world-like downtown where beggars of all ages proliferate and begging is "cool" among some teens.]
  • Marriage fraudster finally deported - Ottawa woman says case was worth it if system changes,
    by Robert Sibley, Ottawa Citizen, C1.
    It is one of the unsavoury secrets of Canada's immigration system. Each year hundreds, perhaps thousands, of Canadian women and men marry foreigners and agree to act as sponsors for them in Canada, only to find themselves abandoned once that spouse is in the country...
  • Japan's GDP shrinks 2.3 per cent, Toronto Globe, B13.
  • Death by austerity? - The policies adopted in Europe stir societal grumbling, Le Devoir de Montréal, B1.
  • Greece nears bailout, but debt cripples economy - Unemployment has climbed to a record high of almost 21%,
    Toronto Globe, B1, B13.
  • Zimbabwe facing blackout over debt [- nonpayment of $90m to major electricity supplier Mozambique],
    AFP via Toronto Globe, B9.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. CDA, WDA launches programme for mature workers by halving work hours, StraitsTimes.com
    SINGAPORE - ...The Silver Lining programme allows mature workers and back-to-work housewives who are new to the industry to have greater flexibility with shorter training and work hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 400 Swedish cabin crew strike over working hours, BusinessWeek.com
    STOCKHOLM, Sweden - ...The union, called Unionen, says the stewards who work for TUIfly Nordic, Novair and Primera Air went on strile on Tuesday. It says it wants its members to work a maximum of 42 hours a week, while the employers want to be able to schedule the cabin crew to work up to 60 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Apple's Tim Cook On Foxconn: Data Transparency, Work Hours Cap On The Way, FastCompany.com
    CUPERTINO, Calif. - ...Lastly, Cook discussed excessive overtime at Apple. According to Cook, Apple's code of conduct has a cap of 60 hours per work week (which is likely news to both China- and Cupertino-based employees). "We've consistently found violations to this code," he said. In response, Apple has started micro-managing supplier work hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- or at least reporting supplier workhours.]
  4. California 'underemployment' among worst in nation, WhittierDailyNews.com
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. - ...Gallup defines underemployment as someone who is out of work or employed part time (less than 30 hours per week) who would prefer to be working full-time... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Easiest and most economy- & ecology-benefiting solution to this = CUT THE WORKWEEK as we did 18940-1940 and redefine "full time" down to, say, 30 hours per week.]
  5. BONUS excerpt - One more reason to go home on time - Study links office air to PFC exposure, Toronto Star, B5.
    BOSTON, Mass. - The more time you spend at the office, the more you might be exposing yourself to potentially toxic chemicals, a Boston University study concludes...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, February 12-13, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Ottawa Sun. fm Mags&Fags & Mon. fm Globe News&Cigars & updating from Café Corsé, Hull, Québec -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The foreclosure settlement - Too many unanswered questions, and too little relief, editorial, 2/12 New York Times, SundayReview10.
    The $26 billion foreclosure settlement between the big banks and federal and state officials is a wrist slap compared with the economic damage wrought by the banks in the housing bubble and bust, and the hardships faced by the 4 million homeowners who have lost their homes and 3.3 million more who are in or close to foreclosure...
    [This type of complaint is not going to get solved until the editors of the NY Times and similar alarm-raisers focus on the economic damage wrought by the banks to themselves, and the increased difficulties (finding stable investments) and heightened personal insecurity for the 300,000 wealthiest Americans as a result.]
  • Religious exemptions for piety & profit, comic strip by Brian McFadden, NYT, SR3.
    Frame 1: [shows a minister (who looks uncomfortably like W.) praying at desk with 2 labels:] Minister [&] Manager.
    Frame 2: Are government rules and regulations getting in the way of your business?
      Then convert it into a church! [shows little church built onto front of big factory labeled:] Church Factory.
    Frame 3: Now anything you do will be fully protected religious speech, including denying health coverage [shows manager
      denying contraception coverage to female employee & firing her as a] baby factory!
    [Other frames cover ducking anti-discrimination laws (wheelchair ramps for handicapped, services for gays) and ordaining your lawyers so you can duck anti-pollution laws, hours laws, and use-of-profits laws. Truly, religions have proliferated and assumed a hobby-like role whether large (Catholicism, Islam...) or small (Scientology, Moonies...), engendering as much social dissent as social cement and meriting no special treatment at law. The whole non-profit category has begun functioning as a giant loophole and phasing it out will make an economy less distracted and more able to adapt to real threats like global warming. In short, ecology is replacing religion as the found and source of all ethics and morality - for any populations that wish to survive on this planet in the loooong term.]
  • Can the working class be saved? op ed by Ross Douthat, NYT, SR11.
    [This is a version of Popping the Big Question.]
    A food pantry in Reading, Pa., [is] one sign of the breakdown in American life. Despite the partisan divide, there are some practical solutions. (photo caption)
    [First, Douthat mentions an impractical one -]
    Charles Murray's "Coming Apart"...argues that our leaders should...scrap all existing government programs (and the dependency and perverse incentives they create) and replace them with a universal guaranteed income.
    [In other words, Charles Murray argues we should scrap dependency by making everyone dependent. Worktime economics à la Timesizing fixes this contradiction by arguing that our leaders should restore wartime levels of full employment and prosperity by as much workweek reduction and overtime-to-jobs conversion as it takes, and then phasing out all government programs that only existed because we hadn't done this and instead were continuously waiting for future Growth to supply the full employment and prosperity - Growth as the modern, ever-delayed Messiah! Douthat, however, lists four steps that he regards as practical, and only the second hints at workweek regulation in terms of "work-life balance," but only in terms of "family policy" to get "stable family lives," highly questionable in the context of global overpopulation insofar as families are humanbeing factories. We need quality, not quantity, of human species and while we're debating the meaning of quality, maybe we should quit coddling quantity. His first step is a complicated back and forth that seems to boil down to a different way to fund Social Security; in other words, he wants to fix something that, with numerous detailed exceptions, works and is not "going bankrupt!!!" for another thirty years (where else do we worry about a supposed 30-yr-out bankruptcy?) - unless Wall Street gets its way and redistributes Social Security funds, for the urgent sake of the 99%, to The Onepercent. Insofar as Social Security exists for the physically, mentally, or old-age disabled, worktime economics argues that if jobs and self-support were as easy and short-time as they should and could be in the age of automation and robotics, we wouldn't need disability or retirement, because senior citizens could easily find short-time jobs where they could retire every loooong weekend. His third step is good and necessary, but secondary after full-employment-maintaining reinvestment in overtime-to-jobs conversion, and indeed, it figures in Timesizing's fifth phase = moving toward steady-state immigration: one out, one in. His fourth step also reaches down for a lower priority, America's record-breaking incarceration rates, which of course would be solved by hungry employers = a timesizing-engineered labor shortage and job surplus. He does come up with a great sentence here, needing one edit:]
    ...Prison is a school for crime and a [drag] on advancement...
    [An "anchor" is good, Ross - don't use it in a negative slot. Douthat demonstrates how totally clueless we are at dealing with our tangle of biggest problems. We're great at lists but we haven't got to the prioritization stage let alone the strategization stage. And we haven't a clue about different problem levels, the fact that some problems are mostly solved "for free" in the process of solving others cuz some are higher-level and some are lower-level - cuz the whole level business, alias the derivativeness or dependency of some problems, is something that only comes up in the priort and strat stages which we seldom get to. Yet we pull off humungo projects like landing on the Moon with management tools like Pert charts and Gant charts and now all kinds of software which we seem never to have applied, or apply, to the economy! Not to mention the design principles that we apply in EVERY OTHER FIELD except economics. Truly we are an embarrassment to intelligent life in this quadrant of the galaxy.]
  • Americans feel conflicted as the safety net expands - With poor getting a smaller share [uh, how is that an "expanding" safety net?] even the doubters of federal aid accept it [and even vehement critics depend on it], 2/12 New York Times, A1.
    [Self-righteous hypocrites - &then they preach family values while jamming divorce courts. And here's they are at the other end of the income scale -]
  • A top Republican is asking the attorney general to examine efforts to enforce the law limiting executive pay in bankruptcy cases, 2/13 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Gee, we wouldn't want to disincentivate The Onepercent from exploiting the bankruptcy laws to profit and loot employee pension funds now, would we!]
  • Whatever happened to first class? - Once it meant lobster thermidor on china - These days it might not even mean a hot meal - Exploring the domestic skies from the front of the plane, 2/12 NYT, Travel1.
    [So The Onepercenters, by backing downsizing and bankruptcy instead of timesizing and consumer spending, have so weakened markets and eroded the value of human life that they've even harmed themselves in many little ways - like making the airlines so desperate, they're even cutting first class perks. Truly, downsizing-style capitalism has become Desperation Management.]
  • Free trade deal with China in [Canada PM] Harper's sights, 2/12 Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [Harper won't be happy until Canada catches up with the U.S. in multidimensional deterioration.]
  • Cloud [computing] shrouds fraud-risk: [says the] Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 2/13 National Post, FP1.
  • Gloomy Soros - EU faces 'lost decade', billionaire warns,
    2/13 National Post, FP1 pointer to FP2.
  • Crisis [tsunami-nuclear] in Japan transforms global natural-gas market [ie: hikes prices], 2/13 WSJ, A1.
  • Greece passes sweeping cuts - Lawmakers approve unpopular plan to secure bailout as rioting grips Athens, 2/13 WSJ, A1.
    [Greeks should break the bailout habit and voluntarily withdraw from the mixed-blessing euro till they learn to deconcentrate their money supply and pay their own way (eg: their own taxes).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work sharing: A win-win alternative to layoffs, 2/13 The Grand Rapids Press - MLive.com
    GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. - ...This program, known as “work sharing,” is a win-win for employers and employees. For employers, it enables them to retain their skilled workers during the downturn, thereby avoiding the need to hire and train new workers when business improves... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Germany looks to cut working hours, not jobs, 2/12 Al Jazeera via youtube.com/user/AlJazeeraEnglish
    BERLIN, Germany - ...Germany's Labour Minister is calling for wage rises across the country after two years of strong economic growth... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Balance: Save the world with a 3-day work week, by Harvey Schachter, The Toronto Globe & Mail via theglobeandmail.com
    LONDON, England - In 1930, famed economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that by the end of the century people would be working a 15-hour week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, February 11, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Globe News&Cigars, 57 William, Ottawa & updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Hull, Québec -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • U.S. stocks fell in their worst one-day loss this year amid tumult over the Greek bailout, disappointing readings on the U.S. economy and downgrades of Italian banks, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    Stocks head back to earth, WSJ, B1 target article.
    The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 89.23 points or 0.7% at 12801.23.
  • USA - $1.33 trillion deficit [annual!] in 2012,
    La Presse de Montréal, Affaires4.
  • Why the world needs America -, WSJ, C1.
    [To demonstrate every stupid mistake in the book?]
    - Foreign-policy pundits increasingly argue that democracy and free markets could thrive without U.S. predominance...
    [Hey, if they can survive despite U.S. democracy-only-for-One Percenters and "free" markets that only seem to harm the 99% (except maybe in China), democracy and free markets would be a lot better off in the U.S. sat down and shut up.]
  • Missing at MF [Global]: $1.6 billion, WSJ, B18.
    Estimate for missing cash at MF Global is increased, NYT, B1.
    [So the "clawing-back" failed?]
  • When the customer talks back, La Presse de Montréal, Affaires1 megapointer to Affaires2.
    Beware companies that betray their customers. Today, consumers avenge themselves when they've given up on complaining. Instead of addressing themselves to the courts or regulatory agencies, they take justice into their own hands, often with the aid of the social media. And it's the best customers, those whom the enterprises have most pampered, that are most disposed to take their revenge when they don't get a solution to their problem.
    [Wait, the "only" bad news here is that more and more companies are betraying their customers, passing costs on to their customers instead of their CEOs, even though customers are generally getting rarer. So strangely, it's not shortage of customers that disciplines CEOs. It's only shortage of jobseekers - as perceived by CEOs (i.e., really a balance of jobseekers and jobopenings systemically that keeps the national income spreading around instead of funneling upward). And if CEOs can only keep jobseekers in superabundant desperation, they can keep surrounded with grateful sycophants ("yes men") and retain their policy of funneling (and decirculating!) more and more of the money supply in their own bulging pockets = suicide, everyone else first.]
  • China on our plate - The long route Chinese food takes to our kitchens - A risk-free journey? La Presse tracks the trajectory, La Presse de Montréal, A1 megapointer to Enjeux1.
    [And when transportation costs (oil prices) really hit the roof, we starve?]
  • 34 Italian banks downgraded [by S&P], Agence France-Presse via La Presse de Montréal, Affaires7.
  • Spain changes its labor laws to ease rules for employers, NYT, B1 pointer to B3.
    [The only thing the government owes employers is enforcement of the discipline to fund [with employment] their own markets, and that means the only thing government owes is adjusting the workweek as short as it takes to achieve and maintain full domestic employment and markets. And that would include refereeing reinvestment of any overtime advantage quickly and smoothly in hiring (and training wherever needed).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. NSW residents dreaming of Queensland [capital: Brisbane], ABC Online via abc.net.au
    SYDNEY, NSW, Australia - ...A survey has found one in four New South Wales residents would prefer to live in another state because of cost of living pressures, bad traffic and long working hours... Queensland [the next state north] was the most popular choice as an alternative home because of its climate, relaxed lifestyle... - see whole article under today's date.
    [That's funny - we thought all Aussies were relaxed...]
  2. Harvard plans to consolidate libraries, shuffle employees - Will modernize and consolidate, Boston Globe via bostonglobe.com
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - ...During the economic crisis in 2009...it offered buyouts to library workers, laid off a small number of people, cut hours for others, and decided not to fill a few open positions... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is an alarmist, economy-eroding response from the richest university in the world with an endowment of over $20 billion at the worst of times. But...cutting hours is better than cutting more jobs and making the economy "worser faster"...]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, February 10, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Mags&Fags at 254 Elgin in Ottawa & updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Oracle a-greed to acquire online-software maker Taleo for $1.9 billion..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Pepsico is chopping 8,700 jobs..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
    ... and increasing its marketing budget by as much as $600 million in 2012 as it tries to overhaul a struggling U.S. beverage business that is losing ground to Coca-Cola.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Rich and poor further apart in education, New York Times, A1.
  • Money and morals - What's hurting working-class whites, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A23.
    [For one thing, Nobel prizewinners like Krugman turning a color-blind economic issue into a racial issue and for another thing, talking about optionally fixable morality and ethics instead of fix-or-die ecology and sustainability.]
  • In Europe, stagnation as a way of life -
    [In Europe, we'd call it steady-state sustainability. In the USA, we'd call it decline camouflaged as growth.]
    - The crisis has receded, but the problems remain, NYT, B1.
    [In the U.S., the crisis has intensified but so has the coverup, and the problems are much worse but the spindoctoring is much better. Basically, as Grannie used to say, this whole story is "the pot calling the kettle 'black'."]
  • Banks come first in Greek rescue plan, NYT, B1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Garuda applies lower limits on work hours to keep pilots fit, tribunnews.com via Jakarta Post via thejakartapost.com
    JAKARTA, Indonesia - National flag carrier Garuda Indonesia applies lower limits on work hours than those stipulated in governmental regulations to keep its pilots fit and healthy. “The official regulation applies a maximum of 9 hours of work per day for pilots, but we apply a maximum of 8 hours of work per day for our pilots,” Garuda spokesman Pujobroto told The Jakarta Post on Thursday. Pujobroto added that the airline also provided a 12–hour rest interval for pilots before they fly, longer than the regulated 9-hour period... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Big round of applause for Garuda Airlines!]
  2. A Carbon Allowance in Every Pot, New York Times via nytimes.com
    LONDON, England - ...Citing the failure of international climate change policy to achieve results, he proposed a different approach in a recent article, arguing that the distribution and trade of personal carbon allowances — along with shorter working hours and higher taxes — should be embraced to reduce greenhouse gas emissions quickly and equitably... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Greens back flexible work hours, CIO Magazine via cio.com.au
    CANBERRA, Australia - ...Greens MP Adam Bandt said research had shown Australians rank at the top of western nations in terms of working hours per week - an average of 44 hours for full-time workers - and most would like to work at least five hours less per week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, February 9, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Réflections in Galeries de Hull & updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Wealth - ...The "1 percenters" speak out about the outrage directed at them, New York Times, A1 pointer to F1.
    Color the 1 percent 99 percent conflicted, NYT, F1 target article.
  • In finance, past hints at future, by Jesse Eisinger, NYT, B1.
    ...Fears mount that Dodd-Frank, the financial overhaul law, is about to be emasculated...
  • Help wanted in the West [of Canada] - Employment Insurance blamed for keeping jobless in the East, frontpage comment by John Ivison, National Post, A1.
    [Labor shortage is a function of employers incensed at market discipline forcing them to pay higher wages. When wages rise, shortages vanish. But employers today are sooo spoiled by labor surplus, they'll call anything a labor shortage. So follow John Ivison. Cancel the (un)employment insurance system. Force those spoiled-rotten jobseekers into hitchhiking out west! Why should wealthy oilmen give up a dime of the millions they've EARNED!?]
  • Big labour loses its competitive edge, National Post, FP1.
    [It lost that a long time ago when it quit pushing for its empowering goal of shorter hours for all and just pushed for its disempowering goal of higher pay for its members.]
  • Canada - Life insurers to report another bad quarter, Ottawa Citizen, C1.
    ...due to unfavourable markets and writedowns...
    [and fewer who can still afford insurance?
  • Census 2011...- Immigration: Two-thirds of overall numbers fueled by newcomers, Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [Canada still hasn't got the news that the planet is grossly overpopulated and every country should be moving ASAP to steadystate migration = one out, one in. You can't save the world by moving it all here.]
  • Athens' broken oaths irk EU - ...Plan to make 30,000 civil servants redundant abandoned; Pledge to eliminate 150,000 jobs by 2015 seems impossible [would crash economy anyway!] - Tax evasion; 40-45 billion euros lost annually, but Greek government has failed to increase collection rates, National Post, FP1.
    [At last we get to the crux of the matter. Keep bailing them out and Greeks will never learn how to pay taxes.]
  • Little to show for 2 years of work, National Post, FP1.
    Athens - Taxes go uncollected...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. SC House not in session next week and will also take furloughs weeks before and after Easter, AP via TheRepublic.com
    COLUMBIA, S.C. — ...Each week of furlough for House members saves taxpayers about $50,000 in mileage reimbursement and pay for meals and lodging. The House took five furlough weeks in 2009 and four in 2010 to trim spending during the recession. It took two weeks off last year... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Council to save £2.1million in cuts, LancashireTelegraph.co.uk
    HYNDBURN, Lancs., England - ...Coun Parkinson said staff will be encouraged to job share and cut hours to avoid compulsory redundancies and wage cuts... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, February 8, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Mags&Fags at 254 Elgin in Ottawa & updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Vital signs - U.S. consumers ramped up borrowing in December... , Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    ...debt outstanding rose at a seasonally adjusted rate of 9.3% from November to $2.498 trillion...
    [Here we go again - and then there's the $17,000,000,000,000 national debt on top of that...]
  • Canada launched a rare U.S. dollar-denominated "Yankee" bond, capitalizing on Canada's status as a haven in turbulent times, WSJ, A1 pointer ot C1.
  • GM is set to announce "horrendous" fourth-quarter losses out of its European Opel unit and is demanding deep cuts from unions there, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Whoa, it's a relatively GoodNews Day (Don't Worry Be Happy) but we still have two extreme adjectives on the front page of the Wall Street Journal: 'horrendous' and 'turbulent, and then the third section adds 'bleak' -]
  • On 'Bleak' Street [ie: Wall St in the doghouse], bosses in cross hairs - Morgan Stanley, Goldman clarify clawback policies, WSJ, C1.
  • Yields on CDs remain flat, WSJ, C14.
    ...0.23% on six-month jumbos...over $95,000...
    [- tantamount to zero interest because concentrated investing power is in gross surplus while jobs and centrifuged spending power are in acute shortage.]
  • Another year of fear for municipal bonds, WSJ, C14.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A different approach - Pella Macomb moving to furloughs instead of layoffs, McDonough Voice via mcdonoughvoice.com
    MACOMB, Illin. — Officials from the local Pella plant say the move to rotating furloughs instead of voluntary layoffs this winter is a better move for both the company and its employees.
    [Understandable - few volunteer for the guillotine...]
    The nearly 250 employees at the Macomb window manufacturing plant are each being given a week off without pay. Macomb Plant Manager Kevin Gaul said Tuesday that rotations for the furlough process are underway and will likely last into March
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Amid Eurozone Crisis, How Germany Became Europe's Richest Country, PBS NewsHour via pbs.org
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ...CEO Nicola Leibinger-Kammuller watched as sales plummeted 40% in two years, and she had to drastically cut production. For most firms, that would have meant layoffs, but not here. "It's just a terrible thought having to lay off people, because we like our employees and we need them. And they are well-trained, and they're loyal. And they have been working for us for decades, some of them, or many of them have. And it's just a terrible thought to have to send them away." Instead, Trumpf turned to a new German program [actually not that new] called Kurzarbeit, or short work, cutting its employees' work hours and pay. The government made up part of the difference. And they got extra training on their off-days... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Germany: First Solar scales production back, pv magazine via pv-magazine.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - First Solar is to reduce production at its Frankfurt/Oder manufacturing facility in Germany by 50 percent. As a result, 1,200 employees will be moved onto six months of shorter working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, February 7, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines fm Globe News&Cigars, 57 William in Ottawa & updating fm Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Greece agreed to lay off 15,000 public-sector workers by the end of 2012, as international pressure mounted on Athens for austerity measures, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [No way they gonna git UPsizing (growth) by DOWNsizing.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks drifted lower as the recent rally "paused" [our quotes], with the Dow industrials declining 17.10 points or 0.1% to end the session at 12845.13, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C4.
  • A bankruptcy trustee investigating MF Global said he faces huge challenges getting back an estimated $1.2 billion in customer funds, WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
  • Loan processing firm ]DocX] indicted - A large company that provided home foreclosure services to lenders has been indicted on forgery charges over so-called robo-signing, New York Times, A1 pointer to B1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Unemployment Insurance: Fix It or Start Over, TheFiscalTimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The president also called for an expansion of work-sharing programs, which now are authorized in 21 states [actually 24 now] but are poorly utilized. Under work-sharing, if an employer chooses to reduce the hours of a group or all employees to save jobs, the amount normally paid in unemployment benefits to those laid off would instead be spread among those on reduced hours, thus making up for some of the lost wages. Many European firms rely on work-sharing to maintain continuity in their workforce... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Factories boom, but with few new workers, ca.mg5.mail.yahoo.com
    BALTIMORE, Maryld. - ...“We are still in a period of this increasing productivity... Mechanization and computerization is still advancing.” But while automation is advancing, millions of low-skilled factory workers are being left behind, said Runiewicz. - see whole article under today's date.
    [And the mechanization and computerization and automation are losing their point because there's fewer and fewer people with earnings from jobs to buy all the stuff they're churning out - UNLESS we hire more potential consumers at shorter hours.]
  3. "Nicolas and Angela - this time it's serious", FRANCE24.com
    PARIS, France - ...Le Figaro congratulates Nicolas Sarkozy and Angela Merkel on their pact to stop François Hollande - saying his programme would put the euro in danger. Unfortunately, it's exactly those measures that Germany doesn't like - like the 35-hour working week - that are popular with French voters, as l'Humanité points out... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If true, Merkel doesn't understand the kinship between Deutschlands Kurzarbeit and les 35 heures de la France, confirming our view that even Europe doesn't understand what it's doing right.]
  4. Overtime work in Japan -- no easy way to reduce working hours, physorg.com
    TOKYO, Japan - Japanese workers are said to be hard working. One of the reasons is the long working hours. So-called full-time employees work some 2,000 hours per year, which is 400 hours longer than their counterparts in Germany or France... How, then, can we reduce working hours, even if only slightly? Unfortunately, there is no fundamental solution for working long hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [That's what they said every step of the way from over 80 hours a week down to 40.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, February 5-6, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from Café Corsé, 152 rue de Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Corporate profits are showing signs of flagging, raising concerns for investors who have regarded them as a key support for the recent rally..., 2/06 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    Profits showing weakness, 2/06 WSJ, C1 target.
  • Itchy investors ramp up the risk - With rates staying low, returns on conservative investments don't cut it anymore for some, 2/06 WSJ, C1.
  • Walmart...- Who's responsible? - A lawsuit after a death during a Walmart renovation in Walpole raises questions about the safety practices on its contractors, 2/05 Boston Globe, G1.
    [And "its contractors" are often just miserly Walmart in disguise.]
  • Things are not OK - The downside of a good jobs report, op ed by Paul Krugman, 2/06 NYT, A19.
    ...As the Economic Policy Institute points out, we started 2012 with fewer workers employed than in January 2001 - zero growth after 11 years - even as the population and therefore the number of jobs we needed grew steadily. ...Long-term unemployment - the percentage of workers who have been out of work for six months or more - remains at levels not seen since the Great Depression. .\..Housing...got us into this slump [no it didn't; trying to maintain a pre-automation workweek forever got us into this slump; housing was a minor accomplice]..\. In particular, at this point America is seriously under-housed by historical standards, because we've built very few houses in the six years since the housing bubble popped.
    [How sensitive Krugman is to how "under-housed by historical standards" Americans are and how insensitive he is to how over-worked by technological standards Americans are!]
    The main thing standing in the way of a housing bounce-back is a sharp fall in household formation - econospeak for lots of young adults living with their parents because they can't afford to move out. Let enough Americans find jobs and get homes of their own, and housing...could start to power us out \of\ this slump...
    [Uh, wouldn't that really be jobs powering us out of this slump? And what do you do to get jobs when you're deep in debt? Krugman is still telling us to go deeper in debt to give more government charity in the form of non-market, artificial jobs, a kind of "job charity." This is Krugman's insanity, Krugman's unsustainability. Through or not through the medium of jobs, Krugman is still recommending CHARITY FROM A BANKRUPT. But there is an approach that avoids this. Indeed, neither emergency first-aid worksharing nor permanent timesizing require any further "job charity" from deeply indebted taxpayers. AND ... worksharing and timesizing depend only on natural, organic, market-demanded employment.  AND ... worksharing and timesizing attack today's problem of a tiny superwealthy population bankrupting everyone else (their foundations!) by shoving all the taxes onto them. How does this worktime approach avoid all these fatal flaws and lethal bugs? By cutting the workweek and engineering a shortage of labor and getting employers bidding against one another to get good help, any help, and thereby harnessing market forces to reverse the flow of the national income defaulting UP the income scale and get it flowing DOWN the income scale to the hundreds of millions who actually SPEND it instead of hoarding it for chest-thumping pecking-order displays and profitable investments, if any can be found when the money supply is this concentrated. Krugman is still time-blind. First-aid worksharing is still just one item on the list for him, and very seldom mentioned - permanent timesizing is completely beyond his ken. He still has no clue that "workweek regulation as full-employment strategy" (LaJeunesse's book title) is the ink and paper of the list itself. And really, Paul, it's not that hard, except maybe in terms of its blinding obviousness!]
    [But isn't this workweek regulation stifling? No, because since it is the right regulation in the center, it allows safe dismantling of all the wrong regulation around the sides that has accumulated because the right regulation was missing. Most of all modern governments are ineffectively trying to create enough 40-hour a week jobs for everyone, which is impossible in a situation of continuous injection of technological worksaving. When we relax our grip on the 40-hour fixation, it all gets easy. And we can dismantle the majority part of all "modern" governments which is job creation, i.e., 40-hour job creation. Drop it. Gone. Unnecessary.]
  • Workers began clearing an Occupy D.C. encampment a day after 11 were arrested in a raid on another [DC] camp,
    2/06 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Women's growing role at Davos - "Nobody should be there if they don't deserve to be there, if they don't have the good ideas." Liz Claman, financial news, CNBC, 2/05 Boston Globe, G3.
    [So, where are "the good ideas" of yours, Liz? Or are we assuming there is a certain hardwired set that are The Good Ideas and any others are unacceptable? We fear progress is bypassing Davos because we haven't heard a word about worksharing from there. In fact, we only know of two thinktanks that are onboard with worksharing and shorter hours (Center for Economic Policy and Research in DC and New Economic Foundation in London) - don't think either of them were at Davos. Plus we know one person onboard at the American Enterprise Institute in DC and we'll be checking out the situation at the Center for American Progress in early March.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Solar panels sprouting on the Carrizo - More than 400 workers converge on plains to build two separate facilities, 2/05 San Luis Obispo Tribune via sanluisobispo.com
    CARRIZO PLAIN, Calif. - ...The project is getting back up to speed after First Solar furloughed about 50 of its 60 workers for about two weeks last month. The slowdown was designed to allow the company time to do some engineering reviews... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 'Take shorter hours or redundancy', 2/06 HeraldScotland.com
    GLASGOW, Scotland - ...A west of Scotland woman got a letter from her bosses saying her hours and those of three other staff would be cut. If they did not agree, one would be made redundant... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is what happens when employees don't grab ahold of their shorter-hours lever and take the initiative in cutting hours, turning themselves from a surplus into a shortage and harnessing market forces to raise their wages in a timely fashion. At least this employer is giving them the choice. Most resume-overwhelmed, sales-underwhelmed employers would just dump them.]
  3. Banks employee federations demand 5-day work week, 2/06 Economic Times via economictimes.indiatimes.com
    KOLKATA [=Calcutta?], India: ..."In view of alternate channels available to customers such as ATM, internet banking, mobile banking etc, a 5-day week may be implemented in the banking industry," G D Nadaf, the general secretary of All-India Bank officers' confederation and All-India State Bank officers' federation said here yesterday. "This saves avoidable cost on water, power, energy, fuel etc, spent for four hours work on Saturday," Nadaf said, adding that 5-day week is in vogue at central government, establishments, Treasury, Forex, IT industries and foreign banks too.... He also alleged that bank officers are 'exploited' and forced to work for long hours in the absence of defined working hours. - see whole article under today's date.
    [We welcome Indian banking to the 20th century.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, February 4, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books & updating from Cate's Café in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Caterpillar closes a plant [450 jobs] in Canada [London, Ont.] after lockout, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [The NYT has higher total -]
    Amid a lockout, Caterpillar will close a Canadian plant with 670 employees, New York Times, B1 pointer to B6.
  • The job market is in bad shape - The job losses are enormous in Quebec -, by Rudy Le Cours, La Presse de Montréal, Affaires1.
    (Translation of: Le marché du travail est mal en point - Les pertes d'emplois sont énormes au Québec.)
    Despite appearances, the state of the job market's health continued to worsen last month, although it's stabilizing in Canada overall and improving in the United States.
    [Don't believe appearances in the U.S. either - see Krugman's article tomorrow 2/05-06 "Things are not OK - The downside of a good jobs report."]
    "Private-sector employment has again fallen in the province (down 1000 from Dec. to Jan.), bringing the total to six declines in a row," points out Matthieu Arseneau, economist at Banque Nationale.
  • Support for the pharmaceutical industry - Quebec misses the target [or, evaluates the results?], La Presse de Montréal, Affaires1.
    (Translation of: Soutien à l'industrie pharmaceutique - Le Québec rate la cible)
    Over the past five years, 2000 jobs have been eliminated in the pharma sector in the Montreal region. A veritable bloodbath. And a track record that makes one wonder: should the government aid for the pharma sector be paid back?

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Jobs "power" [our quotes] market rebound - Unemployment dips to 8.3% on broad [but shallow?] gains, WSJ, A1.
    [Things are pretty bad when the Wall Street Journal is boasting about an 8.3% official unemployment rate.
    Another take -]
    The labor market "grew" in January, adding 243,000 jobs..., WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:2,A6.
    [But doesn't it take 300,000 just to keep up with population growth?]
  • Spain could yet regret its incomplete banking solution, NYT, B16.
    [Like the U.S. couldn't? - we have barely started cleaning up the crap -]
  • N.Y. AG accuses banks of deceit [which constitutes, say it! fraud] - Sues over use of mortgage registry, by Michael Gormley, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    New York's attorney general...Eric Schneiderman sued Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, and Wells Fargo over their use of the Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc., or MERS, asserting the banks submitted court documents containing false and misleading information that appeared to provide the authority for foreclosures when there was none. \They are among\ the nation's largest banks...
    [And then there's this latest brilliant CEO policy fad -]
  • Car [insurance] policy for less, but only if you call, NYT, B1.
    [This is the latest deceptive = fraudulent policy that major companies are adopting, including Bell Canada - pile on bogus fees, and only take them off if customers phone to complain. Yet another tax on customers' time and then CEOs ask, Where are our consumers?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Ark. health officials cut home care program, AP via NECN.com
    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — ...Under the cutbacks, 22 managers will take a mandatory unpaid furlough in each two-week pay period, Purvis said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Better to trim worktime than trigger job and spending loss. And good that everyone sacrifice together, starting at the top.]
  2. Furlough days to increase for Rome, Floyd County schools, Rome News-Tribune via RN-T.com
    ROME, Ga. - The number of furlough days for teachers is expected to increase during the 2012-2013 school year...because of revenue shortfalls.... Because of a recalculation of funding distribution in the state’s equalization grant program, Rome City Schools is projecting three more furlough days than expected, making a total of 11 for the upcoming school year.... Floyd County Schools...saved approximately $900,000 by instituting three furlough days [that] were initiated beginning Jan. 1 as teacher planning days... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing, not downsizing!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, February 3, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books & updating from Cate's Café in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • AstraZeneca is eliminating an additional 7,300 jobs, bringing the drugmaker's total cuts over the past five years to nearly 30,000, Wall Street Journal, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - Fewer Americans are being laid off than in previous months [whoopeedoo - but -], WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    - the number of workers filing new claims for unemployment benefits...fell...to a seasonally adjusted 367,000 [which] is well[?] below the 400,000-plus new claims filed weekly in the summer and early fall.
  • A push by Wall Street banks to create a "more-transparent" way [our quotes] to bet on bond defaults has stalled, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    largely due to the project's complexity.
    [Uh, how do they think they're going to get more transparency out of complexity?]
    A push for CDS [credit default swaps] futures sputters, WSJ, C1 target story.
    [Thank God! - this would be a derivative of a derivative = complete gar-bahszh.]
  • Companies in the U.S. are booking higher profits than ever, but corporate tax receipts as a share of profits are at their lowest in at least 40 years, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [The black hole adds mass in the crushing density of money at its tiny and increasingly isolated center.]
    Many budget watchers point to a "temporary" taxbreak [our quotes] meant to spur investment as a key factor.
    [This on the theory that investment creates jobs? We've been doin' this for decades and, where are the jobs? No jobs, no taxbreaks! Trying to spur investment by giving the wealthy an even huger percentage of the money supply is like pushing on a string. The wealthy already have far too little marketable productivity to sustainably invest in. An officially denied depression is the time to find excuses to transfer megabucks to spenders, not investors. And the less money you have, the more of it you spend. So if you're doing this the dumb way by camouflaged charity instead of the smart way by worksharing and timesizing, PULL on the string by enriching the spendthrift poor who will create more marketable productivity for the thriftspend wealthy to WANT to invest in, because those investments will at least be sustainable and possibly even profitable.]
    With tax break, corporate rate is lowest in 40 years - U.S. companies [however] are booking higher profits than ever..., WSJ, B1 target article.
    [but not for long because they're passing their taxes onto their customers and cannibalizing their consumer base.]
  • Stagnant job growth is expected in report, by Catherine Rampell, WSJ, B1.
    The economic pie is "growing" [our quotes] but the share going to American workers is at a record low...
    [And therefore the so-called growth is just a function of a carefully constructed sinful-not-to-smile index.]
  • Lack of start-ups is keeping jobs tight, WSJ, B1.
    [No, lack of a mechanism [like timesizing] to maintain employment and consumer spending in the face of worksaving technology is keeping jobs tight.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Budget uncertainty hangs over Gustine Unified School District, Gustine Press-Standard via westsideconnect.com
    GUSTINE, Calif. - ...For Gustine Unified, McWilliams said, the outcome could mean the difference between...continuing to give back to employees and restoring prior cuts, as the district was able to begin doing this year when furlough days were reduced from five to three, and having to look at deeper cuts, perhaps in the form of added furlough days... Furlough days, she said by way of example, could be scheduled for after the election and eliminated or reduced in number if the ballot measures pass and mid-year cuts are avoided. Five days of employee furloughs would save the district about $230000 [and save jobs and the local spending rate]... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. DC's Budget Surplus: The Hand that Itches, Politic365.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Washington, D.C. is faced with a problem that is sure to make some other city governments jealous. The District has a $240 million surplus due to some drastic financial moves Mayor Vincent Gray and the D.C. Council made in 2011. Among them were four emergency furlough days for District employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing, not downsizing!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, February 2, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books & updating from Cate's Café in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • American Airlines to cut 13,000 jobs - Aims to regroup in bankruptcy, Boston Globe, B7.
    [Wall Street Journal version -]
    American Airlines parent AMR said it will seek to cut 13,000 jobs and terminate pensions in pursuit of $2 billion in annual cost savings, tipping its hand for the first time in what could be a long and painful bankruptcy proceeding,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    AMR seeks to cut 15% of jobs, WSJ, B1 target article.
    [And the New York Times version -]
    American seeks big job cuts, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    The airline, which is in bankruptcy, made several proposals, including cutting 13,000 workers. [And speaking of Spin Alert -]
    American Airlines asks its workers for big cuts, NYT, B1 target article.
    ["Asks its workers"? Oh, please. "Will 13,000 of you kindly step forward toward the guillotines?"]
  • UMass Memorial Health Care will eliminate 700-900 jobs, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    ...as the largest employer in central Massachusetts struggles with fewer patients and pressure to control costs.
  • Sanofi to cut some jobs [unspecified] at Genzyme, Boston Globe, B6.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • American Airlines parent AMR said it will seek to...terminate pensions in pursuit of $2 billion in annual cost savings, tipping its hand for the first time in what could be a long and painful bankruptcy proceeding, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Here's one of the most fundamental nails in the coffin of downsizing-not-timesizing capitalism: contracts are still sacred only among The Onepercent, nowhere else.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • American Airlines parent AMR [is] tipping its hand for the first time in what could be a long and painful bankruptcy proceeding, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks continue surprising rally, WSJ, CC1.
    [It's not surprising at all. With so much of the money supply defaulting due to deep labor surplus to The Onepercent and less, there is just nowhere else to stash this kind of dough now that many of the exotic investment instruments invented during the 1990s to absorb this funneling have been discredited, so once again we're getting the multipley nested pyramiding of stocks. But now the U.S. Treasury under its criminal violator of the Prompt Corrective Action law of 1991 Timothy Geithner is going to take over from Wall Street and get into the investment-invention racket -]
  • Treasury aims to tap investors' skittishness, by Phillips & Sparshott & Bater, WSJ, C1.
    The Treasury Dept. said it plans to decide by May whether to start selling securities that would let [spin alert, viz. "make"] investors pay for the privilege of lending money to the U.S. government [in terms of] debt with a negative yield...
  • A new study reflects a sharp divide in economic fortunes across the nation during the period from recession to recovery, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    [Again, what recovery? And academic definitions don't count.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Push for shorter work hours gets lukewarm response - Many workers prefer fatter paychecks to more leisure time [and thereby guarantee a future of labor surplus and thinner paychecks], The Korea Herald via koreaherald.com
    SEOUL, S.Korea - The government’s latest drive to reduce working hours is facing reluctance from workers who fear an impact on their paychecks. Yet, experts see it as inevitable that the country tackles the ingrained culture of long hours to boost productivity, improve workers’ quality of life and create new jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Why Work-Life Balance Isn't Balanced - It's necessary, but not sufficient - Here's why focusing on wellbeing makes more sense, Gallup Management Journal via Gallup.com
    [Here's some whining that the mainline of progress in our lifetimes doesn't do absolutely EVERYTHING.]
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...France has mandated a 35-hour workweek, for example. ... A person may spend 35 hours a week at work, but if that worker, like Sheela, has an abrasive boss... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The course of true progress never runs smooth. There are always people who want the impossible, such as this woman who wants not only all employees' main need satisfied but each employee's EVERY need satisfied, regardless of personalities (many of whom may actually like this boss). And shorter hours would solve that anyway by making it easier for "Sheela" to find another good job if she quit. Then there's the next story which can be solved much easier by a government campaign to educate employees to the fact that shorter hours reduce labor surplus and thereby creates an overriding trend for higher paychecks, not lower. The disinformation spread by mostly American CEOs and their media that pay rises or falls by hours or productivity is nonsense at the macro level. The Chinese are working megahours for peanuts, and productivity has grown exponentially since 1970 and real wages have slipped. What's the shorter-hours "win" for employers and The Onepercent? Vastly stronger domestic markets and commensurate marketable productivity to invest in.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, February 1, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books & updating from Cate's Café in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Vital signs - Americans' confidence in the economy inched downward in January, after climbing late last year,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    The Conference Board index of consumer confidence fell more than three points to 61.1 in January...
  • Downbeat economic data pushed the Dow industrials down 20.81 points or 0.2%...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Nuclear reactors in the central and eastern U.S. face previously unrecognized earthquake threats, the NRC said,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Right-to-Work[-without-joining-a-union] Laws Are A Waste of Time for Politicians and Unions: View, Bloomberg.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...Germany’s unions also play prominent roles when the economic cycle turns down. One example is the “Kurzarbeit” plan, or short-work system, in which companies temporarily move employees into shorter workweeks during downturns. Companies pay only for actual hours worked, and the government provides as much as two-thirds of the remainder... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Jobs saved at Heron after working hours change, PrintWeek.com
    [We're going to take a flyer here and guess that part of the change involves a reduction...]
    HEYBRIDGE, Essex, U.K. - ...Wyndeham Group entered into consultation with 86 of the 300 employees at its Heron plant in response to a cut in capacity at the site. However, according to Unite, pressroom staff have agreed a change in shift pattern, which could reduce redundancies from 86 to 79. Unite national officer Steve Sibbald told PrintWeek: "We have negotiated a deal there for a more flexible shift pattern. It is designed to take into account specific contracts and has saved a number of jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Monti takes on lobbies in fight to modernize Italy, Scientific American via AP via CBSnews.com
    ROME, Italy - ...Powerful lobbies...have stifled economic growth by keeping swaths of the economy in the hands of insiders. These groups have long behaved like Medieval guilds — regulating standards, working hours and prices — and Monti now has a lengthening list of enemies that include bakeries, taxi drivers, pharmacists, lawyers, notaries, railroad workers and newsstand dealers... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The fact that vital working-hour regulation is still on the problem list here and not yet singled out as the Kurzarbeit kin of timesizing and the other balancing programs that guarantee higher quality-of-life, weights the odds here in favor of the race to the bottom.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.