Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
December, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Pribula will return as interim manager - The finalists for county manager would not be able to start right away, Wilkes Barre Times-Leader via timesleader.com
    LUZERNE, Penn. - ...Those decisions include who will be furloughed [to avoid layoffs], who will be put in charge of divisions and eliminated row offices and how staff will be shuffled to comply with the new organizational structure... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. "Independent Restaurants Can Be Still Be Successful in the New Year Despite the Certain Hard Economic Climate," Claims Independent Restaurant Marketing Coach, Edmund Woo, San Francisco Chronicle (press release) via sfgate.com
    GREENVILLE, S.C. - ...Restaurant Marketing Coach and author of "The 5 Hour Restaurant Work Week: Work Less, Make More and Have a Life, too," Edmund Woo, says, "Realistically, the upcoming New Year will be a very tough year to grow one's restaurant..." - see whole article under today's date.
    [This guy is the Tim Ferriss of restaurant management, but he had to add an hour to Ferriss' title, "The 4-Hour Workweek."]
  3. French unemployment rate highest in 12 years, thejournal.ie
    DUBLIN, Ireland - ...Some of the measures to tackle this figure include the possibility of encouraging companies to cut hours and have more people working part-time than a smaller number working full-time...
    [= the whole point of France's 35-hour workweek. But France's only mistake was assuming it didn't have to keep adjusting that workweek downward instead of assuming it can remain that level forever, the same mistake it made with its previous 39- or 40-hour levels - and the same mistake every other nation is making. Now Nicolas "Sarcophagus" Sarcozy is having to eat his words about France's "uncompetitively" short workweek, nevermind wage&spending-clobbering high unemployment. The lethal bug is the economic software of the entire world at the moment is the assumption that the arbitrary 40 or whatever hour workweek is valid forever, instead of switching to a truly market-determined workweek, determined by market-determined unemployment caused by market-determined automation and robotization. How can market unemployment determine the workweek? Only dynamically. You let it adjust the workweek downward to maintain or increase employment and wages and spending until you have converted into active consumer-spenders all the deactivated consumers indicated by the unemployment rate.]
    Germany was already on this road to changed working hours a decade ago...
    - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, December 30, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • No Sears, Kmart stores closing yet, by D.C. Denison (the Globe's "undertaker"), Boston Globe, B6.
    ...The company said it was closing.\.100 to 120 store[s. So far] 41 of the stores to be closed are Sears; 38 are Kmarts... Only two...are in New England: a Sears in Nashua NH and one in Keane NH... The company did not...say how many employees will lose jobs, though a typical store employs 40 to 80 people.
    [= average of 60 people per store, over conservatively 100 stores, gives us 6,000 lost jobs.]
  • A city slips as downgrade hits home, by Ianthe Dugan, WSJ, C1.
    UNIVERSITY PLACE, Wash. - ...This city of 31,000 on the Puget Sound...was in the midst of building a new downtown virtually from scratch when the financial crisis set in three years ago, leaving the city with a big debt and little of the new tax revenue expected by now. So University Place cut its work force by 30% to save money. With growing unemployment, some residents lost their homes. Then, earlier this month...Moody's Investors Service cut the credit rating on the city's debt and assigned it a "negative outlook"...
    [This is a town, not a city, and why would any Oregonians be stupid enough to try to expand during the wasted decade of the Bush regime. They violated a fundamental evolutionary principle: Minimum Necessary Departure from Status Quo at Every Point.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • The U.S. reached a $30 billion pact to sell advanced fighters to Saudi Arabia, part of a broader push by Washington to counter Iran, WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.
    [and part of an even broader push by Washington to counter American job losses and bankruptcies.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • The Basement locks up - for good - Discount retailer succumbs to bad [management, bad] economy, competition, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...Filene's Basement...
  • NYSE will delist struggling AMR, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...owns American Airlines..\..filed for Chapter 11 protection in November...
    Delta Air Lines and Northwest Airlines both filed for bankruptcy protection in 2005...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The elections predictor, op ed by Prof. Edward Glaeser of Harvard economics, Boston Globe, A15.
    ...The country needs serious entitlement reform
    [yes, but what this member of The Onepercent has in mind will only further violate system requirements for such "details" as consumer spending...]
    which means less spending on health and retirement benefits.
    [Uh, what about less spending on huge salaries and perks for The Onepercent and tax loopholes and corporate tax breaks... How can you be an "economics professor" at Harvard and be so ignorant of the deep-structure requirements of any economic system for robust consumer spending as a basis for all other domestic markets, whether business or financial? -Admittedly, government spending is not the ideal way to maintain consumer spending, but is Glaeser suggesting any private-sector replacement or any other way at all to arrest the decline of consumer spending? But this is a pedant who speaks repeatedly of "electronic prediction markets" instead of just "internet forecasts."]
    But neither party seems suicidal enough to play Scrooge solo,
    [funny how The Onepercent is always talking about playing Scrooge toward the 99% and never toward themselves, the one's who would feel it least but complain about it most - and as for leadership, they'll do anything but lead by example, except for a couple of parading horses like Bill Gates with his (keep control but) give away half your billions, and Warren Buffett with his Raise Taxes on the Rich (which doesn't seem to have got very far) ]
    so entitlement "reform" [our quotes] will likely require two-party participation, just like tax "reform" in the 1980s and welfare "reform" is the 1990s.
    [Both of which made things worse. The tax code giantized and got more, not less, complicated and fuller of loopholes for The Onepercent, and the disability program giantized to pick up where the five-year welfare cap left off, giantized prisons, and giantized homelessness (and shhhh, suicide). The whole "reform" exercise was just a distraction from the real nest of problems: lack of jobs, lack of consumer spending, inability to purchase our own output (or count on anyone else to do so), greater reliance on public and private makework, unrepayable debt and increasingly tense happytalk coverup. Glaeser is bankrupt. He has no ideas, no solution, no clue. Like the government, that The Onepercent have taken over and then criticize, everything Glaeser advocates would worsen the economy. He's not going to focus on the overconcentration of the money supply, because he's part of it. He's not going to focus on the most free-market way to deconcentrate it, because he's time-blind. So it's going to get worse, much worse, till the Glaesers of this world get a Blinding Glimpse of the Obvious and cut through their pedantics to simply: convert overtime into jobs and cut the workweek as much as it takes to get full employment, rising wages and spending, and a decoagulated money supply.]
  • Cities go dark to save money, NYT, A1 pointer to A11.
    Budget problems are so deep that some cities, like Highland Park, Mich., are increasingly...turning out some of the lights.
    [Pathetic.]
  • Keynes was right - The lessons of a wasted year, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A21.
    [If Keynes was right, Keynesianism would have survived the replacement of the labor surplus of the Great Depression by the entry into the job market of the postwar babyboom and increased immigration around 1970. But Keynesianism did not survive those deep-structure changes, so Keynes wasn't right. So Krugman still isn't drawing the right lessons about what's wrong from a wasted year or a wasted decade or a wasted four decades. He's not even drawing the right lessons about what was right in the postwar prosperity while the wartime labor shortage lasted, or in the wartime prosperity while the labor shortage was being created - or in the three prewar years when the labor surplus was being reduced without war - by workweek regulation and reduction. "Krug" just can't think outside the box despite 100 years of workweek reduction from 1840 to 1940. What would it take to wake up Paul Krugman? Now he's coasting on armament money from the Nobel Prize, he's cushioned in an unwakeable armchair among The Onepercent and an gaping audience of gulls for any pronouncement. For him, worktime manipulation can never graduate beyond worksharing, and worksharing can never be more than one item on a long list of disconnected, unprioritized and non-strategic "should's."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Top stories of 2011: 10 through 6, MeadvilleTribune.COM
    MEADVILLE, Penn. - ...Retirements and other attrition, however, trimmed the number of individuals actually receiving pink slips. In Crawford Central, for example, the number of employees furloughed equaled approximately half the number of positions cut... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So. Fewer furloughs, more positions cut. And vice versa. Timesizing vs. downsizing (and vs. government upsizing as well in pursuit of 40-hour job creation programs).]
  2. 2011 filled with drama, controversy, Willows Journal via willows-journal.com
    WILLOWS, Calif. - ...After several consecutive years of cuts, city leaders this year closed another $500,000 budget deficit mostly through wage concessions, layoffs and furloughs. The 5% furlough imposed on public safety was removed earlier this month, and will become effective Jan. 1, but officials say only an increase in revenue will allow the city to maintain current staffing levels and services for very long... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Young [people] get a kick out of L.L. Bean - Retro duck boot a big hit on campus,
    by David Sharp, AP via Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B2.
    BRUNSWICK, Maine - ...Defying a trend toward offshore production, the outdoors retailer...with headquarters in Freeport ME..\..is adding 125 full-time employees to its Maine manufacturing operation.... And the boots carry the "Made in the USA" label, something that is hard to find these days in footwear.



    Thursday, December 29, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Morgan Stanley to cut 580 N.Y. jobs, NYT via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...as part of a broader wave of layoffs underway at the bank, according to a public filing...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Around the region - 3 life sciences firms get state loans, by D.C. Denison, Boston Globe, B6.
    The Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a quasi-public agency tasked with implementing the state's 10-year. $1 billion Life Sciences Initiative [where's Sen. Proxmire and his Golden Fleece Awards when we really need him&them?!], yesterday said it awarded $2.2 million in loans to three early stage companies. The center's "accelerator program" [we'd call it yet another decelerator program, transfering money from ordinary taxpayers ("the 99%") to The Onepercent with resulting monetary consolidation and decirculation] provides loans of up to $750,000 [with what accountability?] to early stage companies engaged in life sciences research and development, commercialization and manufacturing.
    [More public debt for private profit - pathetic!]
    The center's board of directors ["malefactors of great wealth" - Teddy Roosevelt] approved the fourth round of loans yesterday. The three companies authorized to receive $750,000 loans through the programs are:
    • Intelligent Bio-Systems Inc., a Waltham DNA sequencing company;
      [shame! - if they were really "intelligent" they could get a loan from the private sector and leave taxpayers alone]
    • Allurion Technologies Inc., a Wellesley company that is developing a medical device designed to induce signficant weight loss by displacing volume in the stomach;
      [i.e: merely a better mousetrap, or rather stomach-stapler - shame! - of absolutely no "allure" to taxpayers when full employment can be achieved by quitting the strain to maintain a 1940 workweek (40hrs) forever against endless waves of worksaving technology and just cut hours and spread the vanishing unautomated employment]
    • and Paragonix Technologies Inc., a Cambridge company that is commercializing a portable organ preservation and transport device called Sherpa.
      [= a paragon of parasites - shame! - if it's true that we can channel any % of the national income and wealth to The Onepercent and "it will get right back to work creating jobs" - where are they in this disgraceful picture? why are taxpayers still being dragged in and ripped off?]
    [70-80% of all supposedly "modern" govenments are just desperate, costly and grotesquely inefficient attempts to avoid spreading and sharing the natural market-demanded employment, and smoothly converting overtime into on-the-job-training and hiring. They'll do anything but dive into the obvious, easy and only solution - and that means Growth is a joke and we're still going down.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials sank 139.94 points, posting their worst loss in two weeks, and the euro dropped to a 14-month low as a round of Italian debt auctions revived concerns about Europe's debt problems, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [and revived American efforts to distract from their own longer-workweek, shorter vacation, more coagulated employment and moneysupply, faster-falling consumer spending, faster-rising debt&deterioration problems. America = working harder and dumber for less and less of a future.]
  • Lessons to be learned from five small businesses that failed, WSJ, B1 pointer to B3.
    [Don't expect much during a deepening recession - unless you have your fingers in the taxpayer's pocket - see Makework section above.]
  • Instead of work, younger women head to school - 'I had to do something' - Upgrading their skills [for non-existant jobs] rather than settling for low pay [now a vain hope anyway], by Catherine Rampell, WSJ, A1.
    Workers are dropping out [=CEOs are dropping workers out] of the labor force in droves, and they are mostly women. In fact, many are young women [who] seem to be postponing their work lives [as if they have a choice] to get more education [makework realm 3]. There are now - for the first time in three decades - more young women in school than in the work force. ...The shrinking labor force...drove down November's unemployment rate [so it's even more misleading. This development, contrary to expectations, was not] caused primarily by discarded older workers giving up on the job market...
    [The suicidally cushioned One Percent in America better get behind employment-spreading, worksharing and timesizing, or the whole Ninety-Nine Percent will give up on job market and turn to storming the American "bastilles," gated communities and private estates.]
    For now at least, many young women still feel that the deck is stacked against them...
    ["Still" feel? It's just beginning. When worksaving technology keeps rising and the 1940 workweek does not keep falling, the deck is stacked against everyone, including the 1% who need longer and longer to find investments as the 99% need longer and longer to find jobs.]
  • Foreclosures up 71% in Massachusetts in Nov. [vs.Nov/2010], by D.C. Denison, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...indicating that lenders have improved their ability to process foreclosure paperwork after a slowdown over the past 12 months. ...714 foreclosure deeds were recorded in Nov...from 418 deeds in the same month last year.
    ...Lenders filed ["only"] 1,015 petitions to foreclose [down 8%] from 1,109 a year earlier..\.. Year-to-date foreclosure deeds are down [35% to] 7,685 [from] 11,752 deeds recorded during the same period in 2010...
    [How comforting - not.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Two unions spared layoffs, two to meet soon - $21.4M reserve isn't what it seems, GilroyDispatch.com
    GILROY, Calif. - Two of the city's four unions will avoid layoffs if their members accept furlough days and pay cuts, but the city council still has to decide whether to cut police officers and firefighters to further narrow a shrinking $4.7 million deficit, according to city officials... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Unemployed at 62: Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place, Forbes.com
    EL SEGUNDO, Calif. - ..In 2008, when the financial crisis hit and the stock market dropped almost 40%, it hit just about everyone in this country hard. Our financial helpline was buzzing with calls from people who no longer got the overtime they’d regularly had for the past five years ["overtime" and "regular" are incompatible in any context that does not involve bad management and a deteriorating economy] or had their house payments increased drastically. Executives had their pay cut 15-25% [=part of the exorbitant pay they should never have been getting in the first place] and workers were being furloughed... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    Thursday, December 29, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Morgan Stanley to cut 580 N.Y. jobs, NYT via Boston Globe, B6.
    ...as part of a broader wave of layoffs underway at the bank, according to a public filing...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Around the region - 3 life sciences firms get state loans, D.C. Denison, Boston Globe, B6.
    The Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a quasi-public agency tasked with implementing the state's 10-year. $1 billion Life Sciences Initiative [where's Sen. Proxmire and his Golden Fleece Awards when we really need him&them?!], yesterday said it awarded $2.2 million in loans to three early stage companies. The center's "accelerator program" [we'd call it yet another decelerator program, transfering money from ordinary taxpayers ("the 99%") to The Onepercent with resulting monetary consolidation and decirculation] provides loans of up to $750,000 [with what accountability?] to early stage companies engaged in life sciences research and development, commercialization and manufacturing.
    [More public debt for private profit - pathetic!]
    The center's board of directors ["malefactors of great wealth" - Teddy Roosevelt] approved the fourth round of loans yesterday. The three companies authorized to receive $750,000 loans through the programs are:
    • Intelligent Bio-Systems Inc., a Waltham DNA sequencing company;
      [shame! - if they were really "intelligent" they could get a loan from the private sector and leave taxpayers alone]
    • Allurion Technologies Inc., a Wellesley company that is developing a medical device designed to induce signficant weight loss by displacing volume in the stomach;
      [i.e: merely a better mousetrap, or rather stomach-stapler - shame! - of absolutely no "allure" to taxpayers when full employment can be achieved by quitting the strain to maintain a 1940 workweek (40hrs) forever against endless waves of worksaving technology and just cut hours and spread the vanishing unautomated employment]
    • and Paragonix Technologies Inc., a Cambridge company that is commercializing a portable organ preservation and transport device called Sherpa.
      [= a paragon of parasites - shame! - if it's true that we can channel any % of the national income and wealth to The Onepercent and "it will get right back to work creating jobs" - where are they in this disgraceful picture? why are taxpayers still being dragged in and ripped off?]
    [70-80% of all supposedly "modern" govenments are just desperate, costly and grotesquely inefficient attempts to avoid spreading and sharing the natural market-demanded employment, and smoothly converting overtime into on-the-job-training and hiring. They'll do anything but dive into the obvious, easy and only solution - and that means Growth is a joke and we're still going down.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials sank 139.94 points, posting their worst loss in two weeks, and the euro dropped to a 14-month low as a round of Italian debt auctions revived concerns about Europe's debt problems, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [and revived American efforts to distract from their own longer-workweek, shorter vacation, more coagulated employment and moneysupply, faster-falling consumer spending, faster-rising debt&deterioration problems. America = working harder and dumber for less and less of a future.]
  • Lessons to be learned from five small businesses that failed, WSJ, B1 pointer to B3.
    [Don't expect much during a deepening recession - unless you have your fingers in the taxpayer's pocket - see Makework section above.]
  • Instead of work, younger women head to school - 'I had to do something' - Upgrading their skills [for non-existant jobs] rather than settling for low pay [now a vain hope anyway], by Catherine Rampell, WSJ, A1.
    Workers are dropping out [=CEOs are dropping workers out] of the labor force in droves, and they are mostly women. In fact, many are young women [who] seem to be postponing their work lives [as if they have a choice] to get more education [makework realm 3]. There are now - for the first time in three decades - more young women in school than in the work force. ...The shrinking labor force...drove down November's unemployment rate [so it's even more misleading. This development, contrary to expectations, was not] caused primarily by discarded older workers giving up on the job market...
    [The suicidally cushioned One Percent in America better get behind employment-spreading, worksharing and timesizing, or the whole Ninety-Nine Percent will give up on job market and turn to storming the American "bastilles," gated communities and private estates.]
    For now at least, many young women still feel that the deck is stacked against them...
    ["Still" feel? It's just beginning. When worksaving technology keeps rising and the 1940 workweek does not keep falling, the deck is stacked against everyone, including the 1% who need longer and longer to find investments as the 99% need longer and longer to find jobs.]
  • Foreclosures up 71% in Massachusetts in Nov. [vs.Nov/2010], by D.C. Denison, Boston Globe, B6.
    ...indicating that lenders have improved their ability to process foreclosure paperwork after a slowdown over the past 12 months. ...714 foreclosure deeds were recorded in Nov...from 418 deeds in the same month last year.
    ...Lenders filed ["only"] 1,015 petitions to foreclose [down 8%] from 1,109 a year earlier..\.. Year-to-date foreclosure deeds are down [35% to] 7,685 [from] 11,752 deeds recorded during the same period in 2010...
    [How comforting - not.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Two unions spared layoffs, two to meet soon - $21.4M reserve isn't what it seems, GilroyDispatch.com
    GILROY, Calif. - Two of the city's four unions will avoid layoffs if their members accept furlough days and pay cuts, but the city council still has to decide whether to cut police officers and firefighters to further narrow a shrinking $4.7 million deficit, according to city officials... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Unemployed at 62: Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place, Forbes.com
    EL SEGUNDO, Calif. - ..In 2008, when the financial crisis hit and the stock market dropped almost 40%, it hit just about everyone in this country hard. Our financial helpline was buzzing with calls from people who no longer got the overtime they’d regularly had for the past five years ["overtime" and "regular" are incompatible in any context that does not involve bad management and a deteriorating economy] or had their house payments increased drastically. Executives had their pay cut 15-25% [=part of the exorbitant pay they should never have been getting in the first place] and workers were being furloughed... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, December 28, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Holiday sales woes cast cloud over Sears,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
    At least 100 Sears, Kmart stores to close \-\...Analysts cite poor holiday sales,
    Boston Globe, B7,B5.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials edged down 2.65 points...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Gold [the safe-haven-in-crisis commodity] is up 12% this year...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Federal agencies have proposed barring 1,006 contractors because of ethics or performance lapses, the highest total since 1997, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Internal Bank of New York documents show panic [faced with government investigation],
    WSJ, A1.
  • For IPOs [initial public offerings], the comeback never came,
    WSJ, B1.
  • Home prices fall in most major cities, Boston Globe, B6.
    [99% without the jobs, the money or even the credit any more?]
  • Labor markets ignition is key to liftoff, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    [Even Kelly's beginning to "get" it, but not Harvard or the Fed -]
  • Harvard economist to be nominated to Fed - 'He is one of the most brilliant economists of his generation' Anil Kashyap, University of Chicago, on Jeremy Stein, Boston Globe, B5,B7.
    [But not brilliant enough to figure out the one and only way out of current economic deterioration (or even that there's no real recovery) and not brilliant enough to develop and promote the next big economic upgrade, worktime economics.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. County employees volunteer to cut hours to prevent layoffs, Port Townsend Leader via ptleader.com
    PORT TOWNSEND, Ore. - ...“[Public Works] was looking at potential layoffs, and a number of employees offered to reduce their hours in a memorandum of understanding between the county and the union,” Morley said. The county still faces long-term budget cuts in upcoming years, with an $825,000 reduction budgeted by 2015... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. New library leader hopes to restore hours, 13 WTHR via wthr.com
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - ...As CEO, she faces numerous challenges. Last year, the library board slashed library hours, staffing and the money spent on materials to meet budget. While many patrons thought closing branches one day a week was better than any permanent closures, the move still drew criticism... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, December 27, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Nearly half the members of Congress are millionaires, with lawmakers growing much richer in the past six years while most of the country has become much poorer, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
    Nearly half in Congress are millionaires, study finds - Widening wealth gap separates legislators, voters - $913,000 Median net worth of members of Congress [vs.] $100,000 Median net worth of Americans, by Eric Lichtblau, NYT via Boston Globe, A2 target article.
    ...according to an analysis by The New York Times based on data from the Center for Responsive Politics [dream on!]..\..
    Rep. Ed Pastor [D-Ariz.] a miner's son and a former high school teacher, is a...millionaire... Pastor...does not consider himself wealthy...
    [From the detached sociological point of view, we are in an excellent position to watch the decline of an empire, which is happening much faster than the decline of the Roman Empire. Maybe we can learn the mechanism of decline and design it OUT in future.... It arises when a population fails to realize the key variable(s) in maximizing system feedback, especially negative feedback = the kind that indicates location, direction and speed of change needed for continued or enhanced system health. Currently we see the unlimited process of consolidation that is occurring in the U.S. money supply, not only unlimited but apparently accelerating. The institutions that allow and encourage this result in two lethal flaws: (1) The richest minutiae of the population has sooo much money, they can draw to themselves most of the important decision-making in the system while insulating and isolating themselves from any adverse effects of any of their decisions - result: little or no or worst, perverse, system feedback. (2) The unlimitedly large consolidation of system-wide energy ("money") in an unlimitedly small fraction of the population ("The One Percent," or much smaller, e.g., the 0.01%) rapidly passes a threshold beyond which there is insufficient spending and purchasing going on in the non-financial markets to support sufficient marketable productivity throughout the system to supply sufficient sustainable let alone growing investments for the huge concentrated investing power of "The Onepercent". Result -]
  • As '11 ends, a recovery is still elusive, Boston Globe, B5.
    [How about "still non-existent."]
  • Biz Quiz 2011, Boston Globe, B5.
    ...Question 6. Most Massachusetts residents believe the recession is over. True. False.
    ...Answers on Page B11.
    Answers to Biz Quiz, B5
    ...6) False...
    [And yet right above these answers is the following article, illustrating the insulation, isolation, and perverse effects of the major spokesmen for The Onepercent -]
  • Better economy seen, despite job woes, AP via Boston Globe, B11.
    ...according to an Associated Press survey of economists...
    [And while economists fiddle and "Rome burns," more deterioration -]
  • A cracked foundation threatens housing, by David Reilly, WSJ, C1.
    ...The housing-financial system still has big cracks in it...
  • Vital signs - Fewer shipping containers are arriving at West Coast ports, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    The number...unloaded at...Los Angeles and Long Beach fell 3.6% in November versus a year earlier... Retailers have kept inventory tight amid a still-uncertain economy, leading to less demand for overseas goods.
    [This would be a good thing if we could assume that overseas goods are being replaced by domestic goods, but not even mainstream happytalkin' economists are assuming that! So Q: why is it happening? A: Spending power (still huge but already too little proportionately) redistributing up the income scale and converting to investing power (still much smaller but already way Way WAY too much proportionately = to be sustained by the diminished spending activity). So, more symptoms -]
  • Plummeting TV prices squeeze makers and sellers,
    NYT, B1.
  • Dark times fall on solar sector, by Yuliya Chernova, WSJ, B1.
    ...Bankruptcies, plummeting stock prices and crushing debt loads are calling into question the viability of an industry that since the 1970s has been counted on to advance the U.S. - and the world - into a new energy age...
    [And STILL the process of cutting important negative feedback goes on, even intentionally! -]
  • Keeping students from the polls - To limit Democratic turnout, Republican lawmakers make it harder for students to vote, editorial, NYT, A18.
    ...out-of-state driver's license [disqualifies]...college ID not valid here...paid out-of-state tuition [even with in-state driver's license]...
    [- all because -]
    ...students tend to be liberal...
    [not to mention smarter, more informed, less angry and less talkshow-brainwashed than the suicidally gullible T-Party.]
    ...seven states are already passed strict laws requiring a government-issued ID [like] a driver's license or a passport...and 27 others are considering such measures...
    On Friday, the Justice Department, finally taking action against these abuses, blocked the new voter ID law in South Carolina...
    [And here's a handy example of the misinformation of the talking heads, faithful followers of the mainstream economists -]
  • Midlife crisis economics - How today's problems differ from those of the past, op ed by David Brooks, NYT, A19.
    [We say the surrounding circumstances differ, but the deep-structure problems are same ol', same ol' = namely, not cutting the workweek to spread enough of the not-yet-automated human employment sufficiently to maintain full employment and maximum consumer spending. Here's Brooks' fuzzy-thinking article (scan down to today's date) - judge for yourself.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Bus Drivers May Face New Rest Rules Following Truckers and Pilots, Bloomberg.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - US bus operators may face new limits on drivers' work hours, after the Department of Transportation last week released revised rules for truckers and airline pilots... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Bump in minimum wage to $8.80 raises debate, KMTR NewsSource 16 via kmtr.com
    ROSEBURG, Ore. - ...They say the mandatory pay bump doesn’t mean employees will necessarily end up with more money, because employers could have to cut hours to balance the books... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Oscar Makers in Chicago Ratify New Contract, PRNewswire-USNewswire via Sacramento Bee via sacbee.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ..."Our members voluntarily worked shorter hours for the better part of a year to help R.S. Owens save money, and we're pleased their hard work and dedication to the craft have not gone unnoticed."... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Xmas-Boxingday, December 25-26, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Year of disappointment at the movie box office, 12/26 New York Times, B1.
    [Another symptom of Our Shrinking Consumer Base, thanks to Our Shrinking Employment Basement. Only way out? Resume our 100-year workweek adjustment downward to levels more appropriate for the Age of Automation & Robotics. How far downward? As far as it takes to get full employment and maximum consumer spending via a maximum number of EMPLOYMENT-FUNDED CONSUMERS.]
  • Unfinished business - Brian Moynihan's two-year tenure as CEO has been marked by slow progress as Bank of America untangles itself from its past - On the hot seat - After two years, Moynihan has not met bank's goals - Financial crisis shook banking industry, 12/25 Boston Globe, G1,G4.
  • A living wage, long overdue, editorial, 12/26 NYT, A20.
    [Wrong. "Living wage" campaigns testify to the inadequacy of the whole approach of minimum-wage legislation, which creates a gap in the wage ladder in the range where it's most important NOT to have a gap = the bottom. Much much better approach is to engineer what employers perceive as a general job-applicant shortage (and everyone else perceives as a jobseeker-jobopening balance) to harness market forces in gradually and flexibly and continuously, no-gap, raising general wages levels = organic, natural, market-determined - no more artificial, abrupt, inflexible gap-producing wage-pegging. How engineer that magic-bullet job-applicant shortage? Cut the workweek, not the workforce, and smoothly convert overtime into OT-targeted training&hiring. "Impossible! Outrageous! Socialist!" Oh please, we cut the workweek in half between 1840 and 1940 and it kept things in rough balance as we injected machinery and automation into the economy. Now we're injecting robots and we need to cut the workweek even further.]
  • Climate skeptics oppose preparations for rising sea levels - 'Environmentalists have...put nature above man,' Donna Holt, Virginia [in]activist, 12/25 Boston Globe, A8.
    [A. These aren't skeptics. Skeptics would hedge their bets with worst case planning. These are Constant Climate True Believers. B. Anywhere push has come to shove - like Easter Island - despite Genesis, nature IS above man, and boy, is she getting mad! Genesis 1:28 is all very well; in Hebrew, "p'rU uwr'vU uwmil'U eth hah'Ahrets w'khivshUha", meaning literally, "Befruitful &multiply &fill the Earth &subdueit." Well, been there, done that, and are just beginning to "get the bills" in terms of pollution, lost biodiversity and biosphere resilience. Humanity is part of nature, period. When humanity gets uppity and starts acting separate from and superior to nature, as on Easter Island 800-1400, bad times are comin' and there's going to be a big die-off humans, as on Easter Island 1400-1600, according to Jared Diamond's book "Collapse." Humanity is a part of nature, end of story.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Debt crisis distant in European towns - Cushioned from turmoil, for now, by social programs, Washington Post via 12/25 Boston Globe, A7.
    - see whole article under today's date.
    MONTARGIS, France - ...The expensive social protections that helped pile up the debts — generous unemployment benefits, inclusive health insurance, long vacations — are under attack for living on borrowed funds. But so far they have also buffered the people of Montargis and millions of other Europeans from the worst effects of the financial turmoil in their capitals... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Short workweeks and long vacations have been inexpensive social protections for Europeans. And if they engineered full employment and maximum consumer spending with even shorter workweeks and even longer vacations, they would be able to dismantle and save on unemployment benefits and health insurance, and they would be able to repay borrowed funds.]
  2. Karl Krug: Power, not solvency, is Walker's aim, 12/26 Wisconsin State Journal via host.madison.com
    MADISON, Wisc. - ...The writer states the administration had three choices: lay off or furlough workers, increase employee contributions to pensions and health care or reduce services and programs... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Well, the writer was right about one thing. Furloughs for a few employees enable layoff avoidance, but in addition, hours cuts for all enable avoidance of furloughs for a few and are less traumatic, disruptive and morale bashing.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, December 24, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Bankruptcy filing raises doubts about a bond repayment pledge, NYT, B1.
    ...Jefferson County, Ala...
    [Bond holders are people who may notice losses most but feel them least. And they're generally in The One Percent who by participating in the limitless consolidation of the money supply, have CREATED THE PROBLEMS.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • In some states, the jobs recovery has yet to get under way at all, NYT, B1 pointer to B3.
    [And if you think there's a real jobs recovery anywhere else, your definition is too loose. The five five highest job-loss states since Nov, 2010 are:]
    Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Rhode Is., Alaska...
  • Christmas thrift raps retailers in U.S., WSJ, A1.
    ["Thrift" has become the standard euphemism for POVERTY in the U.S. media.]
  • [With things] looking up, Detroit faces a new crisis, NYT, A1.
    ...Detroit is poised to run out of money by April and fall deep into debt by June...
    [No problem - just raise taxes on those who will notice it most and feel it least. No wealthy people left in Detroit? Then up one to the state level.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. County releases furlough schedules Dec. 27-30, Merced Sun-Star via mercedsunstar.com
    MERCED, Calif. - ...In late November, the Board of Supervisors approved labor agreements that implemented periodic furloughs for all non-critical county functions throughout the next two years. The approved agreements will save county taxpayers about $2 million a year... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. California nurses strike against cutbacks and concessions, World Socialist Web Site via wsws.org
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - ...María pointed out that there is a surplus of nurses in California. However, the hospitals resist calling in or hiring extra nurses: “Nurses have been furloughed while other nurses are forced to work through their breaks,” said María. “Over the summer, nurses were furloughed for about 30 days. That is one reason why we feel so strongly about ratios.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, December 23, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Capital One is facing scrutiny over claims that it has gone after customers for debts that had been discharged through bankruptcy, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    Debts go bad, then it gets worse [with criminal Capital One - boycott call!], WSJ, C1 target article.
    McLEAN, Va. - ...A court-appointed auditor concluded earlier this year that Capital One pursued 15,500 "erroneous claims" seeking money previously erased by a bankruptcy-court judge...
    [Let's go after the scumbag CEO, the entire executive suite and the whole board of directors for this Don't Know When To Stop gang of extortion artists. As Saul Olinsky used to say, it don't change till it gets personal.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The U.S. economy is poised for another year of muddling through, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [- when it could be building a solid foundation for the future with Timesizing and its followup programs.]
    ...Most private economists forecast a modest 2% growth rate for the U.S. in 2012 [thanks only to a ridiculously loose definition of GDP], with the pace subdued by housing woes, a lackluster job market and cuts by government...
  • Advantest and Hynix among the fallers as technologies retreat, Financial Times, p.24.
    Asian shares drifted lower as investors remained worried that Europe's debt crisis would not be resolved in the near future. The FTSE Asia-Pacific index slipped 0.3 per cent to 218.25 with the technology stocks among the biggest fallers across the region following a disappointing set of results from Oracle, the US software group...
  • UK growth fails to lift sterling, Financial Times, p.24.
    The pound barely twitched after the final revision to third-quarter UK growth revealed an unexpected tick higher...
  • Call for QE [quantitative easing] to stave off eurozone deflation - ECB [European Central Bank] executive calls for all tools to be used [all ONE tool?] - Bini Smaglhi stresses need to be decisive, Financial Times, p.1.
    [Too late!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. German consumers once considered a drag on the nation's economy [ha!]..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A15.
    BERLIN, Germany - ...are emerging as a ray of light in the bleak euro-zone outlook - see target article under today's date.
    [We to-o-old you so - all the nonsense hitherto published about German consumers "holding back"... The consumer base of any and every economy is going to be the only thing they can count on in the future, so better quit downsizing it via the employment basement!]
    ...One reason is that [with worksharing or "Kurzarbeit],"Germans have not felt any loss of spending power...
    [And that's because German worksharing trimmed working hours a little for many instead of following the suicidal USA in slashing jobs completely (and the consumer spending that went with them!) for a few, and a few more, and a few more, and a few more, and...]
  2. Management Tip of the Day: Don't stay late. Go home, Reuters via ChicagoTribune.com
    BOSTON, Mass. - If you don't take conscious control of your own work hours, the work hours can easily take control of you, says Harvard Business Review... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Volkswagen turns off Blackberry email after work hours, BBC News via bbc.co.uk
    WOLFSBURG, Germany - ...Volkswagen has agreed to stop its Blackberry servers sending emails to some of its employees when they are off-shift. The carmaker confirmed it made the move earlier this year following complaints that staff's work and home lives were becoming blurred... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, December 22, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The housing slump was deeper than initially estimated, but new data indicate that the worst of the downturn may have passed, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
    [- not when it has a "positive" feedback loop, i.e., it's self-intensifying.]
  • Signs point to economy's rise, but experts point to false dawn,
    New York Times, A1.
  • Not-so-great growth expectations for 2012, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    [Can't upsize/grow by downsizing!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Prospect Hts. Employee Furloughs Reaching End [but layoffs not ending for three police-union members], Journal & Topics Newspapers Online via journal-topics.com
    PROSPECT HEIGHTS, Illin. - ...At the start of the furloughs in 2009 - as the city faced a large projected budget deficit - all 47 city employees were affected. At first, leave of absence time called for employees to cut their worktime 24 hours per month over 10 months. Cuts continued into 2010 and 2011. The Prospect Hts. police union in late 2010 forced an end to furloughs for police officers, leading the city to lay off six full-time patrol officers as revenue continued to dwindle. Since then, three full-time officers have been rehired along with other part-timers. - see whole article under today's date.
    [Alas, suicidal stupidity is not limited to The One Percent who apparently have never considered the possibility that their snowballing consolidation of the money supply could start to undermine itself. Here we see another nasty suicidal union whose solidarity stopped short of their six most junior members, to the continuing suffering of three, while all of the other furloughed employees continued working throughout, unionized or not.]
  2. Santa Ana Service Employees Unhappy With Budget Deal, VoiceofOC.org
    SANTA ANA, Calif. - ...Avalos said union leaders signed the deal because they believe it will significantly reduce the chances of more layoffs. "We're hoping they're nice guys and they won't lay us off," Avalos said. "That's the only reason we signed... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Ah, here's a slightly smarter union (SEIU). But instead of feeling targeted compared with Public Safety employees, they should exercise their gray cells and try to "get the concept" of public safety. But here's the smartest union of all -]
  3. Set record straight on early Christmas break - Longer vacation! It's the teachers' gift!, Attleboro Sun Chronicle via thesunchronicle.com
    ATTLEBOROUGH, Mass. - ...Among other concessions, like a delay in raises and other assorted items, the teachers were willing to be furloughed (mandatory time off with no pay) for two days... Yes, it is our fault for the early break. And I won't lie, it couldn't have come at a better time... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Supervisory Communications Checklist for Furloughs of less than 30 days, DOD Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Service (Dept. of Defense DCPAS) via cpms.osd.mil
    [...Herewith, some furlough legalese for employers...]
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...If an employee is furloughed, and you cannot personally serve the employee with the furlough notification letter, you must mail a copy of the notification letter to the employee's home address, using certified mail with a return receipt requested... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, December 21, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Doubts arise in euro's birthplace - Netherlands' support [ie: eagerness to celebrate the euro's birthday] weakens amid concern over bailouts, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [All the bad news is about Europe today cuz it's a happytalk day for America's major dailies - "Don't worry, be happy!"]
  • A fight to make [European] banks more prudent, New York Times, B1.
    [= better than USA's fight to make its banks less corrupt.]
  • The end, for now - With the "exit" of U.S. troops from Iraq [our quotes], we'll finally get some answers, op ed by Tom Friedman, NYT, A31.
    ...to the core question about that country: Was Iraq the way Iraq was because Saddam was the way Saddam was, or was Saddam the way Saddam was because Iraq was the way Iraq is - a collection of sects and tribes unable to live together except under an iron fist?...
    [Or maybe we won't get the answers cuz we left behind 16,000 "embassy officials."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Analysis: Germany faces recession risk as crisis hits confidence, Reuters.com
    BERLIN, Germany - ...In a sign the government is worried about the darkening economic outlook, Berlin last week resurrected its bank rescue fund and said it could reinstate "Kurzarbeit" subsidies that helped firms pare back working hours without firing staff... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Time for Deutschland to move on from bandaid Kurzarbeit (worksharing) to powerful, versatile, permanent Timesizing!]
  2. Plan to Save Plattsburgh Library Jobs - Up to Union, City Council to Sign off on Measure, WPTZ The Champlain Valley via wptz.com
    PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. - ...He also wants to cut the work week for each of the library's 13 full-time employees to 35 hours a week. They currently work 37.5 hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Cutting workweek, not workforce and consumer base? = Timesizing, not downsizing!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, December 20, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Cate's Café in Boston/Somerville MA - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Pensions chopped but investors paid, Wall Street Journal, C1.
    [Ergo more funneling of more of the money supply to less of the population for less circulation & more recession. NYT version -]
    Pension cuts could be a trend, New York Times, A1 pointer to B1.
    If the sharp cuts agreed to by retired police and firefighters in Central Falls RI is [sic - editors awake!] approved in court, other places may pursue similar results.
    [Ah the grand old US of A is bringing itself down faster than any outside force.]
    Cuts for the already retired - Deal on pensions in Rhode Is. town could set a trend, NYT, B1 target article.]
    [Let's see. How else can investors and their PR team, mainstream economists, clobber consumer spending and "speed the plow" (=plowing under, that is) ?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Saab declared bankruptcy after cash woes forced the Swedish car maker to halt production and it failed to secure new financing, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Indexes fall on skidding back shares,
    NYT, B1.
    The Dow industrials shed 100.13 points or 0.8% as bank shares fell amid Europe worries and expectations of higher capital standards, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Vital signs - Foreign investors shed European debt and stocks in October..., WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    ...as the euro zone [17-member currency bloc] swung back to a current-account deficit...of E7.5 billion in October compared with a E2.2 billion surplus in September.
    [And so, driven to radical and desperate measures by the proximity of th'eroding euro, the U.K. is reinventing the wheel (the "wheel" being the 1938 U.S. Glass-Steagall Banking Act, repealed as "old-fashioned" - HA! - in 1999 under Sleazemeister Clinton! - who's lookin' pretty good in 20/20 hindsight) -]
  • The U.K. government endorsed a banking overhaul that would require lenders to segregate retail activities from investment banking, WSJ, A1 pointer to C2.
    [Now they've segregated banking (commercial and consumer lending) from brokerage (investment banking), all they have to do is segregate both from insurance, or maybe British bankers never "mucked" into insurance anyway...]
  • Just don't call it a 'bailout' - European governments devise unusual measures to prop up their ailing banks, WSJ, C1.
    [Unfortunately, bailouts, even camouflaged bailouts, are no longer that unusual, even though their positive effects, gee, seem to be missing, don't they. Bailouts are like all the rich 1% deciding to hold hands and sing Cumbaya on the deck of the Titanic while they ask the Captain for more speed through the icefloe field - cuz ultimately it's taxpayers who are bailing them out and most taxpayers were consumer-spenders before the One Percent stuffed too much of the money supply in their "stockings hung by the chimney with care." Here's hopin' the intelligent minority among the One Percent move on from their capricious Give Half Your Billions Away concept to backing systemic market-oriented centrifugation via immediate worksharing and long-term timesizing 'ere rude hands move those stockings from "by the chimney with care" to round their necks with irksome torque...]
  • The middle-class agenda - Pres. Obama knows what ails the middle class [is he really focused on JOBS yet??] - Does he know how to fix it? editorial, NYT, A28.
    [Does the editorial board of the NY Times know how to fix the shortage of good jobs, or even just, jobs? We have not noticed any particular NYT focus on worksharing, let alone timesizing. They do mention -]
    ...creating good jobs...
    [but straining directly or indirectly to create enough artificial government jobs to uphold a precomputer 40-hour workweek forever against all technological efficiencies is just sooo "over," especially when we could be resuming our 100-year success (1840-1940) with gradual workweek reduction, especially our 1938,39,40 success when we legislated full-time workweeks of 44-42-40 hours in 1938,39,40 and unemployment went down one percent for every hour cut = 19-17-15% in 1938,39,40 (or to be precise, 19.0-17.2-14.6%).]
    ...stopping foreclosures...
    [good but a far second to JOBS]
    ...regulating the banks...
    [good but a far third to JOBS and slowing homelessness, and according to 1990s S&L cleaner-upper single all-sufficient control and despite *Bill Black, we still haven't investigated and cleaned up the 2008 debacle.]
    ...raising taxes, reducing the deficit...
    [Raise taxes on anybody but the One Percent who have far more than they can spend anyway and you'll hasten and deepen the depression, oops, "stumbling recovery."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it is the world's most common (but least publicized and never fully exploited) response to downturn, that's reinvented thousands of times a day in every recession by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. No layoffs for SBCSC aides, WNDU-TV via wndu.com
    SOUTH BEND, Ind. - ...The board did approve a measure that will allow the superintendent to send out notices to administrators in the corporation detailing how many furlough days they'll have to take and how they will affect their pay. The board approved the furloughs at its previous meeting... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Well, those hours-cuts avoided a few job-cuts/layoffs right there = timesizing not downsizing.]
  2. Towarnicki is named interim city manager, MartinsvilleBulletin.com
    MARTINSVILLE, Va. - ...He and other city employees essentially have had pay decreases from furloughs (days off without pay) that were imposed to save the city money in two budget years. “I was furloughed just like all the other employees,” [departing manager] Clarence Monday said... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Monday, December 19, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "one square above Harvard" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Oldest baby boomers face jobs bust, by E.S. Browning, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    Many older Americans fear they will be working well into their 60s because they didn't save enough to retire. Millions mre wish they were that lucky: Without full-time jobs, they are short of money and afraid of what lies ahead... Deborah Kallick was a professor of biomedical chemistry at the University of Minnesota until she moved into the private sector in 2000 with a job in genome research. She is now one of more than four million Americans 55 to 64 who can't find full-time work. That number has nearly doubled in five years, according to U.S. Dept. of Labor figures in October.
    Kallick, 60, has been unemployed since 2007 and lives in the Northern California home of an ex-boyfriend. She has run out of unemployment insurance, used up most of her retirement savings and is indebted to relatives and credit-card companies...
  • The U.S. economy takes a licking and keeps on ticking, WSJ, C8.
    [Yeah but it's ticking cuz it's a time bomb.]
  • Southern European investors increasingly are shifting their money out of the euro zone, a troubling sign for European banks, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Merkel is jumping the wrong way. She must trust that the USA has become a paper eagle with a termite-ridden nest. The euro must at least be decoupled from the southern European megaparasitism. West Germany had a tough time picking up the multidimensional debts of East Germany and that process is not yet finished. Germany cannot pick up the multidimensional debts of the whole continent, any more than the U.S. landmass can support the poor, the huddled masses of the entire Western Hemisphere. The US may be the richest nation by some superficial quantitative measure, but it's become impoverished by the Third World paradox = lots of money but all concentrated, deactivated and wasted in 1% of the population. Same with Greece, and now that 1% is abandoning ship, some to the US on the idea that All Icebergs Are Melting So Just Jump to a Bigger One -]
  • Rules stretched as green cards go to investors, New York Times, A1.
    [Got $500K? Just sock it into US Immigration's big loophole = half a mill into US construction projex and you're IN!  Meanwhile, back in the grease -]
  • Cash and carry - Some Europeans move funds out - Nearly E14 billion = deposits pulled from Greek banks from September to early November - More than E60 billion = Greek cash exodus since late 2009, WSJ, C1 target article.
    [Truly it is the wealthy who start class warfare and create depressions and revolutions. They have the least-extended self-interest. But then, their affairs are the most complex, and "they know not what they do" beyond their own self-importance-puffing overstuffed accounts. But soft, hither cometh a pleasing sophistry -]
  • Don't tax the rich. Tax inequality itself - What the wealthy pay should depend on what the median income is, op ed by Prof. Ian Ayres of Yale Law & Prof. Aaron Edlin of UC-Berkeley law & economics, NYT, A24.
    ...for the sake of democracy... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Word games are often useful in soothing the incentive of us hominids. This may be an alternative, even a better alternative, to the Timesizing Program's first major upgrade, the Income-Sizing Program. (I confess I don't yet have a gut understanding of their concept.) But now that the concentration of the money supply is reaching levels where it's undermining itself, "save democracy" is not the strongest argument for centrifuging the money supply. The strongest argument to a wealthy person is: do this to save your wealth itself, and to save your self. And the gentlest, most flexible, most market-oriented way to do it is to get market forces doing it in response to a general, employer-perceived labor shortage, engineered simply by downward adjustment of the workweek against unemployment.]
    ...in 1980 one percent made 9.1% of the nation's pre-tax income...
    .......2006..........................18.8%...
    [and 99% made 81.2% - and now, five years on, it's much more extreme and consumer markets and all their dependent-markets are correspondingly diminished.]
  • As patient records have been digitized, data breaches have surged, NYT, B1 pointer to B2.
    [Some things should stay low-tech. Patient records may be one of them. The voting system is definitely one of them.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Resentments reawaken - Britain's Mounting Distrust of Germany, Spiegel Online via spiegel.de
    [Jalousie, nous avons trop de...jalousieeeee.]
    LONDON, Great GREAT Britain - ("The British, the British, the British are best | I wouldn't give tuppence for all of the rest.") -
    ...The German economy as a whole, and achievements such as the short-time working system known as Kurzarbeit and the dual education system, are widely admired... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Greens call for 32-hour week, The Connexion via connexionfrance.com
    PARIS, France - Green party Europe Ecologie-Les Verts is proposing a 32-hour working week. The party has adopted the idea as part of its manifesto for the 2012 presidential elections. It made the decision at a conference at the weekend... Nominated for Paris’s 10th constituency, colleague Denis Baupin said: “Reducing working time is written in history. We’re not saying it’s simple, but neither is four million unemployed.” The party’s national secretary, Jacques Archimbaud, said the debate on the 32-hour week was part of a vision for a new kind of society. “We want to encourage firms to propose sabbaticals or new ways of sharing out work,” he said. As part of their plan for 2012 the ecologists also claim they would create 600,000 new jobs linked to the “green economy”... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Phuket air traffic staff to reduce working hours, ThePhuketNews.com
    PHUKET, Thailand [this is not a joke; it's probably pronounced POOk-8] - Phuket Air Traffic Control are to reduce staff working hours from 12 hours to eight hours a day, following a recent visit by the Deputy Minister of the Transportation Ministry, Kittisak Hatthasongkroh... Mr Kittisak said he worried about the staff working such long hours and becoming very tired, and thought it would be better for them to work a regular work day. Previously, the air traffic controllers did not work 12 hours straight. They worked for two hours and then rested for an hour, though they were available to help out if the situation demands it... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sunday, December 18, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives) - sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -

  • N.C. city tries to revive HUD projects [federal Housing & Uban Development dept.] - Demand is high in Charlotte for affordable units, by Debbie Cenziper, Washington Post via 12/18 Boston Globe, A17.
    Homeless shelters in Charlotte, the South's second-largest city [after Jacksonville FL if TN (Memphis) and TX are not "the South"] are packed and housing officials say thousands of affordable rental units are needed just to meet current demand...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • At home, veterans fight to find work - Unemployment at 30% for the younger ones, 12/18 Boston Globe, A8.
    [But some surprises -]
  • Wealthy N.J. county has dramatic rise in food stamp clients, by Elise Young, Bloomberg via 12/18 Boston Globe, A13.
    ...Hunterdon County, the hilly region of horse farms and weekend retreats where last year's median household income was...$97,874...the highest in New Jersey and fourth-highest in the country, saw food stamp usage surge 513% between 2007 [232 families] and 2010 [1,424 families]. The percentage of US households using food stamps more than doubled in six of the 10 wealthiest counties in the nation as more residents find themselves out of work and unable to sell their homes...
  • Worlds apart - With their different economic pictures, Sherborn and Springfield illustrate the growing financial inequality in Massachusetts, 12/18 Boston Globe, G1.
    Sherborn: 2009 income: $186k, up 43% since 1979
    Springfield: 2009 income: $41k, down 15% since 1979
    Statewide: Top 1% of incomes: 1979 $234752, 2009 $537100: up 128%
    Bottom 10% of incomes: 1979 $21409, 2009 $22700: up 6%
    [And zooming in north of Boston -]
    Report: Gulf widening here [in Boston's northern suburbs] between haves and have-nots - A region moving toward 2 societies: one rich, one poor, 12/18 Boston Globe, North1,7.
    'Without deliberate action to reverse the disparities documented in this report, demographic trends will only worsen the toxic effects of inequity in our region.' Mariana Arcaya, Coauthor of Metropolitan Area Planning Council report (blowout quote)
    [No problem for timesizers - just let the unemployment rate gradually shorten the workweek and spread the natural market-demanded employment, converting your overtime into hiring+/-training, until your region has full employment and maximum consumer spending. If your workweek gets too short too fast for comfort, move-on to income sizing in your region...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. In lean times, Santa ponders downsizing the team to five reindeer, Cherry Hill Courier Post via courierpostonline.com
    NORTH POLE, Canadian Arctic - ...“All eight of us have been making sacrifices for several years,” Blitzen said. “We haven’t gotten any extra in our feedbags since 2008, yet we’ve remained loyal employees of North Pole Inc.”... Santa started to get hot under the collar. He already had furloughed the elves... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We assume these furloughs were temporary, so this was cutting hours to avoid cutting jobs = timesizing, not downsizing.]
  2. CM Russell Museum Awarded $19K, KFBB NewsChannel 5 via kfbb.com
    GREAT FALLS, Mont. - ...News of this a $19000 grant is reassuring since CM Russell had to cut hours and employee shifts just to balance their budget earlier this winter... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, December 17, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Employers promise jobs, seek tax breaks - Red Hat [$927K Massachusetts break so far for promising 181 new jobs], others [eg: IPG Photonics: $431K break so far for 175 new jobs] look to expand - Cell Technology "won" [our quotes] a $91,000 tax break - It promised to add 100 jobs [BFD!], Boston Globe, B5.
    [So, let me get this straight. We can bail out banks and let any percentage of the money supply however large concentrate in a tiny percentage of the population however small, and that money will "get right back to work creating jobs." So (A), where are the jobs and in fact (B), how come state governments are still so desperate to create jobs that they're still giving huge tax breaks to wealthy employers for promising jobs? - AND still doing so with no mechanism in place for followup checking? Haven't we already concentrated and decirculated too much of the money supply among too few people to have any convincing economic recovery?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • DeGette Statement [Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo.1] on Omnibus Legislation, InsuranceNewsNet.com (press release)
    WASHINGTON - ..."Today we voted to keep the government open, providing the American people with the services on which they depend and preventing federal employees from being furloughed during the holiday season...
    [= trying to make a virtue out of a disgrace, a silk purse out of a sow's ear? She's probably been issuing this same press release every month of the budget brinksmanship, not that it's the Dems' fault - it's the new Grand "Old" Party, the radical "conservatives" who want to "starve the beast" and destroy the U.S. government. They're not saying "slim the beast" - they're saying "starve the beast." So how come the new DestroyTheRepublic-ans aren't getting arrested as terrorists?]
  • Dealing stores a hard hand - [From inside the store, mobile] phone apps are letting bargain-hunting shoppers compare prices instantly, then make their purchases online, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Again, what was that you were parrotting about "technology creates more jobs than it destroys"?]
  • New European worries snuff out early rally, Boston Globe, B7.
    ...Worries over Europe resurfaced over Fitch's warning that it might downgrade the debt of Italy, Spain, and four other countries... [- Dow down 2.42 pts to 11,866.39]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Auburn Hills solar firm holds back interest payment, The Detroit News via detnews.com
    AUBURN HILLS, Mich. - ...ECD hasn't made a profit since early 2009..\.. It furloughed 400 manufacturing workers at its United Solar Ovonic plants.
    [- thus postponing layoffs, but...]
    The company also plans to lay off another 500 workers by the end of this month, adding to 300 employees laid off in May. ... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. A Tough Week For Unions Reflects The Bad Economy, Hartford Courant via courant.com
    HARTFORD, Conn. - ...She works 32 hours a week at the home, and her 22-year-old daughter is also a nursing aide there... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, December 16, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "one square above Harvard" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • American Air warns of cuts, Wall Street Journal, B8.
    ...[out of a total of] 88,000 workers...may have to furlough [ie: lay off] 223 Texas-based pilots and flight attendants in February because of fleet reductions...
    [= 1/4 of 1% of its workforce, which it could avoid by cutting its corporate workweek by an unnoticeable 6 minutes a week and keeping all its best customers employed, earning, spending and flying.]
  • Morgan Stanley set plans to cut 1,600 jobs, or 2.6% of its work force, the latest Wall Street firm to retreat amid tumultuous markets, WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
    [Morgan should be cutting 2.6% of its workweek (12 minutes a day) and keeping everyone employed, earning, spending and investing. Unless and until CEOs get onboard with the most vital of new management skills, suturing shorter shifts, they are goin' down, still flogging a contradictory strategy where they're trying to get GROWTH = UPsizing - by downsizing. It ain't gonna happen.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • The U.S. military finally "ended" [our quotes - they're leaving 16,000 "embassy officials" behind] their mission in Iraq, the last of 4,000 U.S. military personnel still in Iraq will head home in coming days...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    U.S. "closes" its mission on uncertain note - Troops depart Iraq, leaving the world's largest "diplomatic" [our quotes] presence behind, as tensions rise between Shiites, Sunnis, WSJ, A6 target article.
    ...a U.S. diplomatic mission that is the biggest in the world and includes thousands of private security contractors and other support personnel...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - Industrial production fell in November, WSJ, A1 graph header.
    Output by U.S. factories, mines and utilities declined 0.2% during the month, and output by manufacturers dropped 0.4%, the Federal Reserve said. The data suggested that U.S. factories are starting [just starting?] to feel the effects of continued sluggish growth at home as well as a slowdown in the brisk[?] pace of expansion[?] in developing world economies.
  • Politics over principle - Pres. Obama has caved in to political pressures [his forte] and will sign a dangerous detention bill, editorial, New York Times, A38.
    ...Mr. Obama refused to entertain any investigation of the abuses of power under his predecessor... This week he is poised to sign into law terrible new measures that will make indefinite detention and military trials a permanent part of American law. The measures, contained in the annual military budget bill, will strip the F.B.I., federal prosecutors and federal courts of all or most of their power to arrest and prosecute terrorists and hand it off to the military, which has made clear that it doesn’t want the job. The legislation could also give future presidents the authority to throw American citizens into prison for life without charges or a trial. The bill, championed by Republicans in the House and Senate, was attached to the military budget bill to make it harder for Mr. Obama to veto it.
    Nearly every top American official with knowledge and experience spoke out against the provisions, including the attorney general, the defense secretary, the chief of the F.B.I., the secretary of state, and the leaders of intelligence agencies. And, for weeks, the White House vowed that Mr. Obama would veto the military budget if the provisions were left in. On Wednesday, the White House reversed field, declaring that the bill had been improved enough for the president to sign it now that it had passed the Senate.
    This is a complete political cave-in, one that reinforces the impression of a fumbling presidency...
    The bill has so many other objectionable aspects that we can’t go into them all. Among the worst: It leaves open the possibility of subjecting American citizens to military detention and trial by a military court. It will make it impossible to shut the prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. And it includes an unneeded expansion of the authorization for the use of military force in Afghanistan to include indefinite detention of anyone suspected of being a member of Al Qaeda or an amorphous group of “associated forces” that could cover just about anyone arrested anywhere in the world.
    There is no doubt. This bill will make it harder to fight terrorism and do more harm to the country’s international reputation. The White House said that if implementing it jeopardizes the rule of law, it expects Congress to work “quickly and tirelessly” to undo the damage. The White House will have to make that happen. After it abdicated its responsibility this week, we’re not convinced it will.
    [Another big step into converting the "Land of the Free" into a police state. The paranoid powerful in the USA are transforming their nation into its former enemy, the USSR, and bringing their own nightmares closer to reality with each step. So much easier to just do timesizing, not downsizing.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Millionaires rarer across Central Ohio after recession, Columbus Business First via bizjournals.com
    UPPER ARLINGTON, Ohio - ...Upper Arlington jeweler Robert Argo says sales were rough in the recession, when he cut hours in response to reduced demand, but that customers are returning in droves... - see more of article under today's date.
    [And he's ready for ém, cuz he avoid layoffs by cutting hours, not jobs = timesizing not downsizing, and kept all his employees and skill set intact.]
  2. UK staff 'working fewer hours', Sales Director jobs via thesalesdirector.com
    LONDON, England, U.K. - The nation's employees are currently working shorter hours than at any time in the past 20 years, according to a new report by the Office for National Statistics... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. U.S. Steel's Slovak Unit Cuts Working Hours on Demand, SME Says, Bloomberg.com
    KOSICE, Slovakia - The Slovak unit of United States Steel Corp. will cut working hours from January as the euro-region's economic slowdown hurts orders, SME reported, citing Jan Baca, spokesman for the Slovak plant... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's Bloomberg's version of yesterday's US Steel story.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, December 15, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from that cluttered kitchen in Boston/Somerville MA -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • The Boston Foundation acquires philanthropy consultants, by Erin Ailworth, Boston Globe, B7.
    ...the Philanthropic Initiative Inc. \which\ advises corporate and other large donors how best to give away their money...and has been looking to merge with another organization since the beginning of the year, in part to shore up finances hit hard during the recent recession. The group's revenues have dropped by roughly 60% since 2007 to about $2.25 million in 2010...
    [Gee, why would any charity be so stupid as to buy a troubled company? But what if it's a charity advisor? Is this brilliant synergy or a grotesque conflict of interest? "How best to give away your money? Nooo prob! Just give it to the Boston Foundation!" But by freezing a pre-automation definition of "full-time work" forever, we guarantee that wé'll always have plenty of surplused labor to feel sorry for and condescend to with donations. But this is rapidly becoming a luxury we can't afford. Future economies will have no tax breaks for "non-profits," which are just another gimmick by The One Percent to perpetuate their dysfunctionally unlimited concentration (and decirculation) of the money supply.]
    "Massachusetts has more nonprofits per capita than any other industrialized state." Grogan [BF prez] said...
    [This is a whole world we can well do without. It's a big sick system that plays on people's compassion, self-righteousness and classism and with the full employment that timesizing provides, you don't need "non"-profits at all, which are all making up, one way or another, for our carefully fostered flood of resumes for every job opening and our bogus attempt to get upsizIng ("growth") by downsizing. Besides, ANY company can turn itself into a "non-profit" merely by raising executive pay as much as it takes. Philanthropic "investments" are arbitrary. Overtime profits reinvested in OT-targeted jobs and training are market-determined and market-building.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Goldman losing at least 37 partners, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B8.
    ...in 2011 as the firm heads toward the end of its worst year for profit and share performance since 2008... Goldman Sachs...with 34,200 employees at the end of September, has said it aims to trim $1.2 billion in annual expenses, which could lead to at least 1,000 job cuts.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Worries about Europe drag stocks down again [131.46 pts or 1.1% to 11,823.48], Boston Globe, B10.
    [Nevermind US's 14 trillion debt and 1 trillion annual interest cost alias "deficit."]
  • New Chinese tariffs could further strain US trade relations, by Keith Bradsher, Boston Globe, B9.
    [Take that, you true-believing Free Traders!]
    Guangzhou - The Chinese government...unexpectely impos[ed] anti-dumping and anti-subsidy tariffs on imports of sport utility vehicles and midsize and large cars from the United States...
    [Get it, US free traders? China dumps on you; you don't dump on China.]
    Because of the high Chinese tariffs and taxes already in place, the vehicles are sold only in the thousands or even hundreds in China, and only to the most affluent... Chinese government agencies and companies have been furious about a current US investigation into whether Chinese exports of solar panels to the United States might have received illegal subsidies or been dumped in the American market at prices below the cost of making them.
    [China has its hollow vampire teeth deep into US free traders' legs and they're gonna stay there, gulping down US jobs and living standards. "Get it? Got it! Good."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Moriarty-backed bill to aid those whose work hours are cut clears Senate, Gloucester County Times via NJ.com
    TRENTON, N.J. – Legislation designed to encourage employers who must reduce their employees' work hours because of economic conditions to avoid layoffs by sharing the remaining work was approved 36-1 Thursday by the [State] Senate, giving it final legislative approval... The bill now goes to the governor. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Senate Republicans Continue Selective Rejection of Snyder Agenda, InsuranceNewsNet.com (press release)
    LANSING, Mich. - Senate Democrats gave their Republican counterparts yet another opportunity to support Governor Snyder's work-sharing proposal today, and the Senate majority again failed to support their own Governor's plan that would keep people on the job... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. US Steel aims to cut work hours at Slovakia ops in January, Metalbulletin.com
    KOSICE, Slovakia - Workers at US Steel Corp.'s facilities in Kosice, Slovakia, might work only four days a week beginning in January, according to the company... - see more of article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, December 14, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - Canadian headlines from the Sul Posto café in the Ottawa RR station -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • California must make $981 million in midyear budget cuts, including cuts in funding for school buses and care for the elderly, Gov. Brown said, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
  • The Postal Service and senators agreed to delay post-office closings until May, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • The federal criminal code has grown so large that it snares unwary citizens [aren't criminals citizens?], legal experts told a House panel, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Consumers increased spending only modestly heading into the holiday season...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
  • Securities regulators and prosecutors are battling what they say is a nationwide surge of investment fraud against baby boomers, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Gingrich surges; Swing vote is elusive, WSJ, A1.
    [From fast self-destruct back to superfast self-destruct. With this much stupidity, the U.S. is down for the count.]
  • Euro at 11-month low [$1.30] - Selloff comes after period of resilience for the currency, WSJ, A1.
    [A vote for Gingrich is a vote to raise the euro!]
  • IMF is no east [heart] bypass for Europe, by Andrew Peaple, WSJ, C18.
    Using the International Monetary Fund may not be as convenient as European leaders hope...
    [No kidding! "Come, leetle Europe, come to Typhoid Mary..."]
  • Household debt hits record: Stats Can - Canadian net worth drops by 2.1%,
    Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    Record high household debt triggers alarm - Growing debt burden poses risk to economy as more consumers strain to keep up with costs, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Isn't this exactly what the U.S. put itself through in the 20-naughts? Harper has cut Canada's 15-year delay on Canuksky self-destructo.]
    Common sense upside down - Our finances continue to deteriorate, La Presse of Montréal, p.1.
    Canadians continue to pile up debts and are beginning to beggar themselves, according to StatsCan yesterday. The average debt relative to disposable personal income has climbed to a record level of close to 153% in the third trimester...
  • India is failing to deliver, WSJ, C18.
    [For whom? Statisticians and investors? So what.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work Sharing: A Proposed Option to Layoffs, PublicNewsService.org
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Instead of laying people off when production slows, Indiana businesses would have a new option if a bipartisan "work sharing" bill becomes law. Companies could opt to keep employees working but trim their hours, says state Rep. Mary Ann Sullivan, D-Indianapolis, the bill's author. Workers would keep their benefits, and state unemployment dollars would be used to make up some of the employees' lost income... Rep. Greg Steuerwald, R-Avon, is a co-author of the bill... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If the 23rd (N.J.) comes through this month and the 24th (Mich.) early in the new year, then Indiana will be the 25th state to have a worksharing program and bring us up to 50% of the states. And then we can watch for Illinois...]
  2. Laborers stood up for workers' rights, Appleton Post Crescent via postcrescent.com
    APPLETON, Wisc. - ...Those who assume the 40-hour workweek was born from anything but blood, sweat and tears suffer from naivete. The common workweek was six [or seven!] 12-hour days. The two-day weekend didn't exist... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, December 13, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -
    - Sunday's headlines from our Boston correspondent K.Jurow and Monday's from le Couche-Tard at Terrasses de la Chaudière -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Sino-Forest flirts with insolvency,
    National Post, FP1.
    Sino-Forest on the brink as default on debt looms - Chinese forestry company says it expects to miss payment and can't release financial results, Toronto Globe, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Depressed prices make these firms vulnerable: Talisman, Encana, Nexen, National Post, FP1.
    [Depressed prices from less consumer spending make ALL firms vulnerable.]
  • Don't freeze when austerity hits: Carney [=Bank of Canada chief urging Canadian companies to keep spending], National Post, FP1.
    [Carney doesn't get it. Austerity IS freezing spending. If you're urging austerity to fight downturn, you're urging downturn to fight downturn = gonna work no better than downsizing to get upsizing (alias Growth).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Merkel: Germany may reintroduce short work hours subsidies, Reuters.com
    BERLIN, Germany - Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Tuesday Germany could reintroduce short working hours subsidies for workers if it became necessary, in a sign Berlin is bracing for a considerable slowdown in Europe's largest economy... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Poultry plant cutting 60 jobs, New Brunswick Business Journal via nbbusinessjournal.canadaeast.com
    ST-FRANÇOIS-DE-MADAWASKA, N.B., Canada - ..."We lost another 22,000 birds per week in August," Landry said in a statement. "We decided at that point that we would cut hours across the board instead of laying people off..." - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, December 11-12, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -
    - Sunday's headlines from our Boston correspondent K.Jurow and Monday's from le Couche-Tard at Terrasses de la Chaudière -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Fisheries and Oceans [Dept.] bracing for cuts - More than half of those affected are biologists and other scientists; Union fears as many as 280 jobs will vanish, 12/12 Ottawa Citizen, A1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Arrests along Mexican border fall - Data indicate flow of illegal migrants is at 1970s levels, 12/11 Boston Globe, A6.
    [In other words, the once-great USA is now in such tough shape that even poor Central and South Americans are thinking twice about jumping the fence.]
  • Warning over 'back door' funding to EU - Bundesbank slams deal to give E200 billion via IMF, 12/12 National Post, FP1.
    [So if the EU is jumping into the arms of US-controlled IMF, doesn't that nullify the whole purpose of the EU and the unified currency in the first place? Hel-lo-o!]
  • Years in the making - The global debt crisis has deep roots, by Gwyn Morgan,
    12/12 Toronto Globe & Mail, B1 pointer to B4.
  • From crisis to catastrophe - The French-German 'win' at the weekend's summit looks all-too familiar, by Brian Milner, 12/12 Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B9.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Gov. Rick Snyder must sell his Michigan workforce ideas to Legislature, 12/11 MLive.com
    LANSING, Mich. - ...One idea the league and others like is the governor’s call for the Legislature to approve a “work sharing” program that would help employers retain talent in economic downturns. The program, used in 22 other states, lets employers reduce workers’ hours during times of soft demand and supplement their pay with unemployment benefits. Work sharing allows companies to retain the talent they will need when business picks up and lets workers maintain their health insurance and other benefits during economic downturns... - see whole article under today's date.
    [More importantly, work sharing allows companies to stop downsizing consumer demand by downsizing their consumer base via their employment basement. They're never going to get upsizIng ("growth") out of downsizing.]
  2. Study, Articles Discuss Impact of Reduced Work Hours for Neurosurgical Medical Students, 12/12 Newswise.com (press release)
    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. & ROLLING MEADOWS, Illin. - ...Critics of longer hours argued that medical errors were more likely to occur when medical residents were fatigued and that a radical drop in resident work hours would serve as a better way to achieve optimal patient care... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Forum - Try giving credit rather than ridicule, 12/12 Times and Transcript via timestranscript.canadaeast.com
    MONCTON, N.B., Canada - ...Hiking minimum wage beyond the ability of a business to pay hurts everyone. Businesses are left with devastating choices whether to decrease employment, cut hours or delay much-needed investment in training and capital... - see whole article under today's date.
    [When you cut hours enough to achieve and maintain full employment (and maximum consumer spending!), employers perceive such a management-disciplining labor "shortage" as during World Wars I and II (remember "wartime prosperity"?) that wage levels rise gradually and flexibly by market forces so effectively that minimum wage laws (and "living wage campaigns") and their artificial and stifling side-effects are avoided.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, December 10, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Rogers [Communications], BCE join forces to buy MLSE - $1.4 billion deal will drive competition [if any], Rogers says, Ottawa Citizen, C1.
    How a deal was done - The biggest-ever sale of North American sports assets brought together two bitter telecom giants [uh, we're lookin' for "enemies" or "rivals" here] in a deal driven by fear, egos and a billionaire construction magnate [MLSE chair Larry Tanenbaum], Toronto Globe, B1.
    Odd man rush - Unlikely BCE-Rogers duo vie to dominate Canadian sports media with MLSE purchase,
    National Post, FP1.
  • March Network's journey ends in $90M sale - Chinese firm [Infinova (Canada Ltd), a wholly owned unit of Shenzhen Infinova Ltd. of China] to acquire Kanata security gear maker for $5 a share, Ottawa Citizen, C1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • little britain - Outflanked by other eurozone members, U.K. left isolated, by Paul Taylor, National Post, FP1.
    [Oh please. It'll be a frosty Friday ere Blighty's island isolation ain't a plus, or ere Blighty gets isolated to any disadvantage, especially when -]
  • A vicious circle of austerity dooms EU to failure, Toronto Globe, B1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Tulare County and union at impasse, Visalia Times-Delta
    VISALIA, Calif. - ...Those furloughs were a cost-cutting measure because of the bad economy, and some workers took pay cuts and other concessions in lieu of the unpaid furlough days... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Long Beach Memorial nurses plan one-day strike over contract talks, Los Angeles Times via LAtimes.com
    LONG BEACH, Calif. - ...The union says the hospital frequently does not have sufficient staff to meet minimum safety standards as required by state law. It also says that even though the hospital posted record profits in recent years, it is still requiring nurses to take furlough days and increasing healthcare premiums... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. NCSC orders top-down furloughs, MansfieldNewsJournal.com
    MANSFIELD, Ohio -- North Central State College announced Friday it will pursue a series of new cost-cutting efforts, starting with furlough days for administrators... NCSC President Don Plotts...said the furloughs will affect 34 employees, including himself, and save the college $97,000... A reduction in force is a possibility... - see whole article under today's date.
    [A possibility but more of a last resort.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, December 9, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Terrasses de la Chaudière -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • 17 layoffs at Ottawa's Museum of Science and Technology due to budget, CBC Radio a.m. news.
    ...some with 15-20 years' service...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Debt risks skyrocket - Crisis triggers BoC [Bank of Canada] red alert - Global conditions have 'deteriorated significantly,' central bank says, National Post, FP1.
    [Only in the twice-removed minds of bubble-dwelling bankers.]
    Germany balks at 'last-chance' euro deal - 'Risk of Europe exploding', National Post, front page.
    [On the contrary, with current problems, Europe will have more fine-tunability and strength at this point if it undoes its premature currency unification.]
  • Inequality too complex for barking dogs: William Watson, National Post, FP1 pointer to FP11.
    [On the contrary, this is just a typical do-nothing ploy. Inequality, or better, over-concentration of the money supply, is simpler than economists want us to know cuz - who's pays their salaries for dreaming up rationalizations of this dysfunctionality?]
  • Econophysics? - Current economic models don't work -, Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B10.
    [Altogether now 1-2-3: "oh-what-a-surprise." As for "econophysics," check out our astrophysical economics - click & search down to 8/01/2011.]
    - because mathematics can't fully explain investor behavior [nevermind consumer behavior which is more fundamental], Emanuel Dermane argues in a new book - so we shouldn't rely on them so heavily.
  • Institute slams corporate welfare, by Jonathan Jenkins, Ottawa Sun, 14.
    TORONTO, Ont. - Ontario [2d biggest Canadian province] has blown $27.7 billion over an 18-year period in a failed bid to jumpstart its economy, a new Fraser Institute study says...
    [And this is NOT the role of government. Maximizing employment (and consumer spending as a primary side effect) by adjusting the workweek as short as it takes to reach target low unemployment IS the role of government. This does not jumpstart the economy - it slowly and solidly BUILDS it.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Q&A | Jay Thompson, Transportation Business Associates, ThePacker.com
    LENEXA, Kans. - ...The expectation is that the industry expects the administration will cut hours of service from 11 hours a day to 10 hours a day. Using rough math, trucking profits ... could easily ... go from 5% to 4%... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Never mind that everyone will get conservatively (11/10 =) 10% safer. American truckers have the same problem as American doctors - they think they can work any hours with no negative side-effects. They think they're supermen, and any collateral damage is ignored, stats on mistakes or accidents in overtime be damned.]
  2. What Is Toronto Public Library Thinking About Cutting Now? - The TPL board doesn't want to cut hours, but it looks like the alternatives are equally unappealing, Torontoist.com
    TORONTO, Ont. - Last month, the Toronto Public Library board rejected, in principle, the idea of reducing hours at branches in order to meet a 10% budget-reduction target. And yet the same amount of money that would have been saved by that move—about $5.4 million—may still have to be cut before budget season is over... The TPL board has already approved about $9.7 million in budget cuts, which will require the library to shed the equivalent of 100 full-time jobs in 2012... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Will the TPL board have the sense to do the right thing and cut hours, not jobs?
    "Will the Cheerios kid save the maiden? We'll soon find out!"]
  3. South Africa: Labour Market Calls for Job Centred Policies, AllAfrica.com
    PRETORIA, R.S.A. (Republic of South Africa) - ...According to the Department's ALMB financial year 2010/11, "well designed active labour market policies, work sharing arrangements and targeted measures to support vulnerable groups, notably youth," are some of issues to be considered on the policy front... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, December 8, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Connoisseur Café, Vincent Massey Bldg. -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Citigroup to cut 4,500 jobs, Toronto Globe, B8.
    ...third-biggest U.S. bank by assets employed about 267,000 people as of September 30...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Mental illness - 'It's a disease, it's not a 'weakness' -
    [=based on alcoholism in the opinion of Alcoholics Anonymous?]
    - As workplace stress rises amid layoffs, a report calls for companies to cure and treat mental health problems at work..., Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Fat chance amid deepening labor surplusing and cheapening.]
  • Pessimism on rise as deadline [EU summit] nears, National Post, FP1.
    [The euro has served its purpose: counterweighing the US dollar in the Bush-era paroxysms of US imperialism. It's OK for the euro to fade now the US is accelerating its own collapse. And with its overseas markets in trouble, China too is slumping -]
  • A sculptor works on statues...in the town of Dangcheng, Toronto Globe, B2 photo caption.
    ...The small town in China's Hebei province has a history of stone carving dating back more than 2,000 years, but business is slumping in the current economic climate as the number of orders declines...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work-sharing law / Job preservation, PressOfAtlanticCity.com
    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - We're in an unusual economic mess, a recovery that's so slow it sometimes seems to be moving backward. And we need unusual ideas to help get us out of it. A bill that passed the Assembly this week is just such an idea. It would allow employers to create shared-work programs as an alternative to layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Marvin Windows cited by Obama in speech about economic vision - President says Warroad, Minn., company an example to country, GrandForksHerald.com
    WARROAD, Minn. - ...It has cut hours and other expenses, but hasn’t reduced its work force nor taken away health benefits. In the last five minutes of an hour-plus speech on his economic vision, Obama said that Marvin’s has shown “values that our country was built on” and is an example of how to get the economy back on its feet... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Work hours decline with sectoral shift, CITY A.M. via cityam.com
    LONDON, U.K. - UK employees have a shorter working week because their firms offer more flexible hours, and jobs have shifted from manufacturing into services over the last 20 years, according to data released yesterday by the Office for National Statistics... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, December 7, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines fm Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Global turmoil - Slowing pains - Europe is struggling with sputtering growth and a roaring debt crisis, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [so how is that different from the rest of the world?]
    Brazil, China and India, economies that held the promise of being primary drivers of global activity [because they were cannibalizing the rest?] are suddenly losing momentum. The Bank of Canada...is taking a dimmer view of [its own] economy while warning of a deeper downturn overseas. And another rate cut by Australia shows how that economy, after prospering from a resource boom and ties to China is now grappling with sinking house prices and a tougher job market.
  • Euro crisis stifles Brazil - Growth stalls across all major sectors,
    National Post, FP1.
  • Canada relegated, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to A13.
    While other countries - even heavy emitters - get their messages out with pavilions and panels, Canada has become nearly invisible at the Durban climate conference.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Anderson Regional in Mississippi Cuts Employee Hours, Becker's Hospital Review via beckershospitalreview.com
    MERIDIAN, Miss. - ...Employee hours will be cut from 40 to 36 hours. Hospital administration said the hourly cuts were necessary in light of declining state reimbursements, lower patient volumes and higher volumes of charity care... Leaders said the reduced hours are a temporary remedy and alternative to job cuts and layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Managing the downturn: A 13-step plan to avoid layoffs, BusinessManagementDaily.com
    TUCSON, Ariz. - ...3. Continually communicate with employees about projected downturns in business so they can prepare psychologically and financially... I encouraged the staff to hang onto their Christmas bonuses in case they needed the money to tide them over if we had to implement furloughs. As it turned out, we did furlough about a third of our employees a few months later—but we were able to stagger them so nobody was gone for more than a week unless he or she requested the longer break... 13. Ask employees to take voluntary leaves of absence during slow periods; you’ll be surprised how many will be glad to do it... AGM’s 13-step plan paid off in the first quarter of 2010, when our backlog decreased again. Instead of laying off employees, we had them around when the backlog spiked during the second quarter. And not one employee quit. - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Layoffs, cuts again forecast for SD schools - But school trustees now say they will avert insolvency, state takeover, SignOnSanDiego.com
    SAN DIEGO, Calif. - ...“The reality is without extension of furlough days...it looks like 764 more people will be laid off and lose their jobs next year... What can we do to agree as a collective entity with all the unions to save these jobs?”... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, December 6, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating fm Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Terrasses de la Chaudière -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The top 10% of Canadians earned ten times as much as the bottom 10% - Why? Toronto Star, B1.
    [Maybe because there's no upper limit on income per person? - say, something like a 100% tax on overline income with a 100% exemption for reinvestment in overline-targeted jobs. And maybe because it's much easier to initiate an upper limit like that in the time dimension than it is in a money dimension. And that's in fact what the Timesizing Program does. It draws an upper line on working hours per person per week based on the status quo, gets the overline reinvestment going in Phase 2 and Phase 3, and in Phase 4 gradually adjusts the upper line downward as far as it takes to cut the income-poverty rate down to referendum-set target.]
    Technology eroding middle clasls, National Post, FP1.
    ...as technology squeezes [the middle class] out...
    [But, but, isn't technology supposed to "create more jobs than it destroys"?]
    The bottom 10%, such as landscapers, restaurant workers and truck drivers benefit from the fact their jobs are not easy to automate...
    [- at least, now that all the easy ones have already been automated.]
  • 'Merkozy plan' - France, Germany seek to impose fiscal discipline, National Post, p.1 pointer to FP1.
    [OK if it's discipline on "the 1%" who will complain the most but suffer the least because having funneled in all the "wage costs" saved by keeping 5-6 jobseekers looking for every 1 job opening, they can't find enough marketable productivity to invest it all in anyway. Deeper recession if it's discipline on 99% who already don't earn enough to provide markets for their own productivity, hence the investors' problem.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. DiMaio 'Shared Work' Legislation Approved By General Assembly, Insurance News Net (press release) via insurancenewsnet.com
    TRENTON, N.J. - ...Legislation sponsored by Assembly Republican John DiMaio that is designed to avoid job layoffs through a shared work program was overwhelmingly approved by the Assembly on Monday, as amended... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. German worksharing might not work in United States, Bloomberg via Wonkblog via WashingtonPost.com (blog)
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...It turns out to be really, really difficult to fire a German worker... A number of U.S. states have work-sharing programs and they’re not used. California, for instance. Experts tell me that these programs are poorly publicized and horribly administered, and I believe them. The German program, by contrast, was aggressively publicized and competently administered... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But it ain't just Germany that's non-suicidal or trying to use downsizing to get upsizing ("growth") -]
  3. Volvo says to shorten work week at Renault unit, Reuters.com
    STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Volvo, the world's second biggest truck maker, said on Tuesday it would introduce a shortened work-week for employees at its Renault Trucks unit as it looks to adjust production to an expected fall in demand... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, December 4-5, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating fm Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines fm Breton News & Terrasses de la Chaudière -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • A shark in the snow [with a man's live head in its mouth, both looking at you] - Does it symbolize the collapse of the global economy?... François Escamel's intriguing paintings are wide open to interpretation, 12/05 Ottawa Citizen, D1.
  • Europe turns to IMF again..., 12/04 New York Sunday Times, A1 pointer to A18.
    [Ah, the siren song of the IMF alias Typhoid Mary!]
  • 13.3 per cent = The portion of all income earned in Canada that went to the highest-paid one per cent of Canadians in 2007, according to the OECD, 12/05 Ottawa Citizen, A1 pointer to B5.
  • The rich, makers of policy, by Nicholas Confessore, New York Times via 12/04 Toronto Star, NYT1.
    [This is the essence of our cybernetic problem. When a tiny percentate of the population, prone to self-insulation and -isolation, make the policy for the whole, and own the media, there's little or no timely feedback let alone response.]
  • Climate change - Biggest jump yet in CO2 - Humans pumped out 10 billion tonnes of carbon emissions in 2010, a climb of 5.9%, the largest since the Industrial Revolution,
    12/05 Montreal Gazette, A1.
    ...Canada one of the highest per capita...,
    12/05 Montreal Gazette, A6 inside subhead.
    Canada blocking progress on cimate change: ex-negotiator [Vic Buxton]...,
    12/05 Ottawa Citizen, A3.
    A retreat from the world stage - Domestic politics* and diminished bureaucratic capacity have down-sized Canada's international role, writes Daryl Copeland, 12/05 Ottawa Citizen, A9.
    [*i.e., a braindead prime minister who doesn't 'get' democracy & apparently a plurality of myopic & manipulable voters...]
    Prime minister Stephen Harper speaks to the media outside the U.N. during a 2007 climate conference. Canada's image, reputation and brand are being radically reconstructed [and degraded]. (photo caption)
    [Meanwhile, where there's still a couple of live gray cells -]
    Electric car-sharing debuts in France - 2,000 drivers have alrelady signed up to the eco-friendly program - Biggest of its kind in Europe, 12/05 Ottawa Metro, 14.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Moriarty on Bill to help Businesses & Workers Avoid Layoffs (A-3818), 12/05 The Star-Ledger via videos.nj.com
    TRENTON, N.J. - ...The measure (A-3818) would encourage employers who are contemplating cost savings through layoffs to instead achieve the savings by sharing the remaining work among all employees... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Michigan's unemployment insurance system to see reform next year, 12/05 LiveInsuranceNews.com
    LANSING, Mich. - ...Snyder has proposed a plan to the state Legislature he calls “work sharing.” Essentially, the plan would prevent employers from making layoffs by having them cut the hours given to their non-essential workforce... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Work share program may not save jobs, 12/05 WOOD-TV via woodtv.com
    GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. - ...Fettig is worried that without proper safeguards, the program could make unemployment insurance premiums more expensive. "That causes the employer to say, 'With that additional expense, I wanted to add more people, but now I can't,'"... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Fire dept. fight rages, 12/04 Tribune-Democrat.com
    JOHNSTOWN, Pa. - ...From the time four firefighters were furloughed and the downtown fire station closed in August, both sides have attempted to control the focus of the dispute... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Summit County Council sniffs at elections board budget request, 12/05 Akron Beacon Journal via ohio.com
    AKRON, Ohio - ...Kostandaras noted that all county offices and agencies have been asked to trim spending because of declining tax revenue and other income. For example, the Child Support Enforcement Agency has laid off workers this year and sheriff’s deputies had to take unpaid furloughs to avoid layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, December 3, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from IGA LaFlamme & Galeries de Hull -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • General lie - When the Occupy Movement's battle lines were drawn, it wasn't just the 99% against the 1% - [It was] the baby boomers vs. 'the screwed generation''[which] is a complete fiction,
    by History Prof. Robert Wright of Trent U, Ottawa Citizen, B1.
    [No it isn't. The babyboomers grew up and entered the job markets around 1970, restorng the labor surplus of the Great Depression and causing wage levels, which had been rising since the start of the war, to plateau. Housewives got worried their husbands weren't getting the same raises so they jumped into the job market and made it worse. The Dems got greedy for grateful voters so they doubled and tripled the immigration quotas and made it worse. They had several amnesties for illegals and that made it worse. Ambitious but dim CEOs couldn't grow market share the honest way so they orgied on mergers & acquisitions, followed by perceiving overlap and downsizing jobs, and that made it worse. Techy but dim CEOs kept injecting worksaving technology followed by downsizing jobs instead of working hours, and that made it worse. Jetsetting but dim CEOs started offshore outsourcing and that made it worse...]
  • We're up, they're down, Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B4-B5.
    Canada's jobless rate rises to 7.4% as global economic turmoil begins to be felt at home...
    Sign in photo carried by young protester - "Where is my prosperity?..."
    [Where? See comment on previous headline.]
  • Ottawa jobless rate up to 6.3%...bottomed at 5.2% in August...,
    Ottawa Citizen, C1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Fingerprint scanners monitor working hours, CourierMail.com.au
    SYDNEY, Australia - Fingerprint scanners are being used to monitor workers' hours and lunch breaks and some businesses are using the technology to dock employees' pay if they are late... - see whole article under today's date.
    [J. Edgar Hoover LIVES! - down under - and hours awareness works two ways - employees can make sure employers don't start overlooking or rewarding lateness leavingwork while noticing and punishing lateness arriving at work.]
  2. City of Alto working to hire a police department, KTRE.com
    ALTO, Tex. - ...The crime logs show it, from break-ins to botched bank robberies. After the city furloughed the five member Alto Police Department in June, crime never took a break... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - 'You break it, you own it' - Germany's the eurozone's reluctant saviour, National Post, FP1.
    [Time to dump the euro, but if they don't and thereby prolong the appearance of health briefly, it will be thanks to Germany's primitive version of Timesizing, which they call Kurzarbeit or 'short work'.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, December 2, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Durable dollars spell doom for printer - New polymer banknotes could put nearly 200 Ottawans out of work, Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    [Again, what's that about "Technology creates more jobs than it destroys"? And what's that Schumpeter was on about ... "creative destruction," as if destroying markets could be a dandy strategy? How would he like "creative recession" or "creative downturn" or "creative depression." Maybe we should just forget Schumpeter for awhile, wuddayasay?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • TD Bank [Toronto Dominion], CIBC [Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce] brace for tough 2012 - Banks post better profits but 'the external environment remains very uncertain', Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Never mind the "external environment" - how about their internal environment - are they themselves UPsizing (hiring)? If not, there nothing uncertain about anything. No upsizing, no growth. And the only kind of sizing you can do that creates upsizing by downsizing is timesizing. By downsizing the workweek, you spread the shrinking market-demanded employment across more potential consumers and upsize wage levels and consumer spending. Forget all your ideas about working hard to get ahead, ideas that have all been obsoleted by robotics. Robots work a lot harder than you ever can or ever will. As a human, it's more important now to get you into a position to BUY all the stuff the robots are churning out, which you ain't gonna do without money, which you ain't gonna have without a good job, however short the hours. As Reuther said to Ford when Ford said, "Let's see you unionize these robots!" - "Let's see you sell them cars." (And as for those of you who are still parroting the Lump of Labor Fallacy, notice a "lump" implies a fixed amount. Today's employment (not "labor" = sacrifice of clarity for alliteration?) is shrinking, not fixed.)]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Senate Dems to Snyder: Your Party Failed You Again, Insurance News Net (press release) via insurancenewsnet.com
    LANSING, Mich. -- ..Following Governor Snyder's special message this morning, Senate Democrats immediately responded by seeking to implement the work-sharing proposal he touted that would help Michigan workers maintain employment... That amendment was defeated by the Republican majority... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Snyder wants to recast unemployment insurance system in Michigan, Detroit Free Press via freep.com
    LANSING, Mich. -- ...Snyder asked the Legislature to approve work sharing -- a plan under which workers stay on the job with reduced hours to avert layoffs -- and introduce an entrepreneurial element by which displaced workers could get help starting their own businesses. The ideas drew praise from Republicans and Democrats, but the GOP-controlled Senate on Thursday voted down an attempt by Democrats to add work sharing to a separate piece of unemployment insurance legislation... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, December 1, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Unemployment figures highlight deep divisions across euro zone, by Brian Blackstone, Wall Street Journal, A14.
    ...The 10.3% October euro-zone jobless rate - up from 10.2% in September at a fresh euro-era high - masked deep divisions between the prosperous north and fragile south. National [Eurostat] unemployment rates in October ranged from 4.1% in Austria [5.5% in Germany, 8.5% in Italy and 9.8% in France] to 22.8% in Spain. [But] the German labor ministry said Germany's unemployment rate [was] 7% in October. [Nevertheless] Germany is expected to grow at least 3% this year for a second straight year, propelled by...strong consumer spending since the summer. Economists say that as long as any global downturn is mild, German unemployment will stay low as companies hold on to existing workers...
  • Central banks move to calm fears, WSJ, A1:1:6" target article.
    Alarmed central banks moved to ease strains in financial markets through U.S. dollar loans to European banks, cheering investors in U.S. and Europe, WSJ, A1:1:12" pointer to A1:1:6" & A14.
  • Fundamentals weighed down by fears, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    [Kelly should know better - if investors were really paying attention to the deep-structure fundamentals (massive wage&spending-depressing labor surplus on a frozen pre-automation workweek), their fears would make current feelings look like confidence - but they would also know how easy the solution is.]
  • Deep slowdown in hiring, New England firms optimistic, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    [No speedup in hiring, no basis for optimism. No downward adjustment of the 1940 workweek, no speedup in hiring. Ergo, cut the workweek and build a basis for optimism.]
  • Camps are cleared, but '99 percent' still occupies lexicon, New York Times, A1.
    [And "the one percent", thus changing the diagnosis from the incurable "income gap" to the reversible "overconcentration of income", reversible by reversing the wage&spending depressing labor surplus via downward redefinition of "full time employment" to levels more appropriate for a robotizing economy.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Our working hours are now 'utter lunacy', The Corkman via corkman.ie
    CORK, Ireland - ..."What is happening now, however, is that the exception has become the rule and we are being called out all the time for all calls." The paramedic says a worst case scenario could see ambulance staff on the road for over 24 hours, where they could leave for work at 6am and not return, after call outs, until the afternoon the following day."... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sarkozy Lays Foundation For Reshaping The Eurozone, NPR.org
    TOULON, France - ...In a clear jab at the opposition socialists, Sarkozy denounced the 35 hour workweek and retirement at age 60 as two policies that had destroyed French competitiveness... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Basically, when you're competing in a race to the bottom, anything you can do to destroy competitiveness is all to the good. Sarkozy's not going to be happy till he returns France to the 12.6% unemployment of its 39-hour workweek in 1997.]
  3. Service organizations and charities report greater need this year than ever before, KTVQ Billings News via KTVQ.com
    BILLINGS, Mont. - ...Employers are forced to cut hours, so those working full-time may now only get 10 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.