Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
January, 2012

[Commentary] ©2012 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Pioneer Press workers get two more layoff-free months, MinnPost.com (blog)
    ST. PAUL, Minn. - ...The Guild — which represents the newsroom and many business departments – will continue to swallow a 37.5-hour workweek first agreed to last January. That deal cut pay proportionately from a 40-hour week. The no-layoff provision has preserved headcount at the state’s second-largest daily [the St. Paul Pioneer Press daily], at least among union types... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Voilà, a classic example of timesizing, not downsizing. And here's another -]
  2. Adair County Road and Bridge Department cutting back, KTVO via heartlandconnection.com
    KIRKSVILLE, Mo. - ...The department will be cutting back from 40 hours a week to 32 hours a week. The economy has taken a major toll on the department, so Adair County Commissioners have decided to go this route rather than lay off employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, January 29-30, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books & updating from Cate's Café in Boston secteur-Somerville MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Stocks record first losing week of year, 1/29 Boston Globe, G5.
    [Tough to keep that pyramid rising steadily?]
  • Consumer alert - Online scams,
    1/29 Boston Globe, G1 pointer to G2.
  • Citigroup's chairman, Richard Parsons, is considering stepping down from the post after helping steer the bank through the financial crisis [which it & he helped create], WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [In other words, he's hopeful that his coverup has been successful for long enough that his successor will have no trouble perpetuating it?]
  • Years of despair add uncertainty in Florida race - Sour mood for voters - Pain of housing slump and frustration with slow recovery, 1/30 New York Times, A1.
  • Bain Capital [aka Mitt Romney] reaped a big profit on Domino's Pizza but also left the chain with a heap of debt,
    1/29 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to G1.
    [This is the "free" market economy as Looting Field for The Onepercent - compare private-sector pension funds via the bankruptcy loophole in the sanctity of contracts: sacred within The Onepercent, not sacred outside The Onepercent. It happens continuously but it's insane, system-destructive and why is it still possible? How can there be huge "profit" in the context - indeed, as a result - of huge debt? What kind of sick, manipulative, phony profit is this, anyway? Why is there no smooth flowthrough of the debt to the "profit" and the "profit" to the debt? Why is this artificial separation of the two not fraud? If it's the case that many of The Onepercent have benefited from it and are at pains to cover it up or dream up big words to confuse the issue and make it intimidating to even mention it, if it's the case that the cohort of people surrounding it are all dependent on that coverup for their jobs at a time when jobs are scarce, how do we unleash the 99% with more free time and more money to notice these aristocratic scams and design them OUT? How do we make jobs plentiful so that no one's job is being held hostage to their silence? We suggest harnessing market forces in response to the one condition that short-sighted decision-makers have trouble controlling besides inflation; namely, labor shortage. How do we engineer a labor "shortage"? Emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing.]
  • Firms keep squeezing associates - Even as legal industry claws back from recession [without getting their extortionate coverup fees clawed back?], partners are keeping lawyer ranks lean, 1/30 WSJ, B1.
    [And uniformly implicated?]
    ...That means little relief for young associates - who took on hefty law-school loans, only to run into layoffs and stagnant pay in the years since 2008 - and fewer chances for new law-school graduates to get in on the ground floor...
    [There is no "ground" any more, only quicksand...]
  • Banks seek a direction - Lenders have helped fuel Dow in 2012, but some question their fundamentals, 1/30 WSJ, C1.
    ["Fundamentals"? What's that?]
  • Weaning off 'alternative' investments [eg: hedge funds], 1/30 WSJ, C1.
    ['Alternative' = bogus?]
  • Demand [low] for bank loans hints at deflation [=recession], by Kelly Evans, 1/30 WSJ, C1.
    ...Through December, commercial and industrial loans outstanding were up about 10% year on year... So far, though, that hasn't translated into much of a pickup in economic growth...
    [How about a pickup "missing" funds and CEOs vanishing to South America?]
  • Persistently low rates carry risk of negative side effects, 1/30 WSJ, C8.
    [No kiddin'!]
  • The austerity debacle - The larger effects of a very bad idea, op ed by Paul Krugman, 1/30 NYT, A21.
    ["Gee, too few people are spending money. Let's make them even fewer!"]
  • Mining rally isn't likely to go deep [gettit? LOL], 1/30 WSJ, C8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work sharing could be good for state - Business can use this tool to adjust quickly during rough economy, 1/30 (1/29 late posting) LansingStateJournal.com
    LANSING, Mich. - ...It also would not create additional taxes for businesses and would have negligible effect on the Unemployment Insurance trust fund (since workers receiving benefits through work sharing would be receiving them otherwise due to layoffs). Today, 24 states have work-sharing programs. New Jersey and Maine established their programs within the past month. There are currently bills in Michigan, introduced by state Rep. Jim Ananich, D-Flint, and Vince Gregory, D-Southfield, to establish a work-sharing program... - see whole article under today's date.
    [OK, let's go, Michigan! - you'd be the 25th state with a worksharing program, meaning that 50% of the United States would have intelligent life in this quadrant of the Galaxy.]
  2. French President Sarkozy unveils plans for VAT and longer work week, 1/29 TheAustralian.com.au
    [Sarkozy is demonstrating more and more clearly What NOT To Do. He is evidently too dense to realize a longer workweek is directly opposite to the German "short work" (Kurzarbeit) program he affects to covet. Truly the big European economies don't have a clue what they're doing right and are beginning to undo (France) or offset (Germany) it.]
    PARIS, France - ...National statistics bureau INSEE now forecasts the economy to be in the second quarter of a two-quarter [so far] recession, and unemployment continues to rise, reaching 9.3% in mainland France in the third quarter of last year. France has also suffered a downgrade from its triple-A credit rating... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And if Sarkozy keeps sacrificing majority-GDP domestic consumption on the altar of the minority-GDP trade, things will keep worsening.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, January 28, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from *Porter Sq. Books & updating from that cluttered kitchen in Somerville MA -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Pension forecasts way too sunny?, by Jason Zweig, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [That would be an understatement.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Massachusetts' economy slows [at the end of 2011], study says - UMass. report cites a decline in hiring and tech purchases, Boston Globe, B5.
  • U.S. economy "picks up steam" [our quotes] - Fourth quarter "growth" rate of 2.8% is fastest in 18 months, but doesn't appear sustainable, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [There's the understatement of the century in this fraud-riddled nation - with Geithner still on the loose & heading the Treasury! - nevermind the Prompt Corrective Action law of 1991...]
  • Banks taketh, but don't giveth, op ed by Delia Ephron, New York Times, A19.
    Banks are eating up the real estate in my neighborhood.... Why are the banks paying only 0.4% interest on a savings account if they can afford to open offices on every other block in Greenwich Village?... [Also, I] realized that for the last six months, I had earned about $4 in interest but had been charged $35 a month for services...
  • Blue-chip stocks fell - The Dow Jones industrials' first losing week this year - After a reading on U.S. economic growth fell short of expectations...the Dow closed down 74.17 points or 0.6% at 12660.46, WSJ, A1 pointer to B5.
  • Facing up to venture capital's slow future,
    WSJ, B16.
  • In the top 1 percent - but of taxpayers, not income,
    column by James B. Stewart, NYT, B1.
  • Welsh economy slips, but London is there to cushion the fall, NYT, B1.
    [As the only one of the five United Kingdoms to have worksharing, Wales should be cushioning London. Guess they haven't yet really "got the concept."]
    ...plagued by persistent deficits and uncompetitive industries...
    [Then they should be moving from bandaid worksharing to sustainable timesizing with as short a Welsh workweek as it takes to maximize employment and consumer spending, rigorous overtime-to-training&hiring conversion, and vigorous Buy Welsh campaigning.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Labour-market policies: A costly business, New Europe via neurope.eu
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark - ...As President Sarkozy seeks re-election this year, he is desperately seeking agreement with unions on pay negotiation and on other "restrictive" laws [our quotes] such as the 35 hour week, in an attempt to push regulation through before voting takes place... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Depression and Long Working Hours Linked, Reveals Study, TopNews United States via topnews.us
    [Meaning psychological depression, but economic depression and long hours are also linked.]
    LONDON, U.K. - A British study that has appeared in the journal PLoS One has revealed that people who work more than standard eight hours are prime targets of depression. The problem gets increased even more for people who work for eleven or more hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [He's already undermined the 35-hour workweek and got higher unemployment. How much more employment funneled onto how many fewer consumers does he want? We understood he was looking at German worksharing, which goes in the opposite direction.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, January 27, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines fm (Can.) Ottawa RR station & (US) Albany RR station & updating fm train 68 & Albany Starbucks -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Bedford MA drug developer Avila Therapeutics Inc. a-greed to be acquired by New Jersey-based Celgene Corp. in a deal that ultimately could be worth $925 million, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    Celgene...to buy Avila [for $195m upfront], by Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, B5 target article.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • More than 700 [nearly 740] jobs lost, Montréal Métro, 01 pointer to 04.
    The Mabe company will close its dryer factory in the east of Montreal in 2014.
  • Monster [Worldwide Inc.] to cut 400 [7%], fewer in Massachusetts [less than 100 or 1.75%],
    Boston Globe, B6.
  • Kentucky operator [Kindred Healthcare] to shut Waltham hospital, by Robert Weisman, Boston Globe, B7.
    ...its 45-bed Waltham hospital, the second Massachusetts facility it has shuttered in just over three years. The company shut its 79-bed hospital in Braintree in fall 2008 after moving its patients to other sites. Kindred at the time also closed a hospital in Modesto, Calif. Kindred...still runs hospitals in Boston, Natick and Peabody MA...
    [Still trying to get upsizing (growth) by downsizing. At least these slash&grab CEOs are getting embarrassed by this excuse for "management" -]
    The company didn't specify how many patients or employees the hospital had, and officials at Kindred's corporate headquarters did not return phone calls.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks fell after a round of disappointmenting economic data, with the Dow industrials ending down 22.23 points or 0.2% at 12734.63, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Feds: Brokers stole millions - [Timothy] McGinn, [David] Smith face conspiracy, fraud counts, Albany Daily Gazette, A1.
    ...McGinn, Smith & Co...
  • "Nonprofit" [our quotes] admits it pays five in 6 figures, by Ebbert & Andersen, Boston Globe, B1.
    The "nonprofit" Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy, which oversees the parkland in downtown Boston with significant financial help from the state [of Massachusetts = taxpayers], pays its executive director [Nancy Brennan] an annual salary of $185,000, according to records revealed only under pressure from state officials this week. The conservancy - which has been seeking a new, voluntary tax from surrounding businesses - pays five officials, including the executive director, six-figure salaries, records show. The other four executives are Steve Anderson, director of park operations, at $111,437;
    Linda Jonash, director of planning and design, $101,614; and
    Jodi Wolin, director of development, $$117,000...
    [Every tax jurisdiction should be doing impact (if any) studies on phasing out the whole corrupt "nonprofit" category and moving toward euthanizing this increasingly grotesque and unsustainable boondoggle for The Onepercent. Yes, that goes for religious nonprofits - the age when religion served as social cement is over. Now religion is just as divisive as unifying, so the church and synagogue and mosque and temple should be payingz their taxes the same as any other business or hobbyshop or health spa or meditation center or what have you. If you Episcopalians and Unitarians wonder why Scientology and the Moonies are paying taxes, they will when you quit burdening the rest of the service industry by claiming special exemption. Then it'll be a lot easier to get rid of job-blackmailing, taxbreak-seeking parasitism from UPS to Fidelity and Walmart. And easier to move taxes back onto The Onepercent from the bottom of the 99% in terms of sales taxes and flat taxes.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Private sector work hours may be cut to attract Saudis, SaudiGazette.com.sa
    DAMMAM, Saudi Arabia - ...Many Saudi employees in the private sector want two days off in a week, seven working hours per day, and 45 days annual vacation, as opposed to 30 days, and longer Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha holidays like those given to employees in the public sector. Many believe that if the ministry approves these demands, a large number of Saudis will show interest in working for the private sector... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The German Labour Miracle, Forbes.com
    [Here's a naysayer - there's always someone willing to dispute the obvious -]
    LONDON, U.K. - ...The rest of the argument is that because Germany has apprenticeships and work sharing then these two things will bring down the unemployment rate elsewhere. But here's the problem. Germany had apprenticeships and work sharing when the German unemployment rate was much higher than everyone else’s too... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This commentator is pretending ignorance of the tremendous rampup of worksharing (German Kurz-arbeit) that led in the low-unemployment period.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, January 26, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Mags & Fags at 254 Elgin in Ottawa & updating from Café Corsé at 152 Montcalm in Hull -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • The [US] Army will eliminate at least eight brigades and reduce the number of active duty troops to 490,000, WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Oh what care we take, what time we waste, avoiding those shocking even numbers, like 500,000 aka 1/2 million, though you'd think they'd want to big-looking number this time to placate the hawks.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • 'Moment of truth' for unions - Secret paper on massive proposed [union] merger says labour groups must reinvent themselves or die, Toronto Star, A1.
    [They don't need to "reinvent" themselves. They just need to refocus on their power issue = workweek regulation as full-employment strategy. Until they or somebody does that, we're goin' down, cuz the usual lame job creation technique has maxxed out -]
  • Federal officials said they expect to keep short-term rates near zero for nearly three more years..., WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1,A2.
    [Cuz there's still so little business borrowing and expansion and job creation.]
  • Fund fines [David] Einhorn for insider trading - Hedge-fund titan, Greenlight Capital, ordered by FSA to pay $11.2m for trading on tip, WSJ, C1.
  • Tight [bank] budgets block [new generation of electronic] ATM defenses, WSJ, C1.
    [Luddism!]
  • The U.K. appears at risk of recession after official data showed that the nation's economy shrank in the fourth quarter of 2011, WSJ, A1 pointer to A18.
    [Heads will roll if the number crunchers let this happen again. The whole purpose of statisticians, insofar as the public sector is concerned (as employer for instance), is to cover up problems, not spotlight them.]
  • Hedge funds trying to shed Greek debt, NYT, B1.
  • Shipping becalmed with the global downturn..., NYT, B1.
    It is one of the worst markets for the shipping industry... [photo caption]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. State program helps Yakima Valley businesses dodge layoffs, KIMA CBS 29 via kimatv.com
    YAKIMA VALLEY, Wash. - ..\..KIMA found more Yakima Valley businesses are taking advantage of Washington's Shared Work program. The state says the program has saved thousands of jobs over the years and it's helping our local companies avoid layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 'Hire and fire' has destroyed Britain's jobs economy - Europe's biggest problem now is youth unemployment – we should be looking at the German labour model, The Guardian (blog) via guardian.co.uk
    MANCHESTER, England, England | Beyond the Atlantic Sea... - ...One of the main reason why Germany's economy was able to recover so quickly after the downturn was the system of short-time working support (Kurzarbeit), introduced in the 1920s and extended in recent years. Funded by an employment insurance levy, it pays for firms to keep workers for six to 12 months, provided employers can show their businesses are in a cyclical [temporary] and not a structural [permanent] downturn... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- which is essentially impossible to show. Here are the two fundamental flaws in worksharing and the reason it is just a temporary, unsustainable, emergency, first-aid, but totally vital and necessary and top-priority band-aid that needs to be converted to sustainable timesizing as soon as possible: (1) it's funded by employment insurance instead of, e.g., a 100% tax on overtime profits and a 100% exemption for reinvestment in overtime-targeted training and hiring (= design the problem to solve itself), and (2) it assumes a natural fixed level of "full time" employment such as 35 or 40 hours a week, when there is no such thing as long as technological worksavings are continuously being injected into the economy.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, January 25, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown, & updating from Café Corsé at 152 Montcalm in Hull -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Average is over - Why the unemployment rate is so stubbornly high, op ed by Thomas Friedman, NY Times, A25.
    [Friedman (any relation to Milton?) is saying that unemployment is high cuz nobody wants average skills anymore - you gotta be an expert in three or four zillion software packages. But he's got it backwards. The reason employers have become so excruciatingly picky-choosy is that they're getting such huge floods of résumés. And the reason they're getting such huge floods of résumés is that so many jobs are getting downsized = eliminated. And the reason so many jobs are getting downsized is that ever since ca.1970 when the babyboomers grew up and restored the labor surplus of the Depression, labor has not had the bargaining power to make employers respond to technological worksavings with timesizing (hourscuts) instead of downsizing (jobcuts) - not that labor had not already, foolishly, become distracted from this their power issue anyway - and to keep employers from moving jobs from state to state and then from the US to Mexico-India-China or to keep them from getting swept away by Free Trade fundamentalism, and neither could they encourage consumers to "Buy American," or stop the Democrats from jumping up immigration quotas to get grateful voters - or from having periodic amnesties for illegals. Now to give him credit, Friedman does mention -]
    ...quantum advances in both globalization and the information technology revolution...are more rapidly than ever replacing labor with machines or foreign workers...
    [though globalization is secondary and it's not just information technology - it's any worksaving technology from mechanization to automation to robotization. Employers have been trying to get growth, which, duh, would be UPsizing, by DOWNsizing. And the only thing you can downsize that's growth-friendly is the workweek. Downsize the workforce and you downsize consumer spending and all the rest of the economy. Friedman's solution? -]
    ...nothing would be more important that passing some kind of GI Bill for the 21st century...
    [presumably billed to taxpayers and loaded onto their already crushing debt burden. Lame lame lame. Something much much more important than evermore ever too-little-too-late artificial job-creation at taxpayers' expense merely to maintain forever a pre-computer 1940 workweek level against all technological worksavings would be to make the private sector clean up their own mess of disposed-of employees and deactivated consumers, and trim the frozen workweek as much as it takes to restore wartime levels of labor "shortage" (actually balance) to centrifuge money out of The Onepercent and transform it back from excess investing power to scarce spending power, and restore full employment and markets. Right now everyone is "on hold" - The Onepercent is waiting longer and longer to find profitable or even sustainable investments, and the 99% is waiting longer and longer to find a job, any job. Pathetic. And those who still have jobs are working longer and longer for less and less. We need to dive into emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing A.S.A.P. Until the private sector quits parasitizing the public sector and stops impoverishing its own consumer base to give Bill Gates and Warren Buffet an extra billion to thump their chests about and then wonder what to do with, our deathspiral continues.]
  • The blue chips fell 33.07% points, pulled lower by...mixed earnings, reports from U.S. firms, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
    [The WSJ as usual tried to distract from U.S. problems by putting "the standoff over Greek debt restructuring" first, but we're not having any of that. Northern Europe has stronger fundamentals (consumer spending per capita) than anywhere, and they'll have stronger financials too once they realize the US is in a deathspiral and they no longer need to compulsively maximize or maintain the number of countries on the euro - they can dump the reckless risk-takers and tax-evaders and quit flushing good credit after bad.]
  • Sign of (tough) times: Small broker's closure, WSJ, C1.
    ...Ticonderoga Securities LLC...
  • The IMF cut its forecast for global growth and warned of a deeper downturn if Europe doesn't take stronger action to stem its debt crisis, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A9.
    [There's going to be a deeper downturn regardless of what Europe does unless more economists lose their time blindness and start pushing for "worktime regulation as a full-employment strategy" (Dr. Robert "Bob" LaJeunesse's 2009 book title) AND as a growth maximizing and optimizing strategy. Compared to that deep-structure change, Europe's debt crisis is superficial and waiting only for The Onepercent to realize that no one has the money to solve any debt crisis except themselves, so the sooner they accept wartime levels of graduated income and estate taxes (rather than just using bailouts to shift debt to taxpayers & further undermine "safe" gov't securities, or just using sales taxes to shift taxes from wealth onto consumer spending & further decelerating currency circulation), the sooner they'll restore investment sustainability and profitability.]
  • Economic potholes add dangers on Egypt's new political path, New York Times, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Govt. to Supervise Work Hours at 35000 Work Places, Arirang News via arirang.co.kr
    SEOUL, S.Korea - ...Although the government did supervise a similar number of work places in 2011, this year the government will focus more on keeping the working hours below 52 hours per week, which is the upper limit under the current labor law... - see whole article under today's date.
    [What happened to the 2004-2011 program to cut the workweek from 44 to 40 in stages starting with large companies?]
  2. Of Shorter Work Hours - Neoliberalism and the End Of Shorter Work Hours, SocialistProject.ca
    VIENNA, Austria - ...Another way of looking at the same development is the comparison of work hours spent by households rather than by individual workers. The combined (paid) workweek of married couples in the US increased from 52.2 hours in 1970 to 63.1 hours in 2000... - see whole article under today's date.
    [As usual, the left is living in the past instead of moving on from mourning and attempts at guilt manipulation to translating their goals into economic core redesign proposals and explaining the benefits in terms of the self-interest of The Onepercent.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, January 24, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines from Mags & Fags in Ottawa & in Hull, le Couche-Tard at Terrasses & Café Corsé on Montcalm (upload) -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Study: City could lose 22,000 federal jobs, Ottawa Sun, p.5.
    [Wait for it...]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Your résumé vs. oblivion - [Résumé-]Inundated companies resort to software to sift applications for the right skills,
    Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [The pandemic of job desperation, in the news again, and with computers doing the sifting, subtlety and intuition are lost and the headline should read: Your résumé into oblivion. So naturally we move to the next level in survival-counselling = from: it's terrible but It's Your Own Fault, to: it's bad but Just Accept It cuz you can't do anything about it, to: it's not so bad so Just Shut Up and Move On, to: it's actually good for you so Don't Worry, Be Happy (and Grateful!) -]
  • Next stage of crisis grief [eg: over bursting of bubble] is to accept and move on [to ??] - When stress is good for you - Don't complain about feeling frazzled - The right level of anxiety is like aerobic exercise, Wall Street Journal, C1.
    [This is like "rightsizing" - you may lose your job, live out of your car, lose the car, live on the streets, but keep your mouth shut - you're actually getting the same benefit as a high-priced aerobics class! And besides, markets haven't weakened much yet for Silicon Valley, so...hitch-hike out there and wear your best rags to interviews -]
  • Average annual salaries for Silicon Valley technology workers surpassed the $100,000 mark last year, according to a new survey, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Meanwhile in the rest of The World of the Upwardly Ratcheting Workweek (if you still have a job - or 3-4 "part-time" gigs) -]
  • Key economic indicator springs a leak, Toronto Globe, B14.
    The Baltic Dry [Goods?] Index, which tracks global freight rates, has dropped 23 days in a row, to levels last seen in a recession. (photo caption)
  • Investors, economists and politicians are increasingly convinced that Portugal will need a second [& 3rd, &4th...?] bailout, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A13.
  • Despite debt crisis, Iceland wants in euro, Toronto Globe, B12.
    [What is this death wish that infects so many countries these days? Oh yeah, it's 2012 - woo-oo-oo...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Lee calls for 'work sharing' at conglomerates, YonhapNews.co.kr
    SEOUL, S.Korea -- President Lee Myung-bak instructed his aides Wednesday to encourage conglomerates to cut the working hours of their employees so as to create additional jobs, as the government considers more tightly regulating the work week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Take that, you sneering "Lump of Labor" sophists! Let's see how much consumer base and competitiveness you have left after slipping back up to the 80-hours-plus workweek of the 1830s and before!]
  2. Mo. House considers shorter week to save money, AP via TheRepublic.com
    [And what's "sauce" for the pols is "sauce" for the public!]
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — ...Missouri lawmakers generally hold floor sessions Monday through Thursday. But this week, Republican House leaders may wrap up the work week on Wednesday... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon., January 22-23, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from Cate's Café in Boston secteur Somerville MA and the Panorama Lounge in the Montréal RR station -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • For plow drivers, the snow brought a much-desired day's work, 1/22 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    [...a slew of articles exuding job desperation...]
  • Hire Dave! - Job seeker from Waltham MA spins social media storm to spread the word about his search,
    1/22 Boston Globe, G1.
    How to make sure your resume gets to the top of the pile,
    1/22 Boston Globe, G1.
    Well-positioned - Go where the jobs are,
    1/22 Boston Globe, G1 pointer to G3-4.
    Dispute brews in Blubber Hollow - Condos, rentals planned for Salem MA tannery sites, but locals would prefer jobs,
    1/22 Boston Globe, North1.
  • More lockouts as companies battle unions, 1/23 New York Times, A1.
    [This is what unions get for letting companies distract them from their power issue = shorter hours and more shorter-hour jobs and less labor surplus and helplessness.]
  • Fed begins an effort to remove all doubt on what it's doing, 1/23 NYT, B3.
    [Oh we KNOW what it's doing - it's covering up how overconcentrated the money supply is and how much it contributed (and is still contributing) to the hyperconcentration. But then, the whole One Percent is not talking about it -]
  • The wealthy and the class war, letter to editor by Morris Waxler of Sturgeon Bay WI, 1/23 NYT, A18.
    Re "What they don't want to talk about" (editorial, Jan.15):
    The wealthy are continuing to win class warfare in the United States.
    [Yeah, if you call vacuuming the spending power out of the markets they need for stable investments, "winning"; or if you call their closer approach to Suicide, Everyone Else First, "winning."]
    Why would they want to talk about income disparity?
    [or more actionably, income concentration]
    Their income is fueled by lower salaries and poor access to health care, food, housing and other necessities.
    [Short-term: fueled. Longer-term: destabilized.]
    Class warfare? Shh!
    [And they own the media so they're in a good position to Shh.]
  • Wooing the fickle consumer..., 1/23 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Again, the consumer isn't "fickle" or "quirky" or "holding back" or any other term that implies optionality. The consumer is defunded - by CEOs' downsizing response to technology instead of timesizing - CEOs have cut jobs - and markets - instead of cutting hours and maintaining jobs and markets.]
  • New York State's bad bet - Casinos are a regressive tax on the poor, op ed by Paul Davies, 1/23 NYT, A19.
    [And another subradar way to concentrate and decelerate the money supply and weaken consumer spending.]
  • Stress case, 1/23 Toronto Globe, L1.
    One in three Canadians say they're more stressed out than ever. ...We suggest giving your smartphone a rest.
    [Nowhere near one in three Canadians HAS a smartphone. We suggest it's job insecurity if you're still working and lengthening job hunt if you're not. Solution - emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing.]
  • Ottawa - Stalled on the road to an effective economic policy, by Barrie McKenna bmckenna@globeandmail.com, 1/23 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [A pretty confused diagnosis but one sentence stands out -]
    ...Consumers are borrowing more, even as their incomes stagnate...
    [which indicates that Canada is just 5-10 years behind the U.S. consumer-credit max-out and spending collapse.]
  • In Britain, rising outcry over executive pay that makes 'people's blood boil', 1/23 NYT, B5.
    [Then DO something about it = cut the wage-depressing surplus of YOU by cutting the workweek and spreading the vanishing work (and by moving to steady-state migration = one out, one in - you can save the third world by exemplifying a solution, but not by moving them all geography-wise here and moving us all economy-wise there).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Maine amends its UI law regarding worksharing benefits, 1/23 CCH via hr.cch.com
    AUGUSTA, Maine - ... Maine law will provide for worksharing benefits effective March 1, 2012... The weekly worksharing benefit amount is the product of the regular weekly benefit amount, including any dependents' allowances, multiplied by the percentage reduction in the eligible employee's usual weekly hours of work as specified in the worksharing plan... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Is that our 25th state so we have our 50% now?]
  2. The reality of retail, 1/22 Crain's New York Business via home.crainsnewyork.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...The biggest barrier to earning more in retail is overtime pay regulations. Even full-time staff is often limited to 35 hours a week to protect against overtime pay kicking in. With the regulations removed, the best workers would be able to get unlimited hours and this would eliminate the need for so many part-time swing shifts of four or five hours. It would also eliminate the need to have more than one job. - see whole article under today's date.
    [Not for long, because the real biggest barrier to earning more in retail is the idea that working longer hours gets you more money, when all it gets you is more desperate unemployed people looking for your job and willing to do it for less. So wages sink and sink and you get to work longer and longer for less and less.]
  3. The purchasing power Presidency, Forbes.com/sites/pierredelage
    PARIS, France - Ironically, Mr Sarkozy campaigned in 2007 on the theme of purchasing power. The idea at the time was to give back to workers their share of economic growth, which they didn’t get because of the 35-hour week [LOL] and still rather high unemployment... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Nevermind the fact that the 35-hour workweek meant 100,000s more jobs and correspondingly lower unemployment (which would have been even lower if the workweek was cut to 32 or 30) and nevermind the higher taxes already needed to support the currently high unemployment (UE) which would both, UE and taxes, be even higher if the 35-hour workweek was relengthened to 39 or 40.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, January 21, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston secteur Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Alnylam Pharmaceuticals planning to cut 61 jobs [33%] in restructuring, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...a Cambridge MA biotechnology company...
  • Massport to cut 25 jobs at Conley Terminal - Decision follows half of COSCO shipping route,
    by Katie Johnston, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...that moves cargo between Southeast Asia and the East Coast. In two phases of layoffs starting Monday, about 20 of the 90 longshoremen and clerks who regularly work at the port will lose their jobs, along with up to five of 30 Massport employees. In addition, five open Massport positions will not be filled.... The suspended service by the China Ocean Shipping Co. [COSCO, the Port of Boston's biggest customer] and its partners means the Port of Boston will lose about 1,000 containers a week being transported throught the Suez Canal in Egypt. The route accounts for more than a third of the cargo business at Conley....

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • More elderly find they can't afford not to work, Wall Street Journal, A1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharingthe & permanent timesizing -
  • Brazil's emerging market: crack [cocaine], Wall Street Journal, A1.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Blacks face bias in bankruptcy, study suggests a disparity in finance - Steered into Chapter 13, less favorable and often costlier [than Chapter 7], New York Times, A1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The new American divide - The ideal of an 'American way of life' is fading as the working class falls further away from institutions like marriage and religion and the upper class becomes more isolated, Wall Street Journal[!], C1.
  • Indexes mixed on Big Blue [IBM] results, home sales,
    Boston Globe, B7.
  • The dawn of a new era of lower pay on Wall Street - Compensation reflects a dismal 2011 performance..\..- Changing a culture where a paycheck measures self-worth, New York Times, B7 (+B1 reachback for subhead).
  • Egypt's economic crisis - The collapsing economy is a serious threat to a democratic transition, New York Times, A20.
    [One word: worksharing]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Will Saving the Environment Require a Shorter Work Week? OpEdNews.com
    SILICON VALLEY, Calif. - A shorter workweek would create more jobs and could help stop the unsustainable cycle of rampant consumption and resource wastage... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Cutbacks cause strain in some school cafeterias, KHON2.com
    HONOLULU, Hawaii - ...While teachers "directed leave without pay" days are on non-instructional dates, United Public Workers' furloughs for support staff including cafeteria workers often will come when kids are present. One middle school is coping by cutting back on one meal. Furlough or directed leave without pay days for UPW cafeteria workers mean on several days during the school year, at least one staff won't be there to help with the herculean task of feeding hundreds of hungry kids... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, January 20, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston secteur Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Constant Constant [online mktg services, Waltham MA] acquires CardStar [shopper-to-merchant loyalty, Boston],
    AP via Boston Globe, B6.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • State unemployment falls [from Nov. 7.0% to Dec. 6.8% in Massachusetts] but firms also cut jobs,
    Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    Massachusetts jobs data present a mixed [nixed?] picture - Unemployment [UE] hit 3-year low in Dec. - Layoffs may indicate a slowdown ahead, by Erin Ailworth, Boston Globe, B5 target article.
    ...Employers...cut more than 6,000 jobs last month.... Only four of 10 private employment sectors added jobs...with the largest increases in trade, transportation, and utilities, which gained 2,300 jobs. Manufacturing added 1,100 jobs.
    [So that's what you call trade aka import-export = a private employment sector. So for one private employment sector, trade, we're nonchalantly sacrificing nine other private employment sectors. At the federal level, we're sacrificing consumer spending = 70% of the economy for one private-employment sector, trade, which is something less than the remaining 30% of the economy - did I hear 17%? All for the fundamentalist true-believers in Free Trade, economic system requirements be damned.]
    The additions were offset by losses in key sectors.... Professional, scientific and business services - which includes a variety of technology firms - lost 5,000 jobs. Employment in education and health fell by 2,400 jobs, and leisure and hospitality lost 1,200 jobs.\.
    [For a total of 5000+2400+1200= 8,600. So why did Erin only say "employers cut more than 6000 jobs" when she should have said employers cut more than 8000 jobs? "Shouting the tiniest good news and whispering the biggest bad news" again?]
    State UE and job statistics are based on separate surveys, and sometimes the results diverge. The UE rate is estimated from a survey of households, and job growth from a survey of employers.
    [Sooo relieved to know our stats are so authoritative and safe from subjectivity and politics! Federal UE was 8.5% in Dec.2011.]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Nearly 15,000 federal retirees collect pensions in excess of $100,000 a year while the system faces a shortfall of $674.2 billion,
    Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
    [- because Congress pilfered the federal pension fund? Or - are retirees the new villains - and the banksters all forgiven...?]
  • Kodak hopes to slash what it owes to retirees...during its journey through bankruptcy court, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1,B5.
    [If we have sanctity of contract within The Onepercent, but not from The Onepercent to the 99%, The Onepercent have carved another huge notch in their own physical security. As long as this continues as "the American way," America is uncontinuable.]
    Retiree imbalance underlies filing, WSJ, B1 target article.
    ...The company has twice as many retirees drawing benefits in the U.S. as it has active employees world-wide...
    [And we thought Kodak was "right sizing" all those years! But here lurks another example of the fundamental flaw in the retirement concept, at any age: it implies a blank check on the workforce and deactivates a valuable, experienced part of the population - the part with the most perspective - deactivation often kills - and flies in the face of humanity's deepest longing, everlonger/everlasting life. How much better to shorten the workweek and retire, temporarily, every long weekend thanks to the incredible waves of technological productivity that are now twisted into a curse by the blind response of downsizing.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Ailing Kodak files for bankruptcy [Chap.11, yesterday] - Iconic photo company hopes to reorganize on printer, ink business, Boston Globe, B6.
    [Gee, just like HP, Canon, Xerox (if it's still alive)...]
    Bankrupt, Kodak vows to rebound, but skeptics see liquidation, New York TImes, B7 inside header.

    JOB- OR JOBLOSS- RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • Army [U.S.] suicides set a record, New York Times, A1 pointer to A11.
    Suicides among active-duty soldiers hit a record high in 2011, and the Army reported nearlyl a 30 percent increase in violent sex crimes.
    ["We support our troops"?]
    ...Gen.Chiarelli said that 164 active-duty Army, National Guard and Reserve troops took their own lives in 2011, compared with 159 in 2010 and 162 in 2009...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Unearned, and taxed unequally, column by Floyd Norris, New York Times, B1.
    Tax legislation that pRes. Geo.W.Bush signed in 2003 set the tax rates on dividends below the rates for ordinary income. (photo caption)
  • Taxes at the top - Do they have to be this low? op ed by Paul Krugman, New York Times, A23.
    [We are going to keep spiralling downward if they do and we keep coagulating the money supply in an ever tinier part of the population.]
  • Practicing what GOP [& American dream] preaches, op ed by Scot Lehigh, Boston Globe, A15.
    ...Although his GOP rivals have made hay of both.\.Mitt Romney's days as a leveraged buy-out specialist and the low tax rate he paid last year...Romney has merely practiced what his party preaches on economics....
    [And what many many Americans naively envy and dream of. But so what if we transfer any percentage of the nation's money supply, however large, to any percentage of the nation's population, however small? -]
    If middle-class and lower-income people have less in their paychecks and pockets, they won't do the consumer spending the economy needs to grow at a healthy clip...
    [and the consumer spending required to provide the marketable productivity the upper-income people need to have profitable, or even sustainable, investments.]
  • Investors seek safety of Treasury bonds, Financial Times, p.1.
    [Oh that's funny. We thought investors wanted to cut their own taxes and "starve the beast," thus bankrupting the government including the Treasury. What a bunch of suicidal putzes.]
  • A judge [J.Garvan Murtha] rules that Vermont can't [not renew license of] nuclear plant, New York Times, A12.
    [because it's a federal prerogative. Vermont should appeal this bizarre and possibly corrupt decision, because any licensing authority granted by Congress implies both license to renew and not renew. Congress should either take back this licensing authority or butt out.]
  • Ireland said to face downturn in second year of austerity, New York Times, B2.
    [Low taxes for The Onepercent and austerity for the 99% guarantees bottomless downturn.]
  • Putin welcomes Kissinger: 'Old friends' to talk shop, New York Times, A7.
    [Chop shop? They're doin' The Mash - the Monster Mash - the Wannabe-Machiavelli Mash. A perfect pair for a mash, because (from CD: Monty Python Sings):
    "Henry Kissinger, how I'm missin' yer - you're the doctor of my dreams -
    with your crinkly hair and your glassy stare and your machiavellian schemes...
    All right so people say that you don't caaaare,
    But you've got nicer legs than Hitler, and bigger tits than Cher..."
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Committee discusses plan to make 12-month school workers take month of unpaid furloughs, Palm Beach Post via Sun-Sentinel.com
    PALM BEACH, Fla. - ...Binns said different employees could be furloughed for two weeks or a month at different times of the year instead of a shutdown all at the same time. Cutting employees like custodians or secretaries to 11 month employees and reducing their pay would have to be negotiated with the labor unions that represent them, Burke said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Chicago Medical Malpractice Attorney says Recent ‘Alert’ Should Wake Medical Community to Risks of Fatigue, PR Web (press release) via prweb.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...As evidence mounts indicating the link between fatigue and poor judgment or execution among medical professionals, it is increasingly appropriate to consider assigning or assuming overly lengthy work hours to be medical malpractice... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Breakthrough! Once lawyers start malpractice suits as soon as they sniff long hours, we'll see our sick sick medical establishment change fast and be on track for some well-rested common sense instead of the load of self-martyring insomniac gougers we have today.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, January 19, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston secteur Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge from *Porter Sq. Books -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Conn. to review NStar's merger with Northeast - Utilities now need OK from 2 states for $17.5b deal,
    Boston Globe, B7.
  • Takeda Pharmaceutical..., AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...recently bought Swiss drug maker Nycomed...
    [Next step: block growth (=upsizing) with downsizing, system requirements be damned! See next -]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Takeda Pharmaceutical to cut jobs, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...2,800 jobs, or about 9% of its workforce over the next five years...2,100 in Europe and 700 in the United States...
    [100 downsized jobs here, a 1000 downsized jobs there, and pretty soon you don't have a consumer base or an economy, let alone UPsizing (alias Growth)...]
    ...Takeda said it will save $2.6 billion a year...
    [For how many years, when it hasn't even calculated how many of its customers it is permanently deactivating?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • FBI sweep targets big funds - Arrests in insider case allege that a 'criminal club' trafficked in information,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 target article.
    Federal prosecutors alleged that a 'criminal club' in the hedge-fund world made tens of millions of dollars...,
    WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    [= exhibit A in today's Incarcerate Wall Street movement...]
  • A Citigroup unit was fined $725,000 for thousands of disclosure lapses involving rules aimed at protecting investors from conflicts of interest, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [725K? a mere bagatelle!]
  • The SEC filed civil-fraud charges against BankAtlantic and its chief, accusing them of misleading investors over the lender's real-estate losses, WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
    [And as investors realize they're sheep for Wall St's shearing, they go into shock and decirculate-decelerate the money supply even further. So much fer, "Naaa, we'll git all these-here billion$$ thet y'all hev so stoopudly oops kindly intrusted to us right bek inta akshun creatin' JOBS!"]
  • Market chaos hurts Goldman profits, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    [Poor baby - conditions too chaotic for its share of insider cheatin'n'fraud?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. State employees' paid leave days can roll over from year to year indefinitely, court rules, The Star-Ledger via NJ.com
    TRENTON, N.J. - ...Under an agreement negotiated between the Corzine administration and the unions in 2009, the employees agreed to take 10 furlough days and an 18-month deferral of raises to avoid massive layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Eastern Cape SADTU considers protest, Jo-burg Times LIVE via timeslive.co.za
    [The wrong direction - a cautionary tale -]
    JOHANNESBURG, Republiek van Zuid-Afrika - ...Mboniswa said some teachers -- who normally worked about 26-and-a-half hours a week -- were now forced to work more than 35 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So how many jobs does that prevent and how many consumers keep on hold?]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, January 18, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from café car of train 448, Amtrak's "Lakeshore Ltd." & a cluttered kitchen in Boston (secteur Somerville) MA -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Kraft Foods to cut 1,600 positions, USA Today, 1B.
    ...among its sales, corporate and other business units.\.in North America as it prepares to split its business in two.... About 20% of the cuts are currently open positions. Kraft employs roughly 46,500 in North America.
  • The U.S. is rapidly losing high-tech jobs as "American" companies [our quotes] expand their R&D labs in China and elsewhere in Asia, a report [by the National Science Board] said, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Long-term unemployment ripples through one town [Roswell GA], by Murray & McWhirter, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    The waiting list for subsidized housing here, just 40 families long a year ago, is up to 500. The number of children eliglble for free or reduced lunch is up 50%. A little more than a year ago, the Methodist church began seminars for marriages strained by job losses.... More than half the city's 88,000 residents have four-year college degrees. But...about 40% if the unemployed in the Atlanta metro region [includes Roswell] in 2010, the most recent local data available, were out of work for a year or more versus the national average of 29%.... While...the national unemployment rate "fell" to 8.5% in December [from 8.6 in Nov. - our quotes]...3.9 million nationwide had been out of work for at least a year and were still looking.... The longer people are out of work, the more likely their skills are to become obsolete - particularly at a time of rapidly evolving technology..\.. Some will never find jobs again... The splotches of unemployment on their applications will make them unattractive to potential employers. Workers who had been employed for less than five weeks in 2010 had a 34% chance of finding a job the following month, according to Labor Dept. data. Those out more than six months had only a 10% chance..\.. Workers who were jobless for six months or more in the late 1990s and early 2000s in Connecticut and eventually found work earned 60% less than those who were unemployed for three months or less.... When their unemployment benefits run out, some...rely on families, draw on retirement benefits or, if they can qualify, go on government disability programs. ...Says Betsey Stevenson, former chief Labor Dept. economist..., "I am really quite fearful that 10 years from now we're going to look back and go, "Why didn't we fight this harder?"...
    [But 10 years from now The One Percent who own the media will be that much more skilled at covering up and ignoring the problem...]
  • The U.S. obesity rate shows no sign of retreating, the CDC said. Over a third of adults and 17% of children were obese in 2009 and 2010, WSJ, A1 news squib.
  • End the senior discounts - Pandering to the graying set has become society's fallback position, despite the deepening economic divide between old and young, op ed by Don Campbell, USA Today, 9A.
    [Pandering to any age-defined set is inefficient and dysfunctional. And Campbell does not mention that students also get discounts. But it's a kinda strange time to bring this up when so many seniors are losing their high-wage pre-retirement jobs to minimum-wage 20-somethings, losing their homes to foreclosure and not being able to afford to retire or stay retired.]
  • Average car age at record 10.8 years - U.S. drivers have kept older vehicles amid the tough economy, by Meier & Woodyard, USA Today, 5B.
    [Bad news for the few big car makers and Detroit's economy but -]
    ...The report is more good news for auto shops and makers of repair parts.... The average age of light trucks increased most, from 10.1 years in 2010 to 10.4 years on average last year, according to Polk's analysis of registration for 12 months through July 1 of each year. Cars rose from 11 to 11.1 years...
  • Inflation falls back in eurozone [from 3% in Nov. to 2.7% in Dec.], USA Today, 1B.
    [Or is it actually the beginning of recessionary deflation?]
  • Slowing growth in China [from 10.4% in 2010 to 9.2% in 2011] raises global concerns, by Kathy Chu, USA Today, 3B.
    [Why? Cuz China is being spun as our future (God forbid)?]
    ...The world's second-largest economy...is slowing much faster when looked at quarter [Q3 9.5%] over quarter [Q4 8.2%]. Yet the country's economy is growing much faster than those of developed nations. In September, the IMF projected trhat the U.S. economy, the world's largest...expanded 1.5% at an annual rate and the eurozone [even larger but not a single nation] 1.6% at an annual rate in 2011...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Governor Christie Signs Work-Sharing Law, The Progressive Pulse via pulse.ncpolicywatch.org
    TRENTON, N.J. - Governor Christie of New Jersey signed into law last week a work-sharing program which is a proven tool that keeps workers on the job even when economic growth is weak or nonexistent.... The program works by reducing workers hours and using unemployment insurance benefits to pay a portion of the wages that employees lose... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Ambulance staff dispute: Working hours reduced in deal over breaks, Scotsman (blog)
    EDINBURGH, Scotland - The Health Secretary has announced plans to reduce the working hours of ambulance staff in a deal to resolve a row over rest breaks. The changes will also result in the creation of 150 new jobs in the Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS), Nicola Sturgeon told MSPs. Under the new plans, staff will move [from 40-] to a 37.5-hour paid week inclusive of rest periods... - see whole article under today's date.
    [=Towards full employment by workweek reduction.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, January 17, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the Metropolitan Lounge of the Chicago Amtrak station -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Tribune to offer [undisclosed number of] staff buyouts - Move comes amid industry challenges and bankruptcy,
    Chicago Tribune, Bus.2.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Gov. Quinn [of Illinois] nears closure rulings - Mentally ill, developmentally disabled affected, by Monique Garcia,
    Chicago Tribune, p.5.
    ...close to picking which state facilities for the mentally ill and developmentally disabled.... The list is being drawn up after Quinn proposed shutting down seven facilities and laying off 1,900 workers last year, arguing that lawmakers did not set aside enough money....

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Man vs. machine, a jobless recovery - Companies are spending to upgrade factories but hiring lags; Robots pump out Sunny Delight, by Timothy Aeppel, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [What's the point of making your factories more productive if you don't do it in a way that makes your markets more active? Worse, if you actually DOWNsize in response to a machine upgrade, how do you expect to get UPsizing = growth?]
    Sunny Delight is spending $70 million to upgrade equipment at its five U.S. factories, much of it [the $70m?] in Littleton, Mass... (photo caption)
    [Meanwhile, what is Congress doing? -]
  • House debt ceiling vote will be primarily symbolic - Action a result of summer deal; GOP infighting remains - "The real opportunity to stand for fiscal responsibility was in August - Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan., Chicago Tribune, p.11.
    President Barack Obama would likely veto any bill to curtail borrowing authority. (photo caption)
  • When the GOP's best candidate quits - If you match the stated wants and needs of Americans with the candidate, Jon Huntsman's reputation fits, op ed by Dennis Byrne, Chicago Tribune, p.17.
  • Occupy values [misrepresented], letter to editor by Cathy Truesdale of Wheaton IL, Chicago Tribune, p.17.
    A recent letter about the Occupy movement stated that "you occupy because you are anti-military, anti-capitalism, anti-government." Someone who advocates peace is not anti-military. Someone who advocates for social justice is not anti-capitalism. Someone who thinks our politicians are not working for the common good is not anti-government.... The protesters' main slogan, "We are the 99%," refers to the difference in wealth and income growth in the U.S. between the wealthiest 1 percent and the rest of the population. That growing disparity...makes me fed up with [the 1 percent's] hold over many of our politicians.
  • China's growth engine declines, WSJ, A1.
    [That's what you get when your growth undercuts everyone else's growth, because your growth depends on everyone else's consumer base which you're impoverishing by bankrupting everyone else's employers with underpricing based on your giant labor surplus and pygmy wages and standards.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Sarkozy makes pre-poll dash for French labor reform - Kurzarbeit in France?, Reuters.com
    PARIS, France - ...Talks have since focused on widening access to partial unemployment, which the government hopes will allow France to replicate Germany's success with a longstanding program of shortened working hours known as "Kurzarbeit."... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Portugal launches labor reforms amid recession, The Associated Press via google.com/hostednews/ap
    [Meanwhile, Portugal goes in the opposite direction. These aren't "reforms amid recession" - these are regressions abetting recession. But hopefully things will get so bad so fast, they'll wake up, as Sarkozy has after attacking France's 35-hr workweek -]
    LISBON, Portugal — ...However, delegates who attended the talks did say the changes included: shortening workers' annual vacation entitlement from 25 days to 22, scrapping at least three public holidays, reducing layoff payouts, cutting overtime pay levels, and giving companies 150 work hours per employee without overtime to be used by employer as and when they were needed... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Monday, January 16, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the café car of Train 4, "Southwest Chief," & the Metropolitan Lounge of the Chicago Amtrak station -

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -

  • No motive yet in [four] Calif. homeless killings - Friends, family say suspect troubled after tours in Iraq, USAToday, 3A.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Growing national debt is a big warning sign, letter to editor by David Patterson of Ft.Worth, USAToday, 6A.
    We have passed a crucial milestone in that our debt as a country is a staggering $15 trillion, which is equal to the GDP. And our leaders have promised us more of the same ("U.S. debt is now equal to economy," News, [last?] Monday). In fiscal year 2011, we paid $454 billion in interest on our national debt alone...
  • Apple invites review of labor practices in overseas factories - Sweatshop conditions have been an issue for tech giant, USAToday, 3B.
  • Investors continue to flee stock funds,
    AP via USAToday, 6B.
  • What has capitalism become? op ed by E.J. Dionne, Albuquerque Journal, A6.
    [uh, suicidal?]
    ...What if there is a distinction between the capitalist we typically honor who comes up with a good product and hires people to make and market [and purchase!] it; and another kind who takes over a company, pulls out all the cash he can, and then abandons it to die? This is...how Rick Perry, who last I checked was a rather ardent conservative, described Romney's line of work. "They're just vultures...waiting for the company to get sick, and then they swoop in, they eat the carcass, they leave with that and they leave the skeleton."...
    [It must be pretty bad if even rightwing nuts are talkin' like this.]
  • A title that speaks for itself - Author explores why, how USA is 'going seriously wrong', book review by Steve Weinberg, USAToday, 7B.
    "Greedy Bastards - How we can stop corporate communists, banksters, and other vampires from sucking America dry," by Dylan Ratigan... (photo caption)
  • Rio Rancho home construction extends decline - Once thriving industry on track to hit lowest point since 1985, Albuquerque Journal, Business Outlook 5.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Teachers' union, province in secret talks to explore cap on work hours, CalgaryHerald.com
    CALGARY, Alta., Canada — Reducing or limiting teacher working hours is under discussion as the province struggles to hammer out a new contract with the Alberta Teachers’ Association before unveiling this year’s budget and heading to the polls. But some school boards are worried the secret negotiations with the 35,000-member union could produce a deal that will hurt students if it includes the equivalent of a 30-hour work week... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Libraries may escape cut in opening hours, BBC News via bbc.co.uk
    BELFAST, Northern Ireland - ...Libraries NI said it had reluctantly proposed shorter opening hours because of a £10m shortfall in funding. It was intended to cut hours by 1,200 hours a week. That could now be halved with the extra allocation of money... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - Canton Township Saves Cash With Furloughs, Patch.com
    CANTON, Mich. - ...The records department at the Canton Police Department was on furlough Friday as part of a township-wide money-saving initiative. Selected Canton Township buildings will close for 12 days this year as part of unpaid furlough days, according to a report...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sunday, January 15, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the cafeteria of Maswik Lodge in Canyon Village, Ariz., on the south rim of the Grand Canyon -

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -

  • Man detained after homeless vet killed [in L.A.], AP via Arizona Republic, A8.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Obama touts cuts for government - President urges bringing jobs to U.S. [= "insourcing"], Arizona Republic, A23.
    ['Bam thinks he can create jobs by creating words? Let's quit straining to steal other countries' jobs or to create enough busywork to fill an outdated 40-hour workweek - let's just trim the workweek and spread and share the vanishing still-unautomated human employment. 'Bam wants to copy the rightwing? OK, even Hoover in 1932 stated that the quickest way to create jobs was shorter hours. (See Ben Hunnicutt's 1988 book "Work Without End".) ]
  • S&P defends mass European downgrade, Arizona Republic, A6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. France seeks exit from crisis, tries to be more German, Agence France-Presse via NDTV via profit.ndtv.com
    PARIS, France - ...A major reason Germany has managed to keep unemployment low is the use of "Kurzarbeit" ("reduced working hours"), a system that allows firms to reduce workers' hours, with the government making up some of their lost pay... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The Past And Future Of The Workweek, Slate Magazine (blog) via slate.com/blogs
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...He began by talking about Keynes's Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren in which Keynes foresaw a radical reduction in working hours and asked why Keynes's vision hadn't come to pass... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, January 14, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the cafeteria of Maswik Lodge in Canyon Village, Ariz., on the south rim of the Grand Canyon -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Town, cast as Romney's victim, says, 'Huh?' - Few recall closing of plant cited by G.O.P. rivals, by Kim Severson,
    New York Times, A1.
    [Maybe cuz, with no work, they all moved away?]
    GAFFNEY, S.C...once boomed with peaches and cotton mills. ...Here...Bain Capital, the private equity firm led by Mitt Romney, closed a factory that produced photo scrapbooks...in 1992 \and\ put 150 people out of work. Mr. Romney's company profited....

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Financial advice for those with small nesteggs - Brokers are eager to help the wealthy - What if you're not?,
    New York Times, B4.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Owner as regulator, like oil and water - Lingering issues over the government's shares in G.M., NYT, B1.
    [Not to mention lingering issues in the first place over forced charity from taxpayers dba government bailouts - not to mention lingering issues over the whole notion of jobs blackmail by less-than-system-savvy CEOs. Economic systems require maximum consumer spending. Cutting jobs defunds consumers and slashes consumer spending. With Timesizing, governments can do an end-run around all the outrageous attempts by CEOs to take jobs hostage and parasitize taxpayers while claiming to respect market forces.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • WaMu to send bankruptcy plan to creditors, Reuters via New York Times, B2.
    Washington Mutual...once the largest savings and loan in the country...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Out of work after 50, by Tara Bernard, nytimes.com/bucks via Bucks via NYT, B4.
    Unemployed older Americans are typically out of work much longer than their younger peers...
  • After 4 days of gains, shares slip backward, Reuters via NYT, B7.
    ...The DJIA dropped 48.96 points or 0.39% to close at 12,422.06...
    The S.&P. 500 lost 6.41 points or 0.49% to 1289.09.
    The Nasdaq composite index fell 14.03 points or 0.51% to 2710.67...
  • Debt ratings cut for 9 countries amid euro woes - France falls a notch [from AAA to AA+] - S.&P.moves may raise costs - Greek loan talks hit a snag, NYT, A1.
    ...France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Austria, Slovakia, Slovenia, Malta, Cyprus...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. After the Crash: A Work-Sharing Boom = Exit ramp to a new economy? by Juliet Schor, (8/09/2010 very late pickup) Care2.com
    BOSTON, Mass. - ...The National Association of State Workforce Agencies estimates that work sharing resulted in 166,000 jobs saved in 2009—a record number, and almost triple the number from 2008. New York, in particular, has been aggressively pushing its program, and use has also exploded in a number of other states... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. E-mail after work hours? That's overtime, says law, AP via CNET.com
    BRAZILIA, Brazil - ...Now a curiously human law has reared its head in Brazil. According to the Associated Press, this law says that if a company e-mails you after your allotted working hours, then this is the same as if one's supervisor is giving one an instruction to perform a certain work task. Ergo, argue Brazilian labor lawyers, if a worker receives such an e-mail and has to act on it, he or she qualifies for overtime pay... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, January 13, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the cafeteria of Maswik Lodge in Canyon Village, Ariz., on the south rim of the Grand Canyon -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Royal Bank of Scotland plans to cut 3,500 jobs and sell assets, by Mark Scott, New York Times, B5.
    ...in its investment banking division over the next three years in response to volatility in global financial markets. The bank [is one] in which the British government holds an 82% stake...
    [And since investments require profitable companies to invest in, and profitable companies require sales, and sales require purchasers, and purchasers require jobs, and RBS is cutting 3500 more jobs instead of cutting its corporate workweek enough to maintain those jobs, RBS is absolutely guaranteeing that it will get less profitable and shrink further. But hey, it's been shrinking for years and its executives still don't get it -]
    The bank also eliminated 2,000 jobs in its investment banking unit in the second half of 2011.... The bank has shed more than 30,000 employees since 2008....
    [What can you do with "leaders" who are persistently so suicidally blind and stupid? It's that standby policy of downsizing capitalism (rather than timesizing capitalism) that goes... "Suicide, everyone else first." What can you do with them? Here's what they're doing with themselves so they can kill the economy, us and themselves even faster -]
    ...Stephen Hester [is] the Royal Bank of Scotland's chief executive.... Despite the bank's problems, Mr. Hester received a total pay package, including salary, pension and bonus, of 3.7 million pounds in 2010, the latest figures available. John Hourican, who heads the bank's investment banking operations, also could receive a bonus of more than 4 million pounds this year, based on the unit's performance over the last three years. ...The bank's...stock price, however, has fallen 44% in the last 12 months....
    [Are these executives or assassins or undertakers? Or have these roles merged because we just can't seem to comprehend a workweek that automatically goes down when unemployment goes up, giving everyone more time and money to get these "executives" out of business management and into "sanitation engineering" and septic-tank cleaning where they belong?]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • More private subsidies, less accountability - A legislative panel doubles the tax credit for private school tuition while eliminating the requirement for AIMS testing, Arizona Daily Sun, A1.
    [Oh yeah, separate and parallel school systems are sooo efficient and resource-conserving: public, private and charter - especially when a charter school has recently been closed for mediocrity despite the argument that they are somehow magically always better.]

    JOB-RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • Foxconn resolves a dispute with some workers in China, by David Barboza, NYT, B6.
    [Here's an item for those of you who are looking to China as a model for the future -]
    ...A major supplier to several electronics giants...resolved a pay dispute with scores of workers at one of its factories in central China after a large protest that involved threats from some workers to commit suicide...
    [So Foxconn workers have moved from karoshi (death/suicide from overwork - see 7/01/2011) to suicide as a tool to get wage concessions. Some model for the future. This may be all that's left to the labor movement around the world now that they've become so distracted from their power issue, workweek (& labor surplus) reduction.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • America isn't a corporation - And it doesn't need a private equity buyout [expert like Romney], op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A19.
    ...There's a deeper problem in the whole notion that what this nation needs is a successful businessman as president: ...businessmen...do not, in general, have any special insights into what it takes to achieve economic recovery. ...To be fair, being a career politician isn't necessarily [any] better preparation..\.. Making good economic policy isn't at all like maximizing corporate profits. ...The economy is vastly more complex than even the largest private company. ...Even giant corporations sell the great bulk of what they produce to other people, not to their own employees - whereas...countries...are overwhelmingly their own main customers. Yes, there's a global economy. But six out of seven American workers are employed in service industries, which are largely insulated from international competition, and even our manufacturers sell much of their production to the domestic market.
    [Then why in the world are we always obsessing about our international competitiveness and with "free trade," sacrificing our economy at large to the small minority of our economy that is our export-import industry?]
    And the fact that we mostly sell to ourselves makes an enormous difference when you think about policy. ...When a business [in trouble] engages in [payroll] cost-cutting...the more costs that are cut, the better.... But the story is very different when a government slashes spending in the face of a depressed economy. Look at Greece, Spain and Ireland, all of which have adopted harsh austerity policies. In each case, unemployment soared [and the consumer base and all other markets (all dependent directly or indirectly on consumer spending) dived], because cuts in government spending mainly hit domestic producers [via the cuts in domestic employment and consumer spending]. And in each case, the [whole purpose of the austerity = a] reduction in budget deficits, was much less than expected because tax receipts fell as output and employment [and consumer spending] collapsed....
    [Case in point -]
  • Labor and retail reports show economic slippage [but DON'T SAY recession], and a modest shopping season - The number of jobless claims increased and December retail sales were weak, NYT, B7.
    [And ditto in austere and workaholic Britain -]
  • Flagging sales [due to flagging consumer spending] in Britain raise recession worries, by Julia Werdigier, NYT, B6.
    A profit warning on Thursday from Britain's largest retailer by sales [and] the world's third-largest retailer after Wal-Mart Stores and Carrefour, said it [Tesco] was caught by surprise by consumers' reluctance to spend....
    [When are we going to break out of this reality-rosying assumption of consumer choice and tell it like it is? = Consumers' decrease in spending - because they're getting less of the national income.]
    The warning also heightened concerns about the profitabilty in the retail sector in Britain and across Europe as consumers, fearful of rising unemployment and government austerity measures, held back on purchases....
    [Again, when are we going to break out of this reality-prettying assumption of consumer choice and tell it like it is? = Consumers are being hit by rising joblessness due to government austerity measures and have less money for purchases. CEOs seem to think they can downsize their workforces without downsizing their sales. Or that they can upsize or grow, by downsizing headcount. The only thing you can downsize that is not only growth-neutral but growth-inducing is the workweek, because as you trim the workweek, CEOs eventually have to INCREASE headcount, and increasing headcount increases consumer spending and everything else. "Then why didn't that always happen in France when they cut to the 35-hour workweek?" Because they didn't keep cutting the workweek. They arbitrarily refroze the workweek at 35 hours and that was still not low enough to match their high level of worksaving technology. Other retailers in Britain that reported weaker sales figures on Thursday are -]
    Home Retail...household goods... Mothercare...baby clothing... Thorntons...chocolate... and Halfords...car parts..\..
    [So what? So less to invest in -]
    The profit warning shocked some investors used to stellar earnings reports from the company. Tesco shares fell 16% in London....
    [And whoopee, a self-accelerating downward economic spiral: less investment, less employment, less consumer spending, less sales, less profit, less investment, less consumer...etc, etc.]
  • Inside the Fed in '06: A coming crisis, and banter - Focused on inflation while the seeds of recession grew, by Binyamin Appelbaum, NYT, A1,A3.
    ...The transcripts of the 2006 meetings, released after a standard five-year delay, clearly show some of the nation's pre-eminent economic minds did not fully understand the basic mechanics of the economy that they were charged with supervising. The problem was not a lack of information; it was a lack of comprehension, born in part of their deep confidence in economic forecasting models that turned out to be broken..\.. Alan Greenspan...stepped down as chairman at the beginning of the year [and Ben Bernanke stepped in]..\.. As the housing bubble entered its waning hours in 2006, top Federal Reserve officials marveled at the desperate antics of home builders seeking to lure buyers.... They joked about one builder who said that inventory was "rising through the roof." But the officials, meeting every six weeks to discuss the health of the economy, gave little credence to the possibility that the faltering housing market would weigh on the broader economy.... "We think the fundamentals of the expansion going forward still look good," Timothy Geithner, then president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, told his colleagues when they gathered in Washington in December 2006....
    [And the same nitwits, unreplaced, are still top center - Bernanke over the Fed, Geithner over the Treasury - covering up for all they're worth.]
  • Debt auctions provide reassurance to euro zone - Leaving the door open to reducing interest rates to counter a recession, NYT, B6 inside headers.
    [Open to reducing interest rates when they're already zero? Where's the reassurance in a bunch of central bankers who think they still have any power to cure?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cutting work hours could improve economy and health, BestMedicalCover.co.uk
    BOSTON, Mass. - ...According to Juliet Schor, professor of Sociology at Boston College, keeping wages in real terms stable would allow productivity growth to be used to reduce work hours. Speaking to the BBC World Business Report, she explained that this is something the Dutch did throughout the 1980s and 1990s. "They ended up with highest labour productivity in Europe, very low unemployment and very high quality of life," she explained... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Reforming work practices, The Korea Herald via koreaherald.com
    SEOUL, S.Korea - One major policy goal of the Ministry of Employment and Labor for this year is to reform shift work practices at domestic companies. The reform drive is intended to shorten Korea’s notoriously long working hours, which is essential to improving workers’ quality of life, creating jobs and enhancing productivity... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, January 12, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the cafeteria of Maswik Lodge in Canyon Village, Ariz., on the south rim of the Grand Canyon -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • University suspects fraud by a researcher who studied red wine - Federal [=taxpayers'] money flowed freely [thanks to what politician?] for research that has been called into question, New York TImes, A11.
    [How about calling the handouts drained from kept-in-the-dark taxpayers into question?
    How about "Taxpayers suspect fraud by a university that's been parasitizing them for frivolous research"?]
  • Mexico updates death toll in drug war to 47,515, but critics dispute the data, by Damien Cave, NYT, A4.
    ...have found that the government regularly undercounts the number of drug-related deaths.\.since Pres. Felipe Calderón began a military assault on criminal cartels in late 2006. The new official tally...included data only through September, and it showed that drug-related killings increased 11 percent to 12,903 compared with the same nine-month period in 2010...
    [What a wonderful makework campaign = the criminalization of drugs! Twin "benefits"! Desperate jobless people turn to growing and manufacturing and distributing and selling criminalized (though largely victimless) drugs, and other desperate jobless people join the military or drug police to half-heartedly stop them. It's like Keynes' solution to unemployment: pay half the population to bury money and let the other half dig it up and spend it. Perfect! And we're already doing it in so many ways: freight haulage on trucks instead of trains, virus writing and checking, adwire writing and blocking, spyware writing and extracting... - all to maintain an arbitary 1940 definition of "full time" forever. What a pathetic proliferation of double-crap, often eco-bashing industries you get when you don't spread& share the vanishing human employment and adjust the workweek as you inject wave after wave of worksaving innovation and productive technology.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Hostess Brands, Twinkies maker, files for bankruptcy [Ch.11 with $860m debt], New York Times, B2.
    [Good Lord, when not even Twinkies can make it in the land of obesity...]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Economic woes loom larger as G.O.P. candidates head south,
    New York Times, A1.
  • As economy "grows" [our quotes], jobs are still scarce, Fed says, Bloomberg News via NYT, B8.
    [If jobs aren't plentiful, the economy is not growing and the Fed needs to dump the "coverup measurements" and get some that reflect reality instead of cheerleading.]
    ...while hiring was limited and housing remained stagnant...
  • Unemployed mortgage holders get extension on payments, NYT, B2.
    [They don't need extensions, they need JOBS, and only emergency worksharing and long-term timesizing can deliver.]
  • Economic troubles cited as the top risks in 2012 - A new report raises the specter of a 'dystopian future for much of humanity', by Eric Pfanner, NYT, B3.
    [or more succinctly for the wealthy One Percent, the specter of "suicide, everyone else first" - but not in every case, because many in the One Percent will be affected before absolutely everyone in the 99%, especially once more of the 99% gets focused and strategic...]
    Severe income disparity [or more actionably, "extreme money-supply concentration"] and chronic fiscal imbalances [trivial by comparison to $concentration] are the top two risks facing business leaders and policy makers this year and over the next decade [and over the next century until they switch from downsizing workforces and consumer bases to downsizing workweeks], the World Economic Forum said in a report Wednesday...published in preparation for the group's annual meeting...in Davos, Switzerland, Jan. 25 to 29...
  • Wealth gap is greatest divide, NYT, A1 pointer to A11.
    Friction between the rich and poor is the greatest source of tension in American society, a new survey says.
    Survey finds rising strain between rich and the poor, by Sabrina Tavernise, NYT, A11.
    ...eclipses racial strain and friction between immigrants and the native-born...survey by the Pew Research Center...
  • Europe's staggering debt, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    European nations will need to sell $1 trillion in bonds in 2012 to replace existing debt and cover deficits.
    Europe's vicious cycle of debt [what about USA's?] - Auctions for billions in bonds to be repeated every month, NYT, B1 target article.
  • Italy's leader [PM Mario Monti] says austerity alone isn't a cure to debts - A premier visits Germany to make a plea for assistance, NYT, A8.
    [Any austerity is disastrous when one manifestation of the problem is insufficient marketable productivity (relative to the way-disproportionate mass of investment money) due to weaker consumer spending. Any German handouts will be disastrous due to moral hazard = removing the pain of risk-taking and corruption. Only emergency worksharing and long-term timesizing can provide a solid foundation, and meanwhile lenders must pay themselves back via graduated income, capital-gain and estate taxes with wartime levels of steepness.]
  • Haiti in shambles - Two years after quake, funds for rebuilding are lagging, USAToday, 1A.
    [Haiti doesn't need outside charity - with its subtle controls and assumed {NEVER spoken) required admission of inferiority. "Who can, by stirring, clear muddy water." (Lao Tzu)  Haiti needs to be left alone to create the magic "shortage" of jobseekers (as perceived by employers - it's really a jobseeker-jobopening balance at last) with which alone, capitalism runs well. How? By Timesizing®, which can be implemented in either public or private sector and at any level of population, however small. So for God's sake all you do-gooders, leave Haiti alone for once, to work out its own salvation. Sooner or later Haiti will discover that it has a number of unique tourist attractions: voodoo, zombies, werewolves, witches, TomTom Macoute, witch doctors, lambi, geckos, breathtaking French Creole (whose delightful simplified spelling will eventually be the basis of the reform of standard French spelling, l'Académie notwithstanding and possibly facilitating), vibrant art, yummy rum, and a huge population of expatriots wanting to help and wishing to God the elite would get some national pride and business imagination and strategic smarts, drop the hairsplitting racism and build Haiti back into the gem of the New World, a source of racial pride for the dark races around the world as the first black republic and at last, a SUCCESS!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Garda World to lay off, cut hours for screeners at Toronto's Pearson airport, CanadianBusiness.com
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ...Garda itself put the figure at 68 workers being temporarily laid off while the employment of a further 231 employees would be reduced to 20 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [231 cut to half time? Probably saved half (115-116 more) from being cut full time = laid off = timesizing not downsizing.]
  2. France – Working hours amongst the lowest in Europe, Staffing Industry Analysts via staffingindustry.com
    PARIS, France - ...The findings mirror similar data presented by the European statistics provider Eurostat, revealing that the average French full-time employee worked 1,679 hours per year in 2010. This is 224 hours less than in Germany or 177 hours less than the UK. The study also found that self-employed workers averaged 2,453 hours a year while part-time employees worked 978 hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, January 11, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the cafeteria of Maswik Lodge in Canyon Village, Ariz., on the south rim of the Grand Canyon -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • MetLife to close mortgage unit, Bloomberg News via New York Times, B6.
    ...The nation's largest life insurer announced Tuesday that it would close its home mortgage-origination operation, costing the company at least $90 million. Most of the 4,300 employees at the unit will lose their jobs....
    [You can't get upsizing (=Growth) by downsizing the workforce, but you can by downsizing the workweek (=Timesizing).]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • In Belfast, judge blocks bankruptcy of a tycoon, New York Times, B3.
    ...Sean Quinn, once considered Ireland's richest man \in\ an attempt...to declare Bankruptcy in Northern Ireland [one of the 5? kingdoms (England! Wales! Scotland! N.Ireland! Ile of Man? +/- Channel Is.?) in the United Kingdom] rather than in his home country [Republic of Ireland], where the terms are tougher. Mr. Quinn...had been accused of "bankruptcy tourism" by creditors seeking to collect almost 3 billions euros ($3.8 billion). ...A lawyer in Dublin...said he was surprised that Mr. Quinn had not taken the step of moving his residence to Northern Ireland..\.. The judge...noted that Mr. Quinn lacked a passport for Britain [U.K.]...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Inquiry into home insurance, New York Times, A1 pointer to B1.
    A New York State financial services agency is investigating several large banks to see whether they fraudulently steered homeowners into overpriced insurance policies.
    [After 2008's financial collapse, why haven't we yet reinstated the 1938 Glass-Steagall Banking Act, one of the major bulwarks against a repeat of the Great Depression, a bulwark that separated banking, brokerage-investing and insurance, thereby blocked all kinds of conflict of interest, and was repealed as "old-fashioned" in 1999 under Clinton, after which it only took nine years of compounding corruption to produce the collapse?]
  • G.M. looks to luxury...Buicks and Cadillacs to bolster its profit and stock price, NYT, B1,B6.
    [More and more desperate companies are looking to fewer and fewer, increasingly besieged wealthy people now that they've downsized their consumer base via their employment basement.... "As goes General Motors, so goes America."]
  • McDonald's dividends rise in sign of recovery, NYT, B1.
    [Or in sign that more people have become too poor to eat out anywhere else?]
  • Olympus [Japanese camera maker] sues executives over cover-up, but does not dismiss them, NYT, B3.
    [Gee, it's been over three years since our financial collapse and no one in the U.S. has yet sued Bernanke or Geithner over their ongoing cover-up. No wonder that -]
    In talks with the Chinese, Geithner faces an uphill climb,
    NYT, B3 directly above previous headline.
  • Fatal stampede in South Africa points up crisis at universities [and job markets], by Lydia Polgreen, NYT, A1.
    JOHANNESBURG, R.S.A. - They lined up well before dawn, some driving from the deep countryside with bags of fluffy blankets and neatly packed sandwiches...desperate to win one of several hundred last-chance places still open at the University of Johannesburg..\.. By morning, the line was more than a mile long. As the gates were about to open at 7:45 Tuesday morning, thousands of students, many accompanied by their anxious parents, surged forward.... Amid shoving and screams, one...mother...was trampled to death and several others were badly injured..\.. They hoped for a shot at one of South Africa's [few?] public universities and with it a chance to escape the indignity of joblessness that afflicts more than a third of the nation....
    [33% unemployment? Why on earth aren't they deep into emergency worksharing and a transition to permanent timesizing?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The Case For A 21-Hour Work Week, FastCoExist.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - To save the world--or really to even just make our personal lives better--we will need to work less... - see whole article under today's date.
    [True, in the context of constant worksaving innovation. But no arbitrary fixed level, however low, is the answer. It's time we flexed up our thinking and realized that the workweek has to remain adjustable so it can be shortened as much as it takes to regain wartime levels of full employment and consumer spending and "wartime" prosperity - without the war.]
  2. France's Surreal Presidential Race, International Herald Tribune via New York Times via nytimes.com
    PARIS, France - What kind of country would France be if it abandoned its 35-hour work week (it actually kills jobs)....?... - see whole article under today's date.
    [No it doesn't. The 35-hour workweek cut unemployment 1% for each of the 4 hours it cut from the previous workweek (39 hours), same results as the US got 1938-40 in cutting from 44 to 40 hours. French unemployment was 12.6% in 1997 when the 35-hour workweek was voted in, and 8.6% in spring/2001 before the US-led recession hit France. The only "abandonment" of its 35-hour workweek that will actually create jobs is abandonment in favor of a 32-hour or 30-hour workweek. It should never have been refrozen at 35 or any other arbitrary number as long as joblessness was and is too high. If this commentator is implying that a longer workweek would not kill but create jobs, let's see him seriously propose doubling the workweek to double the jobs. He'll wind up halving the jobs and collapsing consumer spending and everything that depends on it, i.e., all the rest of the economy.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, January 10, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the cafeteria of Maswik Lodge in Canyon Village, Ariz., on the south rim of the Grand Canyon -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • A merger once scoffed at bears fruit in Detroit, by Bill, Vlasic, New York Times, B1.
    ...beginning to produce new vehicles that combine the talents of both companies...
    [Like they couldn't have done that separately and possibly times two? For every merger that has anything positive to say for it, there's at least one that doesn't.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Alcoa posts loss on fewer orders and lower prices - A plan to close a smelter in Tennessee and cut back in Texas, Italy and Spain, New York Times, B5.
    [Unspecified jobcuts. Whatever - you cain't git growth (=UPsizing) by DOWNsizing. But you can by worksharing to maintain employment and consumer spending, and then timesizing to increase employment and consumer spending.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • 760 awards from comptroller, NYT, A1 pointer to A18.
    New York City's comptroller has given nearly a quarter of his awards to those linked to his campaign. Its finances are under investigation.
    [Awards+comptroller=oxymoron. What's going on here?]
    Comptroller hands out hundreds of honorary awards, many to his donors - Giving out certificates honoring groups and people at a rate of more than one [a] day, by David Chen, NYT, A18 target article.
    [Who does this guy think he is, a one-man Nobel Prize Committee on the taxpayer's tab? Ya know, there's a lot of "groups and people" in the once-great USA who really need to decide if they want smaller government and lower taxes - or more and more forced affirmation from taxpayers, most of whom have no idea who they are. But then there's the jobs - the vital taxpayer-paid-for working hours needed for making the certificates, finding worthy recipients (or simply people that the comptroller feels obligated to) and the vital hours the comptroller himself needs to take out of his job description as city comptroller (does he have one?) to award these awards. Come to think of it, the nation's President currently "has to" do a lot of this too, and even in little Somerville, Mass., every second family wants the city to name an intersection "So-and-So Square" after a dearly departed - with associated plaque and ceremony and time taken out of city officials supposedly busy schedule - at taxpayers' expense - all kinda sad - the whole damn country needs to decide: you want lower taxes and smaller government or forced affirmation from fellow taxpayers who generally know ZERO about you and your little siphon into their pockets. The awards we really need are to resurrect Senator Proxmire and his Golden Fleece awards to give us a few much-needed whacks on the side of the head and wake us up to this Debt by a Thousand Nicks.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Recession holds down health spending, New York Times, A16.
    [Oh but don't the front pages say this is a recovery?]
  • Bank ills an omen in Europe, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    Shares of UniCredit, Italy's largest bank, have been plummeting, underscoring the issues European banks face in trying to right themselves.
    [not to mention American banks...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Madden Bill Providing Shared Work Program To Small Businesses Signed Into Law, Targeted News Service via InsuranceNewsNet.com (press release)
    TRENTON, N.J. - ...Legislation sponsored by Senator Fred Madden (D-Gloucester, Camden) that would permit an employer of at least 10 full-time, non-seasonal employees to provide a shared work program was signed into law today. "While nationally we are seeing progress in terms of reducing the unemployment rate, unfortunately we are seeing little change here in New Jersey," said Madden, chair of the Senate Labor Committee. "That is why it is crucial we take steps that will keep small businesses from having to lay off workers. This bill will do just that, by providing them a better option while at the same time preventing them from having to spend money they don't have." The bill, S-1301, is designed to encourage employers who must reduce their employees' work hours because of economic conditions to avoid layoffs by sharing the remaining work... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Economic fallacies: Is it time to work more, or less? - The economic logic of a shorter working week, by Juliet Schor, Sustainable Business Blog via Manchester Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    BOSTON, Mass. - ...There's another analogous fallacy going around, which is that hard times should lead us to work longer and more intensively.... On the face of it, the work intensification approach makes sense.... For a nation experiencing relative decline, putting its nose to the grindstone makes intuitive sense. But acting this way en masse risks triggering forces that operate in the other direction. Right now we're experiencing glutted labour markets, in OECD countries as well as globally. ...Over the last decade, the effective global labour supply has about doubled, from 1.46 to 2.93 billion. If people offer more hours to the market, wages fall and unemployment rises. Excess supply of labour also undermines investment and innovation, which accelerate when labour is scarce relative to capital... - see whole article under today's date.
    [It's that magic labor scarcity with which wars provide "wartime prosperity" and without which capitalism works worse and worse. How get this magic labor shortage without war? Less work, not more work, per person.]
  3. Libraries get the axe - Branches facing loss of thousands of operating hours as Ford’s budget committee approves cuts, NOWToronto.com
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ...Detailed plans were drafted to cut hours as well, but the board rejected them several times. After Monday's vote those plans now appear to be back in play, and they include cutting a combined 19,444 annual operating hours from 59 of the TPL's 98 branches, or the equivalent of 7% of the system's total hours of operation... The library board had already identified $10 million in savings through the elimination of 107 employee positions, new fines, and greater use of automated technology... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Presumably there'd've been even more employee positions eliminated without the hours cuts. Is TPL making use of *Canada's worksharing program to reduce layoffs and cushion the effect of any wage cuts on employees? Or is Canada's worksharing just a showpiece, trammeled with delays and red tape?]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon., January 8-9, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the El Tovar Hotel on the south rim of the Grand Canyon & the Grand Canyon Community Library -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Support grows for startups - Commerce Authority offers $3 million in innovation grants, by Betty Beard azcentral.com, 1/08 Arizona Republic, D1.
    If you have a good [definition?] idea that could be turned into viable business [like without parasitizing taxpayers?], Arizona may have $250,000 for you...
    [Hey, isn't Arizona supposed to be a "red" (Republican) state, and against big government and soaking the taxpayer? What's up with this? Oh yeah, we forgot. Arizona is one of the top three most corrupt states...]
    As part of its efforts to create more [40-hr/wk] jobs,
    [This is not a valid government role. Monitoring the length of the standard workweek to make sure it does not remain too high for maximum employment and consumer spending against a background of evermore worksaving technology IS a valid government role. Monitoring and adjusting the workweek costs taxpayers nothing, nada, zero, zip, 0 and involves no favoritism or market distortion or political patronage... and enables huge tax savings in terms of safely reducing or completely dismantling the expanding unemployment-insurance, disability, law-enforcement, court, prison, and homeless-shelter systems.]
    the Arizona Commerce Authority this year will double the total amount of innovation [def'n?] grants it will award to small [def'n?] businesses to $3 million...
    The idea is to create more home-grown businesses,
    [- already we're leaving the world of job creation for the unemployed and entering the world of "business creation" for wheeler-dealer gov't parasites -]
    speed up the commercialization of inventions
    [- now departing from the world of "viable," "home-grown" = small businesses to the world of "commerce" = big business - oops, they noticed it themselves, so -]
    and help small businesses [=damage-control rhetoric] in hopes they someday [red alert: where's the accountability? where's the evaluation plan to see if taxpayers got ANYthing for their money or indebtedness?] will become larger employers.
    [Pathetic.]
    It is an economic-development concept that has grown popular throughout the country.
    [And we wonder why the "recovery" is so bogus? Clearly the officially defined-away depression is going to get a lot worse before Americans wake up to this, at best no-op, at worst suicidal, concept. It's merely another form of forced charity from taxpayers to ... the relatively wealthy.]
    Up to now, the state's job-creation efforts largely have focused on developing tax breaks [= another private-sector scam with zero evaluation or accountability] and other incentives to entice companies to move to Arizona from other states.
    [Oh that's a real big help for America = a shell game merely moving jobs from one state to another. How "productive"! How "efficient"! How "energy conserving"!]
    ...It will be advertised globally that Arizona is offering companies grants of up to $250,000.
    [Outrageous! It would be nice if Arizona would first pay the full price of its own water, instead of passing it on to states in the northeast who pay more for water than this big parasitic desert state. So who's the Chief Parasite Midwife in this latest Ariz. scam?]
    "Ultimately, we want the best ideas to come here and start their businesses,"said Don Cardon, president and CEO of the Commerce Authority...
    [Thanks for nothing, Don. Btw, are government agencies supposed to have "presidents" and "CEOs"? What's really going on here? If this was in the Boston Globe instead of the Arizona Republic, we'd be getting a series of exposés out of this!... And trying to get a viable business out of a parasitic birth is just a bit contradictory, like expecting to get law-abiding citizens out of illegal entrants. Truly the once-great USofA couldn't be killing itself faster if it was doing it on purpose. And as for the rationalization that they're "Encourging innovation": as long as CEOs are responding to worksaving innovation by downsizing and cutting jobs instead of timesizing and cutting working hours to maintain employment and consumer spending, innovation is just going to weaken Arizona's economy. You can't get upsizing alias Growth out of downsizing. Then there's the article right below this one on the inside page -]
    Grant helps students stay in Ariz., start business, Arizona Republic, D2.
    [Hooboy - when will it ever end? Only when timesizing replaces downsizing followed by all this forced charity from taxpayers.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • U.S. debt is now equal to economy = $15 trillion red ink projected to surge,
    1/09 USAtoday, 1A.
  • Office market remained flat in '11,
    1/08 Arizona Republic, D1.
  • Financial ruin of [Guyanese] immigrants tied to broker [Edul Ahmad] - Allegations suggest immigrants were prey in fraud [committed by one of their own], 1/09 New York Times, A15.
    ...Richmond Hill, Guyana, in South America...
  • With work scarce in Athens, Greeks go back to the land, by Rachel Donadio, 1/09 NYT, A1.
    ...growing edible snails for export...
    [= wierd "solution," but wierder, and much closer -]
  • PAC ads to hit Romney's [job-destroying] role at equity firm - A pro-Gingrich group focuses on lost jobs, 1/09 NYT, A1.
    [Suddenly GinGrinches care about jobs.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Democrats push new work-share program as alternative to right to work, 1/09 The Statehouse File via Indianapolis Star via indystart.com
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - ...Work sharing first was introduced during the Great Depression when President Franklin Roosevelt instructed companies to reduce workers’ hours to provide additional room for employment. He also asked that workers’ wages be increased to make up for income loss. Roosevelt’s President’s Reemployment Agreement of 1933 saved about 2.5 million jobs. Nearly eight decades and 22 work share states later, Welch says it’s time for Indiana to try the program, too... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sterling Heights to reduce workweek for employees - To save money officials announce reduced hours for employees, 1/09 WDIV Detroit via clickondetroit.com
    [Timesizing, not downsizing = cutting hours, not jobs.]
    STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich. - In an effort to save money through out the city, officials in Sterling Heights announced Monday that effective July 1 non-emergency city employees will have hours reduced from 40 to 32 per week. ...Unless alternative cost saving measures are identified, Sterling Heights will move forward with the planned 20% reduction to the workweek.... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. 50p tax rate 'will stay' - Today's small business news roundup, 1/09 SimplyBusiness.co.uk
    LONDON, England - ...Everyone should work shorter hours in order to combat unemployment according to a new report... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So much for the once-popular sneer ("Share a fixed amount of work? ridiculous! everyone knows work is infinite!") known misleadingly as The Lump of Labor Fallacy, with which economists, even mainstream economists (even Samuelson!), made it clear that what they were practicing was not research-backed science, but mere political rhetoric, and kinda nasty political rhetoric at that.]
  4. Ruling party considers shortening working hours, 1/08 YonhapNews.co.kr
    SEOUL, South Korea - ...Rep. Lim Hae-kyu, the GNP's vice policymaker, said the pledge for reducing working hours is aimed at raising the nation's employment rate by distributing jobs to a greater number of people. "Decreasing overtime that surpasses 40 hours per week as much as possible is directly related to the job market and welfare," Lim said... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, January 7, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from the El Tovar Hotel on the south rim of the Grand Canyon & the Grand Canyon Community Library -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • A shrinking military budget may take neighbors with it, by Binyamin Appelbaum, New York Times, A1.
    ...a land of glass-block office parks, oversize homes and sleek cars \in\ northern Virginia...

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Laid off, with retirement almost in sight, NY Times, B1.
    Barbara Saltsman, 64, planned to work to age 66. But she lost her job as a paralegal in May. (photo caption)

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • For Iranian [fishermen] held by [Somali] pirates, U.S. to the rescue - [Despite] threats from Tehran, Americans lend a hand against a common enemy, by C.J. Chivers, New York Times, A1,A8.
    Senior Iranian military officials this week bluntly warned an American aircraft carrier that it would confront the "full force" of the Iranian military if it tried to re-enter the Persian Gulf [=southwest coast of Iran].
    [Not that a major-power aircraft carrier in your home waters doesn't possibly perhaps pose a just a teensy threat to you. What's the range of its aircraft anyway? Be that as it may -]
    ...The aircraft carrier Jon C. Stennis broke up a high-seas pirate attack on a cargo ship in the Gulf of Oman...210 miles off the [south] coast of Iran..\., then sailors from an American destroyer boarded the pirates' mother ship and freed 13 Iranian hostages who had been held captive there for more than a month... It ended Friday [when] the captured Somali pirates, 15 in all, were...shuttled by helicopter to the aircraft carrier and locked up in its brig. [The Iranian] crew, provided fuel and food by the Navy, then set sail for its home port of Chah Bahar, Iran.
    Several of the Somalis...said they knew the risks of being caught, but had been willing to try nonetheless. Mr. Mahmoud said..."In Somalia, we have no jobs... That's the reason to go to sea..."
    [It's all about jobs. Engineer full employment with a workweek that gradually adjusts downward until you get full employment, and you can dismantle 75% of your law enforcement and incarceration mega-industries (not to mention the unemployment, welfare, and "disability" systems) - and cut all associated taxes - safely. AND cut your workweek even further to provide higher-pay, shorter-hours, mostly private-sector jobs for all the people disemployed from these downsized unproductive taxpayer-parasitizing industries. Until you GET MOVING along these lines, you remain in the dark ages of economics, an embarrassment to intelligent life in this quadrant of the galaxy. (Worried about the wage "inflation" that accompanied full employment in the past? That's because we lacked inflation-control design smarts.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • 200,000 new [Dec. Mc]jobs are a positive[?] sign in U.S. "recovery" [our quotes] - Unemployment at 8.5%...,
    by Shaila Dewan, New York Times, A1.
    ...Employers in the United States added 200,000 jobs last month, the Labor Dept., said Friday...and small businesses showed signs of life...
    [One-two-three Organized CHEER!]
    No sitting president has won re-election with an employment rate at 8.5 percent...
    [So wherefore should we rejoice? Doesn't it take 300,000 new jobs just to keep up with population growth and college graduates?]
  • Waiting for recovery - Without government support, even modest job gains cannot be sustained, editorial, NYT, A18.
    [But with a frozen, pre-computer, 40-hr/wk-or-more definition of "full time," even government support cannot sustain even modest jobs gains. And no government can long be supported on debt, deficit, and transferring taxes from the swelling investing power of the 1% (300,000 wealthy) to the weakening spending power of the 99% (300,000,000 non-wealthy). But doesn't all that dough we're redistribbing to the rich "get invested and right back into action creating jobs"? Sure, sure, SURE it does (waddaya think we are, commies?!), but where are the jobs?]
  • Rich managers, poor clients - A devastating analysis of hedge-fund returns, review in 'Buttonwood' column of Simon Lack's 2012 book "The Hedge Fund Mirage: The illusion of big money and why it's too good to be true," Economist Magazine of London, p.68.
    ...Mr. Lack's book suggests the blind faith displayed by many institutional investors in hedge funds needs to be reconsidered... Investing in hedge funds will enable some lucky managers to enjoy an early retirement on their yachts. It will not enable pension funds to eliminate their deficits.
    [= DiplomaticSpeak for: we need to take a flame-thrower to the whole of 'hedge row'.]
  • Wall Street is bracing for dismal 4th quarter, NYT, B1.
    [Better brace for a dismal indefinite future until worksharing and timesizing put some 'there' there in Wall St.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cut the working week to a maximum of 20 hours, urge top economists - Job sharing and increased leisure are the answer to rising unemployment, claims thinktank, The Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    LONDON, England - ...There's no evidence that if you have shorter working hours as the norm, you have a less successful economy: quite the reverse." She cited Germany and the Netherlands... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. An Italian Austerity Plan: It's Time to Cut Back on Extravagant Lunches, TheAtlantic.com
    ROME, Italy -- ...Time Standardization of the Work Week: Many of you, particularly those of you in the civil service may have been unaware that there was a work week. I must assure you that there is and it is now 30 hours. No, not 40. Not yet. Italy, could we please just try 30?... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is a typical bit of "humor" from the once-great USofA where it's smart to work hard, not smart, and maintain a "free market" but rigidly controlled 1940 workweek forever regardless of how much "worksaving," "efficient," and "productive" technology you inject into the economy via robots or whatever.]
  3. Nanny For 4 Month Old Approximately 28 Hours A Week, care.com
    COLLINGSWOOD, N.J. - ...Looking for an engaging and responsible nanny for a 4-month-old boy. Hours would be 7:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. four days a week. We are looking for someone who can commit to at least 7 months but would like someone long term if possible... - see whole article under today's date.
    [There are so many 28- and 30-hour a week jobs, the US workweek is shrinking anyway - while having its pay cut as only "part time" (exception: CEOs). Till that changes, 7 months IS a long-term job in the US economy for fear employees might dare to ask for a raise.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, January 6, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from mezzanine of the El Tovar Hotel on the south rim of the Grand Canyon, & the G.C. Rec Center -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Military faces historic shift [away from job creator of first resort] - Obama plan would slash armly, limit ability to endure long-term conflicts, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [and hopefully limit ability to start wars of choice.]
  • Alcoa will slash global smelting capacity by 12%, as high costs and slumping prices threaten profits,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Their Kodak moments - Career snapshots: Workers take a look back as many struggle with uncertainties about family finances, retiree benefits, Wall Street Journal, C1.
    ...as the 131-year-old former blue chip prepares for a possible bankruptcy filing..\..In the 1980s, Eastman Kodak Co. employed 145,000 people world-wide...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • MF Global's bankruptcy trustee has declined to turn over some documents to investigators looking for missing customer funds, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Retail sales show slack, by Talley & Mattioli, WSJ, B1.
    New Christmas-season retail sales reports show that the period was far less robust than many retailers had expected. The numbers for some two dozen merchants came in relatively weak, falling below the returns of 2010...
  • Laughing our cares away - Weak economy spurs a funny trend in clubs, movies and online, USAtoday, p.1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work Sharing is the Solution for America's Jobs Crisis, PolicyMic.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - In today’s news cycle, the word “jobs” is as ubiquitous as it is daunting. We are at a point where “jobs jobs jobs” are the primary issue for most of the American electorate. Several events have intensified the issue of high unemployment into our national dialogue; including the GOP nomination battle, Occupy Wall Street, the fall of the American Jobs Act, and the Wisconsin collective bargaining controversy. While articles can be written on each of those events alone, it is the lack of a solution to our 8.6% unemployment which deserves attention... What the U.S. does not need is sloganeering and political banter regarding changes in government policy. “Cut, cap, and balance” and “9-9-9” are not real policy proposals, they [are] merely suggestions of them, subject to change for the political expediency of the elected official at any given time. What we need are new policies to follow in the face of new challenges. With the jobs challenge at hand right before us, work sharing is the best solution out there. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Why the unemployment rate is dropping, WashingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...We should also look to promote more work sharing. As it stands the government effectively pays people to be completely unemployed with unemployment insurance benefits. Why not pay people to work shorter hours. In other words, if an employer lays off 10 workers, they all get half pay from unemployment benefits. Instead, we can reduce the hours of 50 workers by 20% and have the government make up half of the lost pay. It seems like an obvious win-win. Germany has gone this route and gotten its unemployment rate down to 5.5% even though its growth has been no better than ours... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Korean Automobile Manufacturers, Kia and Hyundai, to Add Workers and Cut Hours, Korea Industry & Technology Times via KoreaITtimes.com
    WISCONSIN, U.S.A. - ...Hyundai and Kia are the largest automobile manufacturers in S Korea; we do not know what the other manufacturers will do, but maybe they will follow the lead of these manufacturers and cut hours and add workers; no one should have to work beyond the legal amount of hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, January 5, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from USAir Flight 225 from Boston to Phoenix & the Radisson Woodland Hotel in Flagstaff, Ariz. -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Connecticut regulators said they will review the proposed merger of Northeast Utilities and NStar,
    Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    because of concerns about conditions that Massachusetts could impose.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Boeing to shut tanker plant [2,160 jobs RIP] - Lawmakers say firm reneged on jobs pledge at long-running Kansas operation,
    by David Kesmodel, Wall Street Journal, B2.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Kodak teeters on the brink - Former Titan struggles to find buyers for patent portfolio as Chapter 11 looms,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - U.S. businesses cut back on investment during the month of November, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    The Commerce Dept. said new orders for nondefense capital goods - a proxy for business spending on new equipment - fell 1.2% in November from the previous month. New orders tumbled for products such as computers as well as machinery for mining and construction.
  • Harder for Americans to rise from economy's lower rungs,
    New York Times, A1.
  • The Fed expressed alarm over the battered home market and called for more aggressive action from Congress and other policy makers, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. American Marxism, BarnstablePatriot.com
    [A couple of unusual items today - first some Marx Bros. gags -]
    BARNSTABLE, Cape Cod, Mass. - ...President Rufus T. Firefly of Freedonia was also a caucus member as he revealed when confronting workers who were demanding shorter hours in the film Duck Soup. “Very well, we’ll give them shorter hours. We’ll start by cutting lunch hour to twenty minutes.”... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Kingfisher mulls job cuts, longer work-hours, HindustanTimes.com
    [Then, a poster child for the opposite of timesizing = "downsizing, not timesizing" -]
    NEW DELHI, India - In a major cost-cutting exercise, private sector air-carrier Kingfisher Airlines is believed to be considering about 2,000 job cuts and longer working hours for its staff... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, January 4, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS in the news (archives) -
    M&As provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • PetroChina is acquiring full ownership of a Canadian oil-sands project from Athabaska, marking a first for a Chinese company, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [And another dangerous development for Harper-hamstrung Canada.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news, closely related to makework when jobs are scarce (archives) -
  • Hard to recoup losses from scams - Often the funds are already spent,
    by Dina ElBoghdady, Washington Post via Boston Globe, B9.
    ...75,000 people [bought] an online list of work-at-home jobs but then [were] often denied...access and refused [return of] the fees. ...The firm, Abili-Staff, faced a judgment of $3.6 million. But the bulk of that was suspended because the company's owners could not pay it... Ultimately, each person got an average payment of $9.70...
    [So how has the court guaranteed that the principles of the firm will not keep stealing money like this?]
    ...There's value in shutting down these companies even if victims can't get a full refund...
    [What value is there in that when the principles of these companies are still at large and can start an endless series of companies like these?]
    ...In several recent cases, the [FTC] has succeeded in banning alleged fraudsters from engaging in the same line of business again...
    [And what kind of followup checking are we talking about?]
    ...On occasion, the FTC can't locate the people accused of perpetrating the fraud. Even when the FTC seizes assets, it sometimes does not recover enough to provide a refund of any size to consumers. That's because it costs a lot to hire liquidators to convert the assets to cash, locate injured consumers, and print checks, FTC officials said.
    [So we're still back in that primitive condition known as Caveat Emptor = "Let the buyer beware."]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Investment banks are lowering expectations and cutting costs in Asia, a region that has been a crucial source of growth in recent years, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Some venture capitalists are dialing back on big deals after a breathless investing year that had some comparing 2011 to the dot-com bubble, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Frank laments political attacks - Says money has affected discourse in the country, Boston Globe, B2.
    US Rep. Barney Frank [D-Mass.] took part in a forum last night with Robert Kuttner and the Rev. J. Bryan Hehir. The men discussed whether truth in politics is possible. (photo caption)
    ...Frank [said] a breakdown in rational debate has American politics caught in a vicious circle. "The government doesn't produce good results, so people get angry at the government [and] elect people who hate the government, and then the government is unable to produce results."
  • Iowa caucuses - Unforced errors and a chilling view of extremism, editorial, New York Times, A20.
    ...in which a nation awaits the verdict of a handful of some of its least representative citizens...
    So much fun - So irrelevant, op ed by Thomas Friedman, NYT, A20.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The Ninth Ward: Saving America and the world, Annapolis Capital via hometownannapolis.com
    ANNAPOLIS, Maryld. - ...Hey, fellow Americans, here is one columnist's plan to save our once great nation in this new year... 35-hour workweek: The workweek has shrunk before yet many are working more while many others are unemployed. This will bring about full employment and extend benefits for many part-timers. ...We'd be healthier, happier and save money as we'd take better care of our homes, communities, children and schools through increased leisure time and less stress... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's a guy who has his head screwed on right - he's going to save the world starting with the all-points priority = cutting the workweek and sharing the vanishing human employment, instead of continuing to split the world into workers and drones.]
  2. Hyundai, Kia to hire 1400 to cut work hours, KoreaHerald.com
    SEOUL, S.Korea - Hyundai Motor Co. and its affiliate Kia Motors Corp. plan to hire 1,400 new workers and invest about 360 billion won in facilities this year in order to abolish night shifts and reduce excessive working hours, the labor ministry said Wednesday... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Watch out, world!  If South Koreans, who've just come down from 44 to 40 hours a week by company size over the past seven years, keep puttin' on the moves in this all-points priority agenda for saving the world, they're liable to oust Germany (Kurzarbeit) and France (Sarkozy-weakened 35-hr workweek) from world leadership. Here are some more steps they're considering -]
  3. Male officials with newborns may work shorter hours, KoreaHerald.com
    SEOUL, S.Korea - Male civil servants with newborns may be given an hour off their work day to attend to their children in a move to raise the country’s low birthrate and time spent with family, government officials said Wednesday. According to the Ministry of Public Administration and Security’s 2012 plan, officials are discussing the feasibility of expanding the current measure which allows female civil servants with an infant an hour off their day to include fathers... The plan also includes an increase in the number of off-duty days given to mourn family members and close relatives... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS excerpt - The jobless rate in Germany, Europe's strongest economy, fell, NYT, B1 pointer to B8.
    Jobless rate in Germany edges lower, hitting 6.8% [in Dec., from 6.9% in Nov.], NYT, B8 target article.
    ...The German jobless rate contrasts with that of the euro area as a whole (more than 10%)...
    [German worksharing ("Kurz-arbeit"), a government program that takes a lickin' and keeps on clickin'!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, January 3, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • The number of bank failures dropped in 2011 [to 92, from 157 in 2010, and 140 in 2009], but the decline was partly due to troubled banks managing to stay afloat longer, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [And fewer surviving banks left?]

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Protesters seek day shelter for homeless, AP via Boston Globe, B2.
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. - ...Occupy Providence voted narrowly last month to suspend its nearly three-month-old encampment at Burnside Park when the city opens such a shelter. Advocates for the homeless have been calling for a daytime facility for years...
    [So in at least one city, the Occupy movement not only moved us from unactionable talk of "income gap" to the actionable image of overconcentrated money (The One Percent), but also focused us on American homelessness.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • World's woes leave lasting scars - Economic deleveraging and political paralysis across U.S., Europe in 2011 give markets little wiggle room in 2012, Wall Street Jounral, R1.
    Hangover likely to linger for U.K. [& U.S. & Japanese &&&] retailers in 2012, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    Forecasters see spending pinch lingering in '12 [& '13 & '14 &&&], New York Times, A1.
  • Who maintains foreclosures? - Despite owning the homes, big banks are battling to say, 'not me!'
    Boston Globe, A11.
  • A wage bill's effect on jobs, letter to editor by Pres. Nancy Ploeger of Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, NYT, A20.
    “A Living Wage, Long Overdue” (editorial, Dec. 26) did not mention New York City’s own failed experience with a so-called living-wage law: the Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx. Rather than a bustling retail center creating thousands of jobs, the armory sits embarrassingly empty after politicians demanded wage requirements more than two years ago...
  • By noon today, the super-rich have made an average worker's yearly salary,
    by Heather Scoffield, The Canadian Press via http://ca.news.yahoo.com
    OTTAWA, Canada - The richest of the rich have gained more ground in Canada, and are now making 189 times the average Canadian wage, according to a new report.
    The 100 highest paid chief executives whose companies are listed on the S&P/TSX composite index made an average of $8.38 million in 2010, according to figures pulled from circulars by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, a left-leaning think-tank.
    That's 189 times higher than the $44,366 an average Canadian made working full time in 2010, the report says.
    And it's a 27% raise from the $6.6 million average compensation for the top 100 CEOs in 2009, the report says.
    Regular Canadians, on the other hand, have seen their wages stagnate over the past few years. In 2010, after adjusting for inflation, average wages actually fell.
    "The gap between Canada's CEO elite 100 and the rest of us is growing at a fast and steady pace, with no signs of letting up," says economist Hugh Mackenzie, who authored the report.
    "The extraordinarily high pay of chief executive officers is more than a curiosity. It actually is a reflection of a troubling redistribution of society's resources in Canada and the United States, and in most of Western Europe," he said in an interview.
    He points out that in 1998, the top 100 CEOs were paid 105 times the average wage. Since then, the ratio has generally climbed up.
    In 2008, it was 174, dropping back to 155 during the recession in 2009. The high-water mark was 2007, when it peaked over 190. 
    It means that by noon on Jan. 3, the average top executive will have already made as much money as the average Canadian worker makes in a year.
    The driving forces behind the inequality gap are complex [no, they primarily boil down to labor surplus and fulltime-job shortage - as long as "full time" is stuck at 40 hrs/wk], and lie in the structure of executive compensation packages, Mackenzie says [possible only by undercompensating everyone else, "the 99%"].
    Consultants giving advice to corporate boards on how much to pay their CEOs only compare to other CEOs, perpetually driving up the average in the race to be above-average, he explains.
    The corporate board members all run in the same circles.
    And many companies use stock options for a large part of their executives' bonuses, a practice that not only drives up pay packages but also ties compensation to share price rather than company performance, Mackenzie notes.
    "The process of paying CEOs is really quite incestuous."
    Solutions are equally complex. Debate in the United States has raged over this subject since the subprime fiasco of 2008, and the consensus seems to be that regulating the structure of compensation packages won't really work, Mackenzie says.
    Instead, taxation is a better way to go, allowing corporate boards to compensate as they please, but putting governments in a position to claw back excesses and redistribute them as they see fit.
    [And reducing the labor surplus is better than arbitrary and centralized taxation, because when controlled by unemployment, worktime adjustment can create jobs in an organic and decentralized market-oriented way. For example, we design a mechanism for the incidence of unemployment, as long as it's too high or rising, to gradually cut the workweek and squeeze the natural market-demanded work out onto everyone like toothpaste, with a subsystem to smoothly convert the incidence of overtime (OT) into OT-targeted hiring, and training whenever needed, preferably on-the-job training, modeled on World War II practices.]
    While Mackenzie does not expect Prime Minister Stephen Harper to hike taxes on the rich tomorrow, he does see some kind of policy response eventually.
    "I actually see this kind of growing income inequality as inherently unstable. I think there will be a response," he said.
    "The people at the very top of the income scale — and CEOs are at the top of the top — have really launched themselves into a kind of economic interplanetary travel. If the rest of us are on Earth, they're off somewhere else in a different world. I think that's unstable."
    ["What planet...?!"]
    The top earner on the list is definitely in a galaxy of his own. Frank Stronach, the honorary chairman of auto-parts manufacturer Magna International Inc., took home almost $62 million in 2010.
    Excluding Stronach from the Top 100 calculation would bring the average pay package down by about $62,000, Mackenzie said.
    Number two on the list — Donald Walker, also of Magna — made $16.7 million in 2010.
    The top banker was Richard Waugh of Bank of Nova Scotia, pocketing $13.8 million in pay, bonuses, options and perks.
    But Mackenzie points out that the compensation information companies include in their circulars don't catch the pay packages of investment bankers, whether or not they work for publicly traded companies.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Green Bay-area communities cut spending, but increase levies - They seek to raise more money through property taxes, GreenBayPressGazette.com
    GREEN BAY, Wisc. - ...In De Pere, residents will pay almost 2% more in property taxes this year, but will be protected by a leaner fire department. And adults will pay more to take part in some recreation programs. Even with those changes, employees will be furloughed for the equivalent of a 40-hour week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= timesizing, not downsizing...]
  2. You Know What's Overrated? Retirement, Motley Fool via fool.com
    ALEXANDRIA, Va. - ...In the book, Ferriss finds three major flaws in the "retirement as a goal" scenario: It is based on the assumption that you're doing something you don't like during your most physically able years. "Nothing can justify that sacrifice," Ferriss says... [Also, you'll likely be bored] once you retire... or start your own enterprise. Which of course begs the question: Why not start that new life now?... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Add these to the major flaws we timesizers find in using worklife reduction dba earlier retirement instead of workweek reduction as a major way to engineer the magic labor shortage without which the money supply gets top heavy and flops over.]
  3. Welcome to the Antique Shop Part Three: Will Granular Work Replace the Full-time Work Week? HuffingtonPost.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - For ever, or at least as long as there have been Human Resources departments, employers have shipped talent (or at least manpower) into their factories and offices in one uniform container. That container is called the Forty-Hour Work Week, although it hasn't been anywhere near as small as 40 hours a week in decades. That's what employers love about full-time workers, of course, and the reason most of them are so reluctant to mess around with part-timers and job-sharers. They like the fact that the full-time worker container is almost infinitely elastic. You can stretch it. You can load people up with work and use the big stick to keep them in fear, and get sixty or seventy hours of work out of them every week. You can hire them as 'permanent' employees to pay them less than contractors, and lay them off at any moment... - see whole article under today's date.
    [It's only elastic as long as progressives, idealists and reformers stay unstrategically unfocused, "jumping on their white horses and riding off in all directions." The master agenda, the "cause" that facilitates and accelerates progress on the most other causes, is ... timesizing. How? With minimum controversiality, it centrifuges the wealth and power of The Onepercent (300,000 Americans) and gives the 99% (300,000,000 Americans) more time and more money to fix things. Is there a danger in that? Sure. But with many more numerous and diverse experiments running, we won't be so stuck in present ways that we KNOW are suicidal.]
  4. Europe's core and periphery face different jobs, Financial Times via ft.com
    BRUSSELS, E.U. - ...Measures to shorten unemployment lines are gaining momentum in triple A rated France, where a sharp rise in joblessness to near 10% just months before a presidential election has prompted Nicolas Sarkozy’s centre-right government into a flurry of action, set to culminate in a “summit” with business and trade unions on promoting jobs and growth on January 18. Mr Sarkozy is proposing German-style measures to facilitate temporary redundancies and short-time working, and scope for employers to reach agreements with their workforces on flexible working hours and reduced salaries to avert permanent job cuts... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, January 1-2, 2012, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The economy in 2012: mix of hope, gloom, 1/01 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to G1.
    [But mostly gloom until we quit downsizing payroll for the 99% and consumer spending along with it plus upsizing government programs and debt to compensate, and switch to emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing.]
  • Cars set on fire and Los Angeles set on edge, by Adan Nagourney, 1/02 New York Times, A1.
    ...An arsonist (or arsonists) who in the course of three days firebombed at least 39 cars in the Los Angeles area, many of them parked in carports in gasoline-fueled towers of flame...
    [Uh, maybe we should have been a little more accepting of the Occupy Movement?]
  • Nobody understands debt - Washington's wrong-headed, ill-informed obsession, op ed by Paul Krugman, 1/02 NYT, A19.
    In 2011, as in 2010, America was in a [worthless] technical recovery but continued to suffer from disastrously high unemployment. And through most of 2011, as in 2010, almost all the conversation in Washington was about something else: the allegedly urgent issue of reducing the deficit [without raising taxes on the only people with money, The Onepercent].
    ...Deficit-worriers...see America as being like a family that took out too large a mortgage, and will have a hard time making the monthly payments. [However,] families have to pay back their debt. Governments don’t — all they need to do is ensure that debt grows more slowly than their tax base. The debt from World War II was never repaid; it just became increasingly irrelevant as the U.S. economy grew, and with it the income subject to taxation. Second — and this is the point almost nobody seems to get — an over-borrowed family owes money to someone else; U.S. debt is, to a large extent, money we owe to ourselves [or to "our own" One Percent]...
    It’s true that foreigners now hold large claims on the United States, including a fair amount of government debt. But every dollar’s worth of foreign claims on America is [countered] by 89 cents’ worth of U.S. claims on foreigners. And because foreigners tend to put their U.S. investments into safe, low-yield assets [like Treasury bills], America actually earns more from its assets abroad than it pays to foreign investors. If your image is of a nation that’s already deep in hock to the Chinese, you’ve been mis[imagining]...
    Now, the fact that federal debt isn’t at all like a mortgage on America’s future doesn’t mean that the debt is harmless. Taxes must be levied to pay the interest, and...taxes impose some cost on the economy, if nothing else [then] by causing a diversion of resources away from productive activities into tax avoidance and evasion. But these costs are a lot less dramatic than the analogy [of] an overindebted family might suggest.
    And that’s why nations with stable, responsible governments — that is, governments that are willing to impose modestly higher taxes when the situation warrants it [especially on their One Percent who spend the smallest percentage and therefore feel it least (but complain the most)] — have historically been able to live with much higher levels of debt than today’s conventional wisdom would lead you to believe. Britain, in particular, has had debt exceeding 100% of GDP for 81 of the last 170 years. When Keynes was writing about the need to spend your way out of a depression, Britain was deeper in debt than any advanced nation today, with the exception of Japan...
    So yes, debt matters. But right now, other things matter more [like jobs]. We need more, not less, government spending to get us out of our unemployment trap. And the wrongheaded, ill-informed obsession with debt is standing in the way.
    [But Krug's wrongheaded, ill-informed obsession with straining to increase government's already massive amount of artificial job creation to maintain forever a 1940 definition of "full-time employment" against incessant waves of worksaving technology is also standing in the way of getting us out of our unemployment trap. We need to think outside the box of the last 71 years and resume the overtime-to-jobs conversion and workweek reduction of the 1840-1940 century.]
  • Where has all the water gone? A dozen sophomores go deep into the Grand Canyon to examine the river that waters the West, 1/01 Stanford Magazine, cover pointer to 44.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Schultz Ready To Lead CitationAir, 1/02 Aviation International News via AINonline.com
    GREENWICH, Conn. - ...CitationAir currently employs a roster of nearly 350 active pilots and approximately 200 support staff. In May, the company recalled the last of the 85 pilots that it furloughed in 2009 at the height of the recession..." - see whole article under today's date.
    [= timesizing, not downsizing...]
  2. Guam Memorial Hospital presenting 32-hour workweek to board, 1/1 KUAM.com
    HAGATNA, Guam - ...Acting hospital administrator Rey Vega said, "The 32-hour workweek is being worked out yet, we want to make sure that as we do this 32-hour week we can not and should not be compromising care... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.