Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
September, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. From the archive, 30 September 1974: VW Beetle seeks survival in new markets - Originally published in the Guardian on 30 September 1974, The Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    WOLFSBURG, W. Germany - Unless last week's enforced short-time working at Volkswagen's Wolfsburg headquarters has upset the company's calculations, the eighteen millionth VW Beetle should be built on Thursday... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Greece Risks EU Court Over Doctors' Working Hours, Greek Reporter
    ATHENS, Greece - ...Doctors in Greece work too many hours and today the European Commission asked Athens to conform to EU regulations on working hours in public health services. Brussels has sent Greece a formal letter, and now the country has two months time to take the ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Compare yesterday's story (#2) on Ireland.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, September 29, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • U.S. stocks [sank] as a drop in commodities prices added to concerns about Europe - The Dow industrials fell 1.6%, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A6.
  • Copper has careened into a bear market, catching commodities traders offguard and triggering alarm bells across financial markets, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Then there's the NYTimes-WSJournal swordfight on a judge's reaction to Alabammy's immigration law -]
  • Court backs immigration law, New York Times, A1 pointer to A16.
    A federal judge upheld most sections of Alabama's far-reaching new immigration law.
    A federal judge blocked key points of an Alabama law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration, widely seen as the nation's toughest, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. FEATURE - Booming German firms cast nervous eye to euro crisis, Reuters.com
    GOETTINGEN, Germany - ...Still, a more nuanced picture emerged from interviews that Reuters conducted with a half dozen or so manufacturers from the German Mittelstand -- the small- and medium-sized businesses, often family-owned, that form the backbone of the economy and employ roughly 2/3 of its workforce... They held on to key employees by making use of the government's "Kurzarbeit" short-time working scheme -- state subsidies which encouraged firms to keep workers on reduced hours. That helped them respond quickly when demand returned... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. EC in threat over junior doctor working hours, RTE.ie
    DUBLIN, Ireland - The European Commission has threatened to take Ireland to the European Court of Justice unless it takes action to reduce the number of hours worked by junior doctors. The commission says junior doctors are often forced to work over 100 hours in a single week, sometimes without adequate breaks for rest or sleep. In a statement issued this morning, Brussels said the practice was contrary to EU rules on doctors' working hours in public hospitals. The EU Working Time Directive requires that, for health and safety reasons, all workers should work no more than an average of 48 hours per week, and have a minimum of 11 hours rest per day... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. The long-term unemployed - The ravages of time - An intractable problem is getting worse, The Economist via economist.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Barack Obama’s proposed American Jobs Act would reauthorise for another year current emergency unemployment benefits, which help to support consumption among the jobless, reducing poverty and propping up demand... Benefits could be used to supplement wages at businesses that cut hours rather than lay off workers, for instance... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= Timesizing, not downsizing!]
  4. JetBlue CEO to Washington: FAA shutdown "criminal", CBSnews.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...13 Comments...#10. The economy has changed but the politicians still can't adjust... All you hear is the same old solutions that worked in the 60's. If you want businesses to hire, you must make fundamental changes in the work week to begin with. That would be shortening the work week to 32 hours a week and then 24 down the line. Overtime would be paid for any hours worked over those hours. This could be done in weeks and not years. This would open up new positions and allow others to seek additional employment... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. The Four Day Work Week, BigThink.com
    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - ...In his article "Productivity and the Workweek," Eric Rauch argues that while productivity has steadily increased in developed countries since 1950, workers’ subjective sense of well-being has not seen a similar increase. In other words, the workweek could be drastically shortened without painfully reducing workers’ standards of living. In fact, Rauch points out, “shorter hours were assumed to be a natural consequence of increased productivity in the US until the 1930's, appearing in the platforms of all major parties... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If shorter hours were really a natural consequence of increased productivity, why would the need to appear in the platforms of any major political parties??? That assumption has allowed the workweek to remain frozen now for 71 years and counting, and the huge resulting labor surplus in the context of rising levels of worksaving technology to lower wages, hyperconcentrate and decirculate the money supply, and riddle both the public and private sectors through and through with desperate, inefficient and ecobashing artificial job creation, such as the grotesque American trucking industry: 100,000s of individual locomotive engineers each dragging one huge freight car, wearing out the nation's highways and endangering motorists.]
  6. Charles Reiterates Urgent Need for Flexible Work Week, Government of Jamaica, Jamaica Information Service via jis.gov.jm
    KINGSTON, Jamaica — Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Pearnel Charles, says the Ministry is close to implementing the flexi-workweek, which will provide better employment opportunities. He said that he is hastening to have the flexi-workweek implemented, because it is expected to increase employment... - see whole article under today's date.
    [What is he thinking? Why would scrunching the same number of hours into fewer days spread any work to additional employees? All 40 hours of work from the "old" five-day workweek will have been used up in the "new" 2-3 day workweek and no work left to spread to new hires!]
  7. Ma vows to back 5-day workweek, ChinaPost.com.tw
    TAIPEI, Taiwan - ...The goals also include boosting the labor-participation rate to 60 percent from 58 percent, hiking minimum monthly wage, improving living quality for workers, and reducing the number of legal weekly work hours to 80 from the existing 84, in addition to the across-the-board implementation of a five-day workweek system [five 16-hour days??]. At the moment, the Labor Standards Act sets the legal number of weekly work hours at 84 [?six 14-hour days], meaning that workers can enjoy a five-day workweek [1st wk: 5x14=70] every other week [2nd wk: 7x14=98, and two weeks together: 70+98=168/2= 84]. By contrast, government employees have since 2001 enjoyed a regular five-day workweek, prompting workers to demand the same treatment. This, coupled with the growing trend for working five days a week in most countries [like neighboring South Korea], has cemented Ma's determination to push for the across-the-board five-day workweek system as a mid-term labor policy during his next term as president... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Vital signs - Consumers remained in the doldrums this month, Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption pointing to A3.
    [More likely consumers remained in the un[der]employed poorhouse thanks to a frozen 1940 concept of "full time" employment (40 hrs/wk) which was already obsolete (the US Senate passed a 30-hr workweek in 1933) and a public and private sector riddled through with inefficient, unenvironmental and anyway, grossly insufficient makework.]
    The Conference Board's Consumer Confidence Index registered 45.4 in September, up a bit from August's 45.2 [but still] near its lowest levels since early 2009...
    Job woes still holding shoppers back - Consumer confidence remains weak, Boston Globe, B6.
    [Meanwhile, in a couple of big "non profits" -]
  • MIT's endowment gains 17.9% [to $9.9 billion], Boston Globe, B6.
    ...Last week, Harvard University reported that its endowment "earned" [our quotes] 21.4% for the [same as MIT] year ended June 30 [to ?$25 billion?]...
    [Both right in there as part of the depression-creating hypercoagulation of the money supply...]
  • Employers' health-insurance premiums jumped 9%, WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    The average annual cost of family coverage passed the $15,000 mark for the first time this year...despite a continued trend toward high-deductable plans and more limited use of medical services. Only about 1.5% of the increase was tied to the health-care overhaul, researchers [which?] said.
  • Governing by crisis - The latest [federal government budget] standoff may be averted, but the next one is coming in just seven weeks, editorial, New York Times, A20.
    [It's characteristic of bad managers that they create turmoil around them to distract from their incompetence. Notice how much turmoil we have today, and just maybe we should be investigating our business schools.]
  • Boston-based Sovereign Bank will adopt the name of its owner [Santander], Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    [CEOs are sooo stupid these days that they routinely commit "name suicide." Boston Chicken with its cute chicken logo changed its name to does-not-compute Boston Market with an incomprehensible logo and went bankrupt. Now Sovereign Bank is doing it, and the nitwit Spaniards perpetrating the change even think we're going to pronounce the new unrecognizable name in Spanish, San-tan-DAIR.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Budget approved, but crisis not averted, Muncie Star Press via thestarpress.com
    MUNCIE, Ind. -- After months of discussions and weeks of meetings, Delaware County Council on Tuesday approved a 2012 budget that paved the way for a four-day work week and preserved the jobs of more than 400 county employees... Now that council has approved the financial details of the 32-hour, four-day work week, the county commissioners could approve, as early as their Oct. 3 meeting, the closing of the county building every Friday... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Salary vs sleep: Which would you pick? WashingtonPost.com/blogs
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Surveys have been telling us for years now that people are valuing more vacation time...over better pay..\.. Which would you prefer: An $80000 job with reasonable work hours and seven and a half hours of sleep each night, or a $140000 job with long work hours and just six hours of sleep? A new study from researchers at Cornell, to be published in the American Economic Review, found that most people would pick the higher-paying job with more hours and less sleep... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Talks lift spirits in elevator face-off, Hong Kong Standard via thestandard.com.hk
    HONG KONG, China - ...Union leaders said company representatives were showing "some sincerity" in wanting an amicable resolution. That may be good news for the around 70 striking staff of ThyssenKrupp Elevator demanding minimum pay of HK$8500 and shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, September 27, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Goldman [Sachs] draws up deeper cuts [than the 1,000 or 3% mentioned this summer for mid-2012], NY Times, B1.
    [They could just cut their corporate workweek 3% for everyone and keep everyone employed. But without the required management skills (and who needs management skills after years flooded with desperate resumes?), they continue to foul and weaken their "nest" = the economic system that nurtures and shelters them.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stopgap fix "ends" budget impasse [again?! - (our quotes)],
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • New research suggests that low-priced Chinese imports to the U.S. have taken more of a toll on the domestic economy than expected, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [- "expected" by whom, U.S. exporters with their self-serving "free" trade dogma for whom we are sacrificing all the rest of the economy?]
  • Deep recession sharply altered U.S. jobless map - Struggle of the South - Once-booming sunbelt has fallen behind the rust belt, New York Times, A1.
  • The lost decade - Bad ideas make us poorer, op ed by David Brooks, NYT, A19.
    [Thanks again, Bush, Cheney and your vampire team - you sucked America dry.]
  • Reading, Pa., knew it was poor - Now it knows just how poor - An unwelcome distinction for a city that already had enough problems, NYT, A10.
    ...Census figures show [it] now has the largest share of residents living in poverty (photo 1 caption)
    ...Residents at a food pantry - "It has really started to snowball..." (photo 2 caption)
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Walked Out - Union walks out on steel talks, Hamilton Spectator via thespec.com
    HAMILTON, Ont., Canada - ...In its latest offer to employees, the company refuses to move on its pension demands but offers a $3,000 signing bonus, a profit sharing plan that could pay up to $3,500 per employee every quarter, and a guarantee of a minimum of 26 weeks’ work at 32 hours a week and time credit for the months on lockout for employees who would otherwise have gained the 30 years service needed to retire... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. How would you like to have a four-day work week? Herald Sun via heraldsun.com.au
    CANBERRA, Australia - ...Michael Honey, director of Icelab, takes a different approach to the traditional nine-to-five, Monday-to-Friday work week. Instead, his staff work four days a week. “We've got a certain amount of work to do, let's work when we feel like it,” he said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The question here - is it really a shorter workweek of about 32-hours (four 8-hour days) or just another rearranged workweek like Utah's recent flash-in-the-pan of four 10-hour days? And the danger is, if and when the company grows and/or pressure builds, what guarantees are there than the "certain amount of work to do" won't require an 80-hour workweek like the sicko American Medical Association requires of its residents and interns?]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, September 25-26, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Ad-technology rivals Donovan Data Systems and Media Bank are merging, 9/26 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Investors are losing faith in holding stocks for the long term as signs pointing to an economic slowdown across global markets, 9/26 Wall Street Journal, A1:1 pointer to A1:6, C1.
    Europe stews, markets sour,
    9/26 New York Times, A1.
    Focus goes to new hazards, 9/26 WSJ, C1 target article.
    For months, it has been all about Europe and the U.S. Suddenly, investors have reasons to worry about the rest of the world...
  • Congress will stay in Washington as a shutdown looms, 9/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Deja vu. And government shutdown is not "looming" like an "act of God" about which we can do nothing. It is totally the fault of the new braindead Republican Party, which has turned into a gang of demogogical-fiscal suicide bombers, targeting first the U.S. Government. Foundational Republican presidents Abraham Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt would be embarrassed and appalled. So even, would embarrassing Nixon and nation-splitting Reagan. And the solution, the Reed-DeLauro worksharing bill, cannot even start.]
  • A deep health care divide in Rick Perry's Texas - The Lone Star State has the highest rate of uninsured residents in the nation [24.6%] - The result is a yawning gap between rich and poor even for basic treatment, 9/25 Boston Sunday Globe, A1.
    [And the actionable way of saying "yawning gap between rich and poor" is "extreme concentration of money supply." And also in Massachusetts -]
  • MCAS scores appear stuck in stubborn income gap - Only scattered gains for poorest, despite huge effort, 9/25 BSG, A1.
    ...Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System [MCAS (for schools)]...
    MCAS scores, Wasserman editorial cartoon, 9/25 BSG, K8.
    Teacher at front of class of 10?-year-olds: "So the aim is to boost their math literacy..."
    Visiting politician: "...but not so high that we can't get them to gamble at casinos!" [ - that the state is mining for revenues in lieu of restoring wartime-prosperity levels of graduated income taxes.]
  • On the long road up [from prison], the past is close behind - Step off the bus [Boston #19] and into the world of job-seekers determined to put early misdeeds behind them, the critical first step to getting right wtih life - 'People hustle out of a natural sense of survival...- Some people don't want to be government dependent; it has a crippling effect on your psyche', by Patricia Wen, 9/25 BSG, A1.
    At the Boston Workers Alliance, Hakim Cunningham helped Clayton apply to seal his record. [photo 1 caption]
    "Jail worked for me," said Clifford, a 36-year-old father of five who served time for a domestic violence case. He turned to the Boston Workers Alliance for help in his job search. [photo 2 caption]
    [We've really screwed ourselves when we've allowed the job market to become less attractive than jail.]
    "Everybody's looking for work," said Frank Dixon, 40, who served a decade in federal prison. He got tips about resumes and applying for jobs from Hakim Cunningham at the Alliance office. [photo 3 caption]
    ...The drive to turn things around can quickly fade - they have grown up expecting little from the world. And the world isn't offering much at a time when jobs are scarce even for those with college diplomas, and without rap sheets...
    [Notice that "the world" in this context equates to the job market. And until the job market's playing field is levelled with fluctuating adjustment - against unemployment - of the long-frozen 40-hour workweek, the job market world will offer less and less. And any economies that don't design and implement automatic workweek adjustment, mainly downward, will continue to sink downward as employment is shifted to robots and human employment and wages continue to concentrate on fewer and fewer and fewer active consumers. Then we get -]
  • Congo violence is focus of Clark University [Worcester MA] summit, 9/25 BSG, B1.
    [Like with the scale and increase of our problems we have the luxury of worrying about (and even lecturing?!) the rest of the world? "First pluck the plank out of your own eye, so you can see clearly to pick the speck out of your neighbor's."]
  • Worried Greeks fear collapse of middle-class welfare state, 9/25 NYT, A1.
    [Then maybe now they'll knuckle down and pay their taxes?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. In company town, cuts but no layoffs, 9/25 New York Times, Bu1.
    WARROAD, Minn. - ...Marvin Windows and Doors...employs roughly 4,300 people, about 2,000 of them here, and has annual sales somewhere from $500 million to $1 billion..\.. Unlike so many other companies, Marvin Windows has neither laid off workers nor reduced health insurance benefits. And, its executives vow, it won’t... Nonetheless, given the severity of the financial crisis, it became clear that something had to give... Salaries were cut by 5%. Hourly workers were pulled back [20%] to 32 hours a week. While 32-hour weeks weren’t uncommon during slow winters, this time the hours were reduced indefinitely... Marvin's no-layoff announcement was cheered by employees, and in April 2009, Ms. Marvin and a Marvin employee were hailed as “great Americans” on national television... “You can’t cut your way to prosperity."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Marvin is one of America's great timesizing companies, alongside Nucor Steel, Lincoln Electric and SAS, who are leading the way into a sustainable future.]
  2. Stimulus and the Depression: The Untold Story - The U.S. doesn't need another war to revive the economy: We need a policy turnaround like the one in the late 1930s, 9/26 Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...But declining unemployment reflected significant work-sharing in New Deal policies that began in 1933 with the President's Reemployment Agreement and continued with the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 [which introduced the first nationwide workweek cap at 44 and cut it 2 hrs/yr for each of the next two years]. Work-sharing [decreased unemployment 1% for each hour cut from the workweek and] increased employment by spreading jobs across more people... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. DOLE belies Saudization fears, Journal Online via journal.com.ph
    [No explanation for DOLE unless it refers to a Dole pineapple plantation in the Philippines in a part of the story that didn't get posted on the Web.]
    MANILA, Philippines - ...“Based on our experience, Saudi nationals or even those from the entire Middle East in general, prefer to work in government than in private companies because they get higher pay, labor policies are not as strict, and they have shorter working hours,” Cruz said... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Part-time workers on rise in Massachusetts - Many forced to settle for lower-pay jobs, 9/26 Boston Globe, A1.
    BOSTON, Mass. - The number of people who took part-time jobs because they were unable to find full-time work [minimum 35-40 hrs/wk] has grown nearly fourfold in Mass. since 2000 and has been accelerating at an alarming pace for much of this year... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, September 24, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Suffolk University shuffles, cuts [20 administrative] staff, Boston Globe, B1.
    ...and 15 more are being reassigned to new posts [out of a total] workforce of 1,141...
    [20 jobcuts out of 1141? That's only 1.75%. If this university housed any intelligence, they would just cut 1.75% of the workweek for everybody = 8 minutes a day, and keep everyone employed. As it is, they've added a little more fuel to the immediate downturn, and to the reduction of their own long-term market.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Market rout claims new victim - Investors dump gold, silver to pay for losses - All eyes on IMF this weekend, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    Risks to the global economy are compound, Christine Lagarde, head of the IMF, told ministers and central bankers..., WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    The DJIA finished its worst weekly decline in nearly three years - The Dow...fell 6.4% on the week - It is the Dow's sixth largest weekly drop in its 115-year history, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:2, B5.
    ...Gold fell 5.9% to $1,637.50 a troy ounce, down 10% this week - Its worst weekly score since 1983. Silver fell 17%, its biggest one-day drop since 1980. Copper fell 6%.
  • Mortgage loan plan for jobless falls short - Latest US aid deal to miss expectations,
    Boston Globe, A1.
  • An impasse deepened between the House and Senate over a bill to keep the government open after Sept.30 and provide financial aid to disaster victims, BG, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Uh, an impasse can't deepen. It can maybe thicken but if you want something with an -asse to deepen, it has to be a crevasse.]
  • The government pays out millions to dead people each year - BG, A1 pointer to A6.
    - including to deceased retired federal workers, according to a report.
    [Something like the many dead Americans who vote?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. How Do You Say ‘Economic Security’? New York Times, A18.
    NEW HAVEN, Conn. - ...In 1934, the government was us. We had shared circumstances, shared risks and shared obligations. Today the government is The Other... Over the last 50 years we seem to have lost the words [like "shared"?] — and with them the ideas [like shared work] — to frame our situation appropriately. Can we talk about this? Maybe not. - see whole article under today's date.
    [Well, 20-23 states have shared work programs and Sen. Jack Reed and Rep. Rosa DeLauro have introduced worksharing bills into Congress. But until worried old professors notice and help publicize these developments, they will remain "best-kept secrets" and we will be like Antarctic explorers trying to get back to base camp in a blinding blizzard but dying just 20 feet away. So how do you say 'economic security'? How about 'sharing,' starting with emergency worksharing and transitioning to permanent timesizing. If we don't "get it," it's not the end of the world. Germany just breezed through the last downturn with their federal-level version. They say "economic security' with the word Kurzarbeit = short work. But worksharing via hourscuts or furloughs is reinvented hundreds of times a day in every U.S. recession, Here's an interesting case today -]
  2. Impasse remains but city open to new union proposal, Cape Coral Daily Breeze via cape-coral-daily-breeze.com
    CAPE CORAL, Fla. - ...On Wednesday, the union offered what it said were nearly $807,000 in concessions. Under the plan, union members would increase their pension contribution 3%, up from the current 7%. Members would also agree to take on 40 or 32 furlough hours each year, depending on their years of service... Officers do not take all their hours at once, where overtime is needed. For example, he explained, 40 furlough hours in one year would be broken down to 10 hours per quarter, or about 3 1/2 hours per month. If an officer comes on duty at 6 a.m., he or she may come in at 7 a.m. instead. "That could be one furlough hour for one employee," Sizemore said. The following week, another officer might get off an hour early. "We just make sure there's an overlap of schedules," he said. "They (hours) can be taken in many different conjunctions to make sure we have staffing."... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, September 23, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Markets swoon on recession fears, Dow down 3.5% - World-wide distress rises as investors see futility of governments [which they have bankrupted with bailouts and tax evasion], central banks - Economic signals heighten worries of a double-dip, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [or just another down-arc in a diagonal, continuously downward spiral with absolutely no fundamentals for recovery until we share the vanishing yet-unrobotized work.]
  • The social contract - Of taxes, deficits, and the rich, op ed by Paul Krugman, New York Times, A27.
    ...Detailed estimates from the Congressional Budget Office...show that between 1979 and 2005 [26 years] the inflation-adjusted income of families in the middle of the income distribution rose 21%...compared with the 100% rise in median income over a generation after World War II [1945-1975?].
    Meanwhile, over the same period [1979-2005], the income of the very rich, the top 100th of 1% of the income distribution [= the top ten-thousandth of the population? = the richest 300 Americans?] rose by 480%....
    In 2005 dollars, the average annual income of that group rose from $4.2 million to $24,3 million....
    According to new estimates by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, one-fourth of those with incomes of more than $1 million a year [how many people is that?] pay income and payroll tax of 12.6% of their income or less....
    [Whatever the exact figures, recessions and depressions are always caused by the same phenomenon = the too much of a nation's money supply in too few pockets. As money redistributes up the income scale, it changes function from spending power to investing power because the richer you are, the harder it is to spend the same large percentage of your income as people in the lower brackets. And the greater the investing power, the larger the clumps it moves in, and the less frequently it moves relative to its velocity of circulation in the consumer markets populated by a much higher population of much less wealthy people. Conversely, as money redistributes down the income scale, it changes from investing power to spending power because the less money you get, the higher the percentage of it you spend on necessities.
    This means that the root and cause of recessions and depressions is the wealthy themselves, who stupidly redistribute too much of the money supply to themselves and starve the markets for the productivity they need to invest in.
    How reverse and centrifuge this concentration by market forces? How did we DO it from 1840 to 1940? How did we DO it during the wartime prosperity of 1917-18 and 1941-45? By means of a labor shortage that got employers bidding against one another for good help, and that raised wages and consumer spending and marketable productivity and sustainable investments. The rising tide floated all boats despite the grousing of the wealthy who had to pay higher wages. How do we get that magic labor shortage without war? Cut the workweek and the workyear. In other words, lengthen the weekend and the annual vacation.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Hino back to five-day work week, By JOLENE CRAIG (jcraig@newsandsentinel.com) , Parkersburg News and Sentinel via newsandsentinel.com
    WILLIAMSTOWN, W.V. - ...The cut in production at the local plant, which is on West Virginia 14, began in April when the Japanese-based company dropped production from five to four days a week. In May production was again decreased to a three-day week as parts for the trucks had become scarce after the natural disasters... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= cutting the workweek, not the workforce and the skill set.]
  2. Greece's OTE reaches initial labour deal to cut costs, save jobs- workers[- markets!], Reuters.com
    ATHENS, Greece - ...The deal cuts working hours by 12.5% to 35 hours a week, translating into an average payroll reduction of 11% over three years. Management pledged, in turn, to not seek dismissals or hire any temp workers. The full 40-hour week and current wages will not be reinstated before 2015, the company's labour union OME-OTE said... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, September 22, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • United Technologies a-greed to buy aircraft-components maker Goodrich for $16.4 billion, the company's biggest-ever acquisition, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Tech lab: Windows 8 may be a little too advanced, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    [They're all too advanced these days - who needs all these bells and whistles? Facebook is "updating" against its users' wishes. NetFlix is fixing stuff that works, against their customers' wishes. Yahoo mail recently updated its look for a supposedly faster version that's actually slower and has a lot more space for irritating animated ads and a lot less space for users' mail. It's Death Wish time in CEO suites. Remember when nitwit Boston Chicken flung itself and its cute logo into bankruptcy by changing its name to Boston Market and its logo into something unrecognizable? But gotta justify your salary and show something for your 1940-era eight-hour day!]
  • HP stock rises after reports CEO [Leo Apotheker] might be replaced, by Jordan Robertson, AP via Boston Globe, B9.
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - ...Investors were heartened by yet another turnaround strategy at one of Silicon Valley's oldest, but most publicly dysfunctional, firms.... Brian White, an analyst with Ticonderoga Securities...wrote that he would not be surprised if Apotheker all along was the "fall guy," hired to take the hit for the ugly work of restructuring.
    [How many restructurings or "reorgs" has HP had since it was a good company prior to its purchase of Compaq, against founder Hewlett's advice? New CEO? Don't know what to do? REORG! Keeps everybody off balance instead of getting into the (vital) negative feedback. Keeps everyone insecure. Keeps everybud UNproductive - and definitely uncreative - mustn't take risks! No wonder U.S. CEOs lack all management skill. Who needs management skill in a flood of resumes? Just fire costly pre-pension employees and hire cheap, desperate, know-nothing 20-somethings - declare higher profits - goose the stock price - and quit on the crest! And if you have bad timing, don't matter - there's still that golden parachute you negotiated upfront...]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Court [in Sweden] OK's Saab's bankruptcy appeal, Boston Globe, B6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Fed tries to lower rates with a 'twist' [into long-term T-bills] - $400B bond action angers Republicans, sends stocks down, Boston Globe, B5.
  • Many get shut our on chance to refinance - Lenders shying away from all risks, Boston Globe, A1.
    [As Daddy said, Depression is not a lack of money - there's LOADS of money in a depression - but it's all crowded into the pockets of the wealthiest part of the population - and not in circulation.]
  • The Federal Reserve moved to further lower interest rates, causing the stock market to plummet..., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B5.
    [How do they move below zero?]
  • Greece adds to austerity measures - Taxes raised, pensions cut to meet EU goals, Boston Globe, B9.
    [- thus giving their consumer base and economy the coup de grace.]
  • IMF criticizes debt crisis response by US, Europe, Boston Globe, B9.
    [Oh yeah, kill your consumer base and give 100% of your money supply to your wealthiest two citizens. Then all you have to do is organize a two-car funeral.]
    IMF director Jose Vinals spoke...yesterday about the latest Global Financial Stability Report. [photo caption]
    [Jose Vinals is venal, like the World Bank and the rest of the IMF. Their policies make them Typhoid Mary's, killing their "beneficiaries"/patients right and left.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The NYT Has Not Heard About Work Sharing in Germany, by Dean Baker, BusinessInsider.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The more obvious explanation for Germany's low unemployment rate is its policy of work sharing. This policy encourages firms to reduce work hours rather than lay off workers. The result has been that Germany has met its reduced demand for labor primarily by shortening work hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Obama's New Jobs Proposal: Can it Turn the Economy Around? SocialistAlternative.org
    SEATTLE, Wash. - ...The American Jobs Act would offer unemployment insurance money to workers whose employers choose “work sharing” over layoffs. In its statement on the act, the Center for Economic and Policy Research defines what is called “work sharing” in this way: “Rather than just paying workers who have lost their job, work sharing allows workers to be partially compensated for shorter work hours. Instead of one worker getting half pay after losing her job, under work sharing five workers may get 10% of their pay cut after their hours are cut by 20%." Notice it says “partially compensated.” Rather than a kinder, gentler way to have our standard of living cut, socialists call for sharing out the available work with no loss of pay... - see whole article under today's date.
    [These simpletons can "call for" whatever they like, but as long as they regard all employers as multinational CEOs getting millions regardless of their company's health, they aren't getting the huge audience they'd have had by now if they'd jumped on shorter hours as labor's power issue 150 years ago as they should have. They ignore the fact that with less work and productivity, many employers who are not lavishly compensated do not have the revenue to maintain "no loss of pay." And socialists never seem to "get it" that as worksharing's shorter hours create jobs and cut the labor surplus, market forces flexibly carry pay back up as employers get bidding against one another for good help. (Shorter hours not creating enough jobs? Shorten hours further - there is no God-given permanent level of the workweek as long as we're still introducing worksaving technology such as robotics.) The black&white thinking of socialists has already killed a lot of businesses, such as the host of daily newspapers that New York City USED to have.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Merck will speed layoffs to meet goal, AP via Boston Globe, B8.
    WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. - Merck & Co. has told employees it can't reach its goal of cutting up to 13,000 jobs by 2015 just by eliminating vacant jobs, so it is speeding up layoffs in the United States.... The new cuts will bring to 30,000 the positions eliminated since Merck's November 2009 megadeal to buy Schering-Plough Corp., on top of about 5,000 positions the companies cut before the deal closed.
    [Murk & Co.... American CEOs seem to expect growth is going to come from someone else's hiring while they themselves eliminate jobs. They just can't connect the dots between their own workforce and their customers' customers.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Worries about Greece again hold stocks down, Boston Globe, B10.
    [Such a convenient, distracting scapegoat!]
  • Fed's next move may not spur jobs, Boston Globe, B9.
    [Sounds like a good bet when none of their previous moves spurred jobs.]
  • US challenges China's poultry tariffs - China's tariffs threaten US jobs in an industry with 300,000 workers, says Ron Kirk, the US trade representative, Boston Globe, B8.
    ["Free trade" is so OVER. "Globalization" is history. Thank God. It was even more premature than the euro.]
  • UAW says GM deal will keep jobs in US -
    [Don't count on it. The UAW still hasn't focused on its power issue, shorter hours, despite the historic focused leadership of Walter Reuther.]
    - Lower pay for hires, buyouts to check costs, Boston Globe, B9.
    [Here it is, being played out before our eyes: Of unions' two historic goals, higher pay and shorter hours, if they focus on higher pay they wind up with neither, because they're just tacking an artificially high price on a surplus commodity, themselves, and bucking market forces, but if they focus on shorter hours they wind up with both, because they're harnessing market forces to reward a shortage, their own available workhours and everyone else's, and employers competing for good help raise pay and spending power and consumer markets and all derived (ie: all other) markets.]
  • IMF lowers its US, EU outlook -
    [Turnabout is fair play - we've long since lowered our outlook on the IMF itself.]
    - Says world in new, 'dangerous' phase, Boston Globe, B8.
    [which the IMF contributed to, mightily. See John Perkins' book, "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man." WSJ version -]
    The IMF cut its 2012 global growth forecast to 4% and warned of "severe repercussions" if governments didn't revamp economic policies, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A15.
  • A tax others embrace, U.S. opposes, New York Times, B1.
    [ie: higher taxes on the wealthy - but as Will Rogers said when asked where they'd get the money for economic recovery, "I guess we's gonna git it from the rich, cuz they's the only ones that's got any." But the U.S. is still fighting reality.]
  • Cost still a barrier for the uninsured, [Cambridge MA Health Alliance] study says - About two-thirds of the uninsured were employed, and 49% said they could not find an affordable plan, Boston Globe, B3.
  • Data breaches affect 2m in Massachusetts - Firms increasingly targets for hackers, [Atty.Gen.] Coakley finds, Boston Globe, B7.
    [Our computer technology has outstripped our social technology, specifically our anchor of extended self-interest, dba "common interest." A common system-safe workweek range (with a referendum-set bottom limit and a bottom-limit set top limit) is ready to play that role. Emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing are available to introduce that common system-safe workweek range.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Palm Bay city manager finalizes budget after unions vote to accept furloughs, BrevardTimes.com
    PALM BAY, Fla. - ...The proposed budget includes up to 9 furlough days that have been approved by the collective bargaining groups representing the City's union employees. The furloughs, which will affect all employees, helps close a budget shortfall that resulted from a 23.6% drop in property values over the prior fiscal year. ...Said City Manager Sue Hann, "...This budget represents a balance of City employees, residents and business each making sacrifices to ensure Palm Bay remains strong even while facing financial challenges. I am very proud of our City staff and I am honored by their commitment to Palm Bay."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And "incidentally," cutting hours to reduce the market surplus of - themselves - is labor's power issue. However, there are still cities and towns going in the wrong direction -]
  2. Firefighter work week reviewed - Week would be 54 hours, Parkersburg News and Sentinel via newsandsentinel.com
    PARKERSBURG, W.Va. - ...Fire Chief Eric Taylor recommended council members approve a change for firefighters from 48 hours a week to 54 hours a week. Under the change firefighters would work three 48-hour shifts a month and a 72-hour shift, a 54-hour per month average
    ... [48-hour shifts? A 72-hour shift? Welcome to the workweeks of the 1850s.]
    Without the [upward] adjustment to 54 hours, the firefighters staff level would be increased to 63... - see whole article under today's date.
    [There it is in black and white: longer hours, fewer jobs and more anxious, wage-depressing unemployed people flooding the market with resumes - shorter hours, more jobs and fewer anxious, wage-depresseing unemployed. So someone, something, somewhere else will have to do the hiring for West Virginia's economic recovery. But then, W.Virginians ain't the brightest bulbs in a nation of increasingly dim bulbs. Then there's the split situation where the "privileged" betray their neighbors...& themselves -]
  3. City Hall's Lax Travel Rules | Preckwinkle's Furlough Fury | Rahm's CTA Facelift Plan, Chicago News Cooperative via chicagonewscoop.org
    CHICAGO, Illin. - ...Not Sauce for the Gander: Many aldermen did not take furlough days, even as city workers took as many as 24 furloughs a year. Without naming names, county Board of Aldermen President Toni Preckwinkle took issue with that approach, saying she was “concerned about commissioners who haven’t behaved as leaders.”... - see whole Chcago news roundup under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Worry about a [new] wave of layoffs - Fears rise for workers as economy sputters,
    New York Times, B1.
  • Investors pushed stocks lower in volatile trading as global policy makers geared up for another wave of action to address mounting economic worries - The Dow dropped 0.9%..., Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1, C7.
  • U.S. probes rating-cut [ie: insider] trades - Regulators subpoena hedge funds, others over actions ahead of S&P downgrade [of U.S. debt], WSJ, A1.
  • Carnival [Cruise] Corp. faces middle-class malaise, WSJ, C1.
    [Or is it middle-class extinction?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Canada August Composite Leading Indicators (Text), Bloomberg.com
    OTTAWA, Canada - ...The average workweek continued to fall, although factory employment has been stable in recent months. This partly reflects a decision by firms to keep their workers on staff during the supply disruptions, but at reduced hours. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Confederation head slams minister on working hours, HurriyetDailyNews.com
    ISTANBUL, Turkey - ...Tugrul Kudatgobilik harshly criticized Development Minister Cevdet Y|lmaz for saying Monday that working hours would be cut. “Let the minister first consult with the Turkish industrialists that opened the way to (high economic) growth in Turkey,” he said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [It's nice to hear from a Development Minister who's aware of the developed economies' history of cutting workhours (from over 80 in 1840, to 40 in 1940 in the USA) and knows that that is precisely the way to develop a high-wage workforce, a strong domestic consumer base, highly marketable productivity, sustainable domestic investments, and a robust economy overall. Employers complained every step of the way from the 80 hour workweek down to the 40-hour workweek. But they are incapable of hiring on the necessary massive levels if left with a frozen workweek from any earlier level of technology. If it's really true that "Turkish industrialists...opened the way to (high economic) growth in Turkey," why are so many Turks going to shorter-hours Germany for jobs? Notice Germany breezed through the downturn with Kurzarbeit = "short work" = hourscuts instead of jobcuts.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, September 18-19, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives)- sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -

  • "Obama's right... We need to repair our crumbling infrastructure... Otherwise we don't have a place to live",
    9/19 The Oregonian via Boston Globe, editorial cartoon A12.
    One in six Americans live in poverty [cartoon caption]
    [Cartoon shows two homeless guys sitting under highway bridge.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Optimism fades on Wall Street, 9/19 Wall Street Journal, C1.
    ["Optimism" or "sales smile"?]
  • Buddy, can you spare a job?, reviews of books on joblessness,
    9/18 Boston Globe, K7.
  • Forum [at MIT] explores challenges of high-tech manufacturing in a globalized economy, 9/18 Boston Globe, G1.
    [Bet they didn't explore their biggest challenge = finding enough people who still have jobs and earn enough to buy their robot-produced high-tech manufactures.]
  • The foreclosure process remains snarled, a year after disclosures of problems in banks' mortgage-servicing operations, 9/19 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1, C7.
    [It would have been completed by last year if Obama had lunged for investigations right out of the gate instead of waiting for disclosures.]
  • Tech hiring is tough on veteran workers - Keeping up with the latest gets ever-harder - High-tech forsakes once-prized workers, 9/18 Boston Globe, A1,A13.
    [Not a problem with Timesizing's corporate overtime-targeted and individual overwork-targeted reinvestment in (re)training.]
  • Taking steps to stop debt buyers from using courts as a collection system, by Michelle Singletary, 9/18 Boston Globe, G6.
    ...Rule changes by the Maryland Court of Appeals are being hailed as a significant effort to stop debt collectors from getting judgments based on flimsy evidence.... Several consumer advocates working with clients in New York...looked at 26 debt buyers who filed more than 450,000 lawsuits in NYC Civil Court from January 2006 through July 2008. The companies won about 95% of the time. The people sued were overwhelmingly low-income, elderly, or disabled. A major reason for the high rate of default judgments is that many people do not know they have been sued, the consumer groups found..\.. These lawsuits can lead to garnishment of wages, seizure of assets, and liens on homes and cars.... Kudos to Maryland and..\..a growing number of other states in which judges must demand greater proof from debt buyers before allowing them to sue consumers to recover alleged obligations....
  • UBS raises tally on losses - Details emerge behind $2.3 billion 'rogue' trading..., 9/19 WSJ, C1.
    [Rogue this time = Kweku Adoboli, whose photo appeared for the first time today without a proud grin.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Big changes for unemployment benefits in Pa., 9/19 Daily Local News via dailylocal.com
    EAST WHITELAND, Penn. - ...The state also is encouraging a shared work program in order to prevent mass layoffs, Beaty said. Under the shared work program, employers can opt to reduce the number of work hours for an employee. The employee would then receive unemployment benefits for the lost time. Beaty presented a scenario where an employee’s workweek may be reduced from five days to four days. The employee will be able to receive unemployment benefits for the lost day of work each week. Such a scenario would equate to compensation of four and a half days, Beaty said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Jobs bills not enough to solve unemployment, economy, 9/18 Cincinnati.com
    CINCINATTI, Oh. - ...Obama's plan also lets states craft their own back-to-work programs - including such ideas as adapting Germany's "Kurzarbeit" or "short work" [or "worksharing"] plan, in which the unemployed get part-time work, in effect sharing wages... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Sharing the shrinking still-unautomated employment may share the wages in the short-term, but in the longer term it shares the massive amount of investing power hoarded in the tiny top brackets, because it absorbs the wage-depressing labor surplus and gets employers bidding against one another for good help. Result? Rising wages and spending and markets and investment sustainability, despite loud squealing and wailing from employers and the wealthy - who are also benefiting. They commit suicide by hoarding, quietly, but loudly complain as their lives and fortunes become more slightly reduced but vastly more secure via the money centrifugation triggered by market forces in response to wartime levels of labor "shortage" = wartime prosperity without the war!]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, September 17, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • U.S. companies kept hoarding cash in the second quarter while household net worth fell, factors seen holding back the economy, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A3.
    [Question: What's an easy way to solve these problem factors and stop holding back the economy - and use market forces to maximize flexibility and efficiency? How do you easily harness market forces to discipline companies (yes indeed, market forces force things on companies as well as employees) to stop committing suicide by hoarding and instead, hire more and more potential consumers and consumer-funders for shorter and shorter shifts?
    Answer: Adjust the workweek downward against the squealing and wailing of those being disciplined and dehoarded by a perceived labor shortage until you have wartime levels of full employment and markets - without the war.]
  • Geithner tells EU leaders to stop bickering and act over debt crisis [like he knew how to solve America's all summer], Financial Times, p.1.
    [And EU tells Geithner to CAN IT! -]
    Advice on debt? Europe suggests U.S. can keep it - Fallout from '08 crisis [not to mention America's debt deadlock all été] - Officials are dismissive of Geithner ideas at Poland meeting, New York Times, A1.
    [He's a crook fergawdsake, a fox in the henhouse! Why'd they even invite him?]
  • Michael Moore: a 'good 50m Americans are nuts' [= Teaparty?] - Controversial film maker has lunch with FT - 'I thought Obama would come in swinging - What an opportunity to go down as a great president - squandered', Financial Times, p.1 pointer to L&A3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. For jobs, it's war - The battle for good jobs is global, op ed by Charles Blow, New York Times via nytimes.com
    BROOKLYN, N.Y. - ...At least that is the way Jim Clifton, chairman of Gallup, frames it in his fascinating — and frightening — new book, “The Coming Jobs War.” According to Clifton, “the coming world war is an all-out global war for good jobs.” (He defines a good job, also known as a formal job, as one with a “paycheck from an employer and steady work that averages 30-plus hours per week.”)... The only problem is that there are not enough good jobs to go around. Clifton explains that of the world’s five billion people over 15 years old, three billion said they worked or wanted to work, but there are only 1.2 billion full-time, formal jobs... Clifton enumerates 10 “demands” that America will have to master to “lead the new will of the world”... But at the top of the list is understanding that the world has a shortage of good jobs and every decision of every leader must be informed by increasing the share of those jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Ooh, he is sooo close. He's mentioning hours but he's still talking about "30-hours plus" instead of "30-hours MAX." He's mentioning "increasing the share of those jobs" instead of "increasing the sharing of all that work." Charles, this is the age of ROBOTICS. We have whole factory networks with NO PEOPLE - it's called "light out" manufacturing.   40-hours plus, 30-hours plus, 20-hours plus is OVER. We need 40-hours or less, 30-hours or less, 20-hours or less. Get it? Got it? Good!]
  2. Crowd-sourcing the budget, ChicagoTribune.com
    CHICAGO, Illin. - The new mayor asked Chicagoans for ideas on how to balance the budget... Many of the ideas require further study. This one doesn't: "Rested employees perform better and get sick less frequently. Eliminating vacation days from being carried over into another year will prevent the city from having to make large payouts when an employee separates from his or her position. The city should mandate that all city employees take their annual vacation time."... Many employees have backlogs of unused vacation time because they were forced to take up to 24 days off without pay – 12 holidays and 12 furlough days – to help balance the last three budgets... Banked vacation days eroded the savings from those furloughs. The carry-over is a taxpayer liability. When the Daley crowd exited, $9.5 million of it came due... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, September 16, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • French firm buys Waltham MA PR company [Schwartz Communications, for $??] - Publicis looks to expand into tech, health, Boston Globe, B9.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • The Postal Service proposed ending one-day delivery and closing over half its mail-processing facilities, Wall Street Journal, A11.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Jukebox money not required - New Hampshire state enlists B-52s band in its effort to lure Bay State [Massachusetts] firms, Boston Globe, B5.
    Tickets to a B-52s concert are part of New Hampshire's sales pitch. [photo caption]
    [Or maybe this is silly STEALwork rather than MAKEwork.]
  • Casino arrival could be years off - Report sees long wait for touted construction jobs, by Noah Bierman, Boston Globe, B5.
    Despite the swift pace of legislation to legalize gambling in Massachusetts, it could take at least five years after a bill is signed to approve, build, and open a full-scale casino here...
    [Or maybe this is WAITwork rather than makework.]
  • $140m screening system for Logan, by Katie Johnston, Boston Globe, B6.
    Logan International Airport is getting a $140 million baggage screening system to replace what was the first system in the country to screen every piece of checked baggage via a conveyor belt... funded with a $68 million grants from the Transportation Security Administration for an upgraded baggage belt system and centralized screening facility and $22 million from the Massachusetts Port Authority [= Mass. taxpayers] which operates Logan, to renovate screening rooms and build new ones. The TSA is also expected to provide about $50 million for new screening technology...
    [To the Saudi 9/11 terrorists and their thousands of accomplices in the Bush regime we owe the massive expansion of government makework throughout the USA and the exponentiation of the national debt and deficit. America, ave atque vale.]
  • Treasury Dept. inquiring into Solyndra loan - The company received a $528 million loan from the government, Boston Globe, B9.
    [More, massive corporate socialism extorted from taxpayers to create a jobs in the face of a carefully fostered labor surplus based on an arbitrary pre-computer "full time" workweek that hasn't been adjusted for over 70 years of worksaving technology.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Initial jobless claims rose last week, and consumer prices climbed 0.4% in August, reflecting the vulnerability of the U.S. economy, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
  • Search continues for the bold U.S. consumer, by David Reilly, WSJ, C1.
    [No bold US hiring, no bold US consumer. How resolve this chicken&egg (which comes first)? Enforce the existing 40-hour workweek maximum with an efficient overtime-to-training&hiring design and resume our 1840-1940 workweek reduction, specificallly our 1938-40 two-hours-a-year workweek reduction, as much as it takes to force, yes I said FORCE, hiring because that's where it starts. No jobs - no consumers. Plentiful jobs, however few hours per week - plentiful consumer spending and everything dependent upon it, i.e., everything - just like in wartime with wartime prosperity - WITH the magic labor "shortage" but WITHOUT the war.]
  • Central banks pour dollars into Europe, WSJ, A1.
    [You KNOW the eunified currency was premature when corrupt-bigbank US dollars are being used to try and save it. Evidently the Europs don't have the imagination to design an internal tourniquet or quarantine to seal off the damage from turkeys like Greece... Europe may have the most advanced and strongest economies in the world (Germany...) but fab economic design can always be undermined by financial finagling - that's why the Timesizing Program settles some hash with the central bank right in Phase One and gives rate-setting over to binding public referendum - if it's arbitrary anyway (or impotent once rates are zero), let's let EVERYONE in on the game. Public too ignorant to decide? Hey, these questions are optional. Uninformed? Leave blank. No Australia-like fine for non-participation.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Call that a strike? Looks more like a temper tantrum to me, Daily Mail via wood.dailymail.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - On the final day of their sadly shrunken annual conference, a shrunken band of brothers vowed to bring the country to its knees over the less than heroic matter of public sector pension contributions. Once they swamped car parks, downed tools, marched and picketed for higher pay, shorter hours, longer holidays and the imminent overthrow of the capitalist bloodsuckers... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Friday is state furlough day, Albany Democrat Herald via democratherald.com
    ALBANY, Ore. - Most state offices will close Friday as employees take an unpaid furlough day. Statewide the closure affects 26,500 employees. Asked why the furloughs are not being taken in a staggered fashion so that the agencies could remain open, the state Human Resource Services Division sent word that most unions bargained the 10 fixed closure dates in their contracts... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, September 15, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - and Shaw's Star Market, P.Sq. - "One square above Harvard!" -
    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Tech tools replace people at start-ups, Wall Street Journal, B1 pointer to B5.
    [Startups and everywhere else. Remember when "small business = the engine of job creation"?]
  • U.K. women's job woes, Financial Times, p.1 pointer to p.6.
    The recession in Britain has hit men harder, but the sluggish recovery is proving tougher on women. The number of jobless women has risen by 13% to highest level in more than two decades.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Declaring war forever, op ed by Sabin Willett, Boston Globe, A15 target article.
    Point of view - 'Osama bin Laden may be dead, but some people don't want the war to be...'.
    Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A15.
    '...Or at least a 'war' that turns military commanders into roving prison wardens, seizing 'enemies' the military itself will identify. This avoids congressional responsibility for war's consequences, and many other nuisances.'
    [And it creates jobs, albeit destructive, and profits, and massive theft opportunities...]
  • 'Geriatric' U.S. arsenal needs expensive face-lift, WSJ, A1.
    [How long before the military-industrial complex and the banks realize they've bankrupted their golden goose?]
  • Massachusetts congressional members implore the debt supercommittee to avoid deep cuts in research grants and start-up business money, Boston Globe, A1.
  • Amesbury MA bank gets $17m from US to boost lending, by Todd Wallack twallack@globe.com, Boston Globe, B7.
    [When did taxpayers tell their "representatives" to start funding BANKS??? How long does it take for these idiots to learn the banks don't lend it, they just pay off their TARP loans. And they're STILL giving money to banks, with a national debt of $14 TRILLION and an annual deficit of over $1 TRILLION?! J*s*s Chr*st Alm*ghty!]
    ...So far, the Dept. of the Treasury has awarded $2.4 billion to nearly 200 banks, including $58 million to seven institutions in Massachusetts.
    [The once-great USA is sooo corrupt. So fucked. Time for a chorus from *Katie Goodman.]
    The latest local bank to receive aid is Provident Bancorp Inc. of Amesbury. Two other Bay State community banks previously received $10 million or more: Central Bancorp Inc. of Somerville [has one of our sleezier bank histories here in Slummerville/Slimerville MA], which received $10 million, and Leader Bancorp Inc. of Arlington, which received $12.9 million.
    The White House has argued the program is an effective way to boost small business lending since banks will pay lower interest rates for the money if they increase lending...
    [With a "Democrat" like this in the White House, who needs a Republican? And "lower interest rates"? You morons! Interest rates from the Fed are already ZERO. As Ralph Nader figured, we might as well elect the most fundamentalist imbecilic candidate the Tea Party can barf up and ram this nation down into the poverty-disease-starvation of the third world just to wake people up. How can a Democratic administration be this blockheaded and clueless? Can't they see the obvious? As Will Rogers said in the 1930s, the poor can be dying on the streets and the government turns a deaf ear, but a banker coughs a little and our "representatives" rush up to him with 10 million dollars' worth of cough syrup. The wealthy of this nation are infuriating everyone else sooo fast and sooo deeply.... Yet the more money they clutch in their white-knuckled fists, and the weaker the consumer base gets, the scareder they get and the tighter they clutch and coagulate their trillions to their cavernous chests, thus making things even worse, till their fists merge with their hearts, and the whole system clangs apart.]
    But critics, including several Republicans in Congress, have blasted the Small Business Lending Fund [SBLF] as another bank bailout, similar to the Troubled Asset Relief Program [TARP] approved by Congress during the financial crisis. More than half the banks that received TARP money, including Central Bancorp, have applied for the [SBLF] program in part to repay the money they received under TARP...
    [s-c-u-m s-c-u-m s-c-u-m... Basingstoke, Basingstoke... *Katie Goodman... These parasites have got to perpetuate a job shortage because it's their constant excuse for stealing more money from taxpayers - "Oh we PROMISE to create JOBS!" Yeah, sure. Only the economies that move from this job-creation scam to work sharing will last the next 50 years - or maybe it'll all play out in 20.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Consumers pull back on retail spending, Boston Globe, B6.
    ["Pull back on"? How about "run out of money for"?!]
    Retail sales in the U.S. were flat in August, signaling that wary consumers are delaying spending, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [Yeah, until they get jobs!]
  • Economy clips factories - Growth prospects shrink for U.S. manufacturers whose profits powered the "recovery" [our quotes], Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Economy may no longer be chugging along, by Paul Vigna, WSJ, C1.
    [Here's a guy who's taken a looong time to "get it."]
  • More than half of U.S.-based companies going public this year are under water [below IPO price], WSJ, C1 pointer to C3.
  • City [of Boston] officials seize another troubled vacant property, Boston Globe, B1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 40-hour work week may be thing of past, TheIslandNow.com
    WILLISTON PARK, Long Is., N.Y. - ...We need a four to four-and-one-half day workweek depending on requirements employing everyone who wants to work. Share and share alike. There are many who would squeal but they are paying the unemployment too. It should become the law of the land... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Largest European Economy Supports shorter work week with paid time off! TheSudburyStar.com
    THURINGIA, Germany - ...The work week will be reduced with full pay from 40 to 38 hours in increments over the three-year term, and overtime work will either be paid in full or employees have the option to convert that overtime to paid time off... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Opposition leader seeks to reduce working hours, Yonhap News via english.yonhapnews.co.kr
    SEOUL, S.Korea -- The leader of the main opposition Democratic Party said Thursday that he will seek measures to reduce working hours to improve workers' quality of life and create more jobs. Rep. Sohn Hak-kyu said in a radio address that if employers reduce working hours to the level of developed countries, the nation's employment rate can reach over 70%, up from the current 60%. South Korea's average yearly working hours totaled 2,111 hours last year, the most among countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and exceeding the statutory limits of 40 hours per week, which adds up to about 1,920 hours a year.... "The most important part is shortening overtime hours,"... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - today's headlines in Boston, Mass. provided by Martin's News Stand, South Station -
    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Get smart - Higher education pays off in long term, National Post, FP1.
    [How long?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Soaring poverty casts spotlight on 'lost decade' [thanks Bush & Cheney!] - Median income falls - 2.6 million join ranks of poor as economy remains stalled,
    New York Times, A1.
    Poverty level in US climbs to its highest point since '93 - 15.1% living below line as recovery stalls - Joblessness is driving force, Boston Globe, A2.
    The Census Bureau says 46.2 million people now live in poverty, and soup kitchens are busy. Last year, about 86 million people of working age did not work even one week out of the year. [photo caption]
  • Income slides to 1996 levels - Median household income falls for third year, census says, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    Poverty at 15.1%, highest since '93 - 10-year income drop USA's first in five decades,
    USA Today, 1A.
    [And coming along right behind US -]
  • Debt - Canadians might be heading into a recession of record amounts - Sadly hooked on cheap money,
    National Post, FP1.
    Debt levels in Canada continue to soar, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    [Just like in the U.S. in the late 90s. Harper's getting his wish - he's getting Canada more similar to the U.S. = suicidal.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Will Westminster's Working Hours Modernise After Today? Huffington Post UK via huffingtonpost.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - Joan Ruddock MP will today lobby her colleagues for a change of working hours in the House. It's quite a modest request really: she suggests close of day at 6 or 7pm midweek for business in the House, enabling MPs to get back to their young children in time to read them a bedtime story if they are within commuting distance, while the workaholics can continue with parliamentary business... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Workers sidelined by German success, BBC News via bbc.co.uk
    ESSEN, Germany - ...Iris Heinrich is what is known in local social security-speak as an aufstocker [or in New Yahk as a kvetch], someone in part-time work (30 hours a week in an office canteen) whose income is officially deemed insufficient for her and her teenage son. So she gets top-ups from the government towards rent and costs, amounts which she describes as inadequate for a "humane" existence... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Top-ups from the government? Compared to the UK and the US where there's no jobs and the US where there's no healthcare unless you're on disability or in jail, these workers aren't "sidelined" - they're coddled! This is another article written by an anglo who can't stand to see Germany outperform the US and UK. There's GOT to be something wrong!]
  3. Cleaning out super-exploitation, Anarkismo.net
    WITWATERSRAND, R.S.A. - Cleaning workers throughout South Africa have been on strike since Monday 8 August. They are demanding a living wage of R4 200 per month, as well as a 13th cheque and shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, September 13, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Broadcom a-greed to acquire NetLogic for about $3.7 billion, a deal designed to boost its position in chips for networking equipment, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B9.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • Bank of America's chief executive, Brian Moynihan, announced a $5 billion cost-reduction plan that includes 30,000 job cuts, as he fights to steady the lender and jump-start profits, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Ya can't upsize steady profits by downsizing your customers' customers.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Two-tier pay now the way Detroit works, New York Times, A1.
    WHERE, USA??? - ...900 employees turned out a Jeep Grande Cherokee sports utility vehicle every 48 seconds of the working day at an assembly plant here [three 8-hour shifts?] ...The newest workers earn about $14 an hour; long-time employees earn double that... The advent of a two-tier wage system in Detroit is spiking employment for one of the country's most important manufacturing industries... The new jobs...are seen as long-term....
  • U.S. coal firms have pumped $1.5 million into Boehner's political operation this year as they fight regulations [and spur global pollution], WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [And Boehner is such a nice unbiassed legislator...]
  • Pain mounts for Europe banks - Fears about Greece persist despite efforts to quell worry, WSJ, A1.
    Wary investors start to shun European banks, NYT, B1.
    [We repeat: internal quarantine, tourniquet... Next to Republicans, Greeks are the biggest tax evaders in the universe.]
  • Business school? No thanks, WSJ, B1.
    ...Applications for two-year full-time M.B.A. programs that start this fall dropped an average of 9.9% from year earlier...
    [Geez mabeez, don't tell me the kids are getting turned off by these crap pushers.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The World Isn't Up To Global Coordination, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ...The Geneva-based United Nations Conference on Trade and Development [UNCTAD]...argues that one of the fundamental causes of the euro zone's economic crisis is differential wage growth since the currency was launched in 1999.... UNCTAD's proposed solution is that German wages should now rise rapidly, which sounds like a bit of a vote-winner. Except that the German model is now based on a system known as Kurzarbeit, or "short work," and requires frequent[?] changes in wages[?] and hours[!]. Many Germans credit Kurzarbeit with the turnaround in their nation's economic fortunes from industrial museum to refreshed global powerhouse, and it's unlikely to be abandoned soon. It is especially difficult to envisage a politician advocating that it be dropped and...something as...attractive as wage rises be encouraged, [even] if the argument were that it must be done for the good of the euro zone... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. SEIU Countywide walk-out: Unfair labor lawsuit field against the county, UkiahDailyJournal.com
    UKIAH, Calif. - ...Padilla said the union offered its own 36-hour work week proposal that would give the county the concessions it wants, but would keep the workers as full-time employees, rather than making them permanent, part-time employees... Tess O'Connell, who works 32 hours a week, said a proposal to cut hours by 10% would reduce her work week to 28.8 hours, making her a part-time employee and therefore ineligible for retirement... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, Sept. 11-12, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • City [Toronto] offers sneak peak at cuts, 9/12 Toronto Star, GT1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Lavish tax breaks bolster makers of video games - Technological value questioned - Subsidies on research tapped to develop a firm's big hit, 9/11 New York Times, A1.
    [More forced charity from employees to employers, since most taxpayers are employees. And we dare not call it fraud? Meanwhile -]
  • Vital signs - Americans are borrowing more for student loans, 9/12 WSJ, graph caption, A1.
    In July, consumers owed the government about $386 billion, largely for student loans, up from $139 billion two years earlier. However, during the same period...consumers pulled back on other types of borrowing, such as credit cards and loans for automobiles.
    [From vibrant consumer spending to eternal jobmarket-disconnected studenthood, paid for wiith deeper debt incurred by disemployed Americans themselves! How else can wealthy American decision-makers commit suicide, everyone else first?!]

    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -
  • Social Security's inspector is investigating a case of potentially widespread disability fraud in Puerto Rico, 9/12 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
    [But then, what are their options in this most third-world, no-jobs part of the American empire?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • World at risk of second financial heart attack, 9/12 Toronto Globe, B1.
  • G7 sees 'clear signs of a slowdown in global growth', 9/11 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [What a surprise! These guys are sooo sensitive to anything affecting their own comfort ("Gee, there's a pea in my bed twenty mattresses down! Quick, 'lend' me $700B!") but sooo unaware of real problems for the vast majority of everyone else - almost none of whom they know personally. P.S. What's so bad about steady state instead Growth? Might let our biosphere last longer...]
  • As middle class shrinks. Procter&Gamble aims high and low [bracketwise], 9/12 Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Job woes at home and abroad, 9/12 Canadian Press via Ottawa Metro, p.10.
    ...A much weaker than expected report on Friday showed 5,500 jobs were lost in Canada last month...
  • Ottawa vows action on jobs as hiring slumps - 'We need to do more - Jobs have to be a priority' - Unemployment [canadien] climbs to 7.3%, 9/11 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Despite the existence of a federal worksharing program in *Canada as a kind of parading horse and photo op for the Harper regime in view of its weight of red tape and delays, Ottawa is almost as clueless as Europe about the potential of this approach = its centrality, omni-influence, even stand-alone capability (you really want small government without disaster? start here!) And jobs have always been "a" priority - among lots of other "priorities." Jobs have to be THE priority, or no action will occur in the first place or suffice if it occurs. We are already doing "more" about jobs = more that is useless, ecobashing or tax-wasting in terms of makework. We are so deep into dragging taxpayers into making up for technological worksavings in the context of a frozen pre-computer workweek, that the subtext of 70-80% of all "modern" governments is directly or indirectly devoted to artificial job creation or livelihood support where even job creation fails. So we can afford to do a lot less - if what we do is the right thing. Less of the left's "burgeoning maximum of stifling detailed interventions" and just the third way's "stable minimum of liberating general rules," theoretically just one = the Holy Grail of economic designers = the legendary Single All-Sufficient Control (SASC), so well-designed and centrally positioned in the body economic that we can safely dismantle all other controls, interventions, regulations and bureaucracies. And our SASC-watch has it honed down to two essentials: workweek fluctuation that counters unemployment, and smooth overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
  • Woes at French banks signal a broader crisis, 9/12 WSJ, A1.
    ...as the debt crisis on the euro zone's periphery is slowly infecting the core of the region's financial system...
    [They better design themselves an internal quarantine system pronto... or how about a tourniquet?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. German plan to reduce US unemployment, Washington Post (blog) via washingtonpost.com/blogs
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Known as “short-time work” or “work-sharing,” the scheme aims to spread the pain of recession around rather than forcing a handful to bear the brunt of the suffering. By many accounts, work-sharing appears to have been successful, and a growing number of countries — primarily in Europe, as well as Japan — have actively embraced it... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Why Fewer Work Hours Means a Smaller Environmental Footprint, 9/12 Treehugger.com
    CARRBORO, N.C. - ...A recent Swedish study found that when households reduce their working hours by 1%, their greenhouse gas emissions go down by 0.8%. One explanation is that when households spend more time earning money, they compensate in part by purchasing more goods and services, and buying them at later stages of processing (e.g., more prepared foods)... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Editorial: More unionized workers would be a bigger burden for city's budget, 9/11 Denver Post
    DENVER, Colo. - ...While it's easy to comprehend why city employees would be upset with the 13 unpaid furlough days they've had to take as the city has coped with multimillion-dollars budget shortfalls since 2008, it's important to remember this: It beats the alternative. That alternative is job losses... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Working Hours in Tbilisi Are Increasing Due to Customers' Satisfaction, 9/12 The FINANCIAL via finchannel.com
    TBILISI, Georgia (the Asian country, not the U.S. state) - ...According to the Georgian Labour Code the maximum working hours permitted in Georgia are 41 per week. But the employer can arrange different working hours within the employment contract. The Code doesn’t define the financial side of extra working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["Working hours" in the title really means Open For Business hours (not employee working hours) which is easily handled by multiple shifts. We include this story because of the info on the odd 41-hour Georgian workweek and, hey, we hardly ever hear anything about Tblisi.]
  5. Republic Airways Continues Attack On Pilots Group With Sham Furloughs, 9/11 (9/08 late pickup) AvStop Aviation News via avstop.com
    [Here's a new (bad) use for furloughs -]
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - The Teamster-represented pilots of Republic Airways has learned that Republic plans to furlough approximately 56 pilots despite the fact that the profitable airline is currently so understaffed that it asks pilots to volunteer to work overtime every day.... “Rather than own up to their failed leadership, Republic executives falsely shift blame to its pilots and their union to undermine the resolve of the pilot group to obtain a new collective bargaining agreement under Teamster representation.”... - see whole article under today's date.
  6. America's Productivity Crisis, 9/12 Forbes.com
    LONDON, U.K. - ..Further, it's simply not true that working hours have risen over those decades. They cannot have done, for the average person has more leisure now than they did then. Thus working hours must have fallen... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Huh? With thinking like this, no wonder Britain lost its empire.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, September 10, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Wholesale inventories rose in July as consumer spending stalled, New York Times, B1 pointer to B6.
  • Employers say jobs plan won't lead to hiring spur - Health of overall economy and demand are cited as forceful deterrents, New York Times, A1.
    [And how do employers see getting stronger demand without hiring?]
  • Canada shed jobs last month, pushing up the unemployment rate to 7.3%, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A7.
  • Banker's exit rattles markets - In Europe, top European Central Bank economist [Juergen Stark, Germany's top rep on the ECB] resigns, seen as policy protest; Dow industrials fall 303.68 points, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [or 2.69% to 10992.13, biggest drop in 3 weeks; Dow down 6 of the past 7 weeks; Euro down to $1.3657, biggest one-day drop and lowest finish since Feb.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Obama suggests changing unemployment system, Los Angeles Times via latimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...Work-sharing isn't new to the U.S. It's been around since the 1980s, and employers in 23 states, including California, can sign up for it, though relatively few have. ...The plan works like this:An employer has five workers, but business can only support four. Rather than lay off one worker, the employer cuts each worker's week by eight hours — leaving five workers each putting in 32 hours a week. The unemployment benefits that might have gone to the laid-off worker would be distributed equally among the five employees. Unemployment benefits usually cover about 50% of a worker's pay. Work-sharing is particularly popular in Germany and has helped keep its unemployment rate down during the turmoil of the last few years: It is at 7%, compared with the United States' 9.1%... Work-sharing could save tens of thousands of jobs every month... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This reminds of the orchard example in the first description of worksharing by Sismondi in 1819 in his "New Principles." Even the rightwing is coming round -]
  2. Obama Administration Comes Back to Liberal Wonks for Job Creation Ideas, FireDogLake.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...The basic logic of work sharing is simple. Currently the government effectively pays for workers to be unemployed with unemployment insurance. Rather than just paying workers who have lost their job, work sharing allows workers to be partially compensated for shorter work hours. Instead of 1 worker getting half pay after losing her job, under work sharing 5 workers may get 10% of their pay after their hours are cut by 20%... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Obama: American Jobs Act, Richmond Times Dispatch via www2.timesdispatch.com
    RICHMOND, Va. - ...Rather than firing some workers during economic slumps, businesses in 23 states use a type of unemployment insurance called "work sharing" that permits them to keep employees on the job by reducing their work hours.... Virginia is not among the states that enable companies to voluntarily participate in work sharing programs. In the last session of the General Assembly, Sen. Mary Margaret Whipple and 18 other members sponsored a bill (SB 1474) to allow Virginia businesses to participate in shared work, but it failed to get favorable action... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, September 9, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • U.S. vows to veto [Palestinian] statehood bid at UN, National Post, A1.
    [Yes, a Mideast in turmoil is such a better market for US weapons and source of US jobs than a Mideast at peace - or so the increasingly radical "conservatives" cling to thinking.]
  • Harper puts jobs at top of agenda - [Canada] PM joins Obama and other world leaders in placing added importance on tackling unemployment, Toronto Globe, A1.
    ['Added" importance? They still don't get that domestic consumption is 70% of the economy and domestic consumers are funded by domestic employment, the fuller the employment the stronger the domestic consumption, and the stronger the domestic consumption the stronger the economy. But what kind of jobs does Harper have in mind, you ask? -]
  • Canadian Forces would be ready for extended mission, 24 Hours Ottawa, p.6.
    [Ah, it's that good old "conservative" makework campaign again = billions for "defense," but not a dime for bridge repair.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • High jobless rates stymie recovery - U.S. jobs plan aims to attack long-term unemployment, but Western governments are facing deep-rooted problem, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [It's not deep-rooted. It's just rooted in time, not money. You can't forever fill a workweek of any fixed level while constantly introducing worksaving technology. That would be the LOWF = the lump of workweek fallacy, and every economist who's still stupidly stooping to the misnamed LOLF sneer (lump of labor fallacy, actually a truism), is guilty of it. The LOLF should be called the LOET (lump of employment truism), because it really refers to employment (jobs), not labor (employees and jobseekers) and it's patently obvious from the frequency of downsizing and the swelling of unemployment, welfare, disability and incarceration that the supply of jobs is certainly not infinite nor even plentiful in the market term. If it is protested that "labor" here refers to work, not jobs, and "obviously there's an infinite amount of work to be done," we reply that there is evidently not an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and "work" without pay is slavery (relevant to the economy only in the negative sense of displacing employees) or hobby (irrelevant to the economy except as a potential consumption boost, or relevant negatively like unpaid "work," as in the hundreds of student stage productions in Boston that shrink the metropolitan market for professional performances).]
  • The last days of stimulus spending - Politicians show waning belief in interventionism, National Post, A1.
    [This would be a good thing except that not even the economy practicing the most advanced form of worksharing today (Germany: Kurzarbeit) has any idea of the potential, enhanceability and sustainability of this direction of thinking.]
  • The high-risk game of low, low rates, National Post, FP1.
    [So the mighty "tool box" of monetarists and central bankers is a joke. It contain only one tool - interest rate manipulation - which is useless when rates are already near zero as now. Or maybe we should include the various forms of central bank money printing, like "quantitative easing" (QE1 & 2), which gets us into the high-risk game of talking the talk of controlling inflation while walking the walk of boosting it. The posterboy is Hugo Stinnes, who engineered the German hyperinflation in the early 1920s and starved to death thousands of Germans on fixed incomes or insufficient strength to get a wheelbarrow load of money to the bakery while it would still buy a slice of bread.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. US Work Sharing Could Produce Equivalent Of 2.4 Million New Jobs A Year - Analysis, by Dean Baker, EurasiaReview.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - It is encouraging to hear that President Obama included work sharing as part of his jobs agenda. This is a job creation measure that both has been shown to be successful and has the potential to break through partisan gridlock. The basic logic of work sharing is simple. Currently the government effectively pays for workers to be unemployed with unemployment insurance. Rather than just paying workers who have lost their job, work sharing allows workers to be partially compensated for shorter work hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Obama's $447-billion jobs plan faces opposition, USAtoday.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...But economists and employment experts said among the most intriguing proposals were the president's call for a work-sharing program... Work sharing has had...success in Germany, where unemployment hovers below 7%.... "Over the long term if you can keep workers at the workplace, they continue to maintain their skills and you avoid the situation of long-term employment where people are out of work for 1-2 years and may never find work again."... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, September 8, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Royal Bank and TD Bank are hoping to take advantage of global turbulence and expand through acquisitions, Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    [OK only if in USA and only to extend Canadian bank regulatedness.]
  • U.S. firm buys Cactus Commerce - Gatineau software house to merge with Bellevue WA-based Ascentium [for undisclosed $$], Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    [FYI - I'm sittin' right here in Gatineau-secteur Hull and thar ain't no cacti in sight, 'cept in the occasional houses on a diminutive scale.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Obama's $300 billion job creation pitch, Financial Post, FP1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • No quick economic fix in sight, Bank of Canada warns -, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Maybe not in BoC's time-blind "sight" - but timesizing cuts unemployment (UE) 1% for every hour cut from the workweek as in USA 1938,39,40: 44,42,40 hours/week: 19,17,15% UE, and France 1997-2Q01: 39, 35 hrs/wk: 12.6, 8.6% UE, even without an excellent OT-to-jobs&training conversion design.]
    - Borrowing costs to remain at near-emergency lows for extended period -
    [They still don't understand that this is not a financial emergency. There's tons of liquidity. This is a consumer-spending emergency deriving from a 40-hour job emergency deriving from a downsizing strategy response to worksaving technology instead of a timesizing strategy response.]
    - but central bank expects growth to slowly gain pace
    [nevermind the total lack of foundation for such any expectation of growth whatsoever.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Jobs Plan Fact Sheet, Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog) via blogs.ajc.com/jamie-dupree-washington-insider
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...3. Pathways Back to Work for Americans Looking for Jobs.
    * The most innovative reform to the unemployment insurance [UI] program in 40 years: As part of an extension of unemployment insurance to prevent 5 million Americans looking for work from losing their benefits, the President’s plan includes innovative work-based reforms to prevent layoffs and give states greater flexibility to use UI funds to best support job-seekers, including:
    o Work-Sharing: UI for workers whose employers
    choose work-sharing over layoffs... The President will expand “work-sharing” to encourage arrangements using UI that keep employees on the job at reduced hours, rather than laying them off... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Layoffs (of a few, and a few more, and...), which aggregate to system suicide, should never be an inter-pares "choice" - they should always be clearly disincentivated relative to hourscuts for all (including top management) which should be clearly incentivated by comparison.]
  2. The role of government: Lending a hand - Policymakers can help create jobs, up to a point, The Economist of London via economist.com
    LONDON, U.K. - ...The Hartz labour-market reforms introduced in Germany in the early 2000s included a scheme allowing the government to subsidise short-time working [alias worksharing alias (German) Kurzarbeit alias the emergency form of timesizing]. That is thought to have stopped unemployment soaring after the financial meltdown in September 2008, saving hundreds of thousands of jobs. Singapore benefited from a similar scheme, and several other countries introduced their own versions in the aftermath of the crisis... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Lake Wales panel OKs help for groups, NewsChief.com
    LAKE WALES, Fla. - ...He agreed with other commissioners on restoring every one of the 10 unpaid furlough days that city employees would have had to take to balance the budget if the city had not raised the property tax rate. He disagreed with giving funds to community organizations in a tight budget year and tough economy. "I don't think with facing employee furloughs, we can do this," Rogers said. "Our duty is the run this city. We are not the Salvation Army."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But apparently a lot of other commissioners think they are. They should be monitoring city-level worksharing and overtime-to-jobs conversion to make it easier for all residents to support themselves, instead of usurping residents' rights to choose their own charities.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, September 7, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Older Americans held hostage by mortgages, by E.S. Browning, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    More Americans are reaching their 60s with so much debt they can't afford to retire...as wages have barely kept up with rising prices over the past 35 years...
    Working age Americans now make up nearly 60% of the country's poor, a record, according to census figures, WSJ, A1 news squib.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Uncertainty fuels wild ride in markets, Toronto Globe, B15.
  • Slowdown has sped up crisis, Rubini says, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    [Duh, the slowdown IS the crisis, Rubi. (Somebody's PAYING these guys for touting tautologies?)]
  • The Dow industrials lost 100.96 points as investors again scrambled into investments perceived as safer. The 10-year Treasury yield closed below 2% for the first time.
  • Families feel sharp edge of state budget cuts, New York Times, A1.
  • Business keeps wary eye on global economic turmoil - Canadian executives say there is no panic , but they remain on edge as world's markets gyrate, Toronto Globe, B7.
    [Exports are only 17% of the US economy; consumer spending is 70%. It's probably similar in Canada? So why are we always hearing about "global" problems with the implication we should sacrifice to make things easier for exporters to deal with "global" unpredictables and uncontrollables, instead of how to strengthen things HERE that we can control and predict? Focus, focus, FOCUS.]
  • Rising unemployment and higher taxes are the face of the new Europe, Toronto Globe, B1 pointer to B6.
    [No they aren't. Shorter workweeks and fuller employment and lower taxes are the face of the new Europe, once they realize what they're already doing right, as in Kurzarbeit and trente-cinq heures. At least the threatened and envious economists of UK and US aren't spinning Kurzarbeit as a "failure" - though they seize any opportunity to dream up unlikely but possible downsides ("oh their workforce is RIGID" - never mind the US-UK "full time" workweek). But France got the same unemployment cut 1997-2001 as the US got 1938-40 = 1% less for each hour cut.]
    Europe's austerity challenge - Reforming the euro zone countries involves drastic pay and benefit cuts that could cause severe social disruptions and undo the cure, Toronto Globe, B6.
    [What cure? Austerity's not a cure; it's a coup de grace - which is what Roubini may be referring to above. And reforming the euro zone does not involve pay and benefit cuts except maybe for a few top execs and investors who can well afford it. Reforming the euro zone only involves workweek cuts and a radical expansion of employment and training, however short a workweek it takes.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Work Sharing Should Be Part Of President Obama's Job Program, OpEd by Dean Baker, EurasiaReview.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ...“There are currently two different routes to promote work sharing being considered in Congress . One route would expand the programs that exist in 20 states. Its lead sponsors are Rosa DeLauro in the House and Jack Reed in the Senate. The other would provide an employer tax credit to subsidize costs for companies that participate in the program. Representative John Conyers is the lead sponsor for this bill, which will likely be introduced in the coming weeks.” - see whole article under today's date.
    [Glad Dean got a worksharing-timesizing article into the Eurasia Review today, because both the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times have job suggestions today which are time blind and make no mention of worksharing or Kurzarbeit -]
    "Dear Mr. President" - 14 approaches to creating more jobs, WSJ, B1 pointer to B4.
    [Or do they mean 4?]
    Private ideas on how to create jobs,
    by Joe Light & Alan Murray, Wall Street Journal, B4 target article.
    How to bring the jobs back, op ed, New York Times, A27.
    President Obama is scheduled to discuss his jobs program on Thursday before Congress. What should he recommend, in the face of zero growth in jobs? Four writers share some suggestions.
    [4 writers and nary a mention of worksharing - the US is doomed - "the first shall be last"]
  2. Mayo Clinic: Burnout Persists Among Medical Residents, Despite Shortened Work Hours, Becker's Hospital Review via beckershospitalreview.com
    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. - Feelings of burnout persist among internal medicine residents, despite significant cutbacks in duty hours [from 120 to 80 hrs/wk] in recent years, a national study by Mayo Clinic found. Mayo Clinic researchers surveyed 16,394 U.S. residents in training in 2008-2009, representing three-fourths of U.S. internal medicine residents. The study reveals that 51.5% of residents reported burnout symptoms, 45.8% noted emotional exhaustion and 28.9% had feelings of depersonalization, reflected in cynicism and/or callousness... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. “Average” Statistics that Bruise Our Ears, SmartDataCollective.com
    NORTHERN N.J., USA - ...George Orwell’s poignant tome 1984 presents a dystopian future where a surveillance police state has control over the populace in just about every regard from health, food, speech, and education. Large telescreens mounted on street corners and in the home, blast statistics at denizens regarding how good life is under Big Brother; “Day and night telescreens bruised your ears with statistics proving that people today (on average) had more food, more clothes, better houses, better recreations—that they lived longer, worked shorter hours, were bigger, healthier, stronger, happier, more intelligent, better educated, than the people of fifty years ago.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So, evidently there was a day. when Orwell was writing '1984,' when shorter working hours were regarded as a positive. Wow!  Note that Orwell is not an abbreviation of Orson Welles.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 17/9), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -


    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • U,S, military and spy officials are seeking more authority for covert operations to thwart Iran's sway in Iraq,
    Wall Street Journal, A1:2 pointer to A1:6.
    [So much for "freedom of speech" for anyone else. But at least we'll get more spook jobs, plus another big unaccountable siphon into taxpayers' already bankrupted credit.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Grim jobs report knocks oil lower,
    Wall Street Journal, C1 pointer to C9.
  • Europe signals global gloom, WSJ, A1.
    [Like America doesn't?]
    World markets fall as continent's debt crisis fuels worries of lengthy slowdown
    [It's a not worries, it's reality. And it's not lengthy, it's permanent ... until we make two simple modifications:
    (1) The workweek must stop being ignored, frozen or lengthening and start shortening - as much as needed to bring unemployment down to mere frictional levels and reactivate all those defunded and deactivated consumers.
    (2) Chronic overtime must stop being ignored, frozen or increased and start being converted into jobs, and training whenever needed.
    No economy will ever recover anywhere anytime without these two design mods.]
  • After the Dow industrials posted their ugliest August in a decade, investors are buckling up for September, historically the worst month of the year for stocks, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Workers face a slimmer chance of getting a part-time retailing job for the holidays than they have in several years, a survey of 21 store chains found, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. For(sic)-day workweek no benefit to the public, phillyBurbs.com (blog)
    PHILADELPHIA, Pa. - . . Get ready for the next great governmental innovation that is slowly, but strategically, being rolled out under the guise of saving the public immense dollars on energy usage; the four-day workweek. This is, to use an elite business school descriptor, a scam... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 12 Ways to Survive Academic 2012, InsideHigherEd.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - . . Even those who have been furloughed or had programs cut and workload increased typically blame the economy, the legislature or a political party... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. BONUS excerpt - Millennials evolve as target for foodservice segment, Meat & Poultry via test.meatpoultry.com
    USA - . . 44% are not employed, 30% work 35 or more hours a week and 32% work less than 35 hours a week...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, September 4-5, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -

  • Prison visits with a price, 9/05 New York TImes, A1 pointer to A10.
    Arizona has become the first state to charge families to visit relatives in prison, instituting a one-time $25 fee for a background check...
    [The wealthy lay ever heavier burdens on the non-wealthy - a revolution is born.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks sink on gloomy employment news, 9/04 Boston Globe (BG), G5.
    . . The Dow dropped 253 points, wiping out all of its gains for the week. No jobs were added in the US last month. It was the worst employment report in 11 months and renewed fears that another recession could be on the way [or never left, except in the frozen-smile definitions of corrupt economists]. Gold jumped $48 an ounce as cash flowed into investments seen as less risky.
  • Organized labor grapples with diminished prospects.., 9/05 BG, A1.
    [And it's their own damn fault for not focusing on their power issue all these years, SHORTER HOURS. Instead, they allowed themselves to be distracted by higher pay and trinkets (benefits), which merely served to tack an artificially high price on an increasingly surplus commodity = THEM.  If they had focused on shorter hours, they would have harnessed market forces on their side to reward a shortage (them) and they'd now have both shorter hours AND higher pay.]
  • Losing billions, postal service is near default - Looking to slash costs - Undercut by e-mail - Asking Congress for emergency aid, 9/05 New York Times, A1.
  • Neither Smurf nor wizard [Harry Potter] could save summer movie attendence,
    9/05 NYT, B1.
  • A parent's guide to launching grown children back into the world of paying bills,
    by Michelle Singletary, Washington Post via 9/04 BG, G5.
    One of my favorite movies is "Failure to Launch." The...message...is that parents need to help their adult children launch into adulthood...
    [The concept that Michelle is carefully avoiding here is, job market. Parents for seven decades have gone along with downsizing the workforce instead of insisting on maintaining and growing it with timesizing, and now, literally, it's all coming home to roost in the form of their own jobless adult children. They deserve every expense they're getting for their time blindness. THERE ARE NO JOBS . . . until . . . we quit straining to uphold a pre-automation 1940 forty-hour workweek forever and ever at mounting taxpayer expense and simply SHARE THE VANISHING WORK. If we make it easier for people to support themselves - and that should be VERY easy in the age of robotics - then taxpayers won't have to.]
  • The Vatican strongly rebuked the Irish government, saying it never discouraged bishops from reporting sexual abuse of minors to police, 9/04 Boston Globe, A1.
    [In other words, this centuries-old "Child Abuse Club for Men" was never out-of-its-mind OUTRAGED about this in its entire history, and never took anything but a totally passive (=permissive) position on it. Time to (bumpersticker) "Nuke the Vatican" - or continue with "Open Season on the Kids of the Congregation" and "Your Kids Are OURS" nudgenudge, winkwink?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. If the Wealthy Really Want to Do Something…, by Philip Hyde III, Federicksburg Freelancer Tribune
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - ...The current extreme over-concentration of income and wealth in America is due to running capitalism on the basis of a general wage-depressing labor surplus and job shortage, which is due in turn to responding to automation and robotization with downsizing (jobcuts=nowork) and government-upsizing (job creation=makework) instead of "timesizing" (hourscuts=sharework)... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If we can agree on the historical observation that economies run better during the labor "shortages" of war (hence "wartime prosperity") and plague (hence the birth of the middle class in the 1300s), maybe we can move from there to agreeing that we should perhaps define labor shortage considerably more restrictedly than employers usually do - because if their labor "shortages" produced prosperity, maybe the rest of us should insist they start calling them labor "balances" - real balances between labor and employment that maintain wages or raise wages in pace with rising technological productivity. Then all we need to do is find a method of achieving such labor balance without killing large swaths of the workforce and deactivating the associated consumers. Gee, where could we find such a method?]
  2. The Limping Middle Class, by Robert Reich, 9/04 New York Sunday Times, Sun.Revu.6.
    BOSTON, Mass. - . . Some say we couldn’t have reversed the consequences of globalization and technological change. Yet...other nations, like Germany, suggest otherwise. Germany has grown faster than the U.S. for the last 15 years, and the gains have been more widely spread. While Americans’ average hourly pay has risen only 6% since 1985, adjusted for inflation, German workers’ pay has risen almost 30% [and] the top 1% of German households now take home [only] 11% of all income — about the same as in 1970. And [despite] the debt crisis of its neighbors, its unemployment is still below where it was when the financial crisis started in 2007. How has Germany done it? Mainly by focusing like a laser on education (German math scores continue to extend their lead over American), and by maintaining strong labor unions... - see whole article under today's date.
    [An excellent diagnosis with no cure (more "education," more "unions"? oh, please). America's progressives are almost as block-headed as America's regressives but at least they realize, dimly, that Germany has reached Square One of the answer and we haven't - they just don't realize what it is = German CEOs don't DOWNsize to get UPsizing=growth, they TIMEsize = workshare = short(-time) work = Kurz-arbeit. America's progressives, like humanity in general it seems, are profoundly time blind. And it's devilishly hard even if you have a BGO (blinding glimpse of the obvious) to stay ON ISSUE - witness Juliet Schor's slippage from The Overworked American to The Overspent American - "overspent" in a depression? ohpuhleez, Juliet, show us dat river, take us across, row us back to That Other Schor! - we need you. You're our main gal as long as Barbara Brandt keeps saying, "Shorter hours is not my main thing, Phil" and Heather Boushey remains incomprehensibly below the radar (maybe it's the Bucket-Bouquet syndrome?). 'Course, Mr. "Hyde's the name, hide's the game" should talk!]
  3. On Labor Day, two jobs better than none, 9/04 San Jose Mercury News via mercurynews.com
    [= 2 part-time better than 0 full-time]
    SAN JOSE, Calif. - . . "I work at Wal-Mart 16 hours a week for $8.20 an hour," she said. "I work part time at a chip company, where I'm assistant finance manager, for $14 an hour ... I also work at a software design company one day a week as an accountant, making $20 an hour."... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. The Jobs Mirage: How Much More Work Do Humans Really Need? 9/04 truth-out.org
    PORTLAND, Ore. - . . Instead of clamor for jobs, why not clamor for a shorter workweek and divide the necessary work among more people? How'd 40 hours a week get to be some sort of magic number?... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But then there are the happy slaves, sans imagination, waiting for someone else to tell them what to do -]
  5. BONUS excerpt - Who Wants A Four Day Work Week? by Robin M., 9/04 Care2.com (blog)
    REDWOOD CITY, Calif. - Due to the Labor Day holiday, many people will be experiencing the joy of a four day workweek next week. But what if you could do that all the time? Would you want to?...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, September 3, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Stalling economy creates no jobs - S&P downgrade, strike, debt talks among factors, Boston Globe, A1.
    Zero job growth latest bleak sign for U.S. economy - Jobless rate still 9.1%, and White House says it may stay high for months, New York Times, A1.
    [Try "years"! . . . . unless . . . . we workshare and timesize to raise pay (raising hours has lowered pay, in case you haven't noticed) and employment and consumer spending.]
    Hiring standstill raises recession fears, Boston Globe, B7.
    [If we had remotely realistic economic indices and definitions (e.g., of "recession"), recession fears would never have abated.]
    Job growth grinds to a halt - Lack of hiring in August roils financial markets; Economic gloom ratchets up pressure on Obama, Wall Street Journal, A1:2 target article.
    Stocks tumbled as the dismal jobs report reignited concerns about a slip back into recession, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:2.
    The Dow Jones industrials fell 253.31 points or 2.2% to 11240.26.
    Friday's [financial] markets: Ominous opening for September, WSJ, B1.
  • Jobs data confirm US growth [ie: negative growth] fears - Payroll stagnation increases pressure on Obama [pressure on a marshmallow?] - Chances strengthen of a further Fed "stimulus" [LOL - our quotes], by Harding in DC & Kassell in NYC, Financial Times, p.1.
    The US did not add a single job in August...
  • Battered retailers hope deals lure shoppers back, Boston Globe, B5.
  • The government sued 17 financial firms, including the largest US banks, for selling Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac billions of dollars worth of mortgage-backed securities that turned toxic when the housing market collapsed, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B6.
    [But then, aren't Fannie & Freddie capable of doing their own direct mortgage selling? Why are they two levels removed in the first place? (1) buying mtg-bkd securities instead of mortgages, (2) buying other companies mortgage stuff instead of just doing their own?!? Clearly the taxpayer ripoff has penetrated F&F.]
    Suit says US was misled on mortgages, Boston Globe, B6.
    [Yeah yeah.]
  • Obama abandons a stricter limit on air pollution, NYT, A1.
    [This guy is useless.]
    - Cites economic impact
    [which would actually be positive throughout a very very long-term future.]
  • Beacon Hill [the Massachusetts legislature] surrenders to casinos - Gambling revenue - like other forms of "voluntary" contributions to government - erodes a fundamental idea of democracy: that we're all in this together, op ed by Renée Loth, Boston Globe, A11.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Nothing to Celebrate: This Labor Day Don't Party, Organize and Raise Hell! ThisCantBeHappening! via thiscantbehappening.net
    MIDDLETOWN, Conn. - . . In other words, 50% of us are either out of work or worried about becoming jobless. Meanwhile, those who are still working, according to the BLS, are getting shorter hours or are having their pay cut, so that those who are working are bringing home smaller paychecks. This is the true picture facing the American people this Labor Day... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Southern University board sets Friday vote on financial emergency request for main campus, AP via TheRepublic.com
    BATON ROUGE, La. - . . Southern leaders say "financial exigency" can be avoided if 90% of the 282 permanent professors agree to two years of consecutive furloughs of up to 10%. Faculty leaders said they believe they can reach that benchmark over the holiday weekend... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, September 2, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -


    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • US solar industry fades, but China's shines - Evergreen Solar suffered because it pursued unusual technologies, Keith Bradsher, New York Times via Boston Globe, B8.
    [Uh, aren't all solar technologies unusual except sundials, tanning and evaporation/desalination?]
    HONG KONG, China - The bankruptcies of three US solar power companies in the past month...have left China's industry with a dominant sales position - almost three-fifths of the world's production capacity... Besides Solyndra [of California, there] were Evergreen Solar of Marlborough MA and SprectraWatt of Hopewell Junction NY. Another company, BP Solar [of] Frederick MD.\.halted manufacturing..last spring...
  • Suspected brothel closed [- Unspecified jobs lost] - City [Boston] responds to Roxbury complaints, but no arrests made, Boston Globe, B1.
    Neighbors said they often complained about the two-family building on Mt. Pleasant Ave. in Roxbury MA. (photo caption)
    ["Suspected" only? Guilty until proven innocent? More white witches fingering EVIL on spectral evidence?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Global gloom buffets factories, by Reddy (DC), Frangos (HK) & Blackstone (Frkfrt), Wall Street Journal, A1.
    Factories around the world are throttling back, further darkening the outlook for a faltering global economy...
    [Factories' downsizing impoverishes their own customers' customers, so we go another round of downsizing. This has to change to timesizing = trimming hours and maintaining jobs and markets instead of trimming jobs and markets - there is NO other choice. The first economy that prototypes it and standardizes it with smooth overtime-to-jobs conversion will rule the world. And Germany has already *prototyped it.]
  • The vigorous virtues, op ed by David Brooks, New York Times, A21.
    There is a specter haunting American politics: national decline...
    [And except for the fact that we've been dissing this approach for 71 years, it's all easily, efficiently and market-orientedly reversible by emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing.]
  • U.S. stocks opened September on a sour note snapping a four-day winning streak, WSJ, A1 pointer to C8.
    The Dow industrials fell 119.96 points or 1% ti 11493.57.
    Decline cuts off S&P's 4-day advance, Boston Globe, B9.
  • What's yellow, has four wheels, and is a better investment than gold? Boston Globe, B9.
    A New York City taxi medallion - the official permit that allows you to put a cab on the city's streets - sold for $678,000 in July. That was up from $2,500 in 1947. (photo caption)
    [There's a measure of the Great Leak Upward and the Black Hole of unusably collapsed currency in the wealthiest minuscule of the population = a demonstration of the wealthy's desperation to seize an investment that will at least hold its value even though it will take years for a single NY cab to earn this amount.]
  • "Vital" signs - Construction spending slumped in July, WSJ, A1 graph caption [our quotes].
    Total spending..fell 1.3% from June to $789.5 billion, at an annual rate. Public construction fell 2.1% while spending on factories, hotels and other non-residential projects slipped 0.4%. Residential construction spending fell 1.4%, driven lower by a large drop in spending on home improvement and repair.
    [Guess all them fixer-uppers is ferclosed.]
  • Obama Lays a Goose Egg, by James Taranto, online.wsj.com
    ..Commentary's Peter Wehner is also speculating about the possibility of a primary challenge to the president: "It remains unlikely - but bear in mind Obama is turning into a one man wrecking ball when it comes to the Democratic Party."
    [Colleague Kate: But the Tea Party is turning into wrecking ball for the Repubs. Forty percent of Americans don't like them and they're a bunch of leaderless factions that don't like each other.]
    ...And so in more and more Democratic hearts, and increasingly on more and more Democratic lips, you will hear the soft whisper, "O Hillary, Hillary! Wherefore art thou Hillary?"
    [At least Hillary is still alive. For sane Republicans (if any survive of this most endangered species besides Phil Hyde, now forced to be an independent and start the Timesizing.com Party), it's "O Ike, Ike!" or "O TR, TR!" or "O Abe, Abe!"]
  • The U.S. is set to sue a dozen big banks over mortgages [who] lacked due diligence, New York Times, A1.
    Faulty mortgage papers a widespread problem - 'Robo-signing' goes back to '90s, Boston Globe, B6.
    "Because of these bad titles, property owners can't prove they own the properties they think they bought," said Jeff Thigpen, Guilford County NC register (sic) of deeds (photo caption)
  • Banks make case for Greek bailout [so they can enjoy more "moral hazard"?], NYT, B1.
    [If the big banks want it, policymakers everywhere should run, not walk, IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. CEOs rewarded most for raising unemployment - No wonder US unemployment is stuck at 9.1% when CEOs are paid more than their companies pay in tax – for cutting jobs, The Manchester Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    [There it is - all the "free" market incentives in the once-great USA are set up for the rich decision-makers to commit suicide, everyone else first.]
    MANCHESTER, U.K. - ..Comment 32: ...Technological advancement comes into the equation. We can create everything we need with fewer workers. It is hard to see where job creation is going to come from. We should be considering working shorter hours to spread the wealth around rather than using tax and benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Economix: Explaining the Science of Everyday Life - Jobs Report Preview, (9/01 late pickup) economix.blogs.nytimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - . . What’s happening to the length of the workweek? The workweek has averaged 34.3 hours for the two previous months. Economists are expecting it to remain unchanged in August [it was trimmed to 34.2]. A slight change, though, would give a sense of whether employers are thinking of expanding or shrinking their staffs [they're thinking of shrinking], since they usually change hours before making the bigger commitment to hire or fire... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Dismal jobs report sends stocks lower - The Dow ends down 253 points as a report that the U.S. economy added no new jobs in August increases concerns that the already weak recovery is stalling, Los Angeles Times via latimes.com
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. - The US economy added no new jobs in August as employers cut back hiring and trimmed work hours of existing employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Ironic - if we trimmed work hours systemically - at the city level or state level, or federal level like Germany - we'd be forcing, yes FORCING employers to MAINTAIN jobs and payrolls and CONSUMER SPENDING AND THEIR OWN MARKETS instead of cutting payrolls and consumer spending and their own markets - in other words, we'd be FORCING EMPLOYERS, despite their loud complaints, TO QUIT COMMITTING SUICIDE by making things worse and worse...]
  4. BONUS excerpt - Good News About Those Endless Workweeks, by Kelly Evans, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - The number of hours worked is nearly as important as the number of people working...
    [No it isn't. The percentage of the population who are "supporting themselves," so that taxpayers don't have to, is all-important, and the ceiling on number of workhours required, HOWEVER LOW, that it is required to maximize the number of people working and earning and spending, is of no consequence (except to require ever improving management skills at suturing shorter shifts) and has no adverse effects. Quite the contrary, because the lower the workweek ceiling, the greater the amount of the most basic and fundamental freedom within a given population = financially secure Free Time, more and more vitally necessary to provide enough watchdogs on all the bizarre things that can go wrong in a high-tech economy, like say, in banking, mortgages, ecology....]
    , and the rise of the average private-sector workweek from a low of 33.7 hours during the recession to 34.3 as of July helps explain why consumer spending hasn’t cratered... As always, the initial focus of Friday's big employment report will be on the two headline figures: the U.S. unemployment rate, expected to hold steady at 9.1%, and the number of jobs added during the month. But these don't always tell a clear or consistent story. The unemployment rate sometimes rises even when jobs are growing. The jobs-added figure is volatile... Even a one-tenth of a hour increase in the length of the average private-sector workweek is equivalent to adding some 320,000 jobs, estimates UBS Securities economist Samuel Coffin. This is because of the additional income being generated...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, September 1, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Justice [Dept.] sues to block T-Mobile-AT&T merger - Less competition feared, but move ignites jobs debate, by Edward Wyatt, NY Times via Boston Globe, B8.
    ..The Department argued that joining the second- and fourth-largest wireless phone carriers would result in higher prices and give consumers fewer innovative products. The companies disagreed, and labor unions that support the deal said the merger would add jobs, not cost them...
    [Yes folks, there are still dollar-crazed CEOs claiming that mergers "would add jobs, not cost them." Oops, there are labor unions that support them?! Omigod, are we screwed! There are more and more dumb Americans supporting ideas that shaft themselves. First the Tea Party - now the T-Mobile and AT&T unions. And it's these same ideas that have got our economy to the bountiful job situation we see in the breadlines around us today. Can somebody knock these nitwits on the side of the head?]


    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • US-backed solar firm files bankruptcy, Boston Globe, B8.
    ..Solyndra LLC of Fremont, Calif., had become the poster child for government investment in green technology...
    [Is there ANY way we can stop "our" government from giving our money to already-rich people in tiny segments of the private sector and spend it instead on our dilapidated roads and bridges for EVERYONE? It is NOT a government role to favor individual industries, no matter how compelling their arguments. Government's role is to restore and maintain a level playing field, not only between industries and companies but between labor and management, job-seekers and job-offerers. And since our government has totally ignored this vital second part and focused only on controlling inflation and not unemployment&consumerspending, our economy is in the toilet. And all government has to do is keep the workweek adjusted to lower levels appropriate for our current higher levels of worksaving technology, because if we keep DOWNsizing employee-consumers, which shrinks the economy, instead of merely "timesizing" them, which has no adverse effects since it absorbs the wage-depressing labor surplus (witness the halving of the workweek 1840-1940), there's no way on earth under heaven that we'll ever again get economic growth - which requires UPsizing.]

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives)- sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Help with homeless - Danvers appealing to state for help with [$72,000 last-year] cost of busing [143 homeless] students living in local motels, by Kathy McCabe, Boston Globe, NO8.
    DANVERS, Mass. - In the 2009-2010 school year, Danvers schools spent $158,000 to bus 151 homeless students living in local motels to attend classes in their hometown school districts... With traditional shelters full, the state's housing crisis has forced a record 1,698 homeless families into motels across Massachusetts... Danvers is one of 35 Bay State communities where motels have contracted with the state to house homeless families...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - Hiring slowed last month, Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    According to ADP, the private sector added 91,000 jobs in August, fewer than the 109,000 added in July.
    Survey says 91,000 hired in August, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B8.
    [Is there ANY way we can stop our media from shouting the tiniest good news and whispering or ignoring the biggest bad news? Later in this article, we read -]
    ..Another report yesterday showed employers in August cut more jobs than a year earlier. Planned firings climbed 47% from August 2010 to 51,114, according to figures released by Chicago's Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc.
    [A challenging gray Christmas indeed!]
    Job-cut announcements were led by the government and financial and retail industries.
    [Geez, any of them left out?]
    Job cuts have accelerated as recent data showed the economy slowed more than previously reported in the first half of the year.
  • Major stock indexes had their worst August in a decade, with the Dow industrials dropping 4.4%, their 4th straight month of declines. WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • More than 1,400 Massachusetts homeowners received foreclosure petitions in July.., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B7.
    ..the highest monthly total this year. It was the second consecutive month of an increase [in Mass. foreclosures].
    Foreclosure petitions rise in July - Lenders speed efforts to seize Mass. properties -, Boston Globe, B7 target article.
    [Nice guys, yeah = another push off another little ledge on American's downward plunge. "A house divided against itself cannot stand."]
    - But proceedings are down 38% over 2010
    [Feel any better? No? Homelessness, joblessness - so what do we do? We bring in another drop in the bucket of the billions-strong "huddled masses longing to be free" as if we're still the American economy of the 1950s -]
  • Becoming Americans, Boston Globe, B1 photo caption & pointer to B3.
    BOSTON, Mass. - Over 3,400 [3,414] new US citizens from more than 130 countries took the oath of allegiance from US District Judge Mark yesterday during a naturalization ceremony at the TD [Toronto Dominion] Garden [nee Boston Garden]. The newly sworn citizens included five members of the US military.
    [Well, that only leaves 3,395 jobseekers then - NO PROBLEM !? Miss Liberty and her lamp will kill America yet! Those devious French donors! But they're doin' it to themselves now too!]
    Opportunity beckons newly minted Americans, Boston Globe, B3.
    [Oh yeah? WHAT opportunity in a deepening depression? We are still lying to ourselves and to foreigners. At best, this is a "jobless recovery" - which itself is a lie since...no jobs, no recovery. In Boston, we can't even hang onto our own Boston Garden because our banks are so unregulated, unaccountable and shot through with the corruption of conflict of interest since Bill Clinton repealed the "old-fashioned" Glass-Steagall Banking Act of 1938, nevermind it was designed to prevent a replay of the Great Depression by keeping separate banking, brokerage and insurance. So who buys the Boston Garden? A big bank from next door, Canada, which kept its banks regulated, no thanks to its current Bush-adoring prime minister. Pathetic!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. More poor turning to food pantries - Food pantries are seeing increasing numbers of middle class and out of work professionals turning [to them] for help, MiamiHerald.com
    MIAMI, Fla. - ..The so-called “Great Recession” plunged so many people into poverty that it has changed the face of the American poor. More and more, they are people like Petitfrere, who lost his job in 2006, and now makes less money and works fewer hours... “The middle class is shrinking in the United States,”.. In Miami-Dade, where unemployment is 13.5%, the safety net can include everything from unemployment benefits to free cell phones... - see whole article under today's date.
    [When you cut hours on a citywide, statewide or economywide basis, you make more money for working fewer hours, not less, because you're absorbing the surplus of desperate resumes willing to work for less and you're harnessing market forces in getting employers bidding against one another for good help.]
  2. Economists and other experts outline how to create jobs, USAtoday.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Share jobs to save jobs. Perhaps the least expensive way to bolster payrolls is through work sharing, a program that encourages employers to avoid layoffs by cutting all workers' hours instead. For example, instead of laying off 20% of its staff, a company could trim all workers' hours by 20%. The government then would make up half the workers' lost pay with unemployment insurance — so it's basically a wash [because it makes a smaller impact on UE insurance than total jobloss] or a small expense for state and federal coffers... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Time Off Work for Exercise Linked to Increased Productivity - In Study, Employees Get More Done Despite Reduced Work Hours, Newswise (press release) via newswise.com
    PHILADELPHIA, Pa. — Taking time out of the work week for an employee exercise program may lead to increased productivity—despite the reduction in work hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. How Jobs could reboot working class, Washington Post via ConcordMonitor.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Until last year, when a wave of worker suicides and labor unrest [in China] forced Foxconn to raise wages and cut hours, the men and women who make the stuff America loves worked 60-hour weeks at roughly 50 cents an hour... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Labor Day: A Day to Rest, to Remember, and to Act - for "Entitlements" and Jobs, HuffingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..A 60 or even 70-hour working week was typical for industrial workers in the Nineteenth Century. Fights for ten-hour workdays and a six-day work week were a key part of early union struggles. Now we're seeing working hours rise steeply for households, as both adults now work with diminishing success to maintain the standard of living many of their parents enjoyed on a single income... - see whole article under today's date.
  6. BONUS excerpt - Germany's Resiliency Buoys Europe, by Blackstone & Walker, Wall Street Journal via FreeRepublic.com
    FRANKFURT, Deutschland—   Germany– buoyed by its cadre of family-owned niche companies [and by its powerful Kurzarbeit (worksharing) program]– appears to be weathering the global slowdown, countering fears that Europe's economic powerhouse faces a sharp downturn that could deepen the region's debt crisis. A pair of bullish reports, on German employment and manufacturing, were reassuring on Wednesday: Unemployment remained at its lowest level in nearly two decades last month, while July machine orders jumped 9% from a year earlier. The latest data suggest that Europe's largest economy, which is expected to grow 3% this year, remains resilient, even as evidence mounts that the U.S. and much of the rest of the world are cooling...

    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.