Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
November, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Proposed Reduced Work Week for Some Town Employees, The Daily Greenburgh
    GREENBURGH, N.Y. - ...Greenburgh Town Supervisor Paul Feiner has suggested that willing town employees could work a three- or four-day work week, as opposed to the typical five-day work week... This idea came on the heels of last week's statement by Town Comptroller Bart Talamini that one of the town's fund balances could be in a deficit as early as 2015. Feiner is now looking for employees who would not be opposed to working 20% less hours for a four-day week or 40% less hours for a three-day week... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Marylander among advocates urging shorter hours for truckers - Cockeysville man to push lawmakers for change, BaltimoreSun.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Susan Slattery, a math professor at Stevenson University, was killed last year when a truck rear-ended her vehicle on Interstate 90 as she returned from a vacation in Ohio... Police said the driver of the truck had fallen asleep. Her husband, Ed Slattery, will join other truck crash victims in Washington Wednesday to support a proposal by the Obama administration to reduce from 11 to 10 the number of hours truck drivers can be on the road... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Dentists turn to marketing after getting brush-off from patients, Los Angeles Times via LAtimes.com
    REDLANDS, Calif. - ...The downturn has forced dentists to cut hours, lay off staff and slash their own pay... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, November 29, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "one square above Harvard" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Barney Frank will not run again - Redrawn district drives one-of-a-kind [gay rep] from seat - For 31 years, a liberal [hell with liberal, a WITTY] voice impossible to ignore -
    [= the Dems best debater. But alas, he never really got and stayed focused on JOBS. That means the last glimmer of intelligence in the House is Bernie Sanders (independent, VT).]
    - 'He made you earn your money. If you're going to get up on the House floor and debate Barney, you better know what you're talking about.' Rep. Peter King (R, NY), Boston Globe, A1.
    [Mass. 4th District to be less gerrymandered now and include less liberal support.]
    Memorable lines
    "Wouldn't it be cheaper to raise the city than to depress the Artery?"
    [re 1970s plans for the Big Dig]
    "The Moral Majority supports legislators who oppose abortions but also oppose child nutrition and day care. From their perspective, life begins at conception and ends at birth."
    [1981 Ford Hall Forum]
    "I don't begrudge Ronald Reagan an occasional nap... It's what he does on those moments when he's awake.\.that causes us problems."
    [1984]
    "I can't believe what a bleeder Newt is."...
    [1995 on how easily new speaker Gingrich is affected by criticism.]
    "The problem with the war in Iraq is not so much the intelligence
    as the stupidity."...
    [Bushmush era aka 'lost decade'.]
  • Benefits debate has jobless on edge - 2m people will get far less if Congress doesn't act, BG, A1.
    [And consumer spending and all other markets will weaken accordingly.]
  • Muni market sounds [warning] - Jefferson County's bankruptcy filing [Ala.] may imperil payments to some bondholders, Wall Street Journal, C4.
  • Crude flirts with $100/barrel on geopolitical unrest, WSJ, C4.
  • Crisis in Europe tightens credit across the globe - Businesses feel strain - Slowdown seen in U.S. - European [& everywhere] banks hoarding capital [or just fulfilling new reserve requirements?], WSJ, A1, New York Times.
  • Antagonism toward Wall Street is affecting recruiting on campuses, NYT, B1 pointer to B5.
    [Wait wait, that's GOOD news!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cuts expected at Success Center - A $400k grant which was used in the past five years is set to run out, Coast Report via coastreportonline.com
    COSTA MESA, Calif. - Nearly half of the funding for the Student Success Center at Orange Coast College is set to expire by the end of the year and officials expect they will be forced to cut hours of operation and employ fewer tutors... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Insurance - Two Resolution chiefs cut work week by 40pc, CITY A.M. via cityam.com
    LONDON, England - Financial sector takeover specialist Resolution PLC said the chief executive and finance director of its British insurance consolidation vehicle are to cut their working week by 40% as the group focuses its efforts on new projects outside the UK... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Taiwan's Ma Proposes Shorter Work Week and New Laws on Leave, BusinessWeek.com
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - ...The government proposed cutting the work week from 84 hours every two weeks to 40 hours a week, according to a statement posted on Ma’s website after he met representatives from 10 labor unions yesterday... Under the Labor Standard Act, the legal number of work hours every two weeks is 84, meaning employees often work six days on alternate weeks. Government workers have been on a five-day work week since 2001... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, November 27-28, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "one square above Harvard" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Pharmasset to be acquired for $11B [by Gilead Sciences], 11/27 BG, G4.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressful, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • The pulse of the poor - Armed with data, an MIT lab offers fresh insight on some of the world's most vexing problems, by D.C. Denison, 11/27 Boston Globe, G1.
    If you have good information on the dynamics of poverty, and then disseminate it to policy makers, they will make better decisions to alleviate world poverty.... (intro to display of graphs and map)
    [Not necessarily. This is another "we-feel-good, you-feel-guilty" makework (or get-PhD) campaign aimed at too high a level ("world" poverty? - it ain't like "global warming"!) where there are no effective policymakers to enact or enforce. To rephrase our first paragraph above: To save the world, you have to start at the right place. You can't start with hunger - nobody with money is hungry. You can't start with poverty (lack of money) - nobody with a good job is poor. It all comes down to jobs. And jobs come down to time on the job. Mess up your time arrangements & you mess up your whole society, cuz time counts it all. If one or more of the largest economies can take the next step, the third world will eventually follow, especially if the largest economies quit supporting their dictators in the name of Foreign Aid dba resource grabbing. See John Perkins' "Confessions of an Economic Hitman".]
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - ...In a wood-paneled suite [at MIT, nice!] researchers are tackling problems as complex and vexing as any in technology, science or medicine.
    [Oh c'mon. That's just an excuse. Just create a surplus of good jobs by emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing. Can't do it for "the world" or even any given place in the third world? Then do it here, in the US, or New England, or Massachusetts, or greater Boston, or Cambridge, or ... MIT.]
    This is the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab [oo don't you feel soo PC and inclusive!] or J-PAL [which makes us special group of insiders with our own special warm&fuzzy acronym] where economists through precise detailed studies [another maximal investment at points of minimal return] are trying to find ways to alleviate poverty [especially their own]. For nearly a decade, MIT economics professors Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee have worked with a global network of researchers to conduct experiments in the world's poorest places - where families live on less than $1 a day [a measure that means something to us but is totally irrelevant to the world's "poorest" places] - and reached conclusions that are changing the way economists and policy makers think about development in impoverished places [notice they're not even aiming at improving the thinking, just changing it - which it can do by itself with equal non-effect].
    The findings are contained in their new book, "Poor Economics," [in which] they argue that antipoverty policies must be built on evidence from careful, controlled tests that detail how the poor live, act, and react....
    [Gee, what a coincidence! That's exactly what Duflo and Banerjee DO - so this should at least keep them in heavily garnished pizza for the foreseeable future!]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Thanksgiving week turns out to be a turkey - The worst week for the stock market in two months [not since 1942??] ended with a whimper of thin trading Friday..., 11/27 BG, G4.
  • Vital signs - Americans stepping up their pace of saving in October, 11/28 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    The personal saving rate - the share of income left after spending and taxes - climbed 3.5% in October from 3.3% in September.
    [And whose taxes are relatively lowest? The taxes of the wealthiest.]
    Saving had been declining steadily from the 5.2% rate seen in January, as consumers increased their spending.
    [And the concentration of the money supply slowed slightly.]
    Now, some consumers [yeah, the wealthiest] appear to be more inclined to save than shop.
    [i.e., the funneling of the money supply = national income and wealth is reaccelerating.]
  • Occupy Los Angeles protesters faced a Monday deadline to leave their camp on the lawn of City Hall, 11/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
  • Strength in numbers - As big donations fall, nonprofits look to make up the shortfall in volume - The trick is reaching the masses, 11/28 WSJ, R6.
    [Dream on - the money is all in the mattresses of the super-rich. And anyway, nonprofits can't save the economy because (A) most of them are run by the rich and (B) "any economic system that depends for vital functions (like money spreading) on charity (ever capricious) is lethally flawed."]
  • China may find it hard to break fall, by Tom Orlik, WSJ, C1.
    China is downshifting....
    [Welcome to the club that they created - elsewhere...till now.]
    Signs of a slowdown are prevalent. That comes because of a double whammy from fading demand abroad
    [which China guaranteed by sucking the demand-funding jobs out of its overseas markets]
    and weaker construction activity in China. Headline export growth still looks healthy at 15.9% year-on-year in October. But strip out the impact of yuan appreciation as well as inflation, adn growth dives into single figures... Wang Tao, China economist at UBS, estimates that new housing starts fell to 2.2% year-on-year in October...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Saving jobs - Aid benefits workers, companies, 11/27 WatertownDailyTimes.com
    WATERTOWN, N.Y. - ...Work-sharing programs have been offered for years, but they have gained wider acceptance during the recession. Under the programs available in 22 states and the District of Columbia, employees work fewer hours, but the state helps make up the lost pay with some unemployment benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Ruag to cut 15 jobs, 11/28 evertiq.com
    ALTDORF, Switzerland - ...Short-time working will offered to around 200 staff... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Looking Back 25 Years Ago, 11/27 Berwick Today via berwick-advertiser.co.uk
    BERWICK, N.England [11/21/1986] - The Berwick factory of knitwear, manufacturers Pringle of Scotland, will be virtually at a standstill on Monday as the company begins a short-time working programme due to a sales slump... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    Saturday, November 26, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines today from Tedeschi Food Shop in hip Davis Square, Somerville MA, two squares above Harvard on the Red Line -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks fell, with the Dow Jones industrials making their worst Thanksgiving week performance since markets began observing the holiday in 1942 - The Dow fell 25.77 points to 11231.78 and is down 3% for the year, WSJ, A1 pointer to B4.
    [Glad they cleared that up. We didn't think stocks were bad at all in 1942, and developing "wartime prosperity."]
  • Help wanted - In unexpected twist, some skilled jobs go begging, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [Not unexpected at all when employers are so spoiled by overwhelming floods of resumes, they've pushed all training costs onto jobseekers.]
  • New strains hit euro, global markets - Common currency falls after Italy's borrowing costs soar...,
    WSJ, A1.
    Emerging Europe catches euro-zone cold,
    WSJ, B16.
  • S&P downgraded Belgium a notch, citing funding and market-risk pressure,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
  • Hungary said the country's credit-rating downgrade to junk status by Moody's was part of an attack on its currency, WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    [Hungary should be so important.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Voter-backed law delivers millions for Bridgeport library to buy books, computers, renovations, Connecticut Post via AP via The Columbus Republic IN via TheRepublic.com
    BRIDGEPORT, Conn. - After years of being forced to close branches, cut hours and staff and make do with no money in its meager budget for new books, things are looking up for the Bridgeport Public Library... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. BONUS excerpt - Weekly Roll Call Report...- Senate Bill 697: Authorize “work sharing” unemployment insurance benefits, Midland Daily News via ourmidland.com
    LANSING, Mich. - Introduced by Sen. Vincent Gregory (D), to authorize unemployment insurance benefits for employees in a “work sharing” program, in which an employer temporarily reduces employee hours when business is depressed. The bill would establish detailed regulations that employer work sharing programs would have to meet for employees to still be eligible for unemployment benefits. Referred to committee, no further action at this time.
    [Oh-oh.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, November 25, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "Harvard Sq. convenience plus parking!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Nokia Siemens said it will cut 17,000 jobs and restructure its business in a bid to reach profitability and position itself for independence, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [And the deathspiral makes another big circle downward.]
  • We are the 99.9% - Why we shouldn't coddle the rich, by Paul Krugman, NYT, A29.
    [This is good. Krugman here moves deeper into Attack The Myth territory, the myth that "the wealthy deserve every penny of it because they EARNED it" - and should be allowed to keep it, all of it. He attacks this myth by exploding the allied myth that the wealthy are all Big Innovator-Contributors like Steve Jobs or Bill Gates (you have to have a plural name to succeed?). But Krugman attacks the most destructive myth only as an afterthought - that unlimited tax reduction for. and money redistribution to, the wealthy is better for the economy because that money gets immediately invested "and put to work creating jobs." Now we want to see him move deeper into this territory, which reveals even the wealthy Big Contributor-Innovators who supposedly "deserve" unlimited money as self-destructive economic prosperity killers. We need a lot more exploration and articulation, in terms of the self-interest of the wealthy themselves, of this angle. Where is the point of diminishing returns in the concentration of a nation's money supply? How do we reverse it? Our suggestion: By creating wartime prosperity without the war. How? By creating the key economic requirement for wartime prosperity, a "shortage of labor" as perceived by employers. Capitalism always runs well with a labor "shortage" to raise wages by market forces and direct the national income to those who immediately want and need to spend it. How to get a "shortage" (actually of course, a balance) without killing potential consumer-spenders? How to do it gradually, flexibly, by market forces? Easy. We DID it for 100 years, from 1840 (workweeks over 80 hours) to 1940 (the 40-hour workweek): cut the workweek, and convert overtime into jobs.]
    “We are the 99%” is a great slogan. It correctly defines the issue as being the middle class versus the elite (as opposed to the middle class versus the poor). And it also gets past the common but wrong establishment notion that rising inequality is mainly about the well educated doing better than the less educated; the big winners in this new Gilded Age have been a handful of very wealthy people, not college graduates in general.... For who are the 0.1%? Very few of them are Steve Jobs-type innovators; most of them are corporate bigwigs and financial wheeler-dealers. One recent analysis found that 43% of the super-elite are executives at nonfinancial companies, 18% are in finance and another 12% are lawyers or in real estate. And these are not, to put it mildly, professions in which there is a clear relationship between someone’s income and his economic contribution.... So should the 99.9% hate the 0.1%? No, not at all. But they should ignore all the propaganda about “job creators” [if true, there would be jobs but, where are the jobs??] and demand that the super-elite pay substantially more in taxes. - see whole article under today's date.
    [In fact, once the concentration of a nation's money supply goes beyond a certain point, the wealthy become job destroyers and recession creators because with low interest rates and high risk, they just aren't "getting that money back to work creating jobs" - quite the contrary. All that money is basically out of circulation and just being wasted, sacrificed on the altar of Pecking Order. The concept of unlimited wealth creates recessions and depressions. But since the wealthy own the media, you ain't gonna hear it from them. Clearly, once even the doctored-to-look-rosy mainstream indexes start signaling downturn, the concentration of the money supply has proceeded past the point where it starts to undermine itself, so the question becomes, how do we reverse ]


    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • A judge's decision to throw out the bankruptcy filing of Harrisburg PA opens the way for Pennsylvania to take over the finances of its capital, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.

    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -
  • An ex-Social Security judge in West Virginia who awarded disability benefits in nearly every case is being investigated by federal prosecutors,
    Wall Street Journal. A1 pointer to A6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials are on track for their worst Thanksgiving week since 1942, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    Stocks in Europe closed lower Thursday, an ominous sign for the resumption of U.S. trading.
  • Vital signs - Business investment is slowing, WSJ, graph caption A1.
    New orders for non-defense goods excluding aircraft - a proxy for business spending on computers and other capital investment - fell 1.8% in October from a month earlier. Capital spending has been a rare bright spot for much of the year, so last month's decline sparked concerns that businesses could be running out of steam.
  • Consumers are snapping up goods but showing restraint in spending on services, and the economic "recovery" [our quotes] is suffering as a result, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    Holding off on a haircut to buy a new car, WSJ, A4 target article.
    [Haircuts cost as much as cars? Maybe the point is, you get a lot more currency circulation and economic stability from a million bucks of small purchases than from a million bucks of large purchases? (And that's why redistributing money to the rich is such a recovery killer? - See article "We are the 99.9%" under DOWNSIZING above.)]
    ...goods...9.1% [up] compares with...12.8% [following the] 2001 recession...
    .\.discretionary services...2.8% [up] compares with...11.7% [following the 2001 recession...
  • To advance their cause, foundations buy stocks, New York Times, B1.
    [THAT'S what they're doing with our contributions? No wonder donations are down! Meanwhile the "nonprofit" Greenway Conservancy that manages Dewey Square which Occupy Boston is occupying has pushed Mayor Menino to take them to court -]
  • Can Boston save the Occupy movement?,
    Boston Phoenix, cover story p.1 pointer to p.14.
    The right to occupy - Boston's 99-percenters head to court next week, perhaps with the future of the movement at stake - 'The occupation is not just integral to the protesters' expression of their grievances; it is their protest,' [says designated attorney Howard Cooper of Todd & Weld], by David S. Bernstein, Boston Phoenix, p.14 target story.
    ...Menino has barred the protesters from bringing winterization equipment into Dewey Square [actually Dewey "Rectangle" = a long narrow (50-60'-wide) elongated rectangle extended on one side]. Winterized structures with heat generators are fire hazards. ...Without winterization, the freezing conditions will soon become a public-safety issue. ...Without a court order protecting Occupy Boston, the city will soon be required to shut it down either because it has been winterized, or because it hasn't... Is the medium the message? ...The argument rests not just on location, but on the movement's need to camp out overnight... [Does] ending the 24/7 encampment, in legal terms, "leave...open ample alternative channels for communication" of the protesters' message[?]
    [Damn good question, in a society of highly consolidated media ownership with all media owned by The One Percent, with a diminshing number of gaps in their ownership of the Internet. What good is Free Speech when, for example, people searching for most keywords in Timesizing's message can only find us mentioned on page 54 of Google's search results? What good is Free Speech when human advancement in our lifetimes requires turning over control of the length of a fluctuating workweek to the market-determined unemployment rate, but humans still feel powerless over the time dimension, regarding it as confusing and mysterious - and strictly background - except in occasional (and even more confusing) sci-fi.]
  • Options dwindle for euro crisis, by Stephen Fuller, WSJ, A1.
    ...[from] whether any of the 17 governments...will default [to] whether the euro zone will survive in its current form...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Man's suicide after Honda cut in hours, SwindonAdvertiser.co.uk
    STROUD, England - A Honda worker took his own life after suffering financial strains when the factory was on a two-day week, an inquest was told. Father-of-three Steve Dyson, 40, hanged himself when the South Marston plant was on reduced operating times as a result of the Japanese tsunami in June... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We've had plenty of suicides and deaths due to overwork and layoffs, but this is the first we've noted from shorter hours.]
  2. Manroland Files for Biggest Insolvency in Germany in 2 Years, Bloomberg via BusinessWeek.com
    OFFENBACH, Germany - ...Manroland and larger rival Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG have cut jobs and put workers on shorter hours to lower costs... Manroland’s annual sales have fallen by more than half since 2006 to 942 million euros ($1.25 billion) last year, pushing the company to an operating loss. The company has responded by cutting its workforce by almost one-fifth and putting one-third of its remaining employees on shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Cutting hours instead of jobs doesn't always work on an individual-company level, but city-, state-, or economy-wide, it can't fail because it maximizes circulation of available currency (volume and velocity).]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Turkeyday, November 24, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • No giving thanks for stocks ahead of holiday, Boston Globe, B9.
  • October consumer spending barely rises, BG, B8.
  • Pawn shops edging into main stream amid joblessness..., BG, B9-.
  • Debt crisis strikes at Europe's economic pillar [Germany], BG, B8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Hyundai Motor to cut work hours by 15% - Top Korean carmaker set to introduce two-shift system in 2013 for productivity, KoreaTimes.co.kr
    SEOUL, South Korea - ...``Currently, the daily working time is around 10 hours excluding meal times but this will go down to 8.5 hours in 2013, down 15 percent from now,’’ a Hyundai spokesman said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The young faces of poverty hit home in Christmas Fund, Victoria Times Colonist via timescolonist.com
    VICTORIA, B.C., Canada - ...A more realistic measure, said Wednesday's report, is the "living wage" - the amount needed to meet basic needs. For a family of four in Greater Victoria, that translates to two parents earning $18.03 an hour, 35 hours a week. The calculation was based on the cost of food, shelter, clothing, a used car, child care, health costs not covered by medicare, federal and provincial income taxes, medical premiums and other payroll deductions... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Season of part-time jobs kicks off with holidays, USAtoday.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Part-time work — defined by the Labor Department as fewer than 35 hours a week — provides sorely needed income and experience that often can be leveraged into full-time jobs... Hours are short, applicants plentiful... At staffing firm Randstad, as many as 10 candidates vie for each position, up from three before the recession... There is a downside for firms that employ a large number of workers with no benefits and uncertain hours. "You get high turnover. You get unreliable workers," Lambert says. "If you have workers committed to your firm, you tend to produce a better product...a better service."... Some Americans have had their hours cut. ...Vicki Lehr of Branford CT was hired as a salesperson at a garden center in April. But her weekly hours were trimmed to about 30 in July and to 20 a couple of months later, slashing her weekly pay to about $300 from $550... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But when we've trimmed weekly hours on a citywide, statewide, or nationwide basis, high-paying hours got spread around and incomes were secured or raised as employers bid against one another for good help and wage levels rose to where they should be at constantly rising levels of productivity.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, November 23, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "Harvard Sq. convenience plus parking!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • 'Bad recipe' for risk management - Corzine trades had less oversight than others at MF Global, Wall Street Journal, C1.
    Who oversees a typical trade at a Wall Street firm? Board of directors, chief executive/president, head of sales and trading, chief risk officer, trading chief, risk manager. [photo caption]
    Who oversaw CEO Jon Corzine's $6.3 billion European bet a typical trade at a Wall Street firm? Board of directors [only].
    [But isn't that true for all mergers and acquisitions, except for occasional glances from antitrust agencies?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks declined, with the Dow industrials shedding 53.59 points or 0.5% to 11493.72, weighed down by bearish economic data, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Fed chooses to open up about stress [tests], by David Reilly, WSJ, C14.
    Too bad it takes a crisis to force more openness at the Federal Reserve... [amen!]
    The Federal Reserve said it will publish the full results next year on a bruising stress test of the biggest U.S. banks, in a bid to reassure investors about the health [LOL] of the financial system, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [1. If the test was bruising, why would it reassure?
    2. If they've postponed publishing, why would it reassure?]
  • Higher 'stress' for big banks, WSJ, C1 target article.
    [= a dose of their own medicine?]
  • Financial finger-pointing turns to regulators, New York Times, A1. ["Turns to"? It was there all along - all through the Bush "lost decade."]
  • Hedge funds down, but far from out, NYT, A1.
    [Too bad, we need them OUT. They are just part of the big load of investment instruments that Wall Street invented in the 1990s (a repeat of the 1920s) to absorb the huge extra income that the richest tiny population was getting thanks to ongoing, uncontrolled wage-depressing automation (sacred Innovation), imports (sacred Free Trade), outsourcing (sacred Cost Cutting), immigration (sacred Huddled Masses Longing to be Free), births (sacred Be Fruitful & Multiply) - and a frozen pre-automation 40-hour workweek (sacred Hard Word to Get Ahead, and I'm Busy So I'm Important).]
  • Declining savings augurs ill for consumers, WSJ, C1.
    [- as if today's consumers can spare any change for savings now that such a huge percentage of the national income is going to the richest 1%, who are saving enough for all of us and more, enough more to turn their savings into hoardings cuz there's too little low-risk marketable productivity to invest this much money in.]
  • Vital signs - Gross Domestic Income [GDI], an alternative gauge of economic output [better, gauge of prosperity] to GDP, shows the U.S. near a standstill, WSJ, graph caption, A1.
    GDI - income received by U.S. households and businesses - rose 0.4% in the fourth quarter. GDI should, in theory, be equal to GDP, which rose 2%.
    [This constitutes a definitive rebuttal of the prevailing 'wisdom' that wages automatically rise with productivity.]
    | The discrepancy raised fears that third-quarter was much slower than GDP figures suggest.
    [But then, GDP figures are so innocently doctored to hide problems and make things look better than they are - as Glabraith's last book titled it, 'The Economics of Innocent Fraud.' And our unemployment rate is just the same.]
  • A discussion of Russia's future is long on pessimism -
    [- Welcome to the club of people who've never heard of Timesizing, and its followup programs -]
    - Intellectuals can say what they want [only] to each other, quasi-editorial by Serge Schmemann, NYT, A26.
    [Well our Occupy movement doesn't even know what it wants - but at least it has done us all a huge favor with its "99%" slogan = it has moved the discussion from the bankrupt metaphor of "income gap" (if the wealthy were throwing enough charitable "bridges" across the "gap" there'd be No Problem) to the actionable metaphor of "concentrated income" (if the wealthy backed a system that centrifuged enough income there'd be No Problem - and it's easier to start by spreading the work than the money.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Sarkozy party leader vows to end France's 35-hour week - Jean-François Copé, leader of French president's UMP party, makes divisive call to scrap traditional limit on working hours, The Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    PARIS, France - ..."If it has been such a catastrophe for France why hasn't the right done away with it before? They've had 10 years to do so," a member of the party's economic team told the Guardian. "All the right is trying to do in targeting the 35-hour working week is to distract from its own failures. It's a smokescreen." She added that the law had been shown to have created around 350,000 jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Legislature to revise law, expand labor protections - Big Tent:The CLA said that the main change introduced by the amendments would be to give labor groups the right to conduct health and safety checks in the workplace, TaipeiTimes.com
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - ... In addition, when a doctor determines an individual is not fit for his or her original position, employers will be required to change the work environment, change the job or shorten working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - IN THE PAPERS, by Elena Casas, France 24 International News 24/7 via france24.com
    ...Le Parisien reports plans to scrap the 35-hour work week have gone down well with healthcare managers - because the current law gives doctors 2 million days off to take before the end of 2012...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, November 22, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "Harvard Sq. convenience plus parking!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • As layoffs rise, stock buybacks consume cash [piles], by Nelson Schwartz, New York Times, A1.
    [So American CEOs are putting their huge cash caches into buying back their own company stock - and this is not employee-ownership, as in ESOPs, but executive ownership, as in employees have no say.]
    When Pfizer cut its research budget this year and laid off 1,100 employees, it...had so much cash left over, it decided to buy back an additional $5 billion worth of stock on top of the $4 billion already earmarked for repurchases in 2011 and beyond.... The moves...might seem at odds with one another [they are - they're DOWNsizing their own best customers and still hoping their stock will hold or UP its value] but they represent an increasingly common pattern among [increasingly suicidal] American corporations, which are sitting on record amounts of cash but insist that growth opportunities are hard to find [gee, wonder why!]. The result is that at a time when the nation is looking for ways to battle unemployment, big companies are creating fewer jobs...
    [Well, at least the Wall Street Journal has moved from the weakest "have mercy on the poor" argument of the Democrats to a less weak "have mercy on the nation," but they still aren't pointing out that American corporations, ie: CEOs, had better have mercy on themselves and stop accelerating their own demise, cuz their current strategies are constantly cutting their own markets via their own workforce which funds their own markets. Meanwhile, how else can our brilliant CEOs commit suicide? Oo oo, here's another way! Cut high-wage American jobs that have been funding the "U.S. consumer miracle" and move them to low-wage countries, thereby guaranteeing less consumer spending and weaker global markets -]
  • U.S. firms eager to add foreign jobs, by David Wessel, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    U.S.-based multinational corporations added 1.5 million workers to their payrolls in Asia and the Pacific region during the 2000s and 477,500 workers in Latin America, while cutting payrolls at home by 864,000, the Commerce Dept. reported. The faster growth abroad was concentrated in emerging markets such as China, Brazil, India and Eastern Europe...
    [So why are they looking for magical no-basis growth in the U.S. when they're moving it all elsewhere?]
    The companies cut 14,700 workers in Germany during the decade and added only 8,700 in France, while increasing payrolls in Poland by 135,500 and in Hungary by 53,700. The U.S.-based multinational companies employed 23.1 million workers in the U.S. in 2009 and 10.8 million in majority-owned affiliates in other countries from which U.S. companies make large purchases... The latest data show that the firms cud 864,600 workers in the U.S. between 1999 and 2009 and added 2.9 million workers abroad.... The update for 2009 turned up multinational firms with large U.S. workforces that weren't included in the preliminary data released in April. The earlier data showed that U.S. multinationals had cut 2.9 million workers in the 2000s and added 2.4 million abroad...
    [Uh, how could adding more firms to the survey show the cutting of less workers? Anyway, we seem to have here more fuel for The Great American CEO Conspiracy To Destroy Their Anchor Economy. (Don't seem too smart.) Check also below re Warren Buffett and Japan. Anyway, predictably, the geniuses on Wall Street who have been supporting "leansizing" for 30-plus years, heedless of the leansizing of the economy, are now coming in for some leansizing of themselves (but they still won't necessarily smarten up) -]
  • Wall Street careers stall, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    As the nation's biggest banks struggle [poor poor self-flagellating babies!], thousands of employees have been laid off, taking a toll on workers in their 20s just starting their careers in the financial industry.
    [What careers?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • The trustee overseeing the unwinding of MF Global said that more than $1.2 billion in customer funds could be missing from the firm, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:5.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials tumbled 248.85 points or 2.1% to 11547.31 as the deficit panel's failure fueled worries about the potential for another downgrade of the U.S.'s credit rating, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1, C4.
    But investors bought up Treasuries, still seeing them as among the safest assets.
    [Or at least the least doomed? Meanwhile, the supposedly pinko NY Times is still blaming Europe -]
  • Credit risks in Europe push stocks downward,
    NYT, B1.
  • Buffett searches Japan for a 'big investment', WSJ, C1 pointer to C2.
    [Tough to find a sustainable let alone profitable investment anywhere with this record-breaking degree of concentration in the world's money supply.]
  • Why doesn't no mean no? - The FDA withdrew Avastin's approval - Why does Medicare [still] cover it? op ed by Joe Nocera, NYT, A23.
    [Let me guess. Because Americans (ie: Republicans) have lost the ability to learn from their own or anyone else's mistakes? Or indeed, to learn at all?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Mayors reportedly feel budget heat, Politico.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...More than four out of ten mayors, 44%, said they have had to reduce maintenance and services at parks and gardens, while 29% said they have cut hours, staff or services at local libraries... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The people's panel - Write for us about ... long working hours - The working time directive that restricts time spent in our jobs [to 48 hrs/wk] may be reviewed - Tell us about the extra hours you work, The Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    MANCHESTER, U.K. - ...We want to hear readers' experiences of working long hours and whether they think a mandatory cap is a good idea. Do you have to work long hours in your job? Is it expected, and is leaving on time frowned upon? How many extra hours a week do you work – paid and unpaid? Do you agree with the [British] Cameron government that a cap would be a bad idea for UK business?... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, Nov. 20-21, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "Harvard Sq. convenience plus parking!" -

    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -

  • Doctor revolt shakes disability program - Some who shouldn't be getting disability [support] get it and some who should, aren't, said [Neil Novin, former chief of surgery at Harbor Hospital, who part-timed 10 years for SSA],
    by Damian Paletta, 11/21 Wall Street Journal. A1, A14.
    Earlier this year, senior managers at the Social Security Administration [SSA] in Baltimore, frustrated by a growing backlog of applications for federal disability benefits, called meetings with 140 of the agency's doctors [to say] the number of people seeking benefits had soared [and] doctors had to work faster to move cases.  Instead of earning $90 an hour, as they had previously, they would receive about $80 per case - a pay cut for many cases which can take 60-90 minutes to review - unless doctors worked faster. Most notably, it no longer mattered if doctors strayed far from their areas of expertise when taking a case. "The implication there was that you really didn't have to be that careful and study the whole thing," said Rodrigo Toro, a neurologist who analyzed cases for the SSA for more than 10 years. Some doctors, including Dr. Toro, quit following the changes. Others were fired. In all, 45 of the 140 [32%] left within months, the agency said.... In August, Dr. Novin said, he was pressured by a supervisor to change his medical opinion and award benefits to someone he didn't believe had disabilities that would prevent...working [so] he was... fired.... The SS Disability Insurance Program paid $124B in benefits in 2010, up from $55B in 2001. The backlog of pending appeals [was] 705,367 in 2010 and 392,397 in 2001. ...3.2m people [are] trying to enter the program this year....
    Uneven benefits - Southeast [U.S.] logs highest percentage of disability payments [maps-graphs caption]
    Percentage of population, ages 18-64, receiving disability, 2010 -
    National average:  4.5% (a steady rise from 3.4% in 2000) [and since we saw the figure of 47m Americans on disability in 2004 (3.7%), we estimate 57m in 2010 (4.5%), almost one in five Americans]
    Less than 3%:  3 states with Utah and Alaska tied for lowest at 2.8%, followed by Hawaii
    More than 6%:  7 SE states + Maine, with W.Va. the highest at 8.8%
    [With full employment via a workweek as short as it takes in a mechanized, automated and robotized economy, there would be plenty of easy, well-paying jobs for everyone, and a new profession of job designers for tough cases such as quadriplegics (think of the technology that enables Stephen Hawking to function).]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Waning confidence in political leadership threatens U.S. markets, 11/21 New York Times, B1.
    [With a disability situation such as described above, no wonder!  It's The Great U.S. Leadership Drought, led by Obama - 'course it would help if the brahmin-owned media could recognize leadership when they saw it, and maybe they're finally just starting...with today's page 3 article on "Cutting Hours Instead of Jobs" in the Wall St. Journal (see Hope du Jour below).]
  • Boring cruel romantics - Understanding the architecture of disaster, op ed by Paul Krugman, 11/21 NYT, A23.
    ...Those visions [of the romantics who are bullying both Europe and the United States into austerity] are driven by dreams about the way things should be [i.e: with timesizing fully operational to maintain full employment and maximum consumer spending regardless of austerity] rather than by a cool assessment of the way things really are....
    [i.e: federal worksharing (= ER timesizing) is still being sidetracked by deficit deadlock, and state worksharing is still available in less than half the states and still a "best-kept secret."]
  • Vital signs - A key driver of U.S. jobs growth has stalled, 11/21 WSJ, A1.
    Companies less than a year old employed 2.5 million people as of March... That was up fractionally from a year earlier, but still well below the 3.5 million people such start-ups employed in March 2007...
  • Holiday fear mixed in with cheer - ...Not everyone is anticipating a rosy [sales] picture this year,
    11/21 WSJ, B1.
  • The housing market looks near a bottom, 11/21 WSJ, C1.
    ["Hope springeth eternal..."]
    Housing market still in recovery - 'Housing is likely the most powerful factor dragging the economy down,' Barry Bluestone, 11/20 Boston Globe, G5 inside headers.
    [Shame on Barry Bluestone for such a superficial non-structural analysis, when labor surplus and long hours (if you're still working) are everywhere, and automation and "lights-out manufacturing" is still spreading.]
  • A flashback to August for stocks - This summer, markets shook even though many saw a downgrade coming; An autumn repeat?, 11/21 WSJ, C1.
  • The color of money - In tight economy, nonprofit groups get creative in search for money, 11/20 Bos.Globe, G1 ptr to G4.
    ["Creative" or "desperate"? And with the nonprofit responsible for the park occupied by Occupy Boston asking the city to evict the protesters, despite this being the the most use anyone has ever got out of that park, we are reminded that most "nonprofits" are run by fairly wealthy people.]
  • Deficit effort nears collapse - Partisan divide over taxes and spending stalls agreement on $1.2T in cuts, 11/21 WSJ, A1.
    [Wait a minute, this is good news cuz with no agreement, the Bush taxbreaks for the rich expire!]
  • Fears about European defaults linger, 11/20 Boston Globe, G4.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cutting Hours Instead of Jobs - Rhode Island, Other States Offer Partial Unemployment [Benefits] for Shortened Workweeks, 11/21 Wall Street Journal, A3.
    PROVIDENCE, R.I.—...Susan Houseman, a senior economist at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in Kalamazoo, Mich., said that in 2009, the most severe year of the recession for U.S. job losses, Rhode Island's employers were five times as likely to turn to work sharing as employers in the other states with programs, on average. Of the five million jobs lost across the nation that year, 220,000 of them might have been saved if the whole country was on a work-sharing program like Rhode Island's, she calculates... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We calculate that five millions jobs would have been saved if the whole country was on a work-sharing program evolving into a timesizing program - Susan's imagination and design skills seem sadly limited.]
  2. WSJ says RI's work-sharing program could be national model, 11/21 WPRI-TV 12 (blog)
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. - ...President Barack Obama has included a national work-sharing plan as part of his jobs package, now before Congress, as a way to address the nation’s 9% unemployment rate. … Kevin Hassett of the conservative American Enterprise Institute also is a fan, and noted that he hasn’t encountered any hostility when he has raised the topic with fellow Republicans... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Where does the Occupy movement go from here? - Four Days On, One Day Off, Knowledge@Wharton Today via knowledgetoday.wharton.upenn.edu
    PHILADELPHIA, Pa. - The dim job outlook for many employees has led to a resurgence in the idea of “work sharing” — in which employees work less than a full schedule and then apply for unemployment insurance to make up the difference in their paychecks... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Young men worst for drug disorders, 11/20 (11/21 across dateline) Sydney Morning Herald via smh.com.au
    PERTH, Western Australia - ...Amphetamine use is rife among men in WA due to high incomes and long work hours. Almost one in 10 men under 30 years of age has regularly used stimulant drugs and West Australians are the worst offenders, says a drug expert... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Special report: In Europe's squeezed middle, life gets tougher, 11/21 Reuters.com
    MUNICH, Germany - ...The scheme, known as "Kurzarbeit", is Germany's answer to downturns and is based on the idea that it is better for all workers to take a bit of pain than for companies to start laying people off... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, November 19, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines today provided by Pierre Panoyan's Walgreen Pharmacy, 324 Mass. Ave. across from Adams, Arlington MA -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Older, suburban and struggling, 'near poor' startle the census, NYT, A1.
    ...None are poor, but many describe themselves as barely scraping by...
  • Republican financial plans - "Don't know much about his-to-ry...",
    op ed by Gail Collins, NYT, A19.
  • Decline of American exceptionalism - We must work to make America great again, op ed by Charles Blow, NYT, A19.
    [Actually we must work less - cut the workweek to share and spread the natural market-demanded employment as much as required to achieve full employment and maximum consumer spending and currency circulation.]
  • Euro stress indicators flash red, by Richard Barley, WSJ, B18.
    ...Wild swings in euro-zone bond markets and a further deterioration in bank-funding conditions...
  • Climate change is leading to at least some cases of more extreme weather events world-wide, a report by a U.N.-led scientific panel says, WSJ, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Columbus commissioners consider cuts, furloughs for department, Fayetteville Observer via fayobserver.com
    WHITEVILLE, N.C. - Pay cuts for in-home aides and a 15-hour furlough each month for all full-time employees of the Columbus County Department of Aging are being proposed to help the department make it through the fiscal year...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  2. School calendars: Who's off for Thanksgiving? OCRegister.com
    ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. - ...This year, 12 districts shortened their school year below the state's 180-day calendar – an option allowed by legislators as a way of coping with ongoing funding shortages – by implementing employee furloughs. These districts set between 175 and 178 instruction days. Most have attached their furlough days before or after existing school holidays, giving students and staff longer breaks throughout the year... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, November 18, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • As Whirlpool exits, job hunts begin - Fort Smith, Ark., shows grit amid loss..., Wall Street Journal, B1.
    ...1,000 Whirlpool workers...could lose their jobs. (photo caption)
    ["Could lose" or "have lost"?]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • R.I. adopts sweeping changes to pension system - Democrats' vote defied union allies,
    by David Klepper, AP via Boston Globe, B5.
    ...The legislation is designed to save billions of dollars by backing away from promises to state and municipal workers that lawmakers say the state can no longer afford...
    [So to maintain taxcuts for The Onepercent, it's OK to breach contracts right and left with the 99% - the end of sanctity of contract is the end of downsizing (not timesizing) America, for contracts now hold only within The Onepercent.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • CEOs get warnings about 2012, by John Bussey. WSJ, B1.
    ...Efforts to cut the deficit are falling short... Congress is in seizure. Calamity beckons.\.. Erskine Bowles, former co-chair of the national fiscal responsibility commission....
  • High end hits the auction block - Long associated with desperate sellers and foreclosed homes, auctions are now selling mansions and luxury estates, WSJ, D1.
    [Desperate sellers and foreclosed homes? So the difference would be ... what? All this says is that a lot of people who thought they were safe in the upper class have discovered that they were just in the upper middle class - and the whole middle class is disappearing, mostly downward. This is another example of how the Occupy Wall Street (and Canada's Occupy Bay Street) movement is actually getting what it wants. Frozen-workweek, downsizing, labor-surplus, falling-wages&spending capitalism is falling apart, as recorded day by day in the Sacred Writ of its Inner Sanctum, the Wall Street Journal. Visited Occupy Boston today with Kate in Timesizing Tshirts. Not as big an impact (gave out 5 cards) as with bro Glen at Nepean craft show Nov.5 (cuz Kate still had a jacket, tho open, over her Tshirt?), but still gave out 4 website cards. Craft fairs are good cuz so many of the booth people have been laid off. Occupy Boston has less space (a median park between busy streets over a highway tunnel) than Occupy Ottawa (a city park across the road from a big blockish city hall which itself has considerable "park" in front of it, but Occupy Boston is densely populated with maybe 80 tents while Occupy Ottawa had only maybe a dozen more sparsely situated tents when I visited on Nov.4.]
  • The number of people in the U.S. age 90 or older has nearly tripled since 1980, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Bad news or good? Bad because this pre-babyboom population bulge is straining the "few" workers left in the job market? - never mind their productivity is technologically amplified to hundreds or thousands of times greater than 1980's - though not their wages cuz they've been surplused by their frozen pre-tech workweek. Or good because more people are living longer and most still have that vanishing resource, pensions?]
  • Failure is good - No deal on debt [to extend taxcuts for the rich]? Hooray!, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A27.
    ...In Democrat-world, up is up and down is down. Raising taxes increases revenue, and cutting [government] spending while the economy is still depressed reduces employment.
    [But maintaining spending increases the unsustainable deficit. The Dems need to switch from government job creation in the unnoticed context of a frozen forty-hour workweek to private-sector worksharing and timesizing in the unemployment-countering context of an adjustable workweek, mostly downward.]
    But in Republican-world, down is up. The way to increase revenue is to cut taxes on corporations and the wealthy, and slashing government spending is a job-creation strategy...
    [The Republican position assumes that timesizing is already implemented and fully operational, so that its perceived "labor shortage," purely by market forces, is raising wages and centrifuging the massive cash caches in the liquidity trap of the big corporations and richest of the rich and artificial government job creation, including military makework, is unneeded.]
    [At this point in my "headline from hell" gleaning at the front of Porter Square Books in Cambridge, I was interrupted by a Kris Kringle looking fellow holding out his handshake hand and saying "Phil Hyde?".... "Who now," thought I, "recognizes moi but I have zilch idea who it is?" Gradually I made out a familiar, thinner, more intense, more eccentric, younger face in this smiling, happy, chubby, ruddy cheeked, white-bewhiskered apparition in front of me. It was Vince Dixon, former chairman of the Cambridge Republicans. He looked great. His mom had died and he'd been living on his own, but ... he was a survivor. And he'd turned to leading historic tours and taxi driving about town to augment his diminished fixed income. As the "stumbling recovery" stumbles to lower and lower levels, ever higher income brackets will be "clawed back" into the vanishing middle class and thence into the swelling lower class - and "radicalized" = they'll realize the tea party on the downside and many of their former bracket mates on the upside are clinging to ideas that are suicide.]
    [Still need: the article I saw tonight trying to make the case that the huge cash caches the corporations are supposedly sitting on are not as huge as we thought - because they simultaneously have record-breaking debt.]
  • Dow industrials shed 134.86 points or 1.1% to 11770.73...,
    WSJ, A1 pointer C4.
  • Companies' record debt: Why that corporate cash pile isn't so impressive,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • Massachusetts' economy is expected to slow dramatically, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B7.
    and the state is unlikely to reach prerecession employment levels until mid-2014, a new forecast [by the New England Economic Partnership] said.
  • Europe strains global [financial only] markets,
    WSJ, C1.
  • Crisis ensnares central bank in desperate bid to save euro,
    WSJ, A1.
    A [financial only] world at bay over Europe's debt crisis, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    Global economies can only go their own way if the financial system can hold its own.
    [Wrong. European economies can only go their own way if they return to their old separate currencies. Global economies can only go their own way if we drop disastrous simplism of "free" trade - the more globalization, the less control & fine-tuning and the more contagions. Global currency traders can take care of themselves, or flop and do something useful for a change. Ditto global investors with holdings in various currencies.]
    "Decoupling" is all the rage again on Wall Street.
    [And rightly so.]
    Put simply, many economists say there is little reason a European recession should significantly dent global "growth prospects" [our quotes]...
    [True, but there are absolutely no global growth prospects anyway - the deep structure (worktime per person still not automatically adjusting for technological-et-al. disemployment&deconsumption) is still concentrating and decirculating global money supplies without limit and there are absolutely no fundamental supports for growth until downsizing is replaced by timesizing. Growth is upsizing. Downsizing is not compatible with upsizing. Timesizing IS compatible with upsizing because you're employing more people = funding more consumer spending - remember "consumer spending" as in "consumer base"? And it needed pollute the environment if we practice Buchminster Fuller's precept of "doing more with less," as in, purchasing more massages.
    [But aren't wages lower when you size down worktime per person? Not when you're absorbing=hiring all the thousands of desperate resumes that are flying in for every few job openings, so now employers have to bid against one another for good help and raise wage levels flexibly and gradually - just like the labor "shortage" of the World Wars - remember "wartime prosperity"? Those were the days before drones when we got enough 'Mercans killt to raise wages and markets back home. Ah, war = the "conservatives'" makework campaign.
    [But isn't there too little real productivity to support all these shorter-hour workers? Not when automation and now, robotization, has multiplied productivity per worker-hour thousands of times - and this huge bonus has just been getting funneled to, and frozen in, the tiny percentage of the population. It needs to be centrifuged by market forces in response to an "acute labor shortage" - actually a labor-employment balance at last, of the kind that makes capitalism hum, without grotesque disparity between highest- and lowest-paid.
    [But isn't that huge concentration of money getting invested right away and "put back to work creating jobs" already? If so, where are the jobs? The crushing of the money supply into fewer and fewer hands by the overflowing, automation&robot-supplanted-labor surplus of desperate jobseekers has cut into, and decelerated, the source and foundation of all economic activity = the circulation of the currency, chiefly (70%) in consumer spending. Trim the workweek to correct.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Council overrides Barrett veto on furlough day, citing worker hardship, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel via jsonline.com
    MILWAUKEE, Wisc. - ...Also Friday, the council overrode Barrett's veto of a related measure setting the dates of furlough days. That means the July 5 furlough day is canceled, but furloughs remain in place for April 9, May 25 and Aug. 31 - the Monday after Easter and the Fridays before Memorial Day and Labor Day, respectively. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Taiwan unveils plan to help 20000 find jobs, Economic Times via articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - As of mid-November, at least 48 firms have cut work hours to save costs, affecting 5021 people, according to the Labour Affairs Council... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Nov.17/11 (4 months till St.Paddy'sDay!), while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there's been a recovery, we first bring you a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Obama says U.S. to base marines inside Australia - Message to China seen [yeah, "puhleez act more hostile"] - Deployment of 2,500 aimed at shoring up Asia alliances [more "jobs" for ALL of our suckers, oops, buddies!], New York Times, A1.
    [How smart is it to try to mold China into the Next Big Enemy when it can sell its US Treasury zillions and shut down all Bam's rich backers in an Augenblick?]
  • Fed official [Boston Federal Reserve pres. Eric Rosengren] says more can be done to create jobs,
    Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    [How about just sharing and spreading the market-demanded employment instead of creating more artificial government jobs at taxpayer expense?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • As new graduates return to nest, economy also feels the pain, by Catherine Rampell, NYT, A1.
    Like most of her friends, Hollis Romanelli graduated from college last May and promptly moved back in with her parents. As a result, she didn't pay rent - or a broker's fee or renters' insurance [or] buy a bed, desk, couch, doormat, mop or new crockery set nor did she pay the cable company...to set up her TV and Internet, or a handyman to hang a newly framed diploma [or] buy drinks and snacks for a housewarming party. In other words...she deprived the economy of a lot of potential activity...
  • Consumer prices inched down last month -...Confirmation of weak demand in the economy,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A6.
  • Stocks tumbled in the final hour of the session, capping a volatile day of trading - The Dow industrials slid 190.57 points or 1.6% to 11905.59, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
  • Banks face funding stress -
    [Oh please, bankers can get it from their personal accounts, where they stashed it all...]
    - European institutions resort to potentially risky swaps to generate liquidity, WSJ, A1.
    [Swaps, CDOs, derivatives, SSFs et al. just funnel money to fewer people and generate ILLiquidity - can't they learn that from the plummeting USA?]
  • Widening split in Europe on the virtue of austerity, NYT, B1.
    [Like trying to cut "bad" consumption, trying to foster "good" austerity is actually something you don't have to do in a downturn cuz that's what a downturn IS! Add to it and you get ... farther-faster DOWN!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Pressure for German-style short time working schemes, Yorkshire Post via yorkshirepost.co.uk
    YORK, England - ...Peter Spencer, the professor of economics and finance at York University, said the UK should consider adopting German-style short time working schemes... Mr Spencer, who is economic adviser to the Ernst & Young Item Club, highlighted the fact that the German labour market was “particularly effective” in preserving jobs through short time working... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Good news! - another professional economist "on board" with "Work Time Regulation as Sustainable Full Employment Strategy" to swell the team of Robert LaJeunesse and Dean Baker in Washington.]
  2. The trouble with France - France's problems go well beyond its 35-hour work week. Efforts to preserve its triple-A credit rating may not go far enough, FORTUNE via CNN via finance.fortune.cnn.com
    [Wrong. France's solutions are blocked by stopping workweek reduction at the still-too-high-for-lights-out-mfg 35-hour level and preventing further work&wage spreading. The financial "problems" are superficial and their "solutions" perverse.]
    PARIS, France -- ...What has happened to the French economy? The 35-hour government mandated work week surely hasn't helped matters much, [It certainly has - where does this genius think he's going to get the additional market-demanded employment to go back to 39 or 40 hours per person?] but it goes deeper. France has the highest level of government spending in the eurozone... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Government spending is shallower, not "deeper" than employment and resulting consumer spending. But hey, France is perfectly welcome to renounce its leadership with the world's shortest official nationwide workweek max, reconcentrate its market-demanded employment, clobber consumer spending and even get Taiwan-style karoshi = deaths from overwork -]
  3. Working hours of medical personnel to be ruled more strictly : CLA, China News Agency via Focus Taiwan News Channel via focustaiwan.tw
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - Medical professionals and workers in the health care industry will soon face restrictions on the amount of overtime they are allowed to work, in view of several recent deaths from overwork, the Council of Labor Affairs (CLA) said Thursday... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Masters must give more 'crumbs' to workers, Bloomington Pantagraph via pantagraph.com
    BLOOMINGTON, Illin. - ...Today with many Wal-Mart workers' low wages, averaging only 28 hours per week, some are eligible for public assistance. Their lower wages ensure Wal-Mart of a target group — their employees — unable to afford shopping anywhere but Wal-Mart... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["...I owe my soul to the company store."]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, November 16, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Filmmaking declined this year in Massachusetts, which faced increased competition from 37 other states that offer tax incentives, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B7.
    [Since when is it other taxpayers' responsibility to create arbitrarily selected, private-sector, for-profit jobs in unending support of a frozen, pre-computer workweek of five 8-hour days, which has now become a minimum instead of the maximum it was meant to be when instituted in 1940?]
  • Gov. Deval Patrick sought $21 million in US aid for the state's fishing communities, which he said have been harmed by federal rules, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    [A. What about the harm the state's fishing communities were doing to their own fishing stocks without the federal rules?
    B. Since when is it federal taxpayers' responsibility to prop up arbitrarily selected, private-sector, for-profit state-level jobs in unending support of a frozen, pre-computer workweek of five 8-hour days, which has now become a minimum instead of the maximum it was meant to be when instituted in 1940?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Middle class has shrunk - The portion of American families living in middle-income neighborhoods has declined signficantly since 1970, a study says - The findings show larger patches of affluence and poverty, NYT, A1 pointer to A15.
    [Wouldn't that be "larger patches of affluence and much much larger "patches" of poverty"?]
  • U.S. Postal Service lost $5.1 billion in fiscal 2011 and said it could run out of money by the end of fiscal 2012, WSJ, A1 pointer to A9.
  • Jolted, Wall Street protesters face challenge for future - Ousted by police, then allowed to return, NYT, A1.
    Officials in Canada moved to end the Occupy Toronto protest - London resumed legal action to evict protesters, WSJ, A1 news squib.
  • Young jobseekers told to work without pay or lose unemployment benefits... – providing up to 30 hours a week of unpaid labour – face losing benefits if they quit, by Shiv Malik, Manchester Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    [Has Britain reinstated the slavery law it repealed in 1824? But unpaid "internships" are also proliferating in the USA.]
  • Turmoil spreads in Europe - Broad market selloff hits nations seen as healthy [Austria, Netherlands, Finland, France...], raising specter of contagion, WSJ, A1.
    Signs of broad contagion in Europe as growth slows, NYT, B1.
  • Who's the decider - From India to Europe to the U.S., it's hard to find real leaders these days, op ed by Thomas Friedman, NYT, A31.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. NM courts cut hours, juror pay, Las Cruces Sun-News via lcsun-news.com
    SANTA FE - New Mexico's courts are so cash-poor that jurors took a pay cut this year. Worse still, most courts have reduced hours of business because they had to cut staff, even as case filings increased... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Nine to five soon to be a 'distant memory', with global markets set to keep staff up all night, research suggests, HRmagazine.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - ...The survey also shows that workers expect job shares and multiple careers to be commonplace by 2036... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Job sharing only splits up a frozen 40-hour workweek. We need work sharing, which reduces the definition of full-time downwards from 40 hours as far as it takes to regain full employment and maximum consumer spending and markets. You can't just stop forever at 35 like France when the automation and robots are constantly rolling in.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, November 15, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • At UniCredit, [a Milan-based lender, roughly 1,650] job cuts and share sale,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • At Goldman Sachs, an unusual number of retirements among partners - Cost-cutting is taking a toll at the higher pay levels, New York Times, B2.
    [At last, downsizing at pay levels that can afford it and for people who labeled downsizing firms as BUYs all the way along!]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks fell amid investors' fears about Europe, WSJ, A1 pointer to C4.
    ... The Dow industrials lost 74.70 points, or 0.6%, to 12078.98.
    [What a lucky windfall for our corrupt financial industry - distracting problems in Europe!]
  • Hundreds of millions of dollars might have gone missing from customer accounts at MF Global as far back as four days before the firm [then under Jon Corzine] filed for bankruptcy protection, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [So much for the pristine Corzine.]
  • Europe's 'fragile' economy [our quotes, cuz no way fragile as our USecon] shows deepening distress, WSJ, A1 pointer to A13.
    ...as individual output dropped across the euro zone, dimming hopes the region's leaders will be able to resolve a debt crisis that Merkel called Europe's "most difficult hours since World War II."
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. European rules on doctors' working hours need 'urgent' reform... - NHS managers have demanded 'urgent and common sense' changes to the impractical European rules on working times warning that it damages patient care, (11/16 late pickup) London Telegraph via Telegraph.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - All doctors must not work more than 48 hours a week for the NHS under the EU Working Time Directive... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. State supervisors share pain of furloughs - Management-confidential workers get PEF deal, Albany Times Union via timesunion.com
    ALBANY, N.Y. -- The state's 10,300 non-unionized management and confidential employees will be taking furloughs over the next two years, just like their unionized counterparts. The furloughs [are] known as Deficit Reduction Leave... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Woowee, a special happyface label for furloughs!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, November 13-14, 2011, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • VeriFone is buying European payments from Point International for about $815 million, a bet the trend toward electronic transactions will weather the debt crisis, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B8.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Alternative-energy companies face [unknown] with high-profile bankruptcies, plunging sales...,
    11/13 Boston Globe. A1 ptr to G1.
    Losing power - Clean-tech firms face an uncertain future as the economy lags...,
    11/13 BG, G1 target article.
  • Young voters' ardor for Obama has wilted - Economy has hit under-30s hard,
    11/14 BG, A1.
  • Northeastern [University] teach-in cites US economic inequalities, by Jay Fitzgerald, 11/14 BG, B7.
    ...Economic inequalities they say are harming the country's social fabric...."Teach in: Reclaiming Our Economy"....
    [They'd have more effectiveness if they called it "overconcentrated money supply" and focused on how it's harming the economic fabric, specifically the interests of the wealthiest, who now have far beyond what they can spend or even sustainably invest at this point = a Great Leak Upward, a Black Hole of wasted money. They either get behind work spreading and sharing as a prelude to money spreading and sharing, or their trillion$ will be useful only for stuffing their mattresses.]
  • Banks quietly ramp up costs to consumers [under the radar], New York Times, A1.
    ...replace debit card $5 BofA...
    ...deposit by mobile phone 50c US Bancorp...
    ...deposit by wire $15 TD...
  • Euro risks hit banks - Question about hedges fester as firms detail exposure,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Taxes from the wealthy won't solve all Italy's problems, WSJ, C8.
    [40% sounds pretty good, till they can implement emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A look a Meriden officer Cossette's workweek around the incidents, 11/14 Meriden Record-Journal via myrecordjournal.com
    [Here's another downside to long hours besides endangering patients (medical interns) and elevated accident rate (truckers and other drivers) -]
    MERIDEN, Conn. - An October 2010 incident in which Officer Evan Cossette is accused of police brutality occurred during a 75.5-hour workweek for Cossette, according to city payroll records... "Even the best officers who are impaired by fatigue or chronic fatigue will likely, on occasion, overreach in threatening situations, lose their tempers, and make bad decisions"... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sunways sales still shrinking: 2H 2011 losses expected, 11/4 PV-Tech.org
    ARNSTADT, Germany - ...The company noted it had introduced short-time work at its cell plant in Arnstadt, in early September, to adjust production capacities to the current demand... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Their sales would have shrunk a lot faster in the U.S. with over 50% of the states still downsizing without worksharing ("short-time work") programs.]
  3. Working hours in the hospitality industry, 11/14 Australian Hospitality Magazine via hospitalitymagazine.com.au
    CANBERRA, Australia - Maximum working hours are provided for in the National Employment Standards (NES) and detailed in the Fair Work Act 2009. The NES took effect from 1 January 2010 and set the minimum safety net of employment conditions for all employees throughout Australia. Under the NES, the maximum number of working hours for a full-time employee is 38 hours per week plus any reasonable additional hours [=loophole?]. For those employees who are not full-time employees, maximum hours are deemed the lesser of the employee's ordinary hours each week or 38 hours. ...A 38 hour working week can be averaged over a maximum of four weeks (e.g. 152 hours per four week period)... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Kinders[gartens] warn three's a crowd, 11/13 TheAge.com.au
    WANTIRNA, Vic., Australia - ...Preschools in regional and rural communities also fear the policy would force their three-year-old programs to close because teachers who split their time between two towns would have to quit or cut hours at one kinder to teach more hours at another...
    - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sat.11/12/2011 on Fri's news, while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • MF Global's 1,066 broker-dealer employees were fired by the trustee liquidating the business - Between 150 and 200 will be rehired [briefly] to help wind down the the business, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Caging raging contagion, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    Is there no end to the [investment] contagion?... [Only when investors lose the nutty idea that they can transfer 100% of the money supply to themselves and still have anywhere to put "their" money except their coffin. And only when they back emergency taxes on themselves, and temporary worksharing merging into sustainable timesizing for everyone else, to provide full employment and maximum markets however short a workweek it takes.]
  • Europe pulls back from brink [or does it?] - Greece swears in new leader [any smarter?] - as Italy moves austerity plan forward, WSJ, A1.
    [The only austerity plan that won't lessen consumer spending even further and push Italy over the brink is an "austerity" plan [higher taxes] on the rich, who are neither investing nor spending their money anyway. Apart from that first aid, only Bob LaJeunesse's " Work time regulation as sustainable full employment strategy" will vanish the "brink."]
  • Europe's woes pose new perils to U.S. government, WSJ, A1.
    [Not nearly as great as the US's own old perils and elite coverup. Oh and here's a new US peril -]
  • Gingrich making gains, WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.
    [Wasn't it Newt "Mr. Family Values" Gingrich that served divorce papers on his wife when she was in the hospital with cancer? Wasn't he the nutcase who, back in the '90s, began the insanity of threatening his own nation with bankruptcy in order to get his own suicidal Contract On [oops] With America passed? The silver stake has come loose and he's BA-A-ACK chust lak Freddy or Jason or...Count Drrrahcoolah. Back to feeneesh-off America. And here's America's own version of the prematurely unified eurozone crisis -]
  • U.S. tax code fails to account for regional differences in tax burdens, New York Times, B1 pointer to B5.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Bangalore move on working hours for women seen as dangerous, AsianCorrespondent.com
    [Moving the wrong way -]
    BANGALORE, India - An ill-conceived move by the Karnataka government allowing the extension of working hours for women working in the IT industry in Bangalore is drawing flak both from women and IT professionals...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Sheriff seeks guidance on furloughs - Lines blurred when inmates are released to attend treatment, Springfield News-Leader via news-leader.com
    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - On Wednesday, Springfield police officers and sheriff's deputies had the place surrounded. But, for a few tense minutes, no one was sure if they could go in and get the bad guy. The man had been on furlough, meaning a judge did not formally release him from jail but ordered that he be allowed to go to a treatment program. Whether or not the man completed the program, he had to return to jail.
    [Here's another kind of "furlough" that's irrelevant to timesizing instead of downsizing besides the "furlough" that's really a layoff (slow news day).]
    ...Furloughs muddy the waters... - see whole article under today's date.
    [That's for sure - this kind of furloughs anyway!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, 11/11/11 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • John Hancock Financial Services will cut 116 jobs in Boston as part of a streamlining and restructuring effort, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Boomers' anxiety over retirement growing, AP via Boston Globe, A7.
    ...Most [53%] now doubt that they will be financially secure after they retire [up from 44% in March], according to a new...Associated Press-LifeGoesStrong.com poll. ...Baby boom generation...the 77 million boomers born between 1946 and 1964 [why stop in '64?] \is\ planning to work into retirement years [which are being pushed back later than 65 by Social Security anyway] - with 73% planning to work past retirement, up from 67% this spring.
    ...41% believe they will struggle financially.
    ...62% of the boomers polled lost money on at least one of four core parts of retirement savings:
    A workplace retirement savings plan, 42% Personal investments outside of an IRA/workplace savings, 41%
    An IRA, 32%
    Real estate, 29%

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • U.S. plans bomb sales in [Persian] Gulf to counter Iran, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ["Who can, by stirring, clear muddy water. But leave it alone, and it will come clear of itself." Lao Tzu.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Veterans for hire - Returning troops find job prospects bleak, Boston Globe, A1.
    Unemployment rate (graph from BLS figures)
    October 2010: US 9.7%, vets 10.6%
    October 2011: US 9.0%, vets 12.1%
  • Concerns are rising that the FHA could exhaust its reserves if the economy doesn't recover soon, increasing the risk that the agency would seek a taxpayer bailout, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Get your checkbooks ready. First, taxpayers are forced by "their" representatives to bailout the auto industry (Chrysler...), then the financial industry (Wall Street), now the housing industry.... Then our dumb-parasitic CEOs have the cluelessness to ask, Where are our consumers?]
  • Eight million people entered a lottery to win a U.S. green card, down from a record 15 million last year,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    [And how many can "win"? And with five Americans already looking for every job opening, who is setting these insanely high figures when we should long since have been on steady-state migration = one out, one in?]
  • The EU slashes its growth forecast for the coming year and said it can't exclude the possibility of a "deep and prolonged recession" [= a "depression"?!], WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    [How about "it can almost guarantee a permanent and ever-deepening depression" - unless and until it lets its unemployment rate fluctuate its workweek to countervail.]
  • Legends of the fail [as in "Legends of the Grail"] - What didn't go wrong in Europe, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A25.
    ...What has happened, it turns out, is that by going on the euro, Spain and Italy in effect reduced themselves to the status of third-world countries that have to borrow in someone else's currency, with all the loss of flexibility that implies....
    [More continentalization or globalization, less control - same thing that happened in the early united colonies (USA) - same thing we're getting now when we want the tax code to be sensitive to differences in regional economic levels.]
  • Greece and Italy ask technocrats to find solution - Markets await action - Issue is whether "experts" [our quotes] can succeed after politicians failed, NYT, A1.
    [Historically, the "Technocratic" movement in the USA ca.1910-1940 was on the trail of the real solution - they wanted a 16-hour workweek, four 4-hour days.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Fighting Against Furloughs - Furlough discussions become more common in contract talks, By Kaustuv Basu, InsideHigherEd.com
    [Hours cuts or furloughs - two ways of timesizing to avoid downsizing.]
    CARBONDALE, Illin. - ...In prior years, furloughs haven't been central to many contract negotiations, but faculty members at the university had to take four furlough days this year... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Government urged to regulate doctors' work hours, eTaiwan News via taiwannews.com.tw
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - ... According to Department of Health (DOH) statistic, medical residents in Taiwan work an average of 75 hours per week, said Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Legislator Huang Sue-ying at a public hearing Friday, a day before Doctor's Day. She said the workload was well beyond what the human body can handle and could compromise the quality of medical services or even put the lives of patients at risk.... "A doctor operating on a patient after working for 24 straight hours is as dangerous as a drunk person behind the wheel," she said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And in the "enlightened" USA, interns' hours are "capped" at 80 hours a week.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, November 10, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from café car of Amtrak Adirondack southbound from Montréal & from Albany NY Starbucks -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Four [make that five] of the Fed's main trading partners melted down in the past four years, a record that has critics calling for more oversight, WSJ, A1 pointer to C2.
    When dealers fail the Fed - Post-MF Global, critics call for more oversight of main trading partners,
    by McGrane & Hilsenrath, WSJ, C2 target article.
    ...MF Global Holdings Ltd., which filed for bankruptcy protection last week, was one of 22 financial firms known as primary dealers. They play a key role in the financial system, trading billions of dollars of securities with the Fed every day as part of its efforts to manage short-term interest rates and the broader economy. Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Countrywide and Merrill Lynch also were in the elite club of primary dealers. They evaporated in 2007 and 2008, either via collapse or purchase in a state of distress during the financial crisis...
    ...When "deleted" from primary dealer list: (WSJ Research data)
    MF Global 10/31/2011
    Merrill 2/11/2009
    Bear Stearns 10/01/2008
    Lehman 9/22/2008
    Countrywide 7/15/2008
  • Sewer debt puts Alabama['s most populous county, Jefferson] into record bankruptcy [estimated $4.1 billion],
    Toronto Globe, A17.
    Commissioners in Jefferson County, Ala., which owes more than $3 billion on a failed sewer deal, filed for what would be the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history after a tentative rescue plan unraveled, WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • Criminal case glut impedes civil suits, by Fields & Emshwiller, WSJ, A1.
    An explosion of criminal prosecutions in the nation's overextended federal courts...prompted particularly by criminal cases related to drugs and immigration, as well as by the proliferation of more-obscure federal criminal laws, threatens the functioning of the nation's judicial system...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • 'Mancession' - Young men without work - Fixing the problem will be very hard because it's not simply economic - It's also structural and social, op ed by Margaret Wente, Toronto Globe, A19.
    [Uh, "structural" does not contrast with "economic," Margaret. By "economic" she probably means "financial." Or in Chomskian, surface-structural vs. deep-structural. But just because the problem is (deep-) structural and has broad social effects doesn't mean fixing it will be hard. Cutting the workweek is easy. Converting overtime into jobs wasn't that hard during World War II. Switching management skills and schools from firing to coordinating shorter shifts is the hardest - anybody can tear down; it takes real skill to build up.]
    "The longer they go without work, the dimmer their prospects become - and the more likely they are to drink, do drugs and develop other habits that will make them even less employable" (blowout quote)
  • U.S. home prices fell in nearly three-quarters of metropolitan areas in the third quarter and the national median price dropped 4.7%, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
  • Hardware retailer Rona says consumers still cautious, Toronto Globe, B10.
    [Consumers aren't cautious - they're moneyless. But thank God, Europe is offering a momentary eclipse of America's mounting disaster -]
  • For Europe, a dangerous new phase \in\ debt crisis, Toronto Globe, B1.
    Euro woes roil markets... - Dow down 3.20% to 11,780.94, Toronto Globe.
    Faith in eurozone crumbles -...Canada looks ripe to euro business refugees, National Post, A1.
    'Rome is burning' - Treaty threatens to fracture as markets tremble \-\ Time for a '2-speed' eurozone: Sarkozy,
    National Post, FP1.
  • Italy fears sink global markets - ...Higher margin restrictions for holders of Italian debt spur selloff - Country's debt is second highest on the continent after Greece, Toronto Globe, B1, B8.
    Italy fears rattle world's investors - Markets in U.S. and Europe drop as turmoil fuels fears crisis could endanger common currency, ricochet across Atlantic, WSJ, A1.
    Italy yields through the roof \-\ 7.25% yield on 10-year Italian bond, National Post, FP1.
    [Another view -]
    Reading between the lines on Italy's woes, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    Going by exports to Europe, the Continent's debt crisis seems to pose about as much threat to the U.S. as the giant asteroid that zoomed by this week. The U.S. sends less than 1% of its total exports to Italy, and 0.08% to Greece.
    Its biggest export destinations in Europe - Germany and the Netherlands - each took less than 3% of total U.S. exports in August, followed by Belgium and France with less than 2% each. All told, the European Union's share of U.S. exports has dropped from more than a quarter in 1999 to less than 18% today...
    [And much of that drop was Europe's shock and recoil from what the Bush regime was doing to America and trying to do to the world.]
  • Greeks withdraw their money - Fear grips Greeks who pull 5-billion euros from their bank accounts,
    National Post, FP1 pointer to FP6.
  • Op ed by Amrit Dhillon (with misleading title), Toronto Globe, A19.
    NEW DELHI, India - ...Some men lucky enough to find a wife are letting their brothers sleep with her because the chances of them all finding wives are remote. After decades of practicing femal feticide, families are facing the major consequence... More than 40 million women are estimated to [have been sacrificed] as a result... In some areas [especially in the north], there are only 858 women to every 1000 men compared with the national ratio of 940....
    [And we thought only China had a problem with lack of females. At least India has sacrificed them with a little less brutality (exposure of babies) or mercenariness (selling to Americans).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Benefits of a Shorter Workweek, TriplePundit.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - ...When the competition for jobs increases, the power of labor decreases, especially for unskilled labor. It's hard for a worker to argue for higher wages or a shorter workweek when there are many unemployed people who would gladly take his or her job... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. No balance in Canadian budget in four years..., Daily Commercial News via DCNonl.com
    CALGARY, Alta., USA = Canada's new capital - ...A temporary extension of an enhancement to the Work-Sharing Program by providing an additional extension of up to 16 weeks for active, recently terminated or new work-sharing agreements until October 2012 was also announced... - see whole article under today's date.
    [PM Harper's worksharing window-dressing, trammeled with red tape and delays.]
  3. South Korea's economy - What do you do when you reach the top? - To outsiders, South Korea’s heroic economic ascent is a template for success - But now it has almost caught up with the developed world, it must change its approach, The Economist via economist.com
    SEOUL, South Korea - ...During the 2009-10 recovery...Korea had the second-largest increase in hours worked in manufacturing, after Taiwan... [This, after SK just cut their workweek from 44 to 40 hours to make more jobs and enter the 20th century? And what is the fruit of increased labor in the robotics age? -]
    ...On some estimates, half of recent graduates are failing to find full-time jobs [oh yes, "education," our 3rd-biggest makework realm after war and prisons] and are going into further study or part-time employment.... One way to boost the skilled labour force might be to have rather more people working rather fewer hours. The extra people would be women, often highly educated ones. Quite a lot of Korean women stay at home—the participation rate for women aged 25-54 is only 62%, the fourth-lowest in the OECD—even though they are usually better educated than men. In almost all rich countries, the best-educated women are more likely to work than their less-educated sisters. Not in South Korea. Shorter hours might encourage some of these skilled women into the workforce... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Yes, the waste of women (sexism) is a prime argument for shorter workweeks in many cultures, just as the waste of seniors (ageism) is in others, like ours (US-Canada).]
  4. We need a searching approach to the jobless, YorkshirePost.co.uk
    [Here's a nitwit Brit pundit asking for a "searching approach to the jobless" without mentioning shorter hours to spread the vanishing unautomated employment...]
    YORK, U.K. - With a looming global slowdown threatening to turn into recession, there has scarcely been a worse time to be one of Britain’s two-and-a-half million unemployed. The vast majority of these are doing all they can to get a job – indeed around three-quarters of them will get new work within six months (albeit often at shorter hours and lower wages)... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, November 9, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Honda extends cuts - As flooding in Thailand disrupts supply lines, Japanese auto makers forced to adopt tough measures, Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B5 (sic, actually B4 - editors!).
    ["Forced" only by their inability to think of and implement the worksharing alternative.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Uneasy, Canadians could spend less at Noel - The chancy economy induces consumers to rein in their debts, according to a survey by the firm Deloitte Canada, Le Devoir of Montreal, B5.
  • Adults staying - or returning - to live with their parents,
    National Post, FP1 pointer to FP8.
    At home with Generation Boomerang - Huge number of young adults still live with parents - In 2011, 30 looks to be the new 20 - Call it extended adolescence, National Post, FP8 target article.
  • Problems seem bigger than our leaders -
    [Actually they're smaller but our "leaders" don't have the historical knowledge, imagination or design smarts to enable unemployment to automatically cut the workweek.]
    - The lesson from the G20 summit is the importance of international institutions in solving issues, writes Perry Beatty, Ottawa Citizen, A1 pointer to A13.
    [Again, international institutions are totally UNimportant in solving the issue of overconcentrated national money supplies - in fact, they have generally worsened the problem, which is only solved by imposing national workweek caps and lowering them to get employers bidding against one another for good help - the higher wages centrifuge the uncirculating black hole of megabucks from the "one percent" and to the 99% who actually spend it and the resulting currency recirculation creates genuine recovery.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Slaying deficit to take longer, MontrealGazette.com
    CALGARY, Alberta, USA = Canada's new capital city -- ...Flaherty delivered a fall economic update on Tuesday with a handful of tweaks to the government's fiscal plan, including some relief on employment insurance premiums, extension of a federal work-sharing program and protracting the government's timeline for eliminating a deficit estimated at $31 billion... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. National News: Harper Government Takes Action to Support Jobs and Growth, NorthumberlandView.ca
    OTTAWA-GATINEAU, Canada = Canada's old capital city -- ...Temporary extension of an enhancement to the Work-Sharing Program, which has helped stabilize Canada's job market, by providing an additional extension of up to 16 weeks for active, recently terminated or new work-sharing agreements until October 2012... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, November 8, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Boralex selling five U.S. plants [to ReEnergy Holdings LLC of Latham NY for $93m],
    Toronto Globe, B9.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Government cutbacks [in Canada] - Jobless waiting weeks for Employment Insurance news - Service Canada workforce shrinking, meaning even callbacks take days, by Gloria Galloway, Toronto Globe, A4.
    [Little puppydog economy has to do every dumb thing that Big Dog nextdoor does, even when it's eating toadstools.]
    ...Call centres are being closed and consolidated to help achieve a savings of $247-million by March, 2013. ...There are hundreds fewer employees now than there were before the economy went into a nosedive....

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Global woes start to hit home on health costs, deficit goals,
    Toronto Globe, A1.
  • Bond traders signal Italy is teetering on the edge,
    Toronto Globe, B1.
  • The lost generation - No jobs, no hope for [southern] Europe's young [nevermind America's young!] - [US & Southern] European youths are slipping into the ranks of the long-term unemployed, which threatens to produce lasting economic and social problems,
    Toronto Globe, B1.
  • Young and prey to debt - 'Schools are ramping up financial literacy programs to teach how to budget and save, but many still miss the mark' - Students, still cluelessly optimistic about their future, are vulnerable to monetary pitfalls,
    Toronto Globe, L1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. What Political Compromises Could Create Jobs? NPR (blog)
    WASHINGTON, U.S.A. - ...Work sharing allows workers to use their unemployment insurance to partially offset a reduction in hours. For example, a worker who has his hours reduced by 20% would have 10% of his total wages made up by unemployment benefits...- see whole article under today's date.
  2. Manufacturers, labour support extension of job sharing, CME-MEC (press release) via cme-mec.ca
    OTTAWA-GATINEAU, [old capital of] Canada – Leaders representing Canadian manufacturers and exporters and the Canadian labour movement are pleased that the federal government will extend for one year a [work] sharing program allowing workers who would otherwise have been laid off to work part time and receive EI benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - Employment assurance - The hike in contributions less important than foreseen for 2012 - 'Since the world economy remains fragile, the economic and financial "latest" (mise a jour) goes to show (demontrer) once again that the absolute priority of the government is the economy' - a government source [and more targeted than "it's the economy, stupid" would be "it's consumer spending, stupid," via wages and JOBS: ed.] , La Presse de Montreal, A10.
    CALGARY, Alberta, [USA - new capital of] Canada - ...In his speech before the members of the Calgary Chamber of Commerce, the grand silversmith of the country [Minister of Finance Jim Flaherty] will also announce that Ottawa will prolong by 16 weeks the shared work programme. This programme, set afoot in the thick (foulee) of the 2008 economic crisis, permits employers and employees to avoid temporary layoffs (mises a pied) during a drop in economic activity. By this measure, admissable employees who accept to temporarily reduce their workweek in order to permit an enterprise to stay afloat (se maintenir a flot) receive an income support (soutien de revenus) thanks to payments (grace aux prestations) from employment assurance. Till now, some 300,000 workers took advantage (se sont prevalus) at some (un) given moment of this measure since 2008...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, November 6-7, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Dept. of National Defense [Canada] draws battle plan for job cuts - Objectives will be achieved through hiring freeze, attrition and layoffs, documents reveal, 11/07 Ottawa Citizen, A1.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Fur retailer to close doors after 110 years in business [in Ottawa] - Dworkin Furs started as Rideau St. tailor shop,
    11/06 Ottawa Citizen, B2.
  • Bid for Nova Scotia mill sparks green outcry, 11/07 Toronto Globe, B5.
    ...The shuttered Port Hawkesbury NewPage paper mill...went under in September. [photo caption]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Don't fight deficit on backs of [Canada] veterans,
    11/06 Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    Veterans take concern to [Parliament] Hill - Protesters want details of how benefits will be cut,
    11/06 Ottawa Citizen, B1.
  • Solar power boom hits a wall [in Canada] - Falling prices, overcapacity, doubts over subsidies clobber industry and cloud outlook - Big players are fighting for their lives, 11/07 Toronto Globe; B1, B13.
  • Europe's governments prepare to take their medicine, 11/06 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [If the medicine is austerity, that will cut their consumer spending and plunge them deeper into downturn. If the medicine is shorter hours to rehire the downsized and incentivate employers to bid against one another for good help and raise general wage levels - and consumer spending - that will centrifuge their overconcentrated money supply(ies), accelerate the circulation of their currency(ies), redynamize their economy(ies) and halt and reverse their downward spiral(s).]
  • Debt: Italian brinkmanship threatens Europe, inside header, 11/07 Toronto Globe, B4.
    [Italian, and Greek, and Spanish, and Irish... - and the only sustainable solution is to quarantine them so they can learn the only way they'll ever learn = the hard way, and if that means extruding them from the euro zone, get on with it! The eurozone was only useful to counter the suicidal Bush regime and now that America's in covered-up freefall, Europe needs more fine-tunability. So dump the deliquents and don't ever send good money after bad.]
  • Carney keys in on global liquidity - New Financial Stability Board head [Mark Carney] to address need for lasting solution to debt crisis, by Jeremy Torobin, 11/07 Toronto Globe, B2.
    [But the only "crisis" Carney is "keying in" on is -]
    ...Last week at the Group of 20 summit in France, European leaders were unable to secure outside support to double the 440-billion-euro firepower of a euro-zone bailout fund that many policy makers, including Mr. Carney, argue needs to be much bigger to truly stem the crisis....
    [What's the use of the USA learning the hard way that bailing out the rich is just "waving money around" (caption credit to diligent dialoguer Diane 11/01/11) - it's a superficial and/or crisis-worsening fix, whether financial or non-financial corporations and whether corporations or individuals, if Carney and the Europeans are too stupid to avoid the U.S. mistake? The only illiquidity crisis that matters is the illiquidity of poverty among consumers and the illiquidity of the huge cash stashes among investors who consequently lack sustainable (let along profitable) investment targets (ie: marketable productivity) to invest in. You can't get sustainable consumer spending from consumer debt. You can get sustainable consumer spending from good jobs and wage levels, however short the standard workweek in force. And that workweek should be as short as required to raise wage levels to support the desired degree of consumer spending. As a NYT article pointed out two weeks ago, it's no longer enough to just say "It's the economy, stupid." We've got to get more specific, and so for starters, "It's consumer spending, stupid!" - leading to "It's high unemployment and low wage levels, stupid!" - leading to "It's long, frozen, pre-computer workweeks, stupid!"]
  • Lifted briefly by the tide [ie: taxpayers] - It's a rhythm in the city's poorest neighborhoods that outsiders easily miss - the fleeting prosperity of the first of the month, by Meghan Irons, 11/06 Boston Globe, A1.
    Shoppers line up to check out at Save-a-Lot grocery store, which is more heavily stocked with food and uses more workerss around the first of the month. (photo caption)
    ROXBURY, Mass. - ...The difference between the two days is as simple as the turn of a calendar page: One was the last day of the month. The next the first, when $8 million in public assistance began to flow in a neighborhood where poverty and unemployment are among [Boston's] highest and every other person receives some form of government assistance... Bills are paid, groceries bought, children brought to the doctor. Sales of just about everything rise...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Clifton Heights postal workers protest reductions, 11/07 Delaware County Daily Times via delcotimes.com
    CLIFTON HEIGHTS, Pa. - ...The employees from the Clifton Heights post office said they are concerned about a potential reduction of a workweek from six days to five days. They are also worried about the reduction of a 40-hour workweek to a 30-hour workweek... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Flaherty retools as global economic picture darkens, 11/07 Toronto Star via thestar.com
    OTTAWA, Canada—The federal government is scaling back a planned hike to employment insurance premiums and will extend a work-sharing program as global economic woes slow plans to balance the federal budget... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Angela Merkel's Germany pessimistic about the future - Many middle class Germans are seeing their pay frozen or cut while the cost of living continues to rise, 11/07 BBC News via bc.co.uk
    BERLIN, Germany - ...Germans have shorter hours of work than Britain or America (or Greece). German unemployment (at 6%) is lower than most Western countries including Britain... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Yet Germans have a headstart on everyone else in the longterm solution. They're already used to emergency worksharing a la Kurzarbeit. Now all they have to do is work toward a standard maximum-workweek level, convert the funding from the unemployment insurance fund to something like a confiscatory tax on corporate overtime (OT) profits and individual overwork (OW) earnings, and grant a 100% OT-OW tax exemption for reinvestment in OT/OW-targeted jobs, and training whenever needed.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, November 5, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • After 140 years of independence, diamond giant De Beers is consumed [by Anglo American PLC], National Post, FP1.
    [And probably headed for disaster like Filene's Basement and Boston Market (nee successful Boston Chicken).]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Retirement could be lengthiest stage of life, National Post, FP1.
    [Economies that give over determination of workweek length to their unemployment rate, however short a workweek it may take to achieve full employment and maximum consumer spending, those economies will have lifelong, repeating, temporary "retirement" every lengthening weekend with no such waste of knowledge and experience as currently embodied by permanent en-of-life retirement. With a workweek that lengthens as high tech heightens, retirement will no longer be needed to open up jobs for the young, and agism will vanish.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Factory employment hits a 35-year low as more plants close, Toronto Globe, B1.
    ...particularly in Central Canada...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Financial strain forces Indiana libraries to close doors, cut hours, buy fewer books, AP via TheRepublic.com
    GREENWOOD, Ind. — Libraries across Indiana are cutting hours, buying fewer new materials and closing their doors as they struggle under the weight of statewide property tax caps and declining revenue... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Montgomery sales tax revenue down $400K from Oct. 2010, Montgomery Advertiser
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. - ...The 2012 budget included three furlough days, with each day representing about $400,000 in savings... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Timesizing instead of downsizing, the only way out of this diagonally downward spiral.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, November 4, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Mags & Fags, 254 Elgin, Ottawa -
    -->
    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • AMD plans to cut 10% of its work force, or about 1,400 jobs, after facing manufacturing glitches,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B5.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Greece blinks on euro threat - Papandreou, future uncertain, calls off vote, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [And another consumer base takes a hit, the wealthy get less to invest in, the downturn deepens.]
  • G-20 leaders raced to "help" [our quotes] Europe's next most vulnerable economy: Italy, WSJ, A1 pointer to A11.
  • The ranks of the poorest in the U.S. has climbed to a record of one in 15 people, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Americans Work Too Much for Their Own Good: de Graaf and Batker, Bloomberg.com
    SEATTLE, Wash. - Until World War II, bread (higher wages) and roses (as in, shorter hours -- time to smell the roses!) were the twin demands of the labor movement... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And if you can only get one and it's higher wages, you wind up with neither, because you're tacking an artificially high price on a surplus commodity, you, but if you can only get one and it's shorter hours, you wind up with both, because you're harnessing market forces to raise the price on a diminishing surplus, you.]
  2. Sharing the work -- and the layoffs - Employees get jobless benefits for days they're idle, under state plan, (11/03 late pickup) Albany Times Union via timesunion.com
    ALBANY, N.Y. -- ...The Shared Work Program, as it's called, provides unemployment benefits for the days that employees are idle, while they receive paychecks for the days they work. An employee working three days would receive 60% of his normal pay, plus 40% of what he'd normally get in unemployment benefits... - see whole article under today's date. [= cutting the workweek instead of the workforce.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, November 3, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC - headlines from Réflections, Galeries de Hull -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Filene's saga ends - Modern challenges forcing once cherished Basement stores to shut, Boston Globe, A1.
    ...only 21 stores remaining...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Fed issues bleak outlook - U.S. central bank vows to tackle stubbornly high jobless rate as it slashes forecasts,
    Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Its power to create jobs is only indirect = by supporting unemployment-countering work spreading and sharing, by resuming nationwide workweek reduction, a policy untapped since 1940 but crucial today if there are going to be any markets for all the products and services the robots are churning out.]
  • Canada's quality-job pace slows, Canadian Press via Ottawa Metro, 16.
    Canada's 1.4 million unemployed were finding it tougher to land better-paying jobs, particularly in the public sector, as the pace of job growth [slowed] during the third quarter.... While the economy generated on average 17,000 new jobs a month during the period, that was down from 29,000 a month in the second quarter and 33,000 in the first - and those fewer jobs were generally of lower quality \said\ CIBC[']s Canadian Employment Quality Index...
  • Greek crisis overshadows G20,
    Toronto Star, A25.
    Eurozone leaders tell Greece to take it or leave it,
    Toronto Globe, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Auto-making - Toyota to halt N. America overtime, Toronto Globe, B7.
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - Toyota Motor Corp...will halt overtime and any Saturday production at its North American plants next week as the flooding in Thailand continues to disrupt the auto maker's supply chain... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= Hours cuts instead of layoffs.]
  2. State: Cut hours, cut pay - Agencies told to promote program where 7% of state workforce voluntarily chooses part-time work, Albany Times Union via timesunion.com
    [Systemically, when you cut hours, you paradoxically firm or raise pay because you're cutting systemic labor surplus which is causing systemic paycuts.]
    ALBANY, N.Y. -- ...Ideally, the Cuomo administration wants 7% of the state workforce working -- and getting paid for -- less than five days a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Greece knocks [better: slides?] investors off track - Surprise referendum spoils hopes for rally,
    Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    Greek surprise [referendum on bailing out the rich] flips G20 from calm in Cannes to crisis again..., Toronto Globe, A1.
    ..."It's as if he [PM Papandreou] set off a bomb under the whole continent," says Janis Emmanouilides, a Greek-German analyst with the European Political Centre in Brussels.
    [No, just under the financial "industry."]
    "Nobody expected this, and it's not necessary that he would have a referendum...
    [Yes it is, you arrogant clown.]
    Yes or no - Fiscal austerity or financial ruin [or taxes to force the rich to pay themselves back]: Those are the choices in a Greek vote on the 130-billion-euro bailout = Greece's gamble - So unpopular is the plan to rescue Greece that the country tilting toward a return to its own currency, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Notice they never mention the third and most obvious choice = higher taxes on those who keep taking dumb risks and causing the problems. But please, Greece - please, puhleeez, return to your own currency and pay your own taxes instead of trying to "crisis" foreign taxpayers to pay them.]
  • Carney backs Greek bailout referendum - 'It's imperative that there is broad democratic support,' says Bank of Canada governor, Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [Alert reader Diane reports that the Ottawa Citizen has a good editorial cartoon today - something about a householder opening the door to some post-Halloween trick-or-treaters from the financial industry, still trying to trick people into bailing out the rich.]
    You can vote out Socrates, but not economic "reality" [our quotes], by Peter Foster, National Post, 1.
    [Another commentator suckered by the financial "industry."]
  • Law grads in limbo - Articling experience is mandatory for law-school graduates who want to be fully fledged lawyers, but there aren't enough jobs to go around, Toronto Globe, B1.
  • The Ottawa region is not escaping food insecurity - More than 31,000 persons don't satisfy their hunger [ne mangent pas a leur faim], Le Droit de Gatineau, 4.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Emanuel compromises on some homeless services cuts, Chicago Sun-Times via suntimes.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...On Wednesday, Emanuel reiterated that he rejected a plan to close eight libraries in favor of a plan that cut hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. The German labour market miracle, VoxEU via CreditWritedowns.com
    BERLIN, Germany - ...American observers are rightly intrigued by the system of short-time work used in Germany and certain other European countries. Under this system, a firm in financial difficulties can apply to the employment agency for approval of a package whereby the firm reduces workers’ hours and variable pay in proportion and refrains from layoffs, while workers are reimbursed by the employment agency for 60-67% of their lost pay... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 Montcalm, Îsle de Hull, QUÉBEC -

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • MF Global files for bankruptcy, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    ...a futures broker that began...in 18th-century London...
    European crisis claims MF Global - Chapter 11, National Post, FP1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • 2025 = year the Earth's population will balloon to 8 billion,
    Toronto Globe, A1.
  • Greek gamble threatens euro gains - Ahead of G20 meeting in France, Greek PM calls for national referendum on euro zone bailout plan, Toronto Globe, A1.
  • Panasonic braces for $5.5 billion loss,
    Ottawa Citizen, D1.
  • Is America over? journal of Foreign Affairs, Nov-Dec 2011, cover theme.
    [Before this gets complicated, YES! and =good news for the rest of the world.]
    George Packer on inequality [better: overconcentration of value] and social decline
    Parent & MacDonald on the need [for US military] to come home
    The broken contract, by George Packer
    ...Over the past three decades, Washington has consistently favored the rich...
    The wisdom of retrenchment - America must cut back [its foreign policy] to move forward, by Joseph Parent & Paul MacDonald
    The U.S. can no longer afford a world-spanning foreign policy.... History shows that pausing to recharge national batteries can renew a dominant power's international legitimacy.



    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Uncharted 3 Required "Brutal" Working Hours, EscapistMagazine.com
    SANTA MONICA, Calif. - ...Every game developer usually goes through a period where a lot more work needs to be done to finish a game by a deadline than can fit in a 40-hour work week. Sometimes, that week balloons to 80 hours or more just to meet the ambitious milestones set by publishers and game producers... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We don't have shorter hours today because we ASSUMED for decades that higher technology and rising productivity would bring about shorter hours and higher pay automatically by market forces. This story is an example of what a mistake that assumption was. The only reason we ever got the 40-hour workweek in the first place was because we fought for it all the way (and generally we lost the battles but won the war). And the reason why we're losing it today and working longer (if we still have a "full time" job) is because we've stopped fighting.]
  2. Grim outlook as level of unemployment is set to stay above 9% in Wales as cuts bite, WalesOnline.co.uk
    CARDIFF, Wales - ...Unemployment is not expected to blast the UK with the same force as in the 1990s because employees are already working shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This sounds like a great testimonial for shorter hours, but it doesn't make a grain of sense. These researchers must have a missing chip on their motherboard. It like saying things are already so bad, they can't get any worse - but that's just wishful thinking; there's no solid "floor" on economic decline unless Wales expands its *worksharing program.]
  3. Cadre or non-Cadre, that is the question, ExpatForum.com
    [Management or non-management = exempt from overtime (supposedly prestigious) or non-exempt.]
    PARIS, France - ...The problem is that we suspect they are trying to avoid the 35 hours they put on pôle emploi (we have a baby, assistant maternelle, long commutes etc so we absolutely need that they don't keep her longer than the 35 hours)... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So this is what dumb French employers are doing to sabotage the one thing that is protecting them from the worst of the downturn, their huge domestic consumer base enabled by their spread of work and wages thanks to their first-in-the-world 35-hour nationwide workweek.]
  4. BONUS excerpt - Stanstead Historical Society [SHS], Colby-Curtis Museum - Message from the president, by Pres. Ann Montgomergy, Newsletter Fall 2011 postmarked 11/01/11.
    [Timesizing "too far"? -]
    STANSTEAD, Que., Canada - ...Finally, I must inform our members that the Board of Directors has reluctantly taken a decision to close the museum over the winter [1 Dec. to 31 Mar.], in order to retire the operating deficit which has dogged us for a number of years... Although the permanent staff [of 3] will be laid off, they will still be able to work one day a week (or equivalent) in order to take care of the essential work of the SHS and...respond to requests from the members...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.