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hopes/dooms du jour,
August 2-31, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. High unemployment doesn't have to be the new normal, MCT via York Daily Recordn via ydr.com
    YORK, Penn. - ..Two strategies they could implement are work sharing and subsidized jobs. Work sharing is a federal-state unemployment insurance program that allows companies faced with reduced demand to cut all employees' hours instead of laying off some workers. Company workers, in turn, maintain their jobs and benefits and also receive partial unemployment compensation to help offset lost income. Twenty-two states have work sharing programs... - see whole article under today's date.
    [22 states, 23 states... does anybody have some solid figure for this?]
  2. Sharing the Work and Sparing the Planet: Beyond the Assumption of Consumption, Corporate Social Responsibility Newswire via CSRwire.com
    GOLDEN, Colo. - ..With more part-time opportunities available, there will be far less unemployment overall, and far fewer home foreclosures. By sharing the workload, employers will have healthier, more productive employees... Employee-chosen part-time work is becoming quite normal in the EU, with Holland leading the charge. In recent years, nearly half of all Dutch employees worked less than 35 hours a week, including 75% of all women and 23% of all men. Though [even officially admitted] unemployment rose to 10% in the U.S. in the current recession, Germany’s unemployment actually went down... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is all good except, the enemy is not consumption and there's no need to go on an anti-consumption campaign during a recession or a jobless "recovery" - which is a crisis of under-consumption. Consumption is not the enemy when it's done with Bucky Fuller's "doing more with less." The enemy is the Protestant work ethic of "Work hard to get ahead" in the sense of "Work long hours to get ahead." Also, the enemy is control-freak employers who want a maximum of facetime or a total blank check on employees' lives offsite via email and/or cellphones-nee-beepers, no downtime, no boundary, no life - and lots of wage&spending depressing un(der)employment right next door.]
  3. Conservation group lays off CFO - Officials say intent is not to avoid public scrutiny, ClackamasReview.com
    CLACKAMAS COUNTY, Ore. - ..Garvison had received an annual salary of $61560 for a 30-hours-per-week schedule, which the district has budgeted toward creating two new positions, a conservation planner and a part-time office assistant... Jan Lee, chair of the district's board, said that her main consideration in the decision was the ability to put an equivalent of 1.5 full-time positions on the ground and make time for more conservation work... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Sounds like worksharing's neighbor, payspreading. One more expensive "full time" (arbitrarily defined) position sacrificed for the financing of one&ahalf less expensive consumers and their dependents.]
  4. Unemployment at New Low of 5.5% -..- Steinitz: this proves that Netanyahu's financial policies are sound, Arutz Sheva via IsraelNationalNews.com
    TEL AVIV, Israel - ..The increase in overall employment was accompanied by a 1% drop in full-time employment, defined as 35 hours a week or more of work. The growth occurred among those working fewer than 35 hours per week – another 56,000 employees joined their ranks, for a 7% increase... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So Israel is willynilly sharing the vanishing work: less "full time" employment, more potential consumers employed "part time." Timesizing cuts the holdover definitions of the past and redefines "full time" downward to where it should be in a robotizing economy. Here's another version -]
  5. PM: Gov't policy led to increase in housing construction - Central Bureau of Statistics reports 15% increase in construction starts in first half of 2011, unemployment rate at all time low of 5.5%, Jerusalem Post via jpost.com
    JERUSALEM - ..Participation in the labor force rose to 57.5% in the second quarter from 57.4% in the first quarter... However, the number of people with full-time jobs (at least 35 hours a week) fell by 1%, or 20,000 people, from the preceding quarter, while the number of people with part-time jobs rose by 7%, or 56,000 people. - see whole article under today's date.
    ["However" nothing! There were 20,000 "full time" jobs that transformed into 56,000 "part time" jobs defined totally arbitrarily and without reference to the market as to whether they're more or less than 35 hrs/wk. This provided a net activation of 56000-20000= 36,000 consumers. How much better to adjust "full time" downward as much as required to gain maximum employment and maximum consumer spending!]
  6. BONUS excerpt 1 -  21 court clerks laid off in Mobile County, WALA-TV FOX10 via FOX10tv.com
    MOBILE, Ala. - ..The workers were laid off as part of statewide budget cuts... In Mobile County, the domestic relations division took the hardest hit losing half its staff. Starting September 1, there will only be four people in the office that handles hundreds of divorce and child custody cases. There was a sign on the door Wednesday notifying people the office will have shorter hours beginning Thursday...
  7. BONUS excerpt 2 - Malloy signs Declaration of Emergency, WestHartfordNews.com
    HARTFORD, Conn. – In advance of Hurricane Irene’s likely impact on Connecticut, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy today signed a Declaration of Emergency this afternoon. The Declaration of Emergency provides Governor Malloy with a number of emergency powers, including: @ The ability to order evacuations of all or part of the population of a stricken or threatened area and take necessary steps for receipt and care of evacuees, @ The ability to modify or suspend any state statute, regulation, or requirement (for example: altering work hours, waiving licensing requirements, etc.)...
    [Oooh, altering work hours is an emergency measure in Connecticut - oooh! perhaps if we did it normally, fewer man-made emergencies would arise and everyone would have more free time and more money to respond to Nature's emergencies...]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Vital signs - Consumer spending power failed to keep up with inflation and taxes in July,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    While overall personal income rose during the month [by average, not median, and therefore only for the wealthy], inflation-adjusted personal income after taxes fell 0.1%. It was the first decline since last September
    [because Congress was manipulated into $700,000,000,000 worth of welfare for the wealthy?]
    Stronger incomes will be key to supporting continued gains in consumer spending.
    [No they won't. Only a reversal of the radical upward redistribution of the money supply will do that, because as money is redistributed upward it changes from spending power to investing power.]
  • Housing market hampers economy - Contracts to buy homes fell in July, AP via Boston Globe, B6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. State program aids employers, workers, TheNewsTribune.com
    KENNEWICK, Wash. -- Dr. Ronald Wojnas, one of two pediatricians at the clinic, told state Employment Security Commissioner Paul Trause on Monday that the Shared-Work Program is what helped him keep the clinic open after Medicaid cuts. Trause has been touring WorkSource offices in the state and meeting with employers who use the program, which allows workers to receive partial unemployment benefits when their hours are reduced... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Shared-Work benefits both employer and workers, KNDO/KNDU via kndo.com
    KENNEWICK, Wash. -- ..The Shared-Work program helps financially assist employers to keep their trained employees.\. It is especially good for businesses with people who have specialized training... Right now more than 2,200 employers use this program with 25,000 employees enrolled... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Storm Will Have a Serious Effect on Montville Business - Herb Plotnick donated more than $1,000 worth of food to a Norwich soup kitchen - It was that, or sit by and watch it go bad, Patch.com via montville-ct.patch.com
    MONTVILLE, Conn. - ..With the restaurant closed, there’s no money coming in for the owners. There’s no work, and no tips, for the waitresses. There is no business for the suppliers, who in turn, will have to cut hours for their staffers. The effects move out in circles... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, Aug. 28-29, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Profits falling, banks confront leaner future -,
    ["Leaner" to bankers is luxury to the vast majority. Need profits? Claw back from your grotesquely over-"compensated" CEOs, but no, more of their suicidal downsizing to get upsizing/growth -]
    - New wave of job cuts.., 8/29 New York Times, A1.
    [Boston Globe version -]
    The largest US banks are cutting jobs.., 8/29 Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B9.
    ..consolidating operations, and bracing for a slowdown in lending and trading.
    [They shouldn't be in trading (aka brokerage) anyway and their entry into it, and into insurance, after Bill Clinton's disastrous repeal of the "old-fashioned" - not - Glass-Steagall Banking Act of 1938 inaugurated the decade of corruption with which the largest US banks sealed their own doom. And here they are, still at it, with downsizing instead of emergency worksharing or permanent timesizing.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The world's central bankers are concluding that the global economy is still in a precarious position and that the political apparatus is ill-equipped to help, Wall Street Journal, A1:1 pointer to A1:5.
  • Profits falling, banks confront leaner future -..,
    ["Leaner" to bankers is luxury to the vast majority. Need profits? Claw back from your grotesquely over-"compensated" CEOs, but no, more of their suicidal Punish Our Customers -]
    ..- Consumer fees rise to prop up weakening bottom lines, New York Times, A1.
    [which hopefully will kill these inefficient banks straining to prop up the financially obese. Just as the lengthening time taken by the wealthy to "get their money back to work creating jobs" is paralleled by the lengthening time needed by the non-wealthy to find jobs, so the physical obesity of non-wealthy Americans is paralleled by the gross financial obesity and physical self-cushioning of the wealthy. Unlimited concentration of the money supply hurts everyone, including its supposed beneficiaries.]
  • The I-word - Harvard economist Kenneth Rogoff has spent his career fighting inflation - But today he thinks it might just save the economy, by Leon Neyfakh, 8/28 Boston Sunday Globe, K1.
    ..In the..2009 book "This Time Is Different," he and Carmen Reinhart..laid out a detailed analysis of financial crises that have taken place around the world going back 600 years... What we've been going through ever since the subprime mortgage crisis - has not been..a typical recession, as our leaders have been treating it, but something much worse, something that demands altogether different tools to stop it. One of these tools, Rogoff believes, is a temporary burst of inflation [to] make it easier for debtors to pay down what they owe.... Those who disagree with Rogoff cite several key objections. One is that inflation can be hard to stop once it starts..\..
    [How does he want to get this temporary burst of inflation, because if it's anything but wage-push, his solution is superficial. Wage-push would result from an employer-perceived labor "shortage" (ie: balance), which could only come from resuming 1840-1940 workweek reduction as much as required to restore full employment, along the lines of Bob LaJeunesse's book, "Work Time Regulation as Sustainable Full Employment Strategy." And wage-push along Timesizing lines would have a built-in way to control any inflation that starts. Unfortunately, it looks like Rogoff is only talking about Fed manipulations -]
    A towering mountain of consumer debt, government debt [and some corporate debt - not among the big firms that are hoarding zillions], and millions of underwater mortgages that are gumming up the economy and preventing it from coming back to life.... If the Federal Reserve raises its target inflation rate by several percentage points - up from around 2% where it's been for the past decade, to somewhere in the neighbourhood of 4-6% - and injects new money into the economy until it gets there, then debtors will get some relief and the wheels of the economy will once again start to turn....
    [Debt is secondary. Primary is joblessness and resulting lack of secure earned income = lack of sufficient "full-time" 40-hr/wk jobs for everyone, a 40-hr week that has not been adjusted since 1940 and is therefore appropriate to a much lower-tech, less automated and robotized economy, where people don't do their own travel agenting, bank tellering, supermarket cashiering, telephone receptioning, word processing, proof-reading (spell checking, grammar checking), printing..., where CEOs still have some whole-system understanding and aren't staying awake nights figuring out how to pass costs onto their employees and consumers, so that even jobs that aren't automated have been sloughed off, such as editing and job training and gas pumping....]
    "There's no penicillin for this. There's no quick getting better." - Kenneth Rogoff, Harvard University economics professor (photo caption)
    [Actually there is, if you consider several months or a year "quick," but the "penicillin" is so far from the current mindset of "work hard to get ahead" and current acceptance of living in a state of invasion with your iPhone or Blackberry (previously cellphone, previously beeper) always with you, 24/7 availability, blank check on your life, no boundaries, happy (desperate) slavery that America the First is now going to be - last - as the wheel of Evolution turns - unless some one, or some two or three, out there GET IT.  President Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) 'got it' late, having blocked the 30-hour workweek that had passed the US Senate on April 6 1933 by 53 to 30, and he still got 2% less unemployment for every two hours cut from the workweek between 1938 and 1940. Assuming that he had started in 1938 at a functional definition of "full time" in 1938 (44 hrs/wk), a 30-hour workweek in 1933 would have meant a 14-hour = 14% cut in unemployment in a matter of weeks or months. That means unemployment (UE) would have gone from 24.9% to 10.9% in less than a year if, as he admitted in 1935 had only "got behind the thirty hour work week bill when I had the chance and pushed it through Congress." Meanwhile, Hitler was using military Keynesianism to heal Germany in one and a half or two years even before Keynes published his great Borrow&SpendOnGovernmentMakework tome of 1936 ("The General Theory..."). FDR managed to replace his civilian-makework focus with timesizing in 1938 and keep it going at a rate of 2hrs/2%UE for two years (1938,39,40: 44hrs,42,40: 19%>17%>15%UE) but then the German people's fury at how we (Canucks, Brits, French...) had treated them (vengefully) after the Great War (WWI) forced FDR to shift back to makework, this time the conservative's makework = military, and his slower-but-no-killing-required timesizing was forgotten. UE shifted to Hitler's rate of reduction: 1940,41,42,43,44: 15%>10%>5%>2%>1%: 40hrsFrozen but militarymakework+employeekilling+productionfordestruction - 100,000s of employees were killed and 1,000,000s of consumers wasted - not at all a smart or efficient or safe or sustainable way to get that magic labor "shortage" which disciplines management and investors and makes capitalism hum. Conclusion: we humans still deserve mortality, because we still understand hell better than heaven = we're still readier to kill than to share, even when it's just WORK sharing for chrissake! Ergo, we're still an embarrassment to intelligent life in this (Sirian) Quadrant of the (Lactic) Galaxy, and our own terran cetaceans, anthropoids, proboscideans, giant cephalopods and corvines are well aware of that and suffering miserably from it.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Arkansas amends its UI law on various subjects, 8/29 CCH via hr.cch.com
    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - ..Shared work plans. The law now specifies that an individual who is eligible for shared work unemployment compensation benefits will not be paid for more than 25 weeks, whether or not consecutive, in any benefit year pursuant to a shared work plan. Under prior law, the individual was limited to payment for 26 weeks. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. NYC workers fight for 40-hour week - Cash-strapped retailers using part-time models are cutting back hours, leaving workers to scramble, 8/28 Crain's New York Business via crainsnewyork.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ..When manufacturing reigned, workers fought for a 40-hour week, pushing to reduce their hours on the job. Now that manufacturing jobs have been replaced by retail and other service positions, workers are again fighting for a 40-hour week. Only this time, the battle has been turned upside down... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, August 27, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • On football - With limited jobs [the final seven spots], players [22 of them, are] on the spot, Boston Globe, C1.
    [So the labor surplus affects the sports world too? Will it drive down pay as elsewhere? And ticket prices?]
  • Gloomy back-to-school shopping forecasts may hint at [Xmas] holidays, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    ..Yesterday, the Reuters/UMich. consumer sentiment index, which measures consumer confidence, fell 8 points this month to 55.7, the lowest level since Nov/2008... [from BG, B5 target article]
  • Fed chief [Bernanke] says deficit battle disrupted the economy, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    [Well, it certainly distracted from, and delayed passage of, the only bill in Congress that starts a solid recovery = the worksharing bill of Sen. Jack Reed and Rep. Rosa DeLauro.  Emergency worksharing funded from the money it saves the unemployment insurance program stops the downward spiral. Then permanent timesizing funded sustainably by, for example, a tax on chronic overtime with a complete exemption for reinvestment in OT-targeted training&hiring, reverses the downward spiral. The Wall Street Journal's version -]
    Speech hints at options for Fed - Bernanke offers no new program,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • The economy grew at a 1% annual rate during the second quarter, below the previous 1.3% estimate,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Both are well within a range of error of our padded GDP index that is easily wide enough to slide into the negative.]
  • Failing forward - Our child crisis demands political vision, op ed by Charles Blow, New York Times, A19.
    ..According to a report issued this week by the Guttmacher Institute, the unintended pregnancy rate has jumped 50% since 1994, yet a July report from the Institute points out politicians are setting records passing laws to restrict abortion...
    80 abortion restrictions enacted this year are more than double the previous record of 34..in 2005
    - and more than triple the 23..in 2010...
    This is what we're saying: ..If you didn't want a child, you shouldn't have had sex. You must be punished by becoming a parent even if you know that you are not willing or able to be one.
    This is insane...
    [Note that this will also punish the unwanted children, who in turn will punish their children, and also punish society at large, including the self-righteous punitive privacy-invaders who want to force this obsessive-compulsive dogma and all the unintended consequences and collateral damage of these spiralling, exponentiating, totally unsustainable costs, resentment, and seething fury down everyone's throat into the indefinite future merely because their meddlesome little minds cannot comprehend the traditional and fundamental difference between a foetus and a child. For human survival on this planet, we need to move from quantity to quality. Quality adults come from quality children. Quality children are wanted children. Wanted children come from free parents who made a free choice in an atmosphere of freedom, not in a veil of fear and force from a gang of self-righteous white witches = the kind who see black witches everywhere. White witches are the tougher kind to get rid of. Bush Jr. was a white witch, seeing terrorists everywhere and calling traitor (or terror accomplice) anyone who disagreed. Britain repealed her laws against black witchcraft in 1732 but didn't manage to repeal her laws against white witchcraft until 1949. The Protestant witch hunts and burnings against mostly old, mostly female eccentrics tarnished the 1600s. The Catholic heretic hunts and burnings tarnished the 1500s. Hammurabi's first law (1700 BC) was against white witchcraft = "If man charges (another) man with acts of witchcraft and has not proven it, he shall be killed" (Old Babylonian: "Shumma awilum awilam kispi nertam idin la iktin, uttebibashu"). White witchcraft and its associated witch hunts have long been a thorn in humanity's side. The whole anti-parenting-choice forced-birth self-righteousness is a recent manifestation. It only got started in the 1950s as an unintended consequence of pregnant women permitting Xray motion pictures and then having an understanding about, or verbally or literally, signing publication releases. We believe this started in Scandinavia (probable source: PBS documentary, possibly the Nova series). Then it was, "Oh isn't it cute? > Isn't s/he cute?"]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cops get Yuma donut shop owner, Tucson Citizen via TucsonDailyIndependent.com
    YUMA, Ariz. - ..In his plea agreement, Luy admitted he knew the law required him to pay overtime wages (an additional one half of the hourly rate of pay) to his employees when they worked in excess of forty hours in a workweek, but that he did not do so... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Library books getting antennae, The Olathe News via Kansas City Star via kansascity.com
    OLATHE, Kans. - ..While neither system had layoffs, they have had to cut hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, August 26, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Bloomberg LP to pay $990m for BNA [Bureau of National Affairs Inc. of Arlington VA],
    Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B1.


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Gold futures snapped their two-day selloff, rising $5.70 or 0.3% to $1,759.80 a troy ounce as traders viewed the market's steep declines as an opportunity to buy, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C7.
  • U.S. stocks dropped after three days of sharp gains [LOL] as investors turned cautious ahead of a speech to be given Friday by Fed Chairman Bernanke, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C5.
    The Dow industrials lost 170.89 points, or 1.5%, to close at 11149.82.
    [And the BG version -]
    3-day rally comes to end on Wall Street, Boston Globe, B8.
    ..much like it began, with a steep and sudden turn [down to 11149.82]. Stocks started higher but turned within 20 minutes. Indexes in the US and Europe sank after Germany's main stock index, the DAX, suddenly fell 4 percent...
  • Vital [viz. morbid] signs - More people are applying for jobless benefits, Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    New claims for unemployment insurance rose to 417,000 last week, though the uptick was due in part to a strike at Verizon Communications. More than two years into the "recovery" [our quotes], new claims have yet to fall consistently below 400,000. When claims are below that level, economists view the labor market as generally improving.
    [But who do they think they're kidding? That's just the supposed breakeven point. There's a huge job deficit to make up and it ain't going to be made up by a "consistent" figure of 350,000 because by then the breakeven point will have risen to 450,000. Here's Bloomberg's version -]
    Verizon strike skews weekly US jobless data - Excluding dispute, figures suggest the outlook is stabilizing, by Bob Willis, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B6.
    [Pathetic excuse. Twisted smear attempt. Ridiculous conclusion. The down outlook is not stabilizing as long as we're responding to technology with downsizing (amputating jobs) instead of timesizing (trimming hours for all and maintaining employment and consumer spending). Notice that the economy was healthy in the 1950s when unions were strong but the economy gets weaker and weaker as unions weaken and employers get more and more their own suicidal way = rehiring the downsized is somebody else's (government's? taxpayers'?) problem. If it wasn't the Verizon strike, it would be something else that, gee, if only this hadn't happened we'd be fine. No we wouldn't until we resume what we did successfully from 1840 to 1940 and fluctuate the workweek against the human-employment-vanishing trend of technological productivity-jumps.]
    ..Jobless claims climbed by 5,000 to 417,000 in the week ended Aug.20... The Labor Dept. revised the prior week's figure [408,000] up to 412,000..\.. At least 8,500 applications were filed by workers at Verizon last week, compared with 12,500 the prior week, the agency said...
    [So there was actually a 4,000 DROP in claims filed by Verizon employees but it was zeroed by this week's upward revision of 4,000 of the prior week's figure.]
    ..A sustained rebound in the labor market has yet to develop two years into the economic "recovery" [our quotes].
    [And since the labor market undergirds the consumer base, why are we still calling this a "recovery"? And listen to this doubletalk from a cheerleader in an investment firm. On the one hand he says -]
    ..Said Stephen Stanley, chief economist at Pierpont Securities in Stamford CT, "The real problem has been we're not getting the normal pace of hiring" that comes with a recovery.
    [And then he turns around and says -]
    "For all the talk of impending doom in the economy, there is still not a lot of evidence of that."...
    [Uh, what about "we're not getting the normal pace of hiring," Stevie? Better take some more acting lessons. And there's nothing "impending" about the "doom." It's all around us. But your bubble is so thick, your cushions so deep - we wouldn't want to disturb your doze. Buried in the second half of the article we find more of evidence - that there supposedly is not a lot of - of already deepening doom -]
    Yesterday's data showed the four-week moving average, a less-volatile measure than the weekly figures, increased to 407,500 last week from 403,500...
    [And many of these figures are so outrageously rosied-up -]
    The continuing claims figure \which\ dropped by 80,000 in the week ended Aug.13 to 3.64 million, the fewest since September 2008 [how comforting is THAT?!]..does not include Americans receiving extended benefits under federal programs...
    [So the "continuing" claims excludes "extended" benefits? Omigod. We have an economy shot-through with metastasized cancer and our witch doctors are still passing around the betel nuts instead of learning from Germany's breeze-through this last crisis with worksharing (Kurzarbeit) and passing the worksharing bills that Sen. Jack Reed and Rep. Rosa Delauro have just lodged in Congress.]
    Those who have used up their traditional benefits and are now collecting emergency and extended payments decreased by about 20,400 to 3.64 million in the week ended Aug.6.
    [3.64m? What a coincidence! Has reporter Bob Willis bungled one of these figures or is he wrong about the exclusion? And is the decrease actually due only to the fact that 20,400 people have used up their extended benefits and are now sleeping in their cars or under bridges - but anyway, like the wealthy, not spending? And what do they do now? Swell the "disability" rolls? Get samples from the Hemlock Society and make a soylent-green offering on the altar of St. Kevorkian? Or how about just joining the clientless self-"employed"?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Will Obama Attempt A Spread the Jobs Around Scheme? TownHall.com
    BOISE, Idaho - ..Enter Dean Baker, an Economist at the liberal Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. As if perfectly timed with the President’s upcoming address on the economy, Mr. Baker has proposed what he calls a national “work sharing” program, calling it a “quick route to full employment [and markets!]”... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Prince George’s County Council District 6 candidates square off in exclusive debate - Watchdog group sponsors invitation-only discussion to four of 15 challengers, Maryland Community News Online via Gazette.Net
    PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, Md. - ..Candidates cited foreclosures, jobs, public safety and ineffective government as the top county issues. “The biggest reason people are losing their homes is ... because of no jobs, cut hours or medical issues,” Polk said. “You’ve got to have a job.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • US to require employers to post unionization rights - Businesses groups contend the regulations are part of the Obama administration's prounion tilt, Boston Globe, B7.
    [And about time! sez we, after what the suicidal self-indulgence of the "businesses groups" has done to the economy by responding to technology with downsizing instead of timesizing. How the hell they think they can get growth alias UPsizing out of DOWNsizing is sheer thought disorder. But this move will be totally useless unless unions wake up and get back on their power issue. Of their two historic goals, higher pay and shorter hours, if they can only get one and it's higher pay, they wind up with neither because they're just tacking an artificially higher price on a surplus commodity = themselves, but if they can only get one goal and it's shorter hours, they wind up getting both because they're harnessing market forces to reward a perceived shortage, total employee hours available in the economy. This maintains and restores wage levels and consumer spending and all dependent markets (ie: ALL other markets) and keeps the national income and wealth from defaulting to the richest tiniest slice of the population where it is so coagulated that it is effectively out of circulation, since the longer and longer times it takes the non-rich to find a job is matched at the top by the longer and longer times it takes the rich to "put their money back to work" invested in marketable productivity and maintaining itself via maintaining employment, wages and markets. Otherwise, unions richly deserve the powerless obliquy to which history has condemned them for failing in their vital evolutionary role of disciplining employers and investors and making them recycle=rehire their own "disposable employees"=customers' customers.]



    Thursday, August 25, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Forecast clouds debt cutting outlook, by Damien Paletta, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ,,The CBO projected stubbornly high unemployment will accompany large deficits for much of the decade... The unemployment rate, now 9.1%, will decline to a still-high 8.5% by the end of next year and will remain above 8% until 2014. Full employment won't arrive till 2017, it said...
    [Still sounds insanely optimistic to us. What possible fundamentals do they have to base this on, unless they're taking for granted that the replacement of downsizing with timesizing.]
  • Analysts warn that investors face years of drastic market swings, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    [No, we'd say years of drastic market deterioration and economic dysfunction (and personal insecurity) as investors' percentage of the money supply continues to climb, until it gets centrifuged by increasing wages due to decreasing jobseekers due to decreasing workweeks and increasing overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
  • On the [Martha's] Vineyard, Obama fever is no longer raging - Islanders point to stalled economy, partisan deadlock [as responsible for their] disaffection, Boston Globe, A1.
    'You put somebody in there that could do something, but they can't.' Paul Jackson, Edgartown MA (photo caption)
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Clinton City Hall Closed Friday For Furlough Day, KWQC 6 via kwqc.com
    CLINTON, Illin. - ..Clinton City Administrator Jeff Horne says he'll work from home Friday. He is one of 52 city employees that he and the city decided will take days off without pay. "I'm trying to recoup about $1.1 million this year, so this is a relatively small piece," said Horne. "I'm furloughed too. I take the pay cut just like everyone else."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Some people step up to the plate. Others pout and step back -]
  2. Who said life is supposed to be fair? by Chris Rickert, Capital Times (blog) via host.madison.com
    MADISON, Wisc. - ..As part of a money-saving move in the 2009-11 state budget, unions representing state employees agreed to take 16 unpaid furlough days... But earlier this year, members of the assistant district attorneys union balked at taking the final six of their days... That's when Republican Gov. Scott Walker, who inherited the furlough plan from his predecessor, Democrat Jim Doyle, made a crucial mistake common to parents of two or more children everywhere: He treated one differently than another..and the chorus of "me too!"s began... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • UBS will lay off more than 5% of its workforce, eliminating 3,500 jobs, with the Swiss firms investment bank bearing most of the cuts, Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C3.
    [Though they're targeting their most deserving division, the glorified glutton$ in investment banking, job eliminations are just deepening the depression. What should they be doing? Instead of a dramatic/traumatic 5% workforce cut (3,500 of its 70,000 jobs) as Union Bank of Switzerland downsizes its own best customers (its employees) and their dependent consumers, UBS should just be trimming 5% of their corporate workweek (24 minutes a day for everyone, including top executives), re-investing any overtime profits in overtime-targeted training & hiring, & keeping everyone together working, earning & buying 95% as many banking services as before.]
  • Major layoffs at city schools, New York Times, A1 pointer to A16.
    Nearly 780 NYC Education Dept. employees will lose their jobs by October, the biggest single-agency layoff since Mayor Michael Bloomber took office in 2002.
  • Groupon's joint venture in China has closed offices in some cities and laid off hundreds of employees..,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    ..reversing an aggressive expansion there beginning eight months ago.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Despite rise in July home sales, overall market shaky,
    Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
  • Market bets on Fed miracle [LOL], Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ..DJIA jumped 322.11 points or 3% to 11176.76...
    [How dumb is that? Betting on a miracle, letting alone a miracle from an agency already castrated by near-zero interest rates. Stay tuned for the next crash...]
  • Regional surveys show that manufacturing activity, a driver of the US economic "recovery" [our quotes], is slowing amid worries about a downturn, WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Japan became the latest nation to receive a credit-rating downgrade,
    WSJ, C1 pointer to C3.
  • For young Irish workers [in the US under the State Dept's J-1 Work & Travel Pilot Program - why are they still doing THAT in a depression?], finding a job has been harder than expected, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    [And Erin go bragh! Loik, yung Oireesh werkers deezarv a job in Oirish Catholic Boston ASAP!]
    Living the dream. Sort of. Young Irish workers seek US jobs, but the market is similar to home, by Steve Holt, Boston Globe, B5 target article.
    [There's a dream? What, go to dee US (ie: Boston) and get rich? - when dey can't even pull it off athome with EU subsidies? Maybe dey should troy sum worksharing athome instead o' everlastin' emigration. Once again, they're making themselves as cheap as, pass the list, Latinos, Philippinos, Haitians, Turkish in Germany, Polish formerly, even Limeys in NZ during the 70s when the Kiwis had a Punch A Pommey campaign. If private ownership is so great, it's time each economy stopped trying to export its jobless and OWNED its own unemployment problem and cut its national workweek as much as required to restore full employment and markets. And it's way over high time for all the dopey how-long-before-we-realize-we're-third-world economies like US and Canada to realize they're in absolutely NO CONDITION to be welcoming let alone subsidizing jobseekers from other countries. "Charity" begins at home until and unless we adopt timesizing, and even then, uncontrolled population variables can ram the workweek down so far so fast that employers cannot efficiently coordinate shorter and shorter shifts. And why? Because a group of cushioned well-off people in many "first-world" countries, ignorant of the sufferings of the have-nots among their own neighbors, are willing to sacrifice their fellow citizens immediately (and their own children in the future) for that warm and fuzzy Miss Liberty feeling of "Give me your poor, your huddled masses longing to be free..." Note the condescending (and also ignorant) racist assumption here that "We are free and they're not." With our three biggest voting machine manufacturers owned by fanatical Republicans, and job insecurity nibbling away our most basic freedon, Free Time, "Our Cherished Freedom" has become a joke. If by heroic efforts we manage to elect a non-Republican, s/he can only slightly decelerate our self-mutilation and -amputation - Exhibit A: Obama.]
    Bryan Lyons, who is from Ireland and lives in Boston, searched long and hard for a job before he received an internship at Arbella.
    ["Received an internship"? Great. The labor surplus dba flood of resumes is so intense, firms feel like philanthropists just for bestowing "internships" on happy slaves (happyface but desperateheart).]
    ..The Irish International Immigrant Center of Boston..is assisting 70 interns in the U.S. under the J-1 Intern Work and Travel visa, with another 100 or so expected to arrive in the next few months....
    [And how many stories have we had about Boston teenagers who can't find summer jobs, let alone the millions of adults all over America who can't find jobs, and there's a congressional committee straining to find what government programs they can discontinue in order to reduce the deficit? - and here's their own, our own our State Dept., right in front of them, spending millions of dollars to bring more people over here to compete for the scarce or non-existent 35-40 hr/wk jobs? Pass the hemlock - or would you prefer Guiana koolaid? Is anyone in charge of immigration anymore or is it all run by desperate new-immigrant non-profits like the well-meaning but short-sighted Irish International Immigrant Center of Boston? "Oh the job market is infinite - little ol' us couldn't possibly hurt it." Immigration policy should be determined by regular binding public referendums in a secret ballot, period.]
    The recession in Ireland is so deep that unemployment is above 14% and, by some estimates, the country is losing 1,000 workers a week to countries where jobs are easier to find....
    [It ain't US, babe. We are not a country where jobs are easier to find because our hidden and denied unemployment is at least twice our official and admitted unemployment. That means it's over 18%. But where do we go from US? Where does the US "lose" workers to? Are there any countries where jobs are easier to find? Yes, Switzerland, but they're not dopey enough to make it easy for other countries to exploit them and ram down their standard of living and quality of life. So how about we just cut the "farther fields are greener" BS and share our own vanishing work right here. As Republican President Hoover said, shorter hours are the quickest way to create jobs.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Mom of a Million Mistakes: Another Summer Without Enough Childcare - You would think I would have learned my lesson by now, Patch.com via wheaton-md.patch.com
    SILVER SPRING, Maryld. - ..Last summer, I found myself working at least 28 hours per week as an editor and writer... and did not arrange enough babysitting coverage. This summer I had a newborn at home, as well as her two older siblings, and I committed to a few hours each day... - see whole article under today's date.
    [At least she's talking about 28 and not 48 hrs/wk. But she can move to Pennsy. and take advantage of their rolling back the child labor laws (but watch out for deeper labor surplus and poverty down the line!) -]
  2. Lawmakers Move to Update Child Labor Law - Doing so would increase the hours minors can work while clearing up ‘archaic’ and confusing provisions, UpperMacungiePatch via Patch.com
    HARRISBURG, Pa. - ..Under the bill, teenagers 16 and older could work 10 hours a day on Saturdays and Sundays, up from eight in the current law. Delozier’s bill also would allow those teens to work a total of 48 hours in a week when school is not in session, up from the previous 44 hours, and a maximum of 10 hours a day, an increase from the previous eight.
    [So much for Pennsylvania's respect for the 40-hour workweek OR their children OR their own state economic future!]
    Under current law, when school is in session, employees 16 and older can work a maximum of 28 hours a week, and the bill does not change this number. Newspapers in the state would benefit from the bill because it would allow children as young as 11 to work seven days a week as newspaper carriers, instead of six days under the law as it is today
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. We will not be trampled upon - We'll work with employers in light of the recession, says union chief Chris Furbert - but don't take advantage, by James Whittaker, Bermuda Sun via bermudasun.bm
    HAMILTON, Bermuda - ..He believes Stevedoring Services is asking too much in its proposals to cut working hours of staff on the docks. He said the proposal could mean three-days less work every two weeks for the dockers. But he said cutting working hours was a potential solution for firms looking to reduce overheads. “When it comes to redundancies we have to sit down and talk. The Union is here to represent its members. That may mean going to a shorter work week but that is a conversation we have to have with management.” He said the Union accepted that Bermuda was struggling but urged firms to cut hours rather than jobs... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["Cut hours, not stevedores!"]
  4. Chandler, Gilbert libraries popular with patrons, Arizona Republic
    CHANDLER, Ariz. - There's no hometown loyalty when it comes to public libraries, especially when some cash-strapped cities cut hours to save money while others maintain Sunday and evening hours. The latest reciprocal borrowing numbers show Mesa residents are leaving their city's bookshelves in droves while Gilbert, Chandler and Tempe are attracting crowds from neighboring municipalities... Lakota said her home near Alma School and Baseline roads is close to a branch library in that city, "but they kept cutting their hours; they don't think about people."... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Bloor West area libraries strongly supported in the community - A library is more than just books; it's an experience: councillor, insideTORONTO.com
    TORONTO, Ont., CANADA - ..Even though Swansea library is open just 28 hours a week, it's extremely well used, said Doucette. In 2009, its circulation was 39266. By 2010, it had risen to 42554. In 2009, said Doucette, there were 63 programs, which 1000 people attended... - see whole article under today's date.
  6. Doctors review contract drafted by Treasury, Ynetnews.com
    HAIFA, Israel - ..Increased salaries and shorter hours are among the terms that aim to improve the doctors' employment conditions. The gradual reform is expected to cost the Finance Ministry an additional NIS 2.6 billion ($727 million) a year... As per the agreement, 1,000 additional doctor positions will be gradually added in the coming years. The contract also calls for the doctors to punch a time clock – a bone of contention in the struggle – but allows for an eventual replacement of the clocks with another attendance-recording system... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Hey, professional consultants, lawyers and contractors are time-accountable - it's time medicos joined the rest of humanity! And if they're allergic to physical clocks, they can always check with *Kronos Time&Attendance.]
  7. BONUS excerpt - Vet services cut raises protest, The Trinity Journal via trinityjournal.com
    WEAVERVILLE, Calif. - A job that's been part time at 30 hours a week will soon be reduced to 16 hours after Trinity County's current Veterans Services Officer Doug Bue retires at the end of September and a replacement is hired...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, August 23, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • The recession-era boom enjoyed by for-profit colleges has rapidly gone bust, with new-student enrolments falling sharply, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • More Americans at risk of foreclosure, USA Today, 1B.
    The Mortgage Bankers Assoc. said 8.44% of homeowners missed at least one mortgage payment in the April-June quarter. That's up 0.12% from the Jan-Mar period. Normally, about 1.1% are delinquent.
  • For financial advisers, time to soothe clients - 'It's going to take a lot of time to get people back in the stock market' - Stephen Johnson, financial consultant, Boston Globe, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Longer Weekends and Higher Wages? Five Surprising Ways That Would Help Improve the Economy, AlterNet.org
    BROOKLYN, N.Y. - ..The Germans suffered through a recession like everyone else did, but they absorbed the recession through reductions in working hours instead of through layoffs. Work-sharing arrangements allowed employers to cut hours in response to a decline in demand for their products and allowed workers who had their hours cut to supplement their pay with unemployment insurance benefits... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Indianapolis Marion County Public Library hopes to restore hours, 13 WTHR via wthr.com
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - ..Faced with a big budget shortfall, the library board considered closing six branches, but given the huge public outcry, the board opted to cut hours instead... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["Cut hours, not branches!"]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, Aug. 21-22, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books - "One square above Harvard!" -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Federal asset seizures rise, netting innocent with guilty, 8/22 Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ..Some 400 federal statutes - a near-doubling, by one count, since the 1990s - empower the government to take assets from convicted criminals as well as people never charged with a crime...
  • On Wall Street, a big split in outlook, 8/22 New York Times, B1.
    ..chorus of warnings [on overall economy vs.] remarkably optimistic..the research analysts who track individual companies...
    [and who "can't see the woods for the trees"?]
  • Anxiety rises as stimulus dries up - Federal cuts may stall recovery,
    8/22 Boston Globe, A1.
  • Between haves, have-nots, an ever greater gulf - The state's poorest make less than in 1979, new study finds, while upper incomes climb, by Megan Woolhouse, 8/21 Boston Globe, A1.
    NORTH ADAMS, Massachusetts - ..The inflation-adjusted median income of affluent families in Greater Boston has grown 54% since 1979, to $230,000 from $150,000 a year, largely due to high-paying technology jobs.
    In Berkshire County and the Pioneer Valley, where decades of plant closings have left hollowed-out economies, the inflation-adjusted median income of the poorest families fell 24%, from $21,000 a year in 1979 to $16,000 - on par with some of the most impoverished parts of Appalachia...
    - For some of the richest, two cheers for higher taxes, by Erin Ailworth, 8/21 Boston Globe, A1,A10.
    Bill Cummings..a local developer and founder of the Cummings Foundation, one of the largest philanthropic foundations in Massachusetts.\.agrees with [Warren Buffett] the billionaire investor's recent call for wealthy Americans [to pay] more taxes..\..
    Graph - Sources of federal income tax revenue by earned income, 2010 [from] Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Ctr
    Top 1% of earners [pay] 32.9% [based on what percentage of national income? est.35%]
    Remaining top one-fifth of earners...
    [Even here the media cloud the issue with murky wording. Clearer -]
    Next 19% of earners [pay] 54.6% [based on what percentage of national income? est.55%]
    All others...
    [Clearer -]
    Remaining 80% of US population [pay] 12.5% [based on what percentage of national income? est.10%]
    [And what's this "earned income" distinction? Why are we talking about "total income"?!]
    - Enthusiasm for more taxes varies among wealthy of Mass., 8/21 Boston Globe, A10 internal header.
    Bill Cummings and his wife have promised 90% of their wealth to charity through the Giving Pledge, a philanthropic campaign. (photo caption)
    [But any system that depends for vital functions on charity is lethally flawed.]
    'If it's not connected to an overall strategy...it doesn't make sense,' said John Fish, CEO of Suffolk Construction in Boston.
    [Notice that this implies a version of The Big Question: What is the best overall strategy with which to connect higher payments from the wealthy? Based on the idea that the income "gap" is more actionably described as the income "over-concentration," which is due to running capitalism on the basis of a general wage-depressing labor surplus cum job shortage, which is due in turn to responding to automation and robotization with downsizing (jobcuts) and government-upsizing (makework) instead of "timesizing" (hourscuts), we propose an overall strategy called the Timesizing Program, which we believe to be the most advanced economic design available on the World Wide Web. See below, bolded section "the most effective overall strategy to connect." Timesizing is also the most gradual and market-oriented economic design, and delivers the best results in terms of the elimination of unemployment, the reduction of poverty, the maximization of domestic consumer spending, the greatest national economic self-sufficiency simultaneous with the greatest national economic competitiveness in international trade, and the greatest increase in the most fundamental freedom, financially secure Free Time - with the smallest government and taxes. Plus it offers a succession of upgrades for when it raises expectations beyond what it can deliver.]
    Ernie Boch Jr. would be willing to write a bigger check if he could be assured that higher payments would make a difference.
    [Higher tax payments from the rich won't make a difference until we federalize the underpublicized worksharing programs already in place in 23 states by enacting the federal emergency worksharing bills being sponsored by Sen. Jack Reed and Rep. Rosa Delauro, and start modifying them into permanent timesizing on a sustainable-funding basis. In other words, the most effective overall strategy to connect with higher payments from the rich is a 100% tax on chronic overtime with a 100% exemption for 100% reinvestment of overtime profits (for corporations) and earnings (for individuals) in overtime-targeted hiring and immediate on-the-job training whenever needed similar to homefront practices during World War II. Do you see where we're going here? Do you see the incredible market-respect and orientation which is wasted and flouted today? We base job growth on the market-incidence of overtime. Are you getting it? Is this getting through? There's a whole new, better, easier, less-crap future in this direction. But it involves the time dimension, which is thickly coated with confusion and superstition. Will wages decrease with working hours? No, because we're absorbing the wage-depressing surplus of resumes seeking a shortage of jobs. Will inflation increase? No, because the economywide market-oriented overtime conversion into training&hiring is making it easier for people to get out of jobs they dislike and need more "compensation" for, and into jobs they like more and need less "compensation" for. We're going from an overdependence on the quantitative money motive which is inflationary to a balance of qualitative job satisfaction etc. which is deflationary... Any other doubts and fears? ecdesignr@yahoo.ca - put something in the subject line that doesn't look like spam.]
  • Russia's biggest-ever bank bailout was an "insane waste of money," the Bank of Moscow's embattled former president said in an interview, 8/22 WSJ, A1 pointer to C3.
    [- and so it be with every bailout!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
            (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society, 617-620-6851)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. NPR Tells Us That There Is Nothing that Congress and the Fed Can Do About the Weak Economy, by Dean Baker, 8/22 BusinessInsider.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..That is just not true. ..It could push an aggressive work sharing program like the one that has led unemployment rate to fall below pre-recession levels in Germany... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Catholic education needed for teachers, too, 8/21 CatholicSentinel.org
    PORTLAND, Ore. - ..As parishes cut back staff hours, many DREs [directors of religious education] are finding it harder to find the time to not only finish their parish work, but also to keep up their own educations.\. Every time Suzie Marcy, DRE at St. Monica Parish in Coos Bay, takes one of these courses she..realizes that she can work more effectively... Marcy takes classes online, funded in part by scholarships, but was unable this year to travel to Portland for the DRE “study week” because of budget cuts at her parish. Marcy’s job was cut from 28 hours a week to 20... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= cutting hours instead of complete jobs. Our first pre-publication copy of Timesizing Not Downsizing was bought by Ruy Costa, then Asst. Director of the Mass. Council of Churches cuz he was concerned that with job insecurity and nobody wanting to leave the office first at night, people didn't have time for their spiritual lives.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, August 20, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Bank woes take center stage [don't they always?] - Worries about funding ripple through global stocks as doubts rise over planned Greek Bailout, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [and the NYT -]
    Once again, fear sends stocks down, New York Times, B1.
    A little-watched economic indicator may be signaling a recession, by Floyd Norris, NYT, B1 pointer to B3.
    ..The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia reported that its monthly business outlook survey of manufacturers in its region found that only 14.7% of them thought business was improving, while 45.4% thought conditions were worsening...
    [And the punchier Boston Globe view -]
    Bull market for stress, Boston Globe, A1.
    Worries about weekend troubles spark sell-off, Boston Globe, B7.
    A growing belief that the US economy is headed toward recession [or suspicion that it's been there all along?] gave the market its 4th straight week of losses. The Dow had its 10th move of more that 100 points this month. ..Some investors did not want to chance holding stocks if bad news came out of Europe this weekend...
    Stocks end down again [172.93 pts to 10817.65] as investors can't shake unease, Boston Globe, B6.
    [Never mind there aren't any consumers to anchor a real turnaround, or jobs to anchor any consumers -]
  • Massachusetts consumer confidence down [11 points to 56, lowest since Jan/2009] - For 2d straight quarter; economic worries remain, Boston Globe, B5.
  • Gold continues to hit new record highs, Boston Globe, B5.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. How Can We Get Businesses to Hire? letter to editor by WInthrop Drake Thies of New York City, New York Times, A16.
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ..To encourage new hiring, the United States needs to pass legislation capping the workweek, as France did in 2000. France imposed a 35-hour workweek... In addition, French workers today get 30 days of paid vacation. ..The French policy...reportedly helped create some 350,000 new jobs... I believe that capping the American workweek would be a solid move to create many jobs quickly. Reasonable exceptions could be made for vital workers like police and fire personnel. - see whole letter & others under today's date.
  2. County to explore new furlough program, Hernando Today via Tampa Bay Online via Tbo.com
    BROOKSVILLE, Fla. - County commissioners have said they will look at anything and everything to find money and balance the budget. One of those ideas is implementing a "Furlough Friday" starting Dec. 30 and continuing For 10 months through Sept. 28, 2012. The government center would be closed the last Friday of every month and the employees would take an unpaid day off. The county estimates it would save the general fund $278,550 and other boards funds $598,680 for a total of $877,230... - see whole article under today's date.
    [= cutting hours instead of jobs.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, August 19, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Bank of America is cutting 3,500 jobs in the current quarter and working on a broader restructuring that could eliminate thousands of additional positions, part of a turnaround [LOL] effort by CEO Moynihan, Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Until these dunces find an alternative way to turnaround a downturn besides downsizing, they're just downing it deeper - and faster. Aren't we supposed to be "an intelligent species"?]
  • Mass. jobless rate holds steady - Economists cautious as state outperforms nation [9.1%] again in July, Boston Globe, B5.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Vital signs - More Americans souring on economy, Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Economy sinks markets - Dow falls 3.7% on weak home sales, manufacturing and employment data, WSJ, A1.
    [NY Times view -]
    Stocks fall anew on debt worries and the economy - European fears - Sell-off abroad builds on persistent unease - S.&P. off 4.5%, New York Times, A1.
    [And BG's punchup of their parent's longwindedness -]
    Economic reports unleash recession fear, Boston Globe, B6.
    [More deets -]
    The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note sank to 1.9872% in early trading, the first time it has hit that level since at least the 1960s, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    Amid fears, stocks plunge again [419.63 to 10,990.58] - Investors fret over slow growth, European banks, BG, A1.
    [Aren't these the nitwits that drove up stocks of companies that DOWNsized = negative growth?! It's high time they started "fretting"! But many of them are sooo self-insulating & -isolating, they'll never fret -]
  • Bull market in Wall Street parties, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    Opulent birthday parties for financiers are back, the latest..for a private equity titan that included a performance by Elton John.
    [But the "crisis commodity" is still breaking records -]
  • High prices no big deal as gold ends above $1,800, notching another record, WSJ, C1 pointer to C9.
    [And the "opposite" -]
  • If 'junk' is a leading indicator, look out, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    ..The 8.3% average yield on junk or high-yield bonds looks positively mouth-watering in this low-rate environment. And yet investors have been fleeing the sector in droves...
    [And the newly Pushed-Below-The-Poverty-Line have been fleeing the consumer markets in droves -]
  • Economy may scare off car [and everything else] buyers, BG, B7.
    [So what are their uniformly wealthy, potential "representatives" focused on? -]
  • GOP candidates for president look to undo decades of bipartisan policy that allows nearly half [46%] of households to pay no federal income tax, WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [The wealthy are going to make sure that they're squeezing as much blood as possible out of every stone and that everyone else, however poor, is paying as many taxes as possible before they, the wealthy, cut the sales taxes and fees-for-breathing and harness up with World-War-II levels of graduated income and estate taxes -and realize, THEY are the problem, THEY are coagulating the money supply, THEY have an unsustainably huge proportion of it and THEY need to set the example and quit passing the costs down to their weakening foundations in the consumer base and the employment basement. The only ones with the kind of money to make good on all the huge IOUs they hold is ... THEMSELVES.]
    No easy answer to tax issue - Larger standard deduct'ns for seniors keep many of them from paying income taxes, WSJ, A4 target article.
    Zero sum - About 76 million taxpayers pay no federal income tax [cuz they have no income to tax?] - although most pay Social Security and Medicare taxes [our most regressive taxes which aren't even flat - cuz they stop above a certain high level] - Among those who pay neither [income tax or SocSec-Medicare], more than half are elderly; more than a third are non-elderly earning less than $20,000 a year, WSJ, A4 graph captions in target article.
    ..because of tax breaks for seniors and inducements for work and raising children, among other accumulated changes to the tax code many [46%] manage to avoid income taxes altogether... Of the poorest 20% of American households, those earning less than $16,812 a year, 93.4% pay no income tax. But even 30% of the middle class earning between $33,542 and $59,386 are exempt [and how many above that?!]
    [The wealthy are so self-insulating and -isolating that they simply cannot imagine having NO MONEY. Therefore they think it's just a matter of population. Everyone should pay taxes even if they have nothing to tax. This blockheaded stupidity always happens to great empires - the leaders get soft and blind and stupid.]
  • National Archives criticizes SEC record storage - Sen. Charles Grassley says the SEC's disposal policies appear to handicap it in complex investigations, BG, B7.
  • Shifts in economy affect interest rates, but precisely how isn't always clear, BG, B8.
    [Then determine interest rates by regular public referendum instead of by a tiny cushioned clique.]
  • US will focus on deporting "criminals" [our quotes] - Obama move aims to free up courts - Some immigrants may stay for review, BG, A1.
    [If illegal entrants aren't criminals, what are they? The USA needs to take back its immigration policy from the cushioned Move-The-Third-World-Here'ers before they all want to move back because jobs and wages here are so bad.]
    The White House is reviewing deportation proceedings on a case-by-case basis, allowing those not deemed a threat to apply to remain in the U.S., WSJ, A1:2 pointer to A1:6.
    [The office of a president over a population of 300,000,000 is doing CASE-BY-CASE reviews?? Good gawd, Obama will do anything but focus on the real problems - the overwhelming and strangling centripetal forces on the money supply and the impossibility of creating enough artificial busywork to keep that 300 million forever spinning their wheels for a pre-automation, pre-robotization 1940 workweek of 40 hours. The White House must be severely affected by -]
  • ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder] diagnoses have risen by more than 30% over the past decade, WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [This White House is Much ado about nothing - we had high hopes but this guy ain't a leader - at least we got the black-president benchmark notched but functionality is better than symbolism. America's "give me your poor, your huddled masses...(your) wretched refuse..." has already started the pendulum swinging back the other way -]
  • Not the America they expected, editorial, NYT, A20.
    [Yep, they're starting to move back out, thanks Gott!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Wall Street vs. Earth, by Dennis Goodenough, Capital Times (blog) via host.madison.com
    STOUGHTON, Wisc. - ..Currently, Citizen A works 60 hours a week while his neighbor, Citizen B, has no job. As long as there’s only so much work in this country, let’s spread it out evenly among everyone. Dropping the workweek from 40 to 32 hours would give the unemployed a job and the currently employed more time to have a beer... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Shift work may have little effect on pregnancy, Reuters.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ..In theory, irregular work hours could affect a woman's reproductive function by throwing off the body's natural "clock" and disrupting normal hormonal activity. A recent U.S. government study, for instance, found that nurses who worked rotating shifts were more likely to have irregular menstrual periods than those who worked a consistent schedule. That, the researchers said, raised the possibility that rotating shifts might affect fertility... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The key management skill of the future for any economy that wants to survive is suturing shorter shifts - and if pregnant women find non-rotating shifts healthier, that is the way to go. On the other hand, if we want to do something about planetary overpopulation...]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, August 18, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • More money for less service, New York Times, A1 pointer to A13.
    Since 2010, 71% of large public transportation systems have cut service, and half have raised fares.
  • Health industry braces for cuts, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    Health care, which has reliably added jobs even during sluggish times, is showing signs of cutting back.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Growing debt costs limit investments, says UMass chief - Financial burden drives up tuition, Boston Globe, B5.
    [What debt costs? Interest rates are near zero. Anyway, there are much more efficient ways (eg: OJT) to prepare young humans to support themselves, but not on an old-fashioned workweek permanently frozen in an age before computers and robotics.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Bankruptcy filings down but may signal financial struggles, by David Markiewicz, Cox Newspapers via Boston Globe, B8.
    ATLANTA, Ga. - An 8% decline this year in bankruptcy petitions nationwide...may be..because people cannot afford to file and because there is little pressure from creditors to do so... Just how many bankruptcy cases are lurking in the shadows is unknown... Shadow bankruptcy cases are a concern in the business world..particularly for small companies....

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Nine weather disasters in 2011 have each caused more than $1 billion in damages, the U.S. National Weather Service says, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
    [And this isn't even Japan!]
  • Confusion and frustration is spreading through cities, counties and municipalities bruised by steep credit-rating downgrades, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B3.
  • In shades of panics past, a dash to cash, by Kelly Evans, WSJ, C1.
    [AND gold!]
  • S.E.C. files illegally destroyed, lawyer says, New York Times, B1.
    ..Darcy Flynn, an employee of the SEC's enforcement division for 13 years..has sought protection under federal whistle-blower laws...
    An SEC employee accused the agency of destroying at least 9,000 documents relating to inquiries of Wall St banks and hedge funds, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Hey, wasn't the SEC under "Good Person" Mary Schapiro at that time? Or was this before that? Or is Mary actually a Bad Person? Or are these documents that Really Didn't Matter?]
    SEC accused of dumping records of financial firms, Washington Post via Boston Globe. B9.
    [The coverup continues. Meanwhile, us taxpayers, thanks to our "representatives" in Congress, are still handing out million$ to bankers -]
  • 4 Mass. banks get $18m from US - Some recipients use funds to repay TARP, raising objections, Boston Globe, A1.
    [How can you tell that the USA is still "going south"? Because they're still decirculating money by transferring huge amounts to those who already have far more than they can spend or are willing to INVEST in this climate.]
    The US Treasury..is pumping $18 million into four small Massachusetts banks and taking shares in the financial companies [what financial companies?? c'mon Todd!] as part of a controversial program ["Small Business Lending Fund"] to increase small business lending across the country...
    [You can't solve a crisis caused by the financial industry by giving money to the financial industry. How long is it going to take Obama to realize, you can't get money into circulation by giving it to those who have created the recession by taking it out of circulation and cramming it into their own few-but-bulging mattresses, and that includes banks. In fact, you can't get money into circulation by moving money around (but not worktime) at all. Meanwhile, at the same time as we're stuffing more money into bankers' vaults, we're yanking it out of public transportation, health services, and anything that benefits non-bankers, CEOs and investors - OR JOBS - see above under growth-choking DOWNSIZING.]
  • Charter airlines oppose safety rules, AP via Boston Globe, B8.
    [Whatever happened to intelligence in America?]
  • Cargill restarts plant tied to illness, AP via Boston Globe, B8.
    ..has resumed production of ground turkey at an Arkansas plant linked to a salmonella outbreak...
    [Gobble with Gargill and croak.]
  • Major websites such as MSN.com and Hulu.com have been tracking people's online activities using powerful new methods that are almost impossible for computer users to detect, WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    .."supercookies"...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Study Leads Food Pantry to Shorten Hours - Northfield Township decides to end evening and weekend operations after doing cost evaluation, Glenview Patch via Patch.com
    GLENVIEW, Illin. - The Northfield Township Food Pantry will end its evening and weekend hours effective Aug. 31 after a study found that longer operations were an unnecessary expense. The township’s Human Resources Committee performed a study that determined patron traffic during the evenings did not warrant the cost of extended hours at the pantry, located at 3801 W. Lake Ave. in Glenview... Meanwhile, staff members came in late on Thursday morning rather than being paid for extra hours. “This left the office short staffed once a week—another unnecessary impact in light of the [light] usage”... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Red Bluff City Council drops Parks and Rec Department, RedBluffDailyNews.com
    RED BLUFF, Calif. -- ..The Parks and Recreation Department administrative assistant's hours will be cut from full time to 28 hours a week. Those who oppose the proposal were concerned with the cuts involving the administrative assistant's position. Removing the assistant from the front desk for 12 hours is going to hurt the community center and parks and recreation programs, as there will not be a person there all the time to answer customer's questions... The reduction in hours means less face time with potential customers, which will result in fewer rentals... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. CMC Lays Off More Than 100 Employees, WMUR Manchester NH via wmur.com
    MANCHESTER, N.H. - ..Catholic Medical Center said 101 full-time positions will be eliminated, work hours would be reduced for some positions and employee benefits such as annual merit increases would be frozen... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. The Depression And Choice Corner Is NOW (Philly Fed), by Karl Denninger, istockAnalyst.com (press release) via beforeitsnews.com
    PHILADELPHIA. Pa. - ..Firms indicated that employment and average work hours are lower this month... Gee, all bad numbers in that table on the current situation. New orders collapsed by twenty-six points, shipments collapsed by almost ten points, and both employee count and workweek collapsed by nearly 14 and 9 points, respectively. Worse, on a forward basis inventories, delivery times, unfilled orders and the employee workweek collapsed on a six-month forward look... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. BONUS excerpt 1 - Amazon's publishing arm signs up Timothy Ferriss - Self-help guru's latest book will be published by the online giant, as mainstream publishers admit fearing Amazon's 'big pockets', The Manchester Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ..Ferriss is author of the New York Times bestsellers The 4-Hour Body and The 4-Hour Workweek, which promise, respectively, to help guide readers "to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman" and to "escape the 9-5, live anywhere and join the new rich". The 4-Hour Chef will, said Amazon, build upon the "4-hour" philosophy "by transforming the way we cook and eat"...
  6. BONUS excerpt 2 - Canada July Composite Leading Indicators (Text), Bloomberg.com
    OTTAWA, Canada - ..The average workweek declined again...
    [So in Canada too! But in a Timesizing economy, this is seen as a positive, as it should be in the age of automation and robotics. It's seen as a mark of progress and an advance in individual freedom with more, financially-secure Free Time, not at all a scary negative as now.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Central Falls, R.I. - Receiver lays off three city officials, AP via Boston Globe, B2.
    ..assistant city solicitor and two department heads [code enforcement and recycling] in a cost-cutting move...

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Verizon ad citing pay of $85,000 is disputed - Strikers say figure includes overtime work for 2 months - 'The fundamental issue here is that a larger amount of risk is now being shifted on the employee and what will be the retiree.' Gene Carroll, Union Leadership Institute, Cornell University, by Taryn Luna, Boston Globe, B5.
    [- assuming anyone can afford to retire...]
    Verizon Communications Inc. has taken its battle with 45,000 striking union members to the public by running ads about how well paid its Boston technicians are with $85,000 in annual pay, four weeks' paid vacation, and $51,000 in total benefits to an employee and family members. Yet what Verizon does not say is that the $85,000 includes overtime pay....
    [Chronic overtime alert - this should be getting smoothly converted into jobs, and training whenever needed.]
    Moreover, the workers won't be getting [all] $51,000 in combined benefits if Verizon has its way in contract talks...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Waiting for Mr. Obama... - He needs to fight for an ambitious jobs agenda, editorial, NYT, A20.
    [Oh please, he doesn't fight. He negotiates with and seeks consensus from great white sharks. He needs to drop the 'fight' and just ride executive privilege like his predecessor did to create the disasters. But we're already awash in makework, public- & private-sector!]
    Come September, Pres. Obama's aides say he will roll out more programs to put Americans back to work. What we are hearing so far doesn't go nearly far enough...
    [nor can a government, bankrupted by the financial industry and the wealthy, possibly go far enough in dreaming up enough artificial employment to fill a frozen pre-computer workweek of 40 hours for uncontrolled population numbers as business after business robotizes or shoves the work onto consumers (pump your own gas! check out your own groceries! make your own travel arrangements! be your own receptionist at any business you try to phone!...). The only approach that can come close, for much less money, is emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing once worksharing plants its basic concepts. Germany has demonstrated the way - see 3/26/2009 #1.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The blue chips snapped a three-day winning streak, falling 76.97 points amid investor disappointment over the proposed changes to fiscal governance in Europe, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C5.
    [Who(m) do you trust? - Bos.Globe says it was four days, not three -]
    Worries on Europe bring stocks their first loss [down to Dow 11,405.93] in 4 days,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • On economy, raw data gets a grain of salt [= skepticism], by Binyamin Appelbaum, NYT, A1.
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - When the government announced in April that the economy had grown at an annual pace of 1.8% in 1Q11, politicians and investors saw evidence that the nation was continuing its recovery from the depths of the financial crisis... Three months later, the government announced a small change. The economy, it said, actuallyl had expanded at a pace of only 0.4% in 1Q11. Instead of chugging along in reasonable[?] health, the U.S. had been hovering on the brink of a double-dip recession... The Bureau of Economic Analysis..concluded that it had underestimated the value of vehicles sitting at dealerships and the nation's spending on imported oil...
    [So much opportunity for bending one way or the other. Sooo much room for rose-colored glasses. Sooo many chances to skirt the narrow definition of recession and avoid facing the fact that this a diagonally deepening deathspiral...]
  • In a market full of ills, stocks of health care companies may provide some relief, Boston Globe, B8.
    [In long-hours, wage&spending-depressing, labor-surplus capitalism, deactivated mega-concentrated big money whirls around this way and that desperately looking for break-even investments, instead of the rapid recirculation into jobs and consumer spending and solid upsizing alias Growth that is characteristic of shorter-hours, wage&spending-boosting labor-shortage capitalism. Capitalism always works better with what employers complain is a labor shortage = a vital insight from Art Dahlberg's 1932 Jobs, Machines & Capitalism.]
  • Wal-Mart said uncertain [ie: impoverishing] economic conditions are straining its customers, joining other retailers [Macy's, JC Penney] who have expressed similar concerns, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [So where's all the money? Well, here's $1,375,000,000,000,000 abroad -]
  • Bring cash piles back home, by Steven Davidoff, NYT, B1.
    Apple has a cash problem. It's not just that Apple has too much cash, $76 billion as of June 30. It's rather that the bulk of that pile, [a portion] estimated at $41 billion, is held abroad. Apple does not want to bring it back to the U.S. for several reasons, primarily because of the tax consequences, but also because of its own growing foreign presence...
    In an analyst report in May, JPMorgan Chase estimated that 519 "American" [our quotes] multinational corporations [oxymoron?] had $1,375 trillion outside the U.S.  The problem is particularly acute among technology companies, which historically tend to hoard cash because of the cyclical nature of their business.
    [Cyclical? Technology companies?? Agricultural companies, yes = seasonal. Technology companies, quit whining.]
    A recent Moody's report noted that MicroSoft held $42 billion abroad, or more than 80% of its cash. Cisco Systems has $38.8 billion, or almost 90%... Google - at least before Monday's deal - had nearly $40 billion in cash, with more than 43% of it held abroad... Tax policy is driving much of this trend. ..Cash earned abroad cannot easily be remitted to the U.S. [without being] subject to a dividend tax that can rise to as much as 35%...
    [And wasn't this the money they all told us was going to get immediately reinvested creating jobs? Where are the jobs!]
  • Nevada Attorney General is latest to balk at foreclosure deal - Concerns raised over protections for lenders,
    Boston Globe, B7.
    [Save the lenders, abandon the borrowers? On the other hand, "Foreclose America to Save the World"?]
  • Deportation protests grow, NYT, A1 pointer to A12.
    Latino and immigrant organizations in six cities have stepped up their confrontation with the Obama administration over deportations as part of an immigration enforcement program...
    [So illegal entrants have a right to protest the enforcement of the law of the land whose law they've broken to enter? The Timesizing Program and its successors is the only comprehensive program we've seen on the Web that integrates population variables into quality-of-life variables.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Time Off for Work Exercise Linked to Increased Productivity: Study, Occupational Health & Safety via ohsonline.com
    STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Taking time out of the work week for an employee exercise program may lead to increased productivity—despite the reduction in work hours, reports a study in the August issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM)... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Bellevue to return to 5-day work week, Idaho Mountain Express & Guide via mtexpress.com
    BELLEVUE, Ida. - ..Beginning in October...Bellevue City Hall will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bellevue staff hours were cut from 40 hours to 32 hours per week two years ago due to financial constraints, and City Hall hours were reduced to four days per week. Staff hours have been increased over the past year to 38 hours per week, but City Hall has remained closed on Mondays. "Because of the savings we have made in the budget, we are able to do this," said Councilman Larry Plott... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Google's $12.5 billion gamble - Web giant pays big for Motorola's phone business, patents; Risks alienating allies,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
  • Cargill will buy the Dutch animal-nutrition company Provini for $2.14 billion, one of the agribusiness giant's largest-ever acquisitions, WSJ, A1 pointer to B4.
  • Transocean a-greed to acquire Norwegian rig operator Aker Drilling for $1.43 billion moving to expand into deep, sub-Arctic waters, WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Oh that's just great, especially when -]
    Royal Dutch Shell estimated around 1,300 barrels of oil spilled into the North Sea from a leaking pipeline since Wednesday, WSJ, A1 pointer ot B6.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Evergreen Solar files Chapter 11 - Once-soaring energy firm finds it can't compete with low-cost Chinese products, Boston Globe, B7.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Poverty's boiling point - The US is creating the same conditions that fueled the London riots - The bottom isn't in flames because it lacks morals, op ed by Simon Waxman, Boston Globe, A11.
    ..It should come as no surprise that the British government has opted to distribute the pain downward, much as the US federal and state governments now are. The rich have influence, and the poor do not. That is why economic inequality, not moral failing, is the illness in need of remedy... - see whole article under today's date.
  • In Texas jobs boom, crediting a leader [Gov. Rick Perry], or luck, by Clifford Krauss, NYT, A1.
    [What Texas jobs boom? - Krugman exploded that myth yesterday - see below.]
    HOUSTON, Tex. - Texas is home to at least one third of the jobs created nationwide since the recession ended...
    [(1) The recession only ended for the financial industry, and even there... (2) Texas jobs weren't created. They were just lured from other states -]
    The Texas Unmiracle, op ed by Paul Krugman, 8/15 NYT, A21 NY edition, A19 Boston.
    ..So Texas tends, in good years and bad, to have higher job growth than the rest of America. But it needs lots of new jobs just to keep up with its rising population — and...recent employment growth has fallen well short of what’s needed...
    Still, does Texas job growth point the way to faster job growth in the nation as a whole? No. What Texas shows is that a state offering cheap labor and, less important, weak regulation can attract jobs from other states... Arguing from this experience that depressing wages and dismantling regulation in America as a whole would create more jobs — which is, whatever Mr. Perry may say, what Perrynomics amounts to in practice — involves a fallacy of composition: every state can’t lure jobs away from every other state. In fact, at a national level, lower wages would almost certainly lead to fewer jobs — because they would leave working Americans even less able to cope with the overhang of debt left behind by the housing bubble... So when Mr. Perry presents himself as the [GOP presidential] candidate who knows how to create jobs, don’t believe him. His prescriptions for job creation would work about as well in practice as his prayer-based attempt to end Texas’s crippling drought.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. For Now, Germany Flies Above Economic Storm, NYT, A4 Boston edition, A1 NT edition.
    BERLIN, Germany — ..By one government measure, 706,000 more Germans were employed in May of this year than the year before, of which 415,000 were full-time positions and 289,000 part time. In terms of relative size, that would be roughly comparable in the United States to nearly 2.7 million more people with jobs in 2011 versus 2010... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Didn't Anyone Tell the NYT About Work Sharing in Germany? by Dean Baker, BusinessInsider.com
    [Actually, the NY Times told itself on 3/26/2009 #1.]
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The NYT has a front page piece touting the health of the Germany economy. While the piece notes employment protections in Germany that make it difficult for employers to lay off workers, it doesn't explicit mention the country's shortwork [Kurz-arbeit] program. This program (noted today by columnist Joe Nocera) encourages companies to reduce work hours rather than lay off workers... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. U.S. workers are the victims of a speedup, Los Angeles Times via Kansas City Star via KansasCity.com
    LOS ANGELES, Calif. - ..But there is another way. European companies face the same pressures that ours do - yet in Germany's vigorous economy, for example, six weeks of vacation are de rigueur, weekend work is a last resort, and companies' response to a downturn is not to fire everyone, but to institute Kurzarbeit - temporarily reducing employees' hours and restoring them when things start looking up... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Buffett's call for taxing 'mega-rich' hits chord with Obama, Boston Globe, B9.
    Billionaire investor Warren Buffett is calling on the “mega-rich’’ to pay more in taxes... Buffett noted yesterday that the mega-rich pay income taxes at a rate of 15 percent on most investment income but practically nothing in payroll taxes. The middle class, meanwhile, typically falls into the 15 percent and 25 percent income tax brackets and is hit with heavy payroll taxes... Buffett said most of the mega-rich he knows wouldn't mind paying more in taxes, especially when fellow citizens are suffering... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- never mind that consumer spending is suffering, and all the formerlly investment-worthy marketable productivity that depends on it...]



    Sun-Mon, Aug. 14-15, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from café car of Amtrak's Adirondack southbound from Montréal -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Massachusetts services for HIV face cuts [of 25% or $4.3m] - Agencies fear rise in infections as US shifts funding, 8/15 Boston Globe, A1.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via emergency worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • New stimulus spending if recession hits Canada -..Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, 8/15 Ottawa 24 Hours, p.6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • How react to the somersaults of the markets? - Stocks have had a zigzag week, 8/15 Métro Montréal, 06.
    Eight frenzied days on Wall Street, 8/14 New York Times, A1 pointer to Bu1.
  • Conventional Fed wisdom defied, 8/14 NYT, Bu1.
    [- no, not defied - just realized as impotent.]
  • When a jobs engine stalls - Small businesses led past rebounds, but not this time, 8/15 Boston Globe, A1.
  • Making sense of a distorted economy, 8/14 Toronto Globe & Mail, A1.
    [But they have no clue about the core distortion (1940 workweek regardless of 2011 technology) and are going to come up with nonsense compared to worktime economics. Any mention of Germany's success with Kurzarbeit? Any mention of upward redi$tribution's decelerating and decirculating effects and downward redi$tribution's recirculating and accelerating effects?]
  • After taking big risks and big losses in 2008 [shrugged off, cuz they have sooo much], wealthy investors are hunkering down with cash, gold, farmland, and other haven investments, 8/15 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Anything but jobs (and associated consumer spending) - which alone could substantiate recovery hopes - despite the myth they promulgate that we can redistrib any amount of M1 to them and it'll get right back to work creating jobs and foundational markets.]
  • Markets gird for fresh drama - World Bank president warns of 'new danger zone'.., 8/15 WSJ, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Germany Uses Work Sharing, by Dean Baker, 8/14 BusinessInsider.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..While Cohen mentions several important differences between the United States and Germany, remarkably he did not mention Germany's work sharing system. Even though growth in Germany and the United States has been comparable since the beginning of the downturn, Germany has actually seen a decline in its unemployment rate of more than half a percentage point from the pre-recession level. This is due to the fact that Germany encourages firms to reduce work hours rather than lay people off... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. What Is Business Waiting For? - Our current government isn't going to create jobs, 8/15 New York Times via NYtimes.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - When the German economy turned south after the 2008 financial crisis, the pain was mitigated by a program known as “Kurzarbeit.” The word means short work. Instead of laying off workers, German companies cut back their hours. The government then used money set aside during good times to pay the workers around 60% of their lost wages... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, August 13, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Bridgehead coffeehouse at Elgin & MacLaren in Ottawa, headlines from Mags & Fags, 254 Elgin -

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • U.S. Postal Service looks to cut jobs - Agency reported $3.1-billion net loss in last quarter, Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    ..220,000 full-time jobs and..about 300 processing facilities by 2015...proposal...
    [Still believe in a recovery without sharing the vanishing unautomated work?]
  • Take buyout or face axe, Ford warns - 'Don't put a gun to our heads' - [Toronto] Mayor Rob Ford, Toronto Star, A1.
    [To push the metaphors for a moment, it would actually be smart to put a gun to the head of somebody who was threatening you with an axe. It's bad enough these sad excuses for representative leaders don't have the guts to get the money from the people who have it in unprecedented excess, but then they have the nerve to play victim while destroying another chunk of the middle class? Oh wait, guess they ARE victims cuz they're killing their own tax base, the non-rich.]
    ..few of the 17,000 eligible city workers have expressed interest in an offered buyout package...
    [Must be a pretty lousy package if he has to threaten them to take it.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Global crisis of confidence - World policy makers' inability to agree spurs wild markets this week, WSJ, A1.
    ..Dow on Friday rose 125.71 points, or 1.1%, to 11,269.02...
    [Why would we have any confidence in corrupt, minimally regulated banking culture and an increasing number of topheavy gangster economies? NY Times view -]
  • As dizzying week ends on Wall Street, dangers linger -
    [Just because the week is ending, why should the dizziness?
    Amid relief[??], new worry - Confidence is suffering as western markets move in lockstep, New York Times, A1.
    [So much for the benefits of "globalization."]
  • French economic growth fell to zero in the second quarter, dashing expectations of a modest expansion, WSJ, A1.
    [France would have an easier time getting robust expansion than anywhere but Germany - cut the 35-hour workweek (5x7) another 3 hours (4x8) or 5 hours (5x6) or as much as it takes to reactivate all potential consumers by providing JOBS and EARNINGS for them so they can provide maximum domestic consumer spending and foundation markets - absorbing the labor surplus would maintain wages. And redesign the training tax as an overtime (OT) tax with an exemption for OT-targeted training&hiring. And retrain French employers and managers to quit whining and smoothly coordinate shorter shifts.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. License office to cut hours - Roan proposes reduction to keep open satellite tag office in Lacey’s Spring, The Decatur Daily (subscription) via decaturdaily.com
    LACEY'S SPRING, Alab. - In an effort to keep open a satellite tag office in Lacey's Spring, Morgan County License Commissioner Sue Baker Roan proposes to cut work hours of her 20 employees... Clerk Lauri Boardman said she believes the reduced hours will be good in more ways than one. “Sacrificing a few hours isn’t too much to ask to save somebody’s job,” she said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 5 IE state parks to cut hours due to budget, KABC via abc7.com via abclocal.go.com/kabc
    INLAND EMPIRE, Calif. - Five state parks in the Inland Empire, including Silverwood Lake, will be closed two days a week in the off season because of budget cuts... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, August 12, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé (T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 30/10), 152 rue Montcalm, Gatineau/Hull, QUÉBEC -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Layoffs loom as city buyouts fall short [in fixing Toronto's finances], Toronto Star, A1.
  • Engineers [of Transport Quebec] sound alarm over outsourcing, Montreal Gazette, A1.
  • Greece's jobless rate grows, AP via Ottawa Metro, 18.
    ..to 16.6% in May..from 15.8% in April \and\ 12.0% [the previous May]...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Markets rebound [partially], but economic outlook still soft,
    Montreal Gazette, A1 pointer to B1.
  • 4.9 per cent = Drop in the TSX [Toronto Stock Exchange] over the last month, Toronto Globe & Mail, A1 pointer to B1.
    Compared with other markets, that's a relatively small fall - the S&P500 has plummeted 9.6 per cent...
  • Gold miners help TSX dodge worst of turmoil, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Oh great = the crisis commodity.]
  • $1.6B trade deficit stunts [Canada's] growth,
    Ottawa Metro, 18.
  • Banning - As emergency talks take place across Europe, four nations shut down short selling of bank stocks,
    Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B1.
    ..France, Italy, Belgium, Spain...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A Viable Jobs Policy - Work Sharing is the Answer, by Dean Baker, CounterPunch.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Every month, firms lay off or fire roughly 2 million people. If this figure can be reduced by 10% through work sharing, it would be equivalent to creating 200,000 additional jobs a month... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Loyalty. Is it dead in working America? - Look for a company that inspires loyalty, St. Petersburg Times via TheRepublic.com
    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - ..Look for employers with a history of standing by employees in hard times. For example, firms that, despite financial downturns, did not lay off workers but instead may have cut hours or days while still keeping their people employed until business rebounded... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- assuming you, as a jobseeker in a recession, have any choice, of course. But outside USA -]
  3. Kajola Kristada Denies Layoff Rumors, The St. Kitts-Nevis Observer via thestkittsnevisobserver.com
    BASSETERRE, St.Kitts, BWI - ..The person told The Observer that there were times when "work was slow" but the General Manager Jose Rosa preferred to cut hours than to send people home... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Making the Most of Recession's Lost Work Time: Erik Hurst, Bloomberg.coom
    CHICAGO, Illin. - The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the time American workers spent at their paying jobs decreased by more than 8 percent between 2007 and 2010... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. SF Superior Spares 25 Employees From Layoff, Courthouse News Service via courthousenews.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - ..The reprieve comes on the heels of an announcement last week by the court's top administrator, Michael Yuen, who said the court will cut hours in the clerk's office... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, August 11, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm, sec.Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC: T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 9/30 -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Smart [Technologies Inc.] to close Ottawa assembly plant - Work going to third-party firm(s) in Mexico, by Ari Altstedter, Ottawa Citizen, D1.
    ..maker of electronic whiteboards [huh?]...Calgary-based...[unspecified job loss but] will be more than 200 of Smart's approximately 400 Ottawa employees...
    [They desperately want growth, which would mean UPsizing, but they're still DOWNsizing - even when they're called "Smart" as here and even when they have a female CEO as here (Nancy Knowlton). With this kind of suicidally partitioned brain, North American executives are dragging themselves downdowndown, everyone else first.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks dive again on Europe, economy fears - Dow sheds nearly 520 points [519.83 or 4.62% to 10719.94]; Investors flock to bonds despite record low yields.., Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [So how would that be different from paying taxes, which spread out the money supply to those who actually spend it and create markets for the marketable productivity that investors need to actually get high yields out of their investments?]
  • Companies have been socking away cash since the financial crisis, giving them a cushion against turmoil - Yet the validation [ie: outcome?!] of their conservatism may ultimately be bad news for the economy, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Because that's yet another big chunk of the money supply that's out of circulation besides the mongomegabucks crushed into the pockets of the richest 30,000 Americans (0.01%0). It's The Great Leak Upward - that flies into the Black Hole of money, from which not even photons, oops, pennies can escape the humungus gravitational pull. Ergo, depression on a downspiraling diagonal trajectory with each up-arc hailed as "recovery."]
  • 1987 = The last time Canadian stocks outperformed their U.S. peers by the margin seen on Wednesday,
    Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B13.
    The TSX continued a rally that began Tuesday, while the Dow fell 519 points.
  • Rising fears sink shares of global banks - Mounting concerns over Europe's debt crisis, low interest rates and sectors' profit outlook spark selloff in Europe, U.S. and Canada, TG, B1.
  • Europe's debt problems deepen as fears for France provoke panic - Euro zone's second-largest economy denies speculation over health of banks and possibility of credit downgrade, TG, A1.
  • Financial turmoil evokes comparison to 2008 crisis -
    [But that was sooo looong ago! 36 months!]
    - Some see lower risk [in their dreams!], but cause for worry [reeelleee?] - Markets take another plunge,
    New York Times, A1.
  • Consumers - When cash is cheap, but no one's borrowing -
    [Cash is cheap because there's too much of it redistributed to and trapped in too small a population, and too little cash is left outside that tiny population to circulate and provide credit-worthiness. There's still a size difference - investing power smaller, spending power larger - but it takes a much larger fraction circulating rapidly in the spending zone to support the value of the trillions crushed into and trapped in the investing zone that is moving relatively lethargically. It's like an astronomical black hole, but the matter in the center of a black hole is spinning unimaginably faster while the investment money of the wealthy is taking longer and longer to find attractive investments as the worktime of the downsized is taking longer and longer to find employment.]
    - Three years after the Great Recession [they really believe it ended?], the American consumer is fearful, buried in debt [encouraged by the wealthy] and unable [=too poor] to fix the latest economic crisis with more spending, TG, B1.
    [They could if they met with more hiring and could do more earning - but that ain't gonna happen until the wealthy get solidly behind the sharing of the vanishing human (vs. automated) employment, however short a workweek it may take to restore the kind of full employment seen during "wartime prosperity" in 1944 when unemployment fell to 1.2%.]
  • Vital signs - Work is hard to find, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    For each job opening in the U.S. at the end of June, there were 4.5 people looking for work..down from a year earlier..5.4...but in 2007 there were about two job openings for every three unemployed workers...
    [Notice how they change the measure so you can't really compare and see how bad things are by even these rosifying stats. Doing the math they should have done, this means in 2007 for each job opening there were only 1.5 people looking for work.]
  • Gold hits another record high - Precious metal seen as a 'safe haven', Ottawa Citizen, D1.
  • Gold: How high can it go? $1,800 - For the first time, gold goes over $1,800 (U.S.) an ounce..., TG, B1 pointer to 'inside'.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 12 Ways to Jump-Start Economic Growth Now: Spending Money Edition, NationalJournal.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..5. Use work-sharing as an alternative to unemployment insurance.
    [This should be Number 1, not 5.]
    Dean Baker, codirector of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, said the best way to increase employment would be using work-sharing as an alternative to unemployment insurance, in which people are paid not to work. In a work-sharing program, employees are given half of the pay they lose as a result of working fewer hours—for example, if they had 20 percent fewer hours, they would receive 10 percent less pay. By staving off 10% of the 2 million layoffs that occur each month, the effect would be the same as creating 200,000 jobs, he said, adding that Germany had used the same policy with “enormous success.” “This seems an obvious winner when it comes to keeping people at work at a minimal cost,” Baker said.... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Workers, Freeport Journal-Standard via journalstandard.com
    FREEPORT, Illin. - ..And no one has explained how European workers can be nearly as productive as American workers and work only 30-35 hours a week, have more paid holidays, longer paid leaves and much longer vacations... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Can you say RO-BO-TICS?]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, August 10, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Ottawa provided by Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown Market -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm, sec.Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC: T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 9/30 -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • U.S. on life support - With the recovery faltering, central bank pledges to stick to emergency [rate] levels until 2013, Toronto Globe & Mail (Canada's Wall Street Journal, so, the 'Bay Street Journal'?), A1.
    [i.e., Fed pledges to do nothing - not that it can do anything anyway, except harm...]
  • Its forecast dim, Fed vows to keep rates near zero [meaning investment money, in overwhelming surplus, is worth almost nothing = THE primary source of inflation but never ever ever mentioned] - Two-year plan aims to spur growth [with no near-zero interest to motivate the risk of lending??].., New York Times, A1.
  • 'Crisis of confidence' rattles markets - Monday's drop blamed on panicked herd's lack of faith in politicians, Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [Like they should have faith regardless of pols' failure to notice Germany's success and failure to copy their strategy (Kurzarbeit)? And if 'experts' aren't recommending Faith Regardless, can't we cut the verbiage to just "Monday's drop blamed on pols"?]
  • New GOP Strategy Involves Reelecting Obama, Making His Life Even More Miserable, TheOnion.com = "America's finest news source"
  • Market bounces back [well, not exactly all the way] as Fed reacts - U.S. Federal Reserve vows to keep interest rates near zero.., Ottawa Metro, 05.
    [Dow now 12,109.26 (Ott.Metro 05) or 11,239.77 (Tor.Globe, B1) - geez, they can't even agree on the Dow. So how about the 'vow'? How does a vow to do nothing add up to "reacting"? Here's Wall Street's "take"-]
  • Markets sink then soar after Fed speaks - Pessimism melts [and realism loses] after traders parse statement - [How much "parsing" does it take to understand "We are going to do nothing"?]
    - Biggest Dow rise since '09... - Markets in turmoil, by Reddy & Cheng, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ..gain of 429.92 points, or 4%, at 11239.77...
    [Québec view -]
  • La Fed s'en mêle, Montréal Devoir. A1.
    [Translation: The Fed mucks in - again the objection: but they're doing NOTHING! (At least it's kinda nice that the Fed is feminine in French = not le Fed but la Fed.) ]
  • Market turmoil is posing an unexpected challenge for luxury retailers, shaking what had been the industry's steadiest source of growth, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Not the top brackets were spending (or could spend) any but a negligible percentage of their loot anyway...]
  • Stock dips make us feel poorer - 'Wealth effect' ties consumer spending to perceived net worth, Toronto Star, A1.
    [As the middle class slides downward and disappears, it's less about a supposed Wealth Effect and more about No Job, No Extras.]
  • Idle cash - 'Fortress balance sheets' breed new kind of crisis - Corporate [& richboy] cash-hoarding hinders spending, growth of new jobs, Toronto Globe, B1.
    [So much for the rationalization for cutting taxes on the rich and redistributing any fraction of the money supply, however large, to any fraction of the population, however small, because it will "immediately get invested and create jobs."]
  • Vital signs - Small businesses are feeling gloomier about their prospects, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    An index of small-business confidence slipped to 89.9 in July from 90.8 in June. That is the lowest level since September [2010]. Small firms have consistently appeared more pessimistic [or realistic?] than larger ones, which have had easier access to credit markets and have been better able to tap into global growth.
    [Global growth? WHAT global growth? But there you have it. There's tons of money, indeed way waaay too much, to be loaned and invested "creating jobs" but it ain't happening. Interest is too low to motivate the risk, which is high when the wealthy have redistributed sooo much of the money supply to themselves and left too small a megachunk behind to circulate rapidly outside the financial markets and support the value of same. After all, money only gets its value by exchange and circulation, not by sitting still in financial accounts or under mattresses. Exchange recharges it with value, like recharging a battery. This decline of borrowing amidst huge money to be borrowed is a classic symptom of a classic depression, notwithstanding prevailing, carefully over-constricted definitions.]
  • Productivity declined at a 0.3% annual rate in the second quarter, as the stalled economic recovery cut deep into U.S. companies, Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Exiting workers more disgruntled with employers, by Joe Light, Wall St Journal via Toronto Globe, B15.
    More than three quarters of departing American workers say they wouldn't recommend their employer to others - the worst percentage in at least five years...
    [That would seem to follow - a sour job market means you have to be REALLY POed to quit and plunge yourself into the void of no job openings. So what are you supposed to do now? It's getting more and more ridiculous -]
  • The enchantment factor - Fascination isn't limited to romance: You can enchant your [potential] staff, your boss, your customers, and win lasting support, Toronto Globe, B15.
    Want to cast a positive spell? Start with an honest smile - and make it a real George Clooney grin... [photo caption]
    [So, an ACTOR's GRIN is now our model for an honest smile? Hooboy.  In fact, let's pause for another whack at Germany cuz nobody's allowed to show us up with more success than US so there MUST be something wrong! -]
  • Germany thrust into centre of storm - Relatively unscathed in the financial crisis, country now faces weakening demand for exports, Toronto Globe, B10.
    [like, Who Cares?! - They've still got an intact workforce and domestic consumer base. They don't NEED exports. We obsess about the less than 30% of our economy represented by trade while ignoring the 70% represented by domestic consumption - so our Consumer Miracle is history, while theirs is unscathed. But we can always pull out all the stops and make a silk purse out of a sow's ear -]
  • The stormy economy's silver lining - Falling..prices could get people buying again, Toronto Globe/'Bay St Journal', B1.
    [Uh, with what paychecks exactly? My personal fave -]
    • Foreclosures giving people 'a chance to buy properties at affordable prices', Toronto Globe, B4.
      [Then there's -]
    • Slump may spell [mortgage] rate relief, Toronto Globe, B5.
    • Cheaper gasoline seen fuelling growth, Toronto Globe, B4.
    • For dividend hunters, the news is good, Toronto Globe, B11.
    • Bargain hunters, give thanks to S&P, Toronto Globe, B12.
    • Auto industry stays confident about sales, Toronto Globe, B8.
    • Six reasons to be optimistic about the U.S. recovery, Toronto Globe, B11.
    ["Don't worry, be happy! - System has brain cancer? embolism? naw - take an aspirin & have faith in politicians & puppeteers Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Geo.Soros, Committee of a Hundred, Masons, Bilderbergs..."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. DeLauro: America Needs to Stop Consuming [What Others Make], Start Building [Our Own] - Congresswoman DeLauro lays out a four-point plan for economic growth, Patch.com
    NORTH HAVEN, Conn. - ..Up next, the panel discussed the Layoff Prevention Act, a bill designed to provide businesses with alternatives to laying off employees that simultaneously cuts rehiring costs for companies, and reduces unemployment among workers. Such "work sharing" programs, currently active in 23 states, including Connecticut, allow companies to reduce work hours without firing employees, and provide workers with government benefits to compensate for lost wages... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Lex-Care: Rent unpaid after work hours cut, Lexington Herald Leader via kentucky.com
    LEXINGTON, Ken. - ..She was employed at a local fast-food restaurant. She fell behind on her rent when her employer reduced the number of hours she could work... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Strike is canceled, but the strife continues, SequimGazette.com
    SEQUIM, Wash. - ..Hospital officials say there are in fact just 29 full-time, 40-hour-a-week workers, but that another 134 work 32 hours a week or more and are thus [eligible] for “full-time” benefits.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, August 9, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think there has been a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm, sec.Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC: T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 9/30 -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • 'Pure fear' grips global markets - Investors ignore pleas for calm, head for exits amid growing crisis, Toronto Star, A1.
  • Recession fears trigger massive selloff -..'There isn't anyone who isn't worried about 2008 coming back', Tor. Globe, B1.
    [Is anything going to snap these people out of the self-delusion that 2008 ever went away?]
  • Fear roils markets, no solace in sight - U.S. President fails to calm rattled nerves, Toronto Globe & Mail, A1.
    ..The NYSE's DJIA, which was down about 400 points before Mr. Obama spoke, sank a further 220 points after his remarks [for a total of -634.76], its worst day since December 2008. The Dow dived more than 5.5% [to 10,809.85] following stock market routs from Asia westward...
  • Canadian P.M. [Harper] urges calm as markets tank - The Toronto Stock Exchange nearly recovered from the subprime crisis ... then ran into the sovereign debt crisis, Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    ["Monkey see, monkey do."]
  • Do we know where we're going? - (Montreal Gazette, A1)
    [Yes, "we" (meaning whoever survives this turmoil most gracefully, market-orientedly and sustainably) will front their nationwide worksharing program as Germany did in the last downturn with great success ("Kurz-arbeit') but the USA has only just filed their federal worksharing bills in the House (Rosa DeLauro) and Senate (Jack Reed). Then they'll change the funding from temporary to permanent and go through the five phases of the Timesizing Program to get the length of the workweek market-determined by the unemployment rate (instead of frozen as now) to guarantee full employment and maximum consumer spending and monetary circulation, regardless of automation. Then they'll use the same five phases to balance a succession of further economic variables which will each "go critical" in its turn. Meanwhile -]
    - World markets lose confidence amid national debt crises and bitter fiscal debates..,
    Montreal Gazette, A1.
  • Time to reform conflict of interest rules, Ottawa Citizen, C1.
    [This article is about something else, but it applies to US big banking - for starters, we need to reinstate the Glass-Steagall Banking Act to keep banking, brokerage and insurance separate, but nobody's talking about that yet, so more panics ahead- & not just $$ -]
  • HIV cases rise sharply in [Canada's capital] region - Health unit reports 46 new cases this year, up from 32 in 2010, 8/09 Ottawa Citizen, C1.
  • London is burning - Worst riots of a generation, by Doug Saunders, Toronto Globe, A1.
    ..The small crowds of very young men and women, of every skin colour, typically dressed in almost identical hooded sweatshirts, were on the main streets of the mainly poor neighborhoods along the city's northeastern , southern and western boundaries, engaged in running skirmishes with police, looting hundreds of shops, setting dozens of buildings and houses ablaze...and utterly overwhelmed the city's 32,000 police..\.. The violence spread Monday night outside London, with serious eruptions of violence in Birmingham and Liverpool...
    [Whaddaya wanna bet that most of them can't find jobs?!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. UK riots: advice for businesses, FreshBusinessThinking.com
    LONDON, England - ..What if our business has been damaged and we cannot open as usual?.. Employers may be able lay off employees or put them onto short time working for a short time if there is an express term in the Contract of Employment allowing such actions or if employees consent to it... - see more of article under today's date.
  2. Bill would authorize back pay for furloughed workers, GovExec.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Furloughed employees at the FAA would receive retroactive pay for the two weeks they were off the job under legislation introduced Tuesday in the House... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Looks like a nice goodnews story, right? But there may be a darker side -]
  3. Delta's Greed Helps Shut Down the FAA, truthout.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - You probably don't know that another act of hostage-taking by Republicans is underway. They have shut down the FAA to help Delta Airlines in its battle to keep its workers from voting in a union. This is costing the government $200m/wk, more than 4,000 FAA employees have been furloughed, and as many as 87,000 construction workers and other contractors around the country are being laid off. The agency has been shut down for more than a week and so far the Republicans have refused to let it open before Congress leaves town for the summer. All this apparently so one company can keep employees who want a union from winning an election... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS excerpt - And now the ultimate perk: unlimited vacation time, Toronto Star, A1.
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - CEO of Toronto-based firm [Maggie Fox of Social Media Group] has stopped tracking paid days off and everyone is winning, she says...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, August 7-8, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Ottawa provided by Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown Market -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm, sec.Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC: T-F 7am-11pm, M 7-4 till 9/30 -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • A rush to assess S.&P. downgrade of credit rating.., 8/07 New York Times, A1.
  • Pressing all the buttons for a panic attack, 8/07 New York Times, Bu1.
  • Wall Street's tax on Main Street, by Gretchen Morgenson, 8/07 New York Times, Bu1.
    ..Hidden expenses associated with how local governments [like bankrupt Central Falls RI] finance themselves [via Wall Street] are compounding financial problems down at city hall. ..Poorly structured financial transactions involving bonds and derivatives known as interest rate swaps represented "Wall Street's multibillion-dollar hidden tax on Main Street"...
  • World races to stem debt crisis, 8/8 Toronto Star, A1.
    $14.3 trillion..US debt...
    $1.4 trillion..to shore up Italy...
    $700 billion..to shore up Spain...
    $7 trillion..wiped out from stocks in last two weeks [Toronto Globe B1 says 'only' $4.5T.  Quebec view -]
  • Décoté des États-Unis - Efforts concertés pour limiter la chute boursière, 8/8 Montréal Devoir, A1.
    [transl: Downgrading of the United States - Concerted efforts to limit the financial fall]
  • Leaders race to contain crisis - Europe's central bank pledges to buy government bonds and G7 ministers vow action to stabilize markets as finance officials grapple to ease global anxiety and head off further rout in markets this week, 8/8 Toronto Globe, A1.
    [How can they stabilize markets by buying debt (unless they then forgive it) when markets have had no undergirding fundamentals since the early 1990s when P/E ratios took off merely because the big boys had ignored jobs, and job insecurity had depressed wages and spending and allowed unprecedented concentration of the national income and wealth in the topmost brackets. And they can't create jobs by government makework cuz that will just deepen gov't debt. They've got to create jobs by spreading the vanishing market-demanded employment across all potential consumers, however short a workweek it takes, while swiftly transforming overtime into training and hiring. Emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing is the only market-oriented direction from here. Otherwise, it's all big government makework and taxes - with no success unless the WorldWarII-style military makework can be replicated = unlikely without lots of luddism.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A demographic dilemma for Korea, 8/07 (8/8 over dateline) JoongAng Daily via joongangdaily.joins.com
    SEOUL, S.Korea - ..As for the job competition between generations, it began to appear in 2005. According to an empirical analysis, the employment rate for those in their 20s fell by 0.5 percentage points when that for those in their 50s increases by 1 percentage point. This is because baby boomers started to turn 50 in the mid-2000s and work sharing during the global financial crisis maintained the existing workforce, reducing room to hire new employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Like it's going to make more jobs for 20-somethings if well-paid big-spending 50-somethings get downsized and quit spending? This guy is unclear on the concept. Worksharing, the reduction of the workweek in SK from 44 to 40 from 2004 to 2011 by company size, large staff to small, had the effect of creating jobs and increasing room to hire new employees rather than reducing it. And without maintaining the existing workforce, domestic consumer markets would have shrunk, and so would marketable productivity, and so would the number of jobs needed to satisfy those reduced markets, and so would "room to hire new employees." This is a prime example of economist confusion, twisted logic and self-contradiction.]
  2. Long working hours linked to alcohol addiction: New Zealand study, Xinhua via news.xinhuanet.com
    WELLINGTON, N.Z. -- A New Zealand study has found that people who work at least 50 hours a week can be up to three times more at risk of alcohol problems than people who work fewer hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is great! Now if they call us slackers, we can call them alkies (alcoholics)!]
  3. Businesses can benefit from flexible working hours, 8/8 FreshBusinessThinking.com
    LONDON, U.K. - .."Organisations have grasped the reality that an employee who gives everything they can within flexible working hours offers more than someone reluctantly working a 'typical' working day because that is all that is on offer... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And the same goes for an employee who gives everything they can within, say, a six-hour day compared to someone reluctantly working a 'typical' eight-hour-or-more day because that is all that is on offer.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, August 6, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Ottawa provided by Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown Market -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • A wild ride for financial markets [and richly deserved] - Global [ha] worries fuel volatility in stocks, bonds and currency; Dow suffers worst weekly fall since October 2008, WSJ, A1.
    As the world [there they go, projecting again] traders squirm, Wall St Journal, A1.
    [And the New York Times version -]
  • U.S. debt rating is cut by agency [S&P's], citing more risk [which they helped create] - Concern over deficits [which they backed by backing the bailouts] - Borrowing costs could rise for government and consumers [thus sidelining the financiers to where they belong], New York Times, A1.
  • Fannie Mae continues to bleed red ink as it struggles to digest default mortgages and foreclosed properties [which its sloppy directors helped create], WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
  • U.S. adds jobs and investors sigh in relief, NYT, A1.
    [But only..]
    ..added 117,000 jobs last month...hardly robust enough to produce a sustainable change in the employment picture...
    [So investors are sighing when they should be investing in bottom-up wages and consumer spending and jobs, and if they won't do it on their own, how about some discipline from the market - the only market-oriented approach to reversing this economic downspin is emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing. The market-determined population of potential but deactivated (by downsizing) consumers determines the (slowly adjusting) length of the workweek and consequent pressure for worksharing and/or rehring, no more guesswork or arbitrary self-indulgence by employers. But won't wages fall? No, because the wage-depressing labor surplus is getting stabilized and reduced, not increased. But won't that create inflation? No, because with more free time and more jobs on offer, job mobility will enable more employees to move to jobs with more job satisfaction = DEflationary incentive. But meanwhile, still in a deathspiral, there's finger-pointing in an attempt to deflect blame or at least, distract -]
  • Europe's leaders mount a frantic effort to show they are tackling fears over the continent's debt crisis,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [American crisis management loves company, though its crisis is far more critical than Europe's because America's dogmabombers are running over its karmabamas.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Budget problems force Community Action Coalition to cut hours despite increased need, Wisconsin State Journal via host.madison.com
    MADISON, Wisc. - ..Facing increased demand but a strained budget, the Community Action Coalition for South Central Wisconsin last week cut back the hours it serves the hungry, homeless and others in need... The CAC already has reduced hours for its staff of 35... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Furlough days balance Kingman charter school's books, by Ahron Sherman, Miner Staff Reporter via KingmanDailyMiner.com
    KINGMAN, Ariz. - Faced with a 4% reduction to its budget, the Kingman Academy of Learning decided to enact three furlough days for the 2011-2012 school year rather than eliminate more positions... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, August 5, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Southwest preps for turbulence, WSJ, B3.

    [Actually, this is the exception that proves the rule: M&As are bad except in cases of corporate extremis - like Airtran -]
    ..Southwest..completed its acquisition of AirTran Airways in May... Southwest and AirTran Airways are still operating independently of each other [as of Aug.5]...
    [Southwest is the most successful of U.S. airlines (revenue rose 31% last quarter) and, what a coincidence! has the most European-style management with maximum inclusion of employees in decision-making. Its base is at Luv Field in Texas(?). The photo with the article shows attendees at an event to mark the completion of the acquisition, many holding - are they long narrow balloons? - with the message "SOUTHWEST (heart symbol) AIRTRAN."  Southwest is the Whale Tisk of airlines (log into Facebook and type "whale tisk" into the search field - then you can "friend" him) -]
    Bob Jordan, a Southwest executive who became AirTran's president in May, said not all of the Southwest culture has yet to take. "We got a hugging culture at Southwest Airlines," he said. "I've stunned a few people [with hugs], I think. Since then, I've learned to be a little more careful."...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks nose-dive amid global fears - Weak outlook, government debt worries drive Dow's biggest point drop [512.76] since '08, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ..4.31% to 11383.68...
    As markets plunge, fear rules day - Clients flood financial planners, asset managers with calls as stocks slump; 'It's a losing battle', WSJ, C1.
    Signs of stress on the rise across globe [at least in the self-excusing minds of US investors].. - The stockpiling of cash could be a sign of worry among banks about trouble, Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [Or it could be a big factor that's creating the trouble because if it's stockpiled, it's not in-play, invested and creating jobs and consumer spending power. And the New York Times version -]
  • Stocks in worst tumble in 2 years amid global worry - Fear of recession and debt crisis drive selloff,
    New York Times, A1.
    Retreating on every front.. - Unnerved investors chase low-risk assets.\. - Time to say it: Double dip may be happening, NYT, B1.
    [= saying it but not very loudly. And the Boston Globe's version, presumably based on the NYT's version -]
  • Recession fears pound stocks - Weak US economic growth, worldwide debt concerns send major indexes reeling, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Easily fixed since the indexes only hurt the rich and the rich hold all the IOUs = FORGIVE THE DEBT - and the major indexes will soar. Piece o'cake. They've fostered all this indebtedness anyway merely for their jockeying for pecking order and they're the only ones with the wasted megalevels of loot to pay themselves back anyway. So, duh. Masochists, heal yourselves!]
  • Mortgage rates have fallen to the lowest levels of the year, fueled by recession worries, WSJ, A1.
    But rates may need to drop even lower to ignite refinancings.
    [Hmm, is that bad or good news? Bad for banks, good for homebuyers, if any? But here's a little breakthrough insight in the WSJ - at last -]
  • Small firms hunger for sales, not credit, WSJ, B1.
    [And sales would require customers, and customers would require spending money, and spending money would require jobs, and jobs would require work sharing in the robot age - but then, we only just filed work-sharing bills in Congress a couple of weeks ago while Germany figured it out a long time ago - Germany is the largest work-sharing ("Kurz-arbeit") economy and here's what an embarrassment it is to all our economic policy "experts" (except Dean Baker and Robert Lajeunesse) -]
  • Vital signs - Germany's manufacturing economy has yet to throttle back, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    An index of manufacturing orders rose in June from May, bringing it to its highest level in over three years...
    [Aside from that one bright spot, the front pages are remarkably dark today. More samples -]
  • Congress seen as top culprit in debt debate - 82% in [NYT/CBSnews] poll disapprove [highest on record] - Jobs effort urged, NYT, A1.
    [Never mind the Republican innovation of threatening national bankruptcy and dropping negotiation and compromise and sharing partial disagreement = the essence of politics. Oh no, not even the "liberal" NY Times portrays them as "top culprit" in these politically poisoned days. It's Congress that's seen as top culprit - the NYT judges the illusion of balance more important than truth in an unbalanced time. No wonder even Chomsky prefers the WSJ cuz "They've got to have some truth for investors" (except on the editorial pages). The NYT is doing to itself what the US labor movement did: placing short-term comfort over long-term survival.]
    ..Most Americans say..that creating jobs should now take priority over cutting spending...
    [which hopefully takes us to effective emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing instead of lame makework. After all, even Republican Pres. Hoover in 1932 said, "Shorter hours are the quickest way to create jobs." (Ben Hunnicutt, "Work Without End.") But then we'll still have to stop big corporations from wrecking our habitat -]
    U.S. taking step to open drilling in Arctic Ocean - Shell seeks 4 oil wells - Tentative approval seen as backing in search of more energy, NYT, A1.
    [Hey, they've killed the Gulf of Mexico. Why not let them start on the Arctic Ocean - it's more fragile so they can kill it faster. Can Shell spell RENEWABLE energy? Oops, here's a glimmer of good news -]
  • F.A.A. impasse that hit 4,000 [with permanent? furloughs and idled tens of thousands] ends, for now, NYT, A1.
    [But since nobody's thinking crises-minimizing workweek fluctuation instead of trauma-maximizing firing +/- (re)hiring, we're really no further ahead, as the "for now" tag admits. Biz section -]
  • Learning to live with debt - Debt and the fear of it have taken a heavy toll on the economy, by Floyd Norris, NYT, B1.
    Debt can kill. But you can't live without it...
    [The Amish do. My grandparents did.  Pa Hyde used to sing out -
    "Oh what a world of sin and sorrow
    For all those who beg and borrow,
    For their debts though paltry sums
    They promise to repay tomorrow -
    But tomorrow never comes."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. County workers vote to reinstate 36-hour workweek, Amador Ledger-Dispatch via ledger-dispatch.com
    AMADOR COUNTY, Calif. - ..The results of a “straw poll” taken by union leaders representing 220 Amador County workers this week indicate a majority of them favor reinstituting a 36-hour workweek to try and avoid layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Most Canadians feel good about employment insurance system, survey says, MontrealGazette.com
    OTTAWA — ..And 62% were not aware of work-sharing benefits. Instead of an employer laying off a few workers, work-sharing has the whole staff to take a pay cut instead so no one is left without a paycheque... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And if you do it on a region- or economy-wide basis, there's no pay cut because you absorb the 5000 resumes coming in for every 5 job openings, each underbidding the others.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • New fee to bank cash, by Liz Rappaport, WSJ, A1.
    Bank of New York Mellon Corp. on Thursday took the extraordinary step of telling large clients it will charge them to hold cash. ..Some U.S. depositors will have to pay to keep big chunks of money in a bank, marking a stark new phase of the long-running global financial crisis. ..Fearful corporations and investors have been socking away cash in their bank accounts rather than put it into even the safest investments.
    [As me dad used to say, it wasn't that there was a lack of money during the Depression - there was tons of money during the Depression - but all locked in the grip of a few. This fee for banking money amounts to a step beyond low interest rates to negative interest rates. It's reminiscent of the idea of depreciating money in Arthur Dahlberg's second(?) book. And it's perfectly in line with the devaluing, by The Market, of surplus investing power (concentrated money) and its simultaneous overvaluing of scarce spending power (centrifuged money). In fact, there's probably a slew of PhD feces, oops, theses awaiting the wits who will frame the new economic law expressing exactly how money loses (circulatory velocity and) value as more and more of it concentrates in fewer and fewer hands, but gains (circulatory velocity and) value as more and more of it spreads around to more and more hands. Money is like a rechargeable battery - it gets recharged by exchange = circulating from hand to hand as one person after another agrees that, yes, this decorated coin or piece of colored paper is worth some fraction of my time. Compare today -]
    The curious allure of negative returns, by David Reilly, WSJ, C10.
    Investors are going to the mattresses, or the market equivalent of it.
    [Maybe that's because they've stuffed so much money into their mattresses instead of delivering on their promise to get it immediately invested creating jobs.]
    As fears mount over sputtering growth adn the continued fallout from Europe's crisis, investors are moving heavily into cash. At least that seemed to be the signal from Bank of New York Mellon's plan Thursday to charge some big depositors a fee to hold their cash, producing a negative interest rate. If some customers with deposits of over $50 million accept this, it means they are willing to "break the buck" to hold super-safe cash. And that they prefer to take a predefined, small loss rather than risk potentially bigger losses and illiquidity by putting funds anywhere even slightly more risky.
    The danger is that a big shift into cash fuels a vicious cycle in which companies and investors [nevermind employees and consumers] lose more confidence in economic prospects. That leads to less credit creation and investment [and jobs and consumer spending], which in turn could tip economies into recession [or God forbid, alarm investors with the silly notion that economies never actually rose out of recession, rose-colored indexes notwithstanding].
    While some banks are apparently deluged with deposits, they have few attactive uses for them. [Plus] they aren't willing ot use extra deposits to invest in instruments that are anything but super-short term in nature.
    [This is truly the Anatomy of a Depression. And justifies the name for the prevailing "wisdom" = Short-term Capitalism.]
    ..Yields on one-month U.S. treasury bills, for example, dipped into negative territory Thursday, while yields of two-year Treasury notes plumbed historical lows below 0.3%.
    ..The Federal Reserve's zero-interest-rate policy, in place for more than two years, means the only way for [banks] to lower their funding cost is to take the kind of drastic action seen by Bank of New York. So far, no other big bank has followed suit.
    ..Many investors hope markets' sharp drop will increase pressure on the Federal Reserve to act [to] immediately restart purchases of government bonds.\.when it meets next Tuesday. ..The Fed's last, $600 billion bond-buying program ended only in June. It failed to cut unemployment significantly [= at all], and there is little [=nothing] to suggest it created healthy, sustainable economic growth.
    [Such huge figures. But trapped in the insulated, self-important, mutually deluding financial community, totally wasted. So much money - so little use. A good replay of World War II is called for, to distract the wealthy with jingoism and discipline them with labor shortage. Oh wait, we can achieve the same wartime prosperity without the war and the attendant collateral damage to consumers (and loss of consumer spending) simply by resuming our 1840-1940 workweek reduction...]



    Thursday, August 4, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • U.S. debt deal means paying for college - especially graduate school - will get tougher, AP via Boston Globe, B10.
    [If the US continues dropping its makework and consumer spending support programs before it has timesizing in place, it will really plummet.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stimulus talk [about Fed] turns deep losses into gains [small gains, that is], Boston Globe, B10.
    [This headline is a prime example of whispering the biggest bad news and shouting the smallest good news. How does a large system get useable feedback with this habit in full gear?]
  • Signs of stress are rising across globe, WSJ, C1.
  • Gold continued its march into record territory.., WSJ, A1 pointer to C8.
  • Airline earnings show first drop in two years, Boston Globe, B9.
  • Walmart notes drop in shoppers, Boston Globe, B9.
    [People don't even have enough money to shop at Walmart any more? The downspiral is accelerating. Especially when we get this headline -]
  • Even marked up, luxury goods fly off shelves, New York Times, A1.
    [The great leak upward roars on and the upper brackets, trying to save consumer spending single-handedly (but more symbolically than functionally), are making a few purchases they've been putting off in case it's their last chance before "The Revolution."]
  • Security firm cites 5-year cyberattack, by Barbara Ortutay, AP via Boston Globe, B9.
    NEW YORK - ..McAfee inc. said in a report yesterday.\.that cybercriminals have spent at least the last five years targeting more than 70 government entities, nonprofit groups, and corporations around the world...including the UN, the International Olympic Committee, and companies mostly in the U.S..\..to steal troves of data.... McAfee..says sthe culprit is likely a nation state....
    [Our concept of fair share and sense of common interest have been outpaced by our technology, perhaps because industrialists have broken the promise of technology, to "make everyone's life easier," and replaced it with downsizing instead of continuous timesizing to maintain employment and markets. Now it's boomeranging back to bite them and their investments.]
  • Cargill recalls 36 million pounds of turkey linked to salmonella cases, NYT, B1 pointer to B3.
    [The evil harvest of giantized and delocalized food production - and remote, money-fixated management - and budget-cut meat inspection - proceeds apace. "When the wealthy decline to get involved in taxation, while wheedling bailouts from taxpayers, it's all over."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. SF Courts Cut Hours, Lay Off 200 Employees, Bay City News via The San Francisco Appeal via sfappeal.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - The San Francisco Superior Court Wednesday announced reduced hours of its clerks' offices to adjust to deep budget cuts... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And there'd have been more layoffs without reduced hours. But there should have been no layoffs, and more deeply reduced hours. But California's wealthy, like America's at large, will find they can't both withdraw from taxation and require taxpayer bailouts for their riskier ventures, without jeopardizing the entire bubble they live in.]
  2. Plans in Ashley to hire cops put on hold - Paperwork glitch means taking on new part-timers is put on hold - Part-time chief also delayed, Wilkes Barre Times-Leader via timesleader.com
    ASHLEY, Penn. - ..The new hires would be brought on in a staggered fashion over the next three months and bring the force up to six part-time officers. They work a maximum of 32 hours a week under state law... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Sounds like a rahthah enlightened state.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, August 3, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Google buys discount offers service [Dealmap for $??], Boston Globe, B8.

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -
  • The partial shutdown of the FAA will continue into September -,
    Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Barclays cutting 3,000 [this year] as profit falls, Bloomberg via Boston Globe, B9.
    [Thus guaranteeing it will fall further.]
    LONDON - ..Britain's 2d-largest bank by assets..has already cut 1,400 of the [3000]... The shares rose...
    [= investors still mistaking downsizing for upsizing (growth) or at least, sustainability?]
    European banks have slashed 230,000 jobs since the start of the financial crisis in 2007...
    [And how many has the U.S. slashed?]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • July consumer bankruptcies fall 18% [to 113,470 from last July's 137,698], Boston Globe, B8.
    [Not enough solvent consumers left to maintain the figures? or too many on (forced) vacation?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Default averted [for the moment], battles loom - Huge cuts could imperil recovery, economists say, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Never mind "could imperil recovery" - how about "will accelerate deathspiral."]
  • 2011's gain disappear after a big sell-off... - Incomes rose by the least since September.., Boston Globe, B10.
    [You mean the richest 30,000's income of trillions couldn't even average us up more?]
  • Dow tumbles 266 points as economic worries grow, Boston Globe, B11.
    Investor worries keep Dow tumbling - Debt deal can't allay all fears - Jobs report considered key, by Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, B7.
    The stock market plummeted again yesterday... The DJIA dropped nearly 266 points, or more than 2%..the 8th straight day the stock market has slumpted and marking the longest losing streak since the financial crisis in Oct.2008. Overall, the Dow has dropped 6.7% in the past 8 days and is at its lowest point since March 18, though it still remains up slightly for the year. Analysts said the market has been beaten down by a wave of bad economic news in the past week...
    [Have they been napping? It ain't just the past week...]
    The Commerce Dept. said yesterday that consumer spending dropped 0.2% in June, the first decline in nearly two years...
    [They must be including some pretty wierd stuff to have kept that measure up the last two years!]
  • AAA rating not all it used to be - Only 4 US companies still get top marks, Boston Globe, B11.
    [So if the AAA rating is as good as ever, this headline should really start "US companies not all they used to be -".]
  • Auto industry uneasy after weak July,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • Fed may consider additional stimulus, Bloomberg via Boston Globe, B11.
    [Previous stimulus didn't work. Additional stimulus won't work, especially when the Republicans want to find another $1,500,000,000,000 in government spending cuts.]
  • Investors' fears take a toll on Spain, Italy, Boston Globe, B8.
    [Do we in the U.S. really have any emotional energy to spend on Spain and Italy, let alone to fingerpoint?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. S.C. BMW to add 100 jobs amid increased X3 demand, AP via CanadianBusiness.com
    GREER, S.C. — German automaker BMW is adding 100 new jobs at its South Carolina plant and shifting to a six-day work week as it ramps up production for its vehicles... - see whole article under today's date.
    [A German company shifting to a six-day workweek?? Hopefully they're doing this on 6 1/2-hour days or some other plan that observes the 40-hour workweek max. Otherwise it would be another example of not even the Germans knowing what they're doing right - with Kurz-arbeit (work sharing) for instance.]
  2. Thirty years since the PATCO strike, Part one, By Tom Mackaman, World Socialist Web Site via wsws.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Extreme stress forced a majority of controllers into early retirement. PATCO workers demanded a shorter workweek, increased wages and increased staffing... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, August 2, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by *Porter Sq. Books -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • America Movil [Slim Helu's] moves to acquire the rest [the other 40%] of Telmex, NYT, B5.
    ..to consolidate the Mexican billionaire's telecom holdings... Slim is the world's richest man, with a fortune that Forbes magazine estimates at $74 biilion...
    [Eat your hearts out, Bill Gates and the Sultan of Brunei.]
    Among his other holdings, he owns 6.9% of The New York Times Co.
    [So we ain't gonna get much unbiassed news on him from here. If he buys up to 51%, well, he couldn't possibly do a worse job than that Australian, Rupert Murdoch. What a disgrace to all his mates Down Undah HE turned out to be!]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Arts outposts stung by cuts in state aid, NYT, C1.
    Erika Nelson has lost a $2,000 Kansas grant for her mobile museum holding her tiny models of big things, including the world's largest ketchup bottle. Photos caption.
    [Hooboy. Excuse me, but I don't think government has any business whatsoever in subsidizing the arts, the sciences, industry, exports, jobs or anything else. You want low taxes? Cut the special interests, the special pleading, the parasitism - let the markets prevail, but let government convert market-demanded overtime into jobs and guarantee full employment, however short a workweek it requires, and that in turn will guarantee to everyone more free time and money to subsidize their own tastes and research within the private sector.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Small city, big debt problems - Underfunded benefits lead town [Central Falls, R.I.] to file for bankruptcy, NY Times, B1.
    [The big change during the Bush Regime in America was that the wealthy got stupid, pulled off the gloves, and started treating their fellow Americans the way they treat third-world nations like Jamaica, Latin America, Africa...where, per "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man" by John Perkins, they send "chief economists" from the toxic helpers, IMF, World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank to push them into unpayable debt, and control them through debt slavery. "Sixteen tons and whaddaya get? Another day older and deeper in debt.
    St.Peter don'tcha call me cuz I can't go - I owe my soul to the company store."]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • House OK's debt package -
    - Deal's cutbacks could hobble [Mass.] state's recovery,
    .. - Stark economic statistics
    which the cutbacks will worsen, nationwide,
    ..\.. - Wall Street still worried, Boston Globe, A1.
    [And rightly so until they get behind emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing because they represent the only approach that can create wartime prosperity without the war.]
  • Relief rally [in stocks] disappears afer fresh economic data suggests weakness, by Christine Hauser, NYT, B4.
    ..On Monday, the three main indexes jumped then slumped for most of the day and closed lower as the reality of the challenges ahead for the economy set in...
    a slowdown in the nation's factories... 50.9% in July, down from 55.3% in June...
    [factories? the U.S. still has factories??]
    Production and employment showed continued growth in July, but at slower rates than in June...
    [But only gauged by very flattering indexes.]
    ..The new orders component fell to 49.2%, hitting a notch below 50% for the first time since June, 2009, when it was 48.9%...
    The news was particularly bad on the heels of the Friday report that the nation's GDP grew at an annual rate of less than 1% (0.85%) in the first half of 2011... The GDP data was revised going back to 2003, showing the recession was deeper and the recovery weaker than originally thought...
  • Fraud convictions of five ex-insurance executives are overturned [by a federal appeals court], by Peter Lattman, NYT, B7.
    ..delivering a blow to the Justice Dept. in one of the prominent cases brought during last decade's corporate accounting scandals...
    [The once-great USA is really f*cked, cuz it can't shake its viral infection of wealthy lawlessness. To paraphrase the immortal words of Leona Helmsley, "Oh, laws are for the little people." And here's one reason, from the article concluded right above this article -]
  • Revolving door at S.E.C. is hurdle to crisis cleanup, NYT, B7.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Airline Regulators Delay New Rules on Pilot Fatigue, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Maximum work days, including tasks on the ground, generally would be restricted to 13 hours, rather than the current 16-hour limit... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. State Seeks Reinstatement of Ban on Funding Planned Parenthood - Appeal argues anti-abortion law should be debated with HHS, not in court, 93.1 WIBC Indianapolis via wibc.com
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - ..Planned Parenthood briefly cut hours and furloughed employees before a judge blocked the defunding law in June... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Workers strike at Iamgold mine in Suriname, BusinessWeek.com
    PARAMARIBO, Suriname [Dutch Guiana] - A strike over working hours has halted operations at the large Rosebel gold mine operated by Toronto, Canada-based Iamgold Corp., union and company officials said Tuesday. The 1,100 workers walked off the job because management demanded employees work an additional four hours on the final day of their 14-day shifts, said union president Freddy Burg... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.