Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
July + 8/01, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Gran Via Beach Club Best Venue for After Work Cocktails, 8/01 EventPlannerSpain.COM (press release)
    MADRID, Spain - From mid-July onwards, the temperature rises, many people work shorter hours and those living in or visiting Madrid are subjected to long hours of stifling heat... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. British Men Spend Time Doing Domestic Chores, TopNews United States via topnews.us
    LONDON, U.K. - ..The statistics from Office for National Statistics reveals that man's total paid working hours comprise of 38.4 hours per week and a woman's comprises of 33.3 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Cost of construction - Loss of parking and travel lanes hurts West Franklin businesses, 8/01 Chapel Hill News
    CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - ..June sales were down 30% from June 2010, said Shawn Whelan, manager of Kildare's Irish Pub at 206 W. Franklin St. He's let 15 employees go and cut hours for nearly all the remaining ones... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, July 30, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Shaw's Star Market, P.Sq. "One square above Harvard!" -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Merck & Co. plans to shed 13,000 workers, Boston Globe, B5.
    ..by the end of 2015, in addition to the 20,000 jobs it has shed since a merger in 2009, the pharma company said yesterday... 35-40%..will be in the U.S...
    [Still trying to get growth, alias UPsizing, by DOWNsizing?  WSJ version -]
    Merck to cut 13,000 more jobs as patents expire, Wall St Journal, B1.
    ..in addition to some 17,000 job cuts already planned...
    [So this could be 13k+20k+17k= 50,000 job losses unless some of these categories overlap. Oh, that will really help Merck's future growth! Why don't they cut everyone's hours & keep everyone employed - and minimize their response to expired patents instead of maximizing and traumatizing their response - and guaranteeing that they will continue to shrink?  NYT's version -]
    Merck..will cut an additional 13,000 jobs - Continuing a trend that has shed 299,000 jobs in the last decade, NYT, B3.
    [299k? - that's "damage-controlese" for 300,000 and probably more or they wouldn't be so obvious about it. Sounds like Merck has chosen a kickline of undertakers instead of CEOs. Why don't they just hire Chainsaw Al Dunlap and quit dawdling on their trip to the boneyard?]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Construction and government jobs are missing from the "recovery" [our quotes] -
    [Gee, a couple of our HUGEST government makework campaigns are FAILING! Whatever are we going to DOOO? We may have to get taxpayers off the hook and make the private sector hire their own markets for a change. Because, yes folks, the horrible truth is out = ordinary taxpayers have to FORCE the private sector, the big "capitalists," the hedgefund managers and mega investors, to not be socialist alias taxpayer-supported or -guaranteed or -bailed-out - they have to be FORCED not to get more and more siphons into our wallets or gliding-plopping onto our credit = debt ceiling - and then they pretend they don't want to raise it -]
    - Homeowners have reasons to be concerned as the debt ceiling debate drags on, by Candice Choi, AP via Bos.Globe, B6.
    ..One of the major concerns for many is the fate of a valued tax break..which allows taxpayers to deduct their mortgage interest payments [and is] used by 35 million households.
    [A tremendous artificial boost for jobs in housing and construction, all unnecessary with guaranteed full employment via incremental shortening of the workweek, however much it takes, and shift-coordination management skills plus continuous overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
    Now lawmakers have proposed limiting the deduction as part of an agreement to raise the government's borrowing limit to avoid a default after the Aug.2 deadline... Even if lawmakers strike a deal...there's still a chance the government's credit rating could be downgraded [and] the prospect of higher mortgage rates... Some borrowers could find it more difficult to get approved [and] the government's cost of borrowing would also rise [and carry with it] interest rates on..mortgages [because they] are tied to government bonds...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Economy losing its cushion, by Hilsenrath & Murray, Wall Street Journal, A1 - see whole article under today's date.
    [What cushion? Government? Taxpayers?—when the wealthy have withdrawn from taxation to their gated communities and private Caribbean islands with more money and a bigger income gap than ever before in American history??  NYT's version -]
  • New data shows sharp slowdown in growth rate - Risk to U.S. "record" [our quotes] - For first half of year, G.D.P. expanded less than one percent, New York Times, A1.
    ..The government on Friday reported that the economy grew at a rate of just 1.3% in the second quarter, failing to bounce back from knocks earlier in the year...
  • Recession risk up amid growth [&] debt woes,
    Boston Globe, B6.
  • Politicos fiddle while U.S. growth burns, WSJ, B16.
    [Oh heavens, they're not fiddling. They're doing exactly what you rich lads on Wall Street have bought and paid them to do - they're fostering growth by creating jobs - or at least that's what you've told them they're doing by transfering money to you in any way, means or device you dream up. It's just that the basic job-creation concept here isn't just flawed - it actually does the opposite. Because past a certain point, coagulating the nation's money supply among a tiny population of its citizens actually starts taking it out of circulation, cuz that tiny population has way waaay more than it can spend, and it gets to the point where it's getting way more than it can find sustainable investments for, cuz it's just got too big a fraction - or percentage - of it. Now, as America's robopathic wealthy drive on and on towards redirecting 100% of the national income toward their 30,000 selves (richest 0.01%) regardless of economic collapse all around them, they still retail the myth that every economy needs as much big investment money as possible because those trillion$ go right back into the economy, creating jobs. Well, let's see about that -]
  • For investors, cash is king - Washington stalemate spurs flows out of markets and into bank accounts, WSJ, B1.
    [Uh, if the Treasury bills that back up cash go, won't cash go too? And money sitting in bank accounts will create LOTS of jobs?? This myth was exploded in the 1930s and several times since then, but the wealthy have a sturdy forgettery of things that are the slightest bit tricky to understand ("How could WE be the problem?!") and - they own the media.]
  • A crisis of credit, credibility -, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Hmm, these are the two variables that the 4th and 5th successors to the Timezing Program balance, between 2400 and 2599 AD if each program takes 100 years (which it won't; it'll be messier) - regulating only the per-person versions of each variable of course, while deregulating and freeing up the market-determined per-job versions.]
    - Along partisan lines, House passes debt ceiling bill, which Senate shelves; Pressure for compromise builds, BG A1.
    [The Republicans are such extremist babies, If Bam doesn't want to do Executive Privilege which his sleazy predecessor would have done months ago, then how about JC's "Resist not evil..." and "If your brother steals your coat, give him your shirt too." Maybe Retroublicans will wake up if their catastrophic Push-It-All-To-The-Superrich policies flush America down the commode much faster (Katrina-grade 'antiquing' across the land, not all bestowed on New Orleans) - or at least wake up the boys in Canada and the EU who still want to copy America in its time of fastest self-mutilation and -amputation (Harper & Sarkozy take notice!)]
  • Lawmakers 'a disgrace' - From residents, growing feelings of fear, frustration, and disgust, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Oh quiet! What do you "residents" matter anyway? Have a little respect for your richer and better's!]
  • Financial institutions react - Message from Wall Street clear, as markets shudder and fall, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Is ANYthing clear from the clique of cushioned clowns who set this all up, gouged the taxpayer for bailouts, and now think they have any standing to complain about whiplash from their "Suicide, Everone Else First" policies of transfering any fraction of the nation's money supply, however large, to any fraction of the population, however small?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. What the Government Debt Crisis Means to You, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..The threat of a short-term government shutdown earlier this year came with consequences that were far less severe. In that case, the federal government had the money on hand to pay its bills, but it didn't have the Congressional authority to spend it. The government announced ahead of time that current Social Security beneficiaries would receive their checks and employees learned whether they'd be furloughed. That's not the case this time...
    - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Furloughs to start Friday, (7/28 late pickup) Hawaii Tribune Herald via hawaiitribune-herald.com
    HAWAII COUNTY, Hawaii - Most Hawaii County offices that serve the public will be closed on Friday, which will be the first county employee furlough day of the new fiscal year. Starting in August, the county furlough days will be scheduled on the first Friday of each month... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. A new world of work, and an old way of working, Toronto Star, A6
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - Imagine a world that is entirely, materially insecure. It is a world in which people scramble for whatever jobs they can get. When they succeed, they labour long hours with no assured wage... Students of history will recognize this world [as] industrializing England during the 19th century or parts of Latin America during the 20th... But amazingly and tragically, it is also Canada in the 21st century... A pamphlet produced by the Toronto District School Board..is one of the most honest - and most depressing - descriptions of work in Canada that I've seen... This world of cutthroat competition and insecure work..may be disguised by new technologies such as the Internet or Twitter. But in essence it is very, very old. It is a world we thought we had conquered. - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, July 29, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by switching to timesizing -

  • Profit down, Credit Suisse will trim 2,000 jobs, New York Times, B5.
  • Boston Scientific to lay off 1,200-plus - Company mum on effect in Massachusetts, Boston Globe, A1.
    ..plans to eliminate 1,200 to 1,400 jobs worldwide during the next 2 1/2 years to free money for new investments...
    [Never mind that with fewer consumers with wage-earning jobs, there will be a weaker consumer base and fewer potential "new investments" that are sustainable. This is another incompetent CEO who is bored with his corporate mission, medical device making, and wants to be an investment banker, regardless of the "suicide, everyone else first" that it entails.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • House puts off debt vote as press[ure] by Boehner fails - Uncertainty building as Democrats wait, throwing endgame into disarrary, New York Times, A1.
    [Can Obama spell e-x-e-c-u-t-i-v-e p-r-i-v-i-l-e-g-e?]
  • U.S. sell-off ahead of key vote, Financial Times, p.1.
    Dow retreats for a fifth day as debt stances feed anxiety, NYT, B8.
    ..down 62.44 points, or 0.51%, at 12,240.11...
  • A recovery that repeats its painful precedents, NYT, B1.
    Car sales sputter, home prices weaken and the jobless numbers swell as a tepid recovery slogs on. Caption, photo 1.
    [Then why are we still calling it a "recovery"?]
    The San Francisco Fed estimates that spending per person per month remains about $175 below its trend before the recession. Caption, photo 2.
    [Of course, because we're still transferring huge percentages of the money supply to the few people in the wealthiest brackets where they can't possibly spend that volume of money. And any credible definition would define the situation as "continued recession" and not "recovery." Why do our economic "scientists" discredit their "science" by exaggerating the positive and ignoring the dysfunctionality of a hyperconcentrated money supply in terms of depressing spending per person and CAUSING RECESSION?]
  • Financial pressures are worrying baby boomers.., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A9.
    ..as they get older, particularly the issue of rising medical bills, according to a new poll.
  • Cybertheft affects 35m South Koreans, Boston Globe, B8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Keeping the 40-hour work week from feeling part time, WashingtonPost.com (blog)
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..Based on recent workforce trends, is the 40-hour work week considered part time for white-collar professionals? How does this play out among the federal workforce? What are the implications of these trends if true?.. - see whole article under today's date.
    [The implications are that the population is splitting into ever fewer resentful workaholics and ever more numerous and vulnerable parasites.]
  2. Shorter hours a part of post office decline, Gloucester County Times via NJ.com
    GLOUCESTER COUNTY, N.J. - I have been..hearing on the news how the U.S. Postal Service is losing money in its retail-window business. In my opinion, the postal service is accelerating this problem on its own. For example, the Mantua post office used to be open from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays. In the past few months, they changed their opening times to 9 a.m. weekdays and 9:30 a.m. Saturdays... Of course, not as much money is generated without the front window open... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The design trick in robotized economies of the future will be to control worktime per person while DEcontrolling worktime per job. We can cut people's workweek and still keep businesses open long hours by having more shifts, and the key management skill of the future will be coordinating shorter and shorter shifts.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, July 28, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Markets swoon on debt fears - Deadlock fuels worst one-day Dow drop in two months, Wall St Journal, A1.
    ..fell 198.75 points, or 1.6%, to 12302.55...
    [Remember "Dew Drop Inn," from the innocent 1950s, when all we had to worry about was climbing under our desks and kissing our *ss goodbye in a hydrogen-bomb drill?]
  • A rising hunger among children - Boston Medical Center sees more who are dangerously thin and facing lasting problems, Boston Globe, A1.
    Young children...underweight
    2007: 12%
    2010: 18%
    Families with..malnourished.\.young children
    2007: 18%
    2010: 28%
    [But as we say in our top paragraph above, if there's money, there's no hunger.
    And if there's a good job, there's no lack of money.
    IT ALL COMES DOWN TO JOBS.
    And JOBS come down to guaranteeing full employment by adjusting the workweek downwards as much as full employment might require, and in the interim, sharing the vanishing market-demanded employment as automation spreads and the robots march in and unions are so weak from not focusing on their power issue (shorter hours for all), that they're powerless to stop imports of products and exports of jobs (=outsourcing).]
  • Survey shows slow growth - Fed marks year's worst showing, by Christopher Rugaber, Boston Globe, B8.
    ..Growth slowed in eight of the Fed's 12 bank regions in June and early July.\.hampered by high unemployment, weak home sales, and signs of a slowdown in manufacturing...
  • Hit with foreclosures, Bank of America donating, demolishing homes, by Lindsey Rupp, Bloomberg via Boston Globe, B8.
    [Now that's quite a trick = the perpetrator of foreclosures has managed to get itself spun as a victim! (They pay you extra for this, Lindsey?) ]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Newton Falls Paper Mill promises a re-opening, YNN via centralny.ynn.com
    ST.LAWRENCE COUNTY, N.Y. - ..Some of them will have to close down, shorten hours and then that will have an impact.".. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Cash-strapped Miami commissioners lower tax rate, employees could face 30 furlough days, MiamiHerald.com
    MIAMI, Fla. - ..For employees, that could mean more than the 22 furlough days the mayor originally proposed... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, July 27, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The dollar tumbled across the board and stocks slid for the third straight day amid worries about the default standoff - Investors pushed down prices of Treasury bills maturing in August, Wall St Journal, A1.
    [The wealthy are undermining themselves right and left. They want Treasuries to be safe-haven investments and the US dollar to be the international currency, but they don't want to pay the taxes that make Treasuries safe and underpin the US dollar. They want government to be there to back them up and bail them out, but they want to 'starve the beast' and destroy government. Make up your minds!]
  • Uncertainties keep home sales in slump, Boston Globe, B11.
    [But home sales are trivial compared to -]
  • On all levels, concern about the impasse - Losing top rating could cost job growth [WHAT job growth?] and
    job creation
    [WHAT job creation?], New York Times, B1.
  • What's wrong with America's job engine? Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [In a word, coagulated employment, coagulated income, coagulated wealth and coagulated credit.
    The first thing that needs spreading around is employment, but it ain't gonna happen with a long 1940 pre-robotics workweek perpetuated forever. To save work we have to spread it around to everybody, but that can only happen if we continue our 1840-1940 adjustment of the workweek - downward. When the workweek comes down, wages go up, because the desperate long-term unemployed and their flood of mutually underbidding resumes are absorbed into employment.]
  • Wary firms opt for temporary staff, hiring overseas, by David Wessel, WSJ, B1.
    Over the past ten years [the America-killing Bush years]:
    • The US economy's output of goods and services has expanded 19% [but not its wages or markets]
    • Nonfinancial corporate [paper] profits have risen 85%
    • The labor force has grown by 10.1 million
    • But the number of private-sector jobs has fallen by nearly two million
    • And the percentage of American adults at work has dropped to 58.2%, a low not seen since 1983
    • [And the concentration of private-sector employment and the nation's money supply (M1) has reached back to Depression levels. We need a better centrifuge of employment (and everything else) - and that would be automatic adjustment of the workweek against unemployment, and automatic overtime-to-training&hiring conversion.]
  • Confidence rises only slightly among consumers in July, Boston Globe, B8.
  • Spain's borrowing costs rise amid weaker demand, Boston Globe, B9.
    [Spain's in good shape compared to US...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A work-hours proposal born of tragedy, ModernHealthcare.com (blog)
    JACKSON, Miss. - Often overlooked in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's rollout of stricter resident work-hour limits is a new rule that says, "The sponsoring institution must provide adequate sleep facilities and/or safe transportation options for residents who may be too fatigued to safely return.".. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Average EU worker clocked 39.7 work hours, 25 vacation days in 2010, MonstersAndCritics.com
    BRUSSELS, Belgium, E.U. - ..Finns had the shortest weeks, with an average of 37.8 working hours, followed by France with 38, and Ireland with 38.1... On the vacation front, Denmark and Germany shared the record of an average 30 days of annual leave set out in unions agreements, followed by Italy with 28 days... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Glimpse of the past is a vista on the future - There was that ubiquitous four letter word again, HeraldScotland.com
    EDINBURGH, Scotland - “Cuts” were a feature of museums all over Britain said the report published last week. Some of over 25%, resulting in shorter hours, fewer days and staff redundancies... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Brooks Automation buys Nexus Biosystems, a Calif. firm for $79m, Boston Globe, B6.

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -
  • The Postal Service plans to close 3,653 post offices in mostly rural communities as first-class mail volume falls, WSJ, A1.
    [US deterioration proceeds apace...]
  • Struggling BlackBerry maker RIM to begin layoffs of 2,000 employees, Boston Globe, B6.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Can't get a job, or an interview - Some online ads and recruiters confirm.., NY Times, A1 pointer to B1.
    ..that employers prefer to hire those recently laid off or still working instead of those out of work for months.
    [So you have to "have a job to get a job." America's cascade accelerates... Soon = a paper eagle with crouton claws....]
  • Stocks dropped as financial markets began taking seriously the prospect of a downgrade of the U.S.'s credit rating - Treasury prices fell and gold hit a[nother] record, Wall St Journal, A1:1 pointer to A1:3, C5,6,7.
  • Obama argues debt case to nation - Uncertainty has Massachusetts firms wary of hiring, expanding, Boston Globe, A1.
  • Back-and-forth over US debt derails economic indexes, Boston Globe, B8.
  • US money woes make Americans fret over own debt, Boston Globe, B9.
  • Boston condo sales slip, but luxury market zooms, Boston Globe, B9.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. France Debates Effect of Overtime Law, Wall Street Journal via online.wsj.com
    PARIS, France — French employees have been claiming more overtime since a 2007 law loosened restrictions on working hours, but a pair of economists say workers may not really be clocking longer hours—just reporting more overtime and thus earning more... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Social Security offices to cut hours by 30 minutes, STMW via Sun-Times Media via WLS 890 am via wlsam.com
    CHICAGO, USA - ..Social Security offices in Chicago and the suburbs will close 30 minutes earlier every day starting Aug. 15 to cut costs... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Budget cuts cause layoffs in Morgan County, WAFF.com
    DECATUR, Ala., USA - ..Two maintenance workers are being laid off, another worker's hours were cut to 32 hours a week. These are the first jobs to be cut because of the county's tight budget... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, July 24-25, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Business of food is flavored by pinch of a bitter economy - 'Our view is that it's going to be a slow recovery. We know that consumers are being more careful.' Ken Powell, chief executive, General Mills Inc., 7/24 Boston Globe, G2.
    [Here's another chief executive who is so out-of-touch, he thinks consumers are being "more careful" with no comprehension of the fact that consumers have less work and less money. And that there is absolutely no basis for a recovery, however slow.]
    ..During a recent trip to Boston to meet with investors, he spoke with Globe reporter Taryn Luna about the company's most recent acquisition, Yoplait...
    [And he has no comprehension of the fact that his series of acquisitions, followed by the perception of overlapping staff, and consequent "leansizing," "rightsizing," or just plain downsizing - instead of maintaining employment with timesizing - is directly causing the "bitter economy.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Power shifts - Government support has helped make Massachusetts a leader in clean-tech, but are the firms that have taken root here strong enough to survive looming budget cuts?, 7/24 Boston Globe, G1.
    "It's a perfect sector that will grow in Massachusetts ... It relies on innovation, it relies on education." Richard K. Sullivan, Jr., Massachusetts Energy and Environment Secretary
    [A "perfect sector" that parasitizes taxpayers? Ooh but there's those wonderful words, "innovation" and "education" - never mind that innovation takes over more human employment every year with consequent reductions in the workforce instead of the work week, and education has become a giant taxpayer-impacting makework campaign to keep young people out of the weakening job market as long as possible. We have this crazy situation of everyone assuming that The Government (=taxpayers) is infinite while the superwealthy, who are actually approaching infinity (more billionaires every year!) are legislating and loopholing themselves out of taxes. But we have sooo many wonderful justifications for transfering money from taxpayers to unlimited CEO pay & perks in the 'private' (LOL) sector, chief among them JOBS, in an economy that has not adjusted its 1940 workweek for rising techological productivity for 71 years and is therefore making it harder and harder for ordinary taxpayers to get and hold a job.]
  • The case for public-sector involvement - An investment in our future, by Dir. Jeremy McDiarmid of Environment Northeast of Mass., 7/24 Boston Globe, G4.
    [Another failure to realize that unless and until America's wealthy get re-involved in practicing and promoting timesizing instead of downsizing, and meanwhile paying World War II levels of graduated income and estate taxes, the public sector across Massachusetts and the nation is effectively bankrupt. Here's a partial rebuttal -]
    The free-market solution - Independence spurs innovation, by Pres. Richard Lord of employers' "union" Assoc'd Industries of Massachusetts, 7/24 Boston Globe, G4.
    ..Real world market forces and the business climate are far more powerful in shaping our economic future than any attempt by government to pick winners among industries... Policy makers love to paint new-economy jobs as immune to high taxes, staggering electricity costs, and bureaucratic regulation. They subsidize the development of innovative "industries of the future" while raising costs for industries of the present - as when they add to our already highest-in-the-nation electricity costs by mandating use of alternative energy sources at far-above-market prices. Then they are shocked when their "new economy" investments are lost to leapfrogging technology and, yes, uncompetitive business costs...
    [We agree with him so far and go further: government should have no involvement in private-business "investments" at all - but then he goes on to contradict himself so we'll stop here.]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • Old-fashioned scams find place in high-tech world, by Mitch Lipka, 7/24 Boston Globe, G3.
    [Sure "technology creates more jobs than it destroys" - lots of opportunity for "earning" a dishonest living while we keep using technology not for timesizing but for downsizing that makes earning an honest living harder and motivates the opposite -]
    ..The Better Business Bureau..compiled a top 10 list of scams that consumers faced in 2010...
    1. Job seekers: Watch out for the lure of a great job, which results in a request for a fee, a bank account #, or Social Security #.
    2. Debt relief: Pay a fee upfront and you’ll be free of debt. More likely, you’ll end up deeper in debt.
    3. Work at home: You’ll either be asked for money or unwittingly become a fence for stolen goods.
    4. Timeshare resales: You pay a fee up front. You’re out that money and still have the timeshare.
    5. “Free’’ trial offers: Sign up for a “free’’ trial, but end up with monthly charges that are hard to stop.
    6. Rogue home repairs & roofers: They collect an upfront fee with the promise of cheap work. That’s the last you’ll see of them.
    7. Lottery/sweepstakes: Be assured that you didn’t win a contest you didn’t enter or have to pay to collect on one you did.
    8. Advance-fee loans: Don’t pay fees in advance for the promise you’ll get something.
    9. Overpayments: You receive a check that’s more than the agreed upon amount for merchandise or a service, and you pay them back the difference. They do it because their check is a fake and your money is real.
    10. Identity theft: Giving personal information to someone who calls or e-mails you is a recipe for disaster.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Unsettling stock swings over the past few weeks reflect deep disagreement among investors about whether it is time to buy or sell, 7/25 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [And reflect unresolved disagreement whether government = regulation is good or bad - which is so easily resolved: You can go for No Regulations (chaos), Any>Many Regulations, or Few Regulations, theoretically just One All-Sufficient Control, so well-designed and centrally positioned that all the rest can be safely dismantled. We've got it down to two essentials: overtime-to-jobs conversion and an unemployment-controlled workweek.]
  • As politicians feud, Main St. feels pinch, by Glen Johnson, 7/24 Boston Globe, B4.
    ..Jumps [in some grocery prices] far exceed the rate of inflation... Kevin Deignan, a..regular grocery shopper, said..."People are afraid... They've cut back on everything..."
  • Lower taxes, bigger government? review by Kevin Lewis of journal article by J.Ura & E.Socker, “The Behavioral Political Economy of Budget Deficits: How Starve the Beast Policies Feed the Machine,” in The Forum: A Journal of Applied Research in Contemporary Politics (July 2011), 7/24 Boston Globe, K12.
    One of the operating assumptions of modern conservatism is that tax cuts help reduce the size of government, because the loss of revenue will eventually compel spending cuts. Although intuitively appealing, this logic has been largely refuted by empirical research, some of which has even shown that taxes and spending move in opposite directions. But it hasn’t been clear why. According to a new analysis of public opinion trends, a good explanation may be “fiscal illusion theory,” whereby lowering the perceived cost of government (i.e., taxes) increases voters’ demand for it. Indeed, budget deficits have been associated with more favorable public opinion towards government. On the other hand, as the authors note, “surplus revenue collection is associated with decreased demand for government.” So if conservatives really want to shrink government, they might be better off letting taxes go up. Kevin Lewis is an Ideas columnist. He can be reached at kevin.lewis.ideas@gmail.com.
  • Looking for an edge in the race against China, 7/24 Boston Globe, G1.
    [We don't need an "edge" in a race to the bottom. We need to toss the misleading masochism of "free trade and replace it with "fair-trade" tariffs that offset the grotesque cheapness of human life and work in grossly overpopulated, life-not-worth-living China. There is still at least 20% unemployment in China, that's over 200 MILLION desperate people that we never hear about, except that I saw a mention recently that it's so bad in the cities that the desperate country people who moved to the cities to get jobs are now moving back to the country - I guess in order at least to get food. If China is the future, most of us would prefer to borrow Japan's harakiri concept to "give a miss" to that kind of future.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Equal Workloads for Husbands and Wives, 7/25 New York Times via parenting.blogs.nytimes.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..According to data just released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, men and women in 2010 who were married, childless and working full time (defined by the bureau as more than 35 hours a week) had combined daily totals of paid and unpaid work...that were almost exactly the same... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So if "full time" is defined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as 35.001 or more hours a week, explain to me again why our economists and media CEOs are spinning the French as radical and lazy for having a nationwide 35-hour workweek instead of 40... could it possibly be envy (economists) or control-freakiness (CEOs)?]
  2. Depleted but not defeated: Precinct 3 constable’s office fighting crime with fewer deputies, 7/25 Houston Community Newspapers via YourHoustonNews.com
    HOUSTON, Tex. - ..“By the men and women working 32 hours a week, 15 people short, they're still catching criminals, still putting people in jail,” the constable said, his remarks applauded again... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And without the shorter workweek, there'd have been even more jobs lost and they'd be even more people short.]
  3. For travel agencies, specialization key to surviving in digital age, 7/25 EastValleyTribune.com
    TEMPE, Ariz. - ..In search of new revenue streams, Sinclair started booking motor coach tours and escorted tour groups abroad. She had to reduce the escorting after the recession forced her to cut hours for her six employees... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Orlando holds line on property tax rate, 7/25 Orlando Sentinel via articles.orlandosentinel.com
    ORLANDO, Fla. - ..Dyer said the city is in good shape because in recent years his administrators eliminated 400 positions, did away with cost of living raises, cut hours at community centers, reduced litter cleanup and eliminated many nonessential services... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Confederation of British Industry sees danger in more workplace red tape, 7/24 Financial Times via ft.com
    LONDON, U.K. - ..The CBI employers’ group says the workplace flexibility that emerged during the recession, in which staff accepted shorter hours to save their jobs, is being endangered by a prescriptive approach to employment law... The CBI, in a joint report with Hays, the recruitment group...said ministers were..introducing policies that reduced flexibility...
    [Governments can easily get focused on a burgeoning maximum of stifling detailed regulations instead of looking for the stable minimum of freeing general regulations, theoretically just one, so well-designed and centrally positioned in the body economic that all others can be safely dismantled. Our best candidate? Timesizing.]
    \but\ welcomed signals from the government on reducing regulation... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The only regulation government needs is to level the playing field in the direction of maximizing consumer spending per capita by converting overtime into training&jobs to stop market deterioration due to employment concentration (workaholism) and then decrementing the workweek to convert more poverty into markets via employment. Indeed, the purpose of employment is to convert poverty into markets.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, July 23, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Saints Medical Center sold to Steward Health Care [for $??], AP via Boston Globe, B5.
    ..Officials [of Steward, no doubt] say the sale to the for-profit hospital chain secures the jobs of Saints' 1,300 employees...
    [Kate: "Good luck with that one!"]
    Steward has recently bought nine Massachusetts hospitals.
    [Yes folks, despite more colleges per square inch than any other state, Massachusetts is every bit as dumb as all the rest.]

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -
  • Impasses lead to shutdown of FAA, Boston Globe, A8.
    WASHINGTON - Efforts to avert a shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration failed yesterday amid a disagreement over a $16.5 million cut in subsidies to 13 rural communities, ensuring that at midnight nearly 4,000 people will be temporarily [any guarantees of that?] out of work and federal airline ticket taxes will be suspended...
    [If it's a day a week or two days a month, it's a good timesizing "furlough," cuz employees keep spending. If it's total joblessness with no end in sight, it's a bad downsizing "layoff," cuz employees go into shock and cut spending as much as possible. It was only alcohol that resolved the Republican "we're crazier than you" tantrum in Minnesota -]
    Drown ideology in beer, editorial, Boston Globe, A10.
    ST. PAUL, Minn. - It wasn't the shuttered state parks that prompted Minnesota’s governor and legislature to resolve a budget impasse. Nor was it the 22,000 furloughed [ie: laid-off-with-no-end-in-sight] state employees or the disruptions in services for the needy and the disabled. In the end, it was all about the beer... - see whole article under today's date.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Debt talks dissolve into acrimony - Boehner walks out; irate Obama summons leaders to talks today [Saturday], Boston Globe, A1.
    'I've been left at the altar now a couple of times.' Pres. Obama
    [Dear Barack - Can you spell e-x-e-c-u-t-i-v-e  p-r-i-v-i-l-e-g-e? JUMP ON IT!]
    'Dealing with the White House is like dealing with a bowl of Jell-O.' House Speaker Boner.
    [Democrat jello is better than Republican Guiana koolaid. A jello a day stops your fingernails from splintering and there's a lot you can do with strong fingernails... - especially when survival is threatened by a nutcase like 'Jonestown' Boehner taking 300m Americans financial hostage and saying "Gimme exackly wud I want or I'll flip da switch on this megamongo financial fountain of Guiana ghoulaid." Hey, Jeff Sachs turned Russia into a gangster economy with his stupid 'shock therapy,' Berlusconi turned Italy into a gangster economy, Greece doesn't look too good, 4-5 bankers tried to "do" Iceland but the Icelanders put their foot down, Chirac and Sarkozy have been trying to "do" France - today's disgrace to the history of the GOP is waving the gangsta-pranksta clubcard over what little Bush left of the once-great USA.]
    Congress departs, mystifying observers - No progress made on deficit, debt limit extension - 'It's completely frustrating that the leadership isn't there.' Lew Finfer, Dir., Mass.Communities Action Network, Boston Globe, A7.
    [On the other hand, maybe the berserk GOP will lighten up if they get some distance/perspective and have a few beers - it's evidently the beer that did it for the GOP/gopglop in Minnesota - see d(r)ownsizing story above, "Drown ideology in beer".]
  • Myra Kraft remembered for philanthropy, empathy, Boston Globe, B1.
    [The problem with philanthropists is that they're in a position to be philanthropists in the first place. All the modern economies have inadequate systemic money centrifuges - Europe's is less inadequate than the rest. But any system that relies for vital functions (like $centrifugation) on charity is lethally flawed. Timesizing replaces charity with a perceived labor shortage cum job surplus to harness market forces in raising employment and wages and consumer spending. (Domestic consumer spending is still being quoted as "70% of the economy" but weakening so fast, that must be overly generous or correct only cuz the whole system's shrinking.) ]
  • Last of the moguls, caption on photo of Rupert Murdoch, The Economist Magazine of London, cover.
    [We wish! But as Big J might have said, "The rich you have always with you." There's always a bunch of simple-minded clowns that just want MORE of something that can hurt other people.]
  • Greek deal done, money woes linger - Some fear bailout may hurt Europe, Boston Globe, B6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. New Kensington-Arnold school staffing changes in works, Tarentum Valley News Dispatch via pittsburghlive.com
    NEW KENSINGTON, Pa. - ..Although no one would lose a job in the proposed realignment, Orr and union President Steve Taylor said three other employees' hours would be reduced... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Keller school district plans to rehire 25 teachers, Fort Worth Star Telegram via star-telegram.com
    KELLER, Tex. -- ..The most expensive item returned to the budget is the three workdays for employees. Had teachers, librarians, counselors, nurses and speech pathologists been furloughed for three days, the district would have saved $1.8 million. All administrators and support staff members will still have three days of unpaid leave, saving the district $346,000... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Details released for SEIU tentative contract agreement with Oregon, StatesmanJournal.com
    OLYMPIA, Wash.State - ..SEIU also did slightly better on unpaid furlough days. Its workers will have to take either 10, 12 or 14 furlough days over the 2011-2013 biennium, depending on their pay level. AFSCME workers will take either 12 or 14 mandatory unpaid days off... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Higher population count helps Somerton's budget, YumaSun.com
    SOMERTON, Ariz. - ..Somerton's population jumped from 7,266 in 2000 to 14,287 in 2010, according to last year's census, and that means the city gets a larger slice of state and federal funds... That means more money for street work and an end to monthly furloughs of city employees... As part of cutbacks a year ago, the city began requiring each of its employees to one day off on furlough a month... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • No red carpet for Walmart market - Grocery store faces obstacles in Somerville, Boston Globe, B5.
    [Keep cancer-corp. Walmart OUT of Somerville, Mass.! - we need our small businesses.]



    Friday, July 22, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Express Scripts buying Medco for $29.1B, looking to limit costs, Boston Globe, B8.
  • Athenahealth [of Watertown MA] buys care services firm [Proxsys of Birmingham AL for $28m+$8m], Boston Globe, B8.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Uncertainties over US aid vex students, Boston Globe, A1.
    [Education = 'realm 3' of modern American makework.]
  • Region [New England] awash in new wave of niche breweries, Boston Globe, A1.
    [More desperate private-sector makework, cf. self-employment with no markets.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Judge OK's Borders liquidation, Boston Globe, B8.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Key Index [of Leading US Indicators] points to weakened expansion, Boston Globe, B11.
  • For now, [holding-at-7.9% Massachusetts'] job picture still brighter than nation's [9.2% jobless], Boston Globe, B7.
  • Back-to-school spending apt to be flat in '11 - Higher costs put focus on essentials, Boston Globe, B9.
  • More using credit to pay for basics, Bloomberg News via Boston Globe, B8.
    [RIP America.]
  • The Federal Aviation Administration would be forced to shut down at midnight, halting jobs and collection of tax revenues, unless Congress [ie: the tantrum-throwing, hate-filled, America-destroying, has-been Republican Party] agrees to extend the FAA's operating authority, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A10.
  • BJ's executives in line for big payouts if fired, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    [More "free" market incentives for self-destruction in the luddite. workaholic capitalism of the moment (hopefully short).]
  • EU leaders forge Greek bailout plan - Deal could cause limited default, Boston Globe, B8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Views on the news: NHS, final space shuttle flight and Greek debt - Readers tell us why this should be the final frontier for the space shuttle and what competition for NHS services could really mean, The Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    MANCHESTER, England - ..German siestas - Whether to take a nap in the working day was a divisive issue amongst commenters, raised by news that German unions are calling for lunchtime siestas... Germanlady, a shop steward, also supports the idea saying that workloads have increased with companies not wanting to pay the cost of taking on more staff: "The utmost concern is now, how to keep the existing workforce healthy, so they can actually work until 67. The 35 hour week is likely to have to go and the workload on the individual has increased sharply after the crisis."... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Guess this means that in Deutschland, as with US Social Security age, retirement age has been pushed back to 67.]
  2. Ramadan can be a great experience for everyone here, The National via thenational.ae
    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates - ..While many non-Muslim expats will enjoy the privilege of shorter working hours without abstaining from food or drinks, there are certain issues new expat residents in the country should be aware of, to avoid sensitivities with their Muslim co-workers and business partners... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, July 21, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - headlines in Cambridge, Mass. provided by Porter Sq. Books and Tisch Library, Tufts University, Medford -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • AMAG Pharma & Colo. firm [Allos Therapeutics] agree to merge, Boston Globe, B8.
  • LogMeIn acquires a British net service [Pachube, for $15 million], Boston Globe, B10.

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -
  • Layoffs deepen gloom, by Conor Dougherty, Wall St Journal, A1.
    Companies are laying off employees at a level not seen in nearly a year, hobbling the job market and intensifying fears about the pace of the economic recovery.
    [Recovery? What recovery? Why is our overpaid, lethally flawed economics profession making the same mistake they did all through the Great Depression when they claimed "recovery is right around the corner" every week starting in 1929 despite their later decision that it didn't end until 1941? Why aren't they jumping ahead to the more valid criteria of the future and facing the fact that there are absolutely no fundamentals in place for a recovery and in fact, the foundational consumer base of our economy is still being by mass layoffs alias downsizing? - and you don't get recovery - which would mean UPsizing - out of DOWNsizing. Their policies have failed. Why don't they come clean and just admit it so we can move on? They need something more basic and obvious, however counter-intuitive it may be to their current, failed "prevailing wisdom." They need worktime economics, despite their attempts to reject or ignore it for nearly 200 years.]
    Cisco Systems Inc., Lockheed Martin Corp. and troubled bookstore chain Borders Group Inc. are among those that have recently announced hefty cuts, while recent government numbers underscore how companies have shifted toward cutting jobs. The increase in layoffs is a key reason why the U.S. recorded an average of only 21,500 new jobs over the past two months, far below the level needed to bring down unemployment, which now stands at 9.2%...
  • Springfield-based Baystate Health will eliminate 354 jobs [3.5%].., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B7
    ..as cuts in Medicaid propel a budget shortfall that is projected to reach $25 million.
    [The deterioration of government makework in America continues, and the only alternatives are:
    (A) war (the "conservatives'" makework program) - but today's wars are either too robotized, too small or too suicidally nuclear.
    (B) plague - but today's medicine is too good - plagues just aren't effective at creating that magic labor shortage any more.
    (C) longer education(#3) & earlier retirement (worklife reduction, not workweek reduction) - but who can afford these any more?
    (D) workweek reduction and overtime-to-jobs conversion.]
  • Fidelity Investments plans to move 80 to 100 jobs from its Boston offices to Texas and New Hampshire.., Boston Globe, A1 pointer to B7.
    ..by the end of 2012, continuing a spreading out of operations.
    [Hey, didn't Massachusetts taxpayers give Ned and Abby Johnson, heads of Fidelity, tax breaks a few years ago cuz they were threatening to take jobs out of Mass. unless we gave them this kind of candy?  Of course, our dumb legislators had absolutely no enforcement mechanism in mind... So maybe, if the Johnsons like dessert so much....]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Debt fight [in US] drags down stocks, despite good news [about yesterday's Dow..],
    Boston Globe, B10.
  • A jobs pinch for the ages - As older workers stay in place, younger aspirants struggle to break in, Boston Globe, A1.
    'There are many people who continue to work into their 80s.... I want to work as long as I'm physically able.' Roxane Larouche, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center [aide?] (photo caption)
    'Not only was there nothing available, but I've gone through a ton of personal contacts and nobody could come up with anything. It's really bad right now.' Andrea Mazzarelli, Holy Cross graduate in search of a marketing job (photo caption)
    [All the more reason for resuming the 1840-1940 reduction of the workweek, and "retiring" every long weekend to maintain full employment and maximum consumer spending regardless of "jobs pinch," with no ageism or forced uselessness on either end of our lifespan. Probable result? Much longer lives, with less waste of talent trapped in We-Knowitall–You-Knownothing universities at the front end and less waste of experience and perspective at the back end.]
  • June home sales continue slump; weakest in 14 years - Fewer new buyers, low appraisals hurting market,
    Boston Globe, B11.
  • Bonuses for billionaires - You know, I think the Republicans may be on to something, op ed by Nicholas Kristof, New York Times, A23.
    [This is a wonderful sendup by Kristof - basically, why wait for gradual economic deterioration and slow starvation? Why not just give all our money, all 100% of the money supply to the richest (and stupidest) 30,000 Americans - they're trying to get it all anyway, with no clue about the best allocation between spending power and investing power, thereby sacrificing functionality for symbolism (pecking order) without no concerns, lalala, for anything else. They live in a thick bubble and only relate to people as rich as themselves. THEY are The Problem and until they get behind the easiest and most accessible and most market-oriented kind of sharing (worksharing and timesizing), they are building up anger and fury and rage against themselves. Not at all smart. Check out the history of the French Revolution.]
    The first few times I heard House Republicans talk about our budget mess, I worried that they had plunged off the deep end. But as I kept on listening, a buzzer went off in my mind, and I came to understand how much sense the Tea Party caucus makes.
    Why would we impose “job-crushing taxes” on wealthy Americans just to pay for luxuries like federal prisons? Why end the “carried interest” tax loophole for financiers, just to pay for unemployment benefits — especially when those same selfless tycoons are buying yachts and thus creating jobs for all the rest of us?
    Hmmm. The truth is that House Republicans don’t actually go far enough. They should follow the logic of their more visionary members with steps like these:
    BONUSES FOR BILLIONAIRES Republicans won’t extend unemployment benefits, even in the worst downturn in 70 years, because that makes people lazy about finding jobs. They’re right: We should be creating incentives for Americans to rise up the food chain by sending hefty checks to every new billionaire. This could be paid for with a tax surcharge on regular working folks. It’s the least we can do.
    Likewise, the government should take sterner measures against the persistent jobless. Don’t just let their unemployment benefits expire. Take their homes!
    Oh, never mind! Silly me! The banks are already doing that.
    LET JOBS TRICKLE DOWN Leftist pundits say that House Republicans don’t have a jobs plan. That’s unfair! Granted, the Republican-sponsored Cut, Cap and Balance Act would eliminate 700,000 jobs in just its first year, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, but those analysts are no doubt liberals. America’s richest 400 people own more wealth than the bottom 150 million Americans, and the affluent would feel renewed confidence if the Republican plan passed. We’d see a hiring bonanza. Each of those wealthy people might hire an extra pool attendant. That’s 400 jobs right there!
    Cut, Cap and Balance would go even further than the Ryan budget plan in starving the beast of government. Sure, that’ll mean cuts in Social Security, Medicare and other programs, but so what? Who needs food safety? How do we know we really need air traffic control unless we try a day without it?
    ROOT OUT SOCIALISM Republicans have been working to end Medicare as we know it but need to examine other reckless entitlements, such as our socialized education system, in which public schools fritter resources on classes like economics and foreign languages. As a former Texas governor, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson, is said to have declared when she opposed the teaching of foreign languages: “If English was good enough for Jesus Christ, it’s good enough for us.”
    For that matter, who needs socialized police and fire services? We could slash job-crushing taxes at the local level and simply let the free market take over:
    “9-1-1, may I help you?” “Yes, help! My house is burning down!” “Very good, sir. I can offer you one fire engine for $5,995, or two for just $10,000.” “Help! My family’s inside. Send three fire engines! Just hurry!” “Yes, sir. Let me just run your credit card first. And if you require the fire trucks immediately, there’s a 50 percent ‘rush’ surcharge.”
    CHILL OUT ABOUT THE DEBT CEILING House Republicans like Michele Bachmann are right: If the debt ceiling isn’t raised, some solution will turn up. As Representative Austin Scott, a Republican from Georgia, observes: “In the end, the sun is going to come up tomorrow.”
    We got through the Great Depression, didn’t we? It looked pretty hopeless in 1929, but in just a dozen years World War II bailed us out with an economic stimulus. Something like that’ll come along for us, too. Ya gotta have faith.
    CONSIDER ASSET SALES While Democrats are harrumphing about “default,” Republicans have sagely noted that there are alternatives in front of our noses. For example, why raise taxes on hard-pressed managers of hedge funds when the government can sell assets?
    Fort Knox alone has 4,600 tons of gold, which I figure is worth around $235 billion. That’s enough to pay our military budget for four months! And selling Yosemite, Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon would buy us time as well.
    RENT OUT CONGRESS If the debt ceiling isn’t raised, we could also auction members of Congress for day jobs: Are you a financier who wants someone to flip burgers (steaks?) at your child’s birthday party? Why, here’s Eric Cantor! Many members of Congress already work on behalf of tycoons, and this way the revenue would flow to the Treasury.
    Finally, if we risk default, let’s rent out the Capitol for weddings to raise money for the public good. Wouldn’t it be nice to see something positive emerge from the House?
    [Amen! Now, how else can wealthy Republicans destroy the foundations of everything they've built? Nicholas Kristof is moving into the Gail Collins–Maureen Dowd–Paul Krugman zone. Laugh or go nuts! (Hey *Dmitry, what stage have we reached?)]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. U.S. July Philadelphia Business Outlook Report (Text), Bloomberg.com
    PHILADELPHIA, Penn., U.S.A. - ..Firms indicated that employment grew modestly while the average workweek lessened. Indexes for prices show a continuing trend of moderating price pressures... About 22% of the firms reported an increase in employment, up slightly from 14% last month. Slightly more firms reported a shorter workweek (21%) than re-ported a longer one (15%) and the workweek index was down 7 points... - see whole article under today's date.
    [There you have it, by market forces alone: less workweek per person, more persons employed and spending. This directly contradicts the spinning of France's shorter workweek as a failure (they had to manipulate the data window to do that) and the whole dismissal of worksharing as a "failed approach" by mainstream economists like the now-retired Lester Thurow. How often in history the "professionals" block progress because their "science" needs a "revolution"! - see Thomas Kuhn's "Theory of Scientific Revolutions."]
  2. Proposed cuts would devastate Toronto Public Library, CNW Group (press release) via newswire.ca
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ..A KPMG report released earlier today suggests the City close library branches, cut hours of operation, and slash programs for children and immigrants... "If the KPMG consultant who came up with these ideas was CEO of Tim Horton's [famed Canusky donut chain], he would be fired for closing outlets and reducing hours, measures that would cut into sales and profits..," said Maureen O'Reilly, President of the 2,400-member union... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Oh no, don't tell me my hometown is getting just as suicidally stupid as Americans! Why do they keep hiring these failed advisors who have presided over the collapse of North American living standards over the past 40 years and are like jackasses who know nothing but how to kick down their own stable? Dopey Schumpeter's "creative destruction" was creative only in the sense of requiring a new start out of nothing. Where are the old-fashioned real conservatives who knew when to label ideas "radical"? We've got more crazy self-whacking ideas regarded as serious proposals today than anything since the Trojans said, "Gee, what a nice big toy horse the Greeks have made for us! Let's pull it inside the walls!"]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, July 20, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -

  • Death more likely than losing federal job, USA Today, 1A pointer to 3A.
    [Oh yeah? -]
    U.S. to close 800 computer data centers, by Steve Lohr, New York Times, B1
    ..40% of its computer centers over the next four years. ..Analysts estimate that tens of thousands of jobs will most likely be eliminated...
  • Colleges get creative to cut costs - Budget-conscious schools dump trash pickup, phone lines, [swimming] pools,
    NYT, 1A.
    ..With funding down and enrolment up...
    [They can't get enrolment to fund them? Time to cut the presidents' salaries.]
    ..State support per student hit a 25-year low last year...
    [Yasee, that's the trouble with government makework, or in this case delaywork = too little, too late, too vulnerable to the tax tantrums of the rich. It's sharework or bust!]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • One chapter closes...- Passing of Borders [bookstore chain] is serious drain for readers, authors and publishers, WSJ, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • HSBC is cutting ties with wealthy American clients who bank offshore as U.S. authorities seek information about account holders who may be evading taxes, Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Probably sooner rather than later, the USA will have to strip citizenship from wealthy Americans who bank offshore to evade taxes, so that "where their treasure is, there their {citizenship} is also." It's just a game with them. But it's system breakdown for everyone else.]
  • Spain's debt costs rise as anxiety grows over European banks, New York Times, B1 pointer to B3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Residents taking LV workweek in stride, Las Vegas Review-Journal via lvrj.com
    LAS VEGAS, U.S.A. - ..To avoid layoffs and save money, members of the Las Vegas City Employees Association, the largest of the four city unions, agreed to a 5% pay cut and moved to a schedule of four 9.5-hour days [a 38-hour week], with City Hall and some other buildings closed on Fridays... The shorter work week..saves $5m a year...translating into an 8% drop in energy costs as well... Employees generally like the new schedule, even though it comes with a pay cut, said Don King, [LVCEA] president. "I think the majority...would want to stay on the 4-day work schedule," he said. "We had some people grumble when they first went on it, but once they adjusted, they loved it." Four-day schedules were previously adopted in North Las Vegas and Henderson, and like other businesses and government agencies that have switched, they've proved popular and even efficient... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Royal Oak city workers union takes immediate pay cut, Royal Oak Daily Tribune via dailytribune.com
    ROYAL OAK, Calif., USA — ..The members also will return to a 40-hour work week after a year of four-day, 36-hour weeks to help the city save money. The shorter work week cut payroll costs... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If the unions could think two moves ahead in chess with the kind of strategic thinking their great-grandparents did, they'd be leading the charge for shorter hours for eveyone (and without effort, getting fuller employment and scarcer jobseekers and higher market-determined wages) but many unions are still fighting first or solely for higher pay and other toxic baubles instead of marshaling their last resources on their one huge power issue, which coincides with the single most problem-solving regulation that governments can implement - shorter hours.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, July 19, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Thermo Fisher buys lab-tests maker [TREK Diagnostic Systems for $??],
    Boston Globe, B6.
  • Atty.Gen. presses utilities on rate freeze [for 5 years - Martha] Coakley will back merger [of NStar with CT-based Northeast Utilities], but only if consumers are protected from cost, Boston Globe, B5.
    [And who or what is going to enforce the freeze, Martha? - and what happens after five years?]

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -
  • Cisco increases job cuts to 6,500 [from yesterday's announced 4,400], by Rachel Metz, AP via Boston Globe, B7.
    SAN FRANCISCO - ..6,500 [is] about 9% of the networking equipment maker's workforce - as it follows up on a plan announced in May..to reducee costs [and consumer markets] and raise profits [and risk of bankruptcy].
    [What's that you were saying about "technology creates more jobs than it destroys"? SHOW US the jobs.]
    Cisco, which has about 73,400 employees worldwide [but not for long], said yesterday that it was laying off 4,400 people. Another 2,100 employees chose to leave as part of an early-retirement program...
    [The early severance packages are better than the later ones as a company alarms and deproductivitizes its workforce, and starts its decline.]
    ..The cuts will cost..$1.3 billion in severance and termination benefits...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Treasurer says patronage hires at liquor agency to get 'fair shot', by Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, B9.
    Massachusetts Treasurer Steven Grossman said he has no plans to fire patronage hires at the state liquor control agency - as long as they perform their job satisfactorily. Grossman, responding to revelations by the Globe that the agency [had] defended a discrimination complaint by claiming it had to hire relatives of state legislators or lose funding for the positions, vowed future employees at the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission would be hired solely on merit.
    [Yeah sure.]
    But the treasurer, who took office six months ago and oversees the agency, said he would give all 23 current employees the opportunity to prove themselves. He said he didn't know how many were patronage hires and had no plans to try to find out...

    HOMELESSNESS in North America (archives)- sooo unnecessary with full employment via timesizing -
  • Homeless man [with criminal record, James Randolph] charged in stabbing [of name-withheld Mattapan man in Chinatown], Boston Globe, B2.

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • Prison costs [in Canada] going through the roof - Up 86% since Tories took over and likely to continue, report says, Ottawa Citizen, A3.
    [So Canadian "conservatives" are just as stupid as American? = locking everyone into a less and less sustainable workers-drones ~ parasite&host situation rather than making it easier for everyone to earn an honest living.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Deliberations on [US] debt limit are diverting attention, Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A6.
    ..from most other matters in the capital, from job creation to the [makework] conflict in Libya, from [delaywork] education to [makework] polical stumping.
    If you fear the US will default on its debt, [still,] don't ditch your long-term plan,
    by Dave Carpenter, Boston Globe, B8.
  • European debt fears hit markets - 24 of 90 banks fail or barely pass fiscal 'stress tests',
    Boston Globe, B7.
  • Debt worries spur clamour for gold,
    Ottawa Citizen, D5.
  • Mitt Romney, a critic of high foreclosure rates, has relied on a fund-raiser [Martin Fiortino] who lobbied on behalf of a company that drew a government reprimand for its foreclosure practices ['foreclosure mill' Lender Processing Services], Boston Globe, A1 pointer to A8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. RMT rejects London Underground pay offer, sQuidcard.com
    LONDON, England - ..In addition, the union has expressed desire for a short-time deal, providing shorter working hours for members of staff as well as a flat-rate pay rise for select employees... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Doctors given say on unsafe work hours, The West Australian newspaper via au.news.yahoo.com/thewest
    PERTH, Western Australia (WA) - ..A national survey of more than 550 hospital-based doctors in 2006 found most had work hours and patterns that posed unsafe risks of fatigue, with 62% of doctors in the "significant risk" and "higher risk" categories... The Australian Medical Assoc. WA said...it was well-established that tired doctors were more likely to make medical errors and be involved in accidents during their everyday lives... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway (even for doctors & truck drivers), but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon, July 17-18, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today Terrasses de la Chaudière on l'Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC -
    - headlines in Ottawa provided by Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown Mkt, and Mags & Fags, on Elgin St -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -

  • San Francisco to shutter courtrooms, lay off 200, by Paul Elias, 7/18 The Associated Press via google.com/hostednews/ap
    The San Francisco Superior Court announced Monday that it's laying off more than 40% of its staff and shuttering 25 courtrooms because of budget cuts...

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • Locking up the young - Canada's youngest criminals are receptive to rehabilitation, but likely to reoffend after prison - [Therefore high] youth incarceration rate.., 7/18 Toronto Globe, A1.
  • Ottawa's bicycle thieves keep busy in downtown Ottawa, 7/18 Ottawa Metro, p.3.
    [Besides the swarms of beggars in downtown Ottawa, today we hit a new record in Hull: (1) Awaiting the #33 bus outside a little pharmacy in Hull, a middle-aged woman with a speech impediment burst out of the pharmacy and practically demanded money to buy her medications. (2) Awaiting ANY bus in front of the Vincent Massey Bldg, we were asked to phone a taxi by a black mother with a sleeping 4(?)-year-old & a stroller who didn't want to take the bus because it didn't stop "right in front" of her house. (3) After that, two 12(?)-year-old girls came up and asked for 40 cents so they could get on the bus (they managed to get on the bus anyway). This nation's capital region is getting pathetic - it seems to be a hobby with more and more people to ask strangers for money just in case they happen to be among the must-be-many-many patsies in this town.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • U.S. looks at fallback option of debt talks,
    7/18. Ottawa Sun, 8.
    U.S. must defuse $14-trillion time bomb, op ed by Monte Solberg, 7/18 Ottawa Sun, 15.
    ..Last month, Alberta's job growth alone outstripped that of the entire U.S...
    [Alberta being only one of Canada's ten provinces but the one with the most oil at the moment.]
  • 2nd loans, 2nd wave of losses [for big banks],
    7/17 NYT, page Bu1.
  • Law school economics: Ka-ching! - Though few jobs await graduates, tuition soars and enrolment grows,
    7/17 New York Times, Bu1.
  • How we survived a lay-off and 35% pay cut, 7/18 Toronto Star, B1.
    [Good start! - stay tuned for worse.]
  • Amid global economic storm, Carney [Canada's central bank chief] faces growing dilemma, 7/18 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [- whether to raise rates and squelch supposed recovery and imaginary inflation.]
  • When fiscal responsibility offers no guarantees, 7/18 Toronto Globe, B2.
    [It does in combination with economy-level quarantine, population sanity, and timesizing to maximize employment, consumer spending, marketable productivity and sustainable investment - however short a workweek it requires (smooth overtime-to-jobs conversion is also useful).]
  • Murdoch's pernicious influence on journalism - Hacking scandal through the prism of Watergate,
    7/17 NYT, In1.
  • Tabloid taint rubs off on a cozy Scotland Yard - Tied closely to Murdoch empire, police shared goal of containing hacking case, 7/17 NYT, In1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Sen. proposes work-sharing program meant to save jobs, 7/18 AthensNEWS.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. - ..Brown cited federal estimates that in 2009, STC programs in various states helped retain some 165,000 American jobs; in Germany, he said, where work-sharing is well-established, the estimated number of jobs saved in recent years is around 400,000... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Heatstroke deaths quadruple as nation shuns air conditioners, 7/17 (7/18 over dateline) Bloomberg via The Japan Times via search.japantimes.co.jp
    TOKYO, Japan - ..Supervisors at construction sites and factories should raise heatstroke awareness and have workers drink water and take salt even if they show no symptoms, the health ministry said on May 31. Farmers should work shorter hours, the agriculture ministry said... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, July 16, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC -
    - headlines in Ottawa provided by Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown Mkt, and Mags & Fags, on Elgin St -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The debt crisis - If [U.S.] Treasury bonds aren't safe, what is? Wall Street Journal, B1.
    [German Treasury bonds?]
    Playing chicken - Republicans stuck on debt fight? [or] - Maybe not,
    National Post, FP1 pointer to FP6 or FP19.
    Fallback moving to fore as talks on budget stall - Obama signals support - Claiming public's on his side, President still urges 'big deal', New York Times, A1.
    [Bam don't know howta take off da gloves!]
  • Dow Jones CEO resigns over scandal, WSJ, A1.
    ..Les Hinton, as the top executive at News Corp.'s financial publishing unit..sought to contain the damage from the company's British tabloid scandal, which began when he oversaw the company's U.K. newspaper operations...
  • The U.S. told Credit Suisse it is a target of a criminal investigation into how Swiss financial institutions allegedly helped U.S. citizens avoid paying income tax, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
  • As a watchdog starves, Wall Street is tossed a bone, by James B. Stewart, NYT, A1.
    The economy is still suffering from the worst financial crisis since the Depression, and wide-spread anger persists that financial institutions that caused it received bailouts of billions of taxpayer dollars and haven't been held accountable for any wrongdoing. Yet the House Appropriations Committee has responded by starving the agency responsible for bringing financial wrongdoers to justice - while putting over $200 million that could otherwise have been spent on investigations banks into the pockets of Wall Street. A few weeks ago, the Republican-controlled appropriations committee cut the Security and Exchange Commission's fiscal 2012 budget request by $222.5 million, to $1.19 billion (the same as this year's), even though the SEC's responsibilities were vastly expanded under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act...
  • Few banks fail EU exams - After only eight of 90 lenders flunk, skeptics question rigor of 'stress tests', WSJ, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Cuomo and PEF reach contract deal w/ furloughs, Albany Times Union (blog) via blog.timesunion.com
    ALBANY, N.Y., U.S.A. - ..Under the agreement, PEF’s members will be furloughed for nine days: five in this fiscal year, and four in the next fiscal year. There will be no base pay increases for the first three years of the five-year contract, with two percent raises given in years four and five. Jobs will be protected for the life of the five-year deal... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. 32-hour work week would be beneficial, NewsOK.com
    OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., U.S.A. - ..Many Americans are working long hours while an increasingly larger number are on the government dole with nothing to do. Yet I've heard little discussion about a shorter workweek. A 32-hour workweek would result in lower unemployment and significantly reduce social welfare expenditures. This appears to be a better approach than having the employed work harder to support those who aren't working at all. - see whole article under today's date.
  3. He quits journalism to sell you tiao, (7/17 over dateline) TheBorneoPost.com
    KUCHING, Borneo - ..However, he admitted working as a reporter was the best experience he ever had – with the shorter hours, off days, paid sick leave, annual salary increment, helpful colleagues as well as the opportunity to meet different people everyday... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, July 15, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - updating today from Café Corsé, 152 rue Montcalm on l'Îsle de Hull, Gatineau, QUÉBEC -
    - headlines in Ottawa provided by Globe News & Cigars, 57 William in Bytown Mkt, and Mags & Fags, on Elgin St -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -

  • Credit Suisse plans to cut 3% of its work force, 500 in its private-banking unit, Wall Street Journal, C1 pointer to C3.

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Deep cuts, clawbacks hit Nortel pensioners, Toronto Star, A1.
    [Uh, "clawbacks" is appropriate in the context of people who can fight back, like the big bankers; not in the context of people who can't, like pensioners.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Stocks fall as Bernanke sinks stimulus hopes, Wall Street Journal, C6.
    [Like the "stimulus" didn't sink stimulus hopes by itself? Oh, guess it means more money for the rich. More incentives for the hyperincentived. Guess Bernanke has his hands full covering up how much "incentive" he's already given them.]
    ..Dow industrials..shedding 54.49 points, or 0.4%, to 12437.12..\..their lowest July close...
  • Jittery investors drive gold to record, Toronto Globe, B1.
    ..reached $1,594.90 in New York before settling back...
  • Behind battle over debt, a war over government - Deal elusive as two parties cling to principles in dispute about Washington's role, New York Times, A1.
    [How is it that the NYT is still treating the parties as equally sane when the GOP's buddies in big banking would be bankrupt if it weren't for government yet they still want to destroy government? They're suicidal maniacs. At least Krugman has it right -]
  • Getting to crazy - How the GOP lost its mind, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A21.
    ..A number of commentators seem shocked at how unreasonable Republicans are being. “Has the G.O.P. gone insane?” they ask. Why, yes, it has. But this isn’t something that just happened, it’s the culmination of a process that has been going on for decades. Anyone surprised by the extremism and irresponsibility now on display either hasn’t been paying attention, or has been deliberately turning a blind eye... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. U.S. July Empire State Manufacturing Index, Bloomberg.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y., U.S.A. - ..The index for number of employees fell to a level near zero, indicating that employment levels held steady, while the average workweek index dropped well into negative territory... The index for number of employees fell nine points to 1.1, indicating that employment levels held steady [huh??], while the average workweek index declined to -15.6, indicating that the length of the average workweek was shorter... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So the average workweek sinks while those who still have full-time jobs monopolize megahours of the planet's fastest vanishing natural resource, market-demanded human employment -]
  2. LA Noire lead programmer defends Team Bondi, admits development hardship, Gamasutra via Joystiq.com
    SYDNEY, Australia - ..Team Bondi has caught a lot of flack from ex-staffers recently about unfair work hours in the final weeks of LA Noire development. Lead gameplay programmer Dave Heironymus recently defended the company to the IGDA in a letter republished by Gamasutra... Heironymus also downplayed the 100-hour weeks that some staffers have claimed... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Then there's the horrors in American "healing" -]
  3. UC Davis researchers find work hours vary widely by physician specialty, could expand gap in access to primary care, HealthCanal.com
    SACRAMENTO, Calif., U.S.A. — ..More than 25 work hours per week separated the most time-consuming specialty of vascular surgery and the least time consuming of pediatric emergency medicine... Mean annual hours worked was 2,524, or just over 50 hours per week during a 50-week year... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Then there's slave labor on shorter hours for young people under the cover-term "internship" -]
  4. Interning in a down economy, St.Louis Post Despatch via STLtoday.com
    ST.LOUIS, Mo., U.S.A. -- For the past month, Liz Renner has spent 32 hours a week interning at Housing and Community Solutions Inc... And she does it without pay... She's among the large percentage of interns today who work for free in an economy where entry-level work has become increasingly hard to secure. ..Anecdotal evidence would suggest that employers are increasingly taking advantage of the tight labor market to secure free intern labor... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Still believe that pay depends on hours worked and not pure supply and demand? Labor is a commodity. If it's rare, its price goes up. If it's common, it's price goes down. Today labor is as common as dirt and as cheap as dirt. Capitalism runs worse and worse on a deepening labor surplus + job shortage, better and better on a rising labor shortage + job surplus. How to get that prosperity-creating labor shortage without war or plague? Cut the workweek.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Thursday, July 14, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Ajax Partners and two of its big clients a-greed to acquire health-care company Kinetic Concepts in a deal valued at $6.38 billion, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Dire warning by Fed's chief on debt talks, New York Times, A1.
    [Bernanke? Didn't he just stand by or help it along as the problem was developing? Is he now championing the obvious solution, tax the rich to pay themselves back cuz they're the only ones with that kind of money? No. He's a coward. The name of his game, as a certified Fox in the Henhouse, has been COVERUP - same as Geithner in the Treasury.  Bill Black, who played a major role in the cleanup of the Savings&Loan crisis of the early 1990s thinks they should both be behind bars - but here they are, still in power, coveringup for all their ittybitty tiny peabrains are worth.]
  • Raters put U.S. on notice - Moody's, S&P sound alarms on debt; President Obama walks out of talks, WSJ, A1.
    [Yeah, but only because today's Republicans have become totally suicidally CRAZY (see tomorrow's Krugman op-ed in the NYT) = "Jonestown Republicans" passing out Guiana cocktails - Lincoln would vomit on them - they're a disgrace to intelligent life (if any) in this quadrant of the galaxy.]
  • The European Union's banking "stress tests" are facing an eleventh-hour scramble, with regulators, politicians and bankers jostling over the details, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Euro-zone politicians, deadlocked for months over providing more aid for Greece, are trying furiously to stomp out the flames of contagion licking at Italy and Spain, WSJ, A1 pointer to A12.
    [The Europeans have still not accepted the obvious = the only solution to contagion is quarantine. And they don't need as big a euro-zone now that the once-great USA is committing suicide by dawdling on worksharing and cliff-hanging on government creditability.]
  • Utility [American Electric Power] shelves plan to capture carbon monoxide - Blow to climate effort - Congressional inaction limited incentive for ambitious project, New York Times, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Sen. Brown's 'work-sharing' bill submitted, ToledoBlade.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. - US Senator Sherrod Brown Wednesday said he is co-sponsoring legislation that would allow employers who reduce their payrolls to do so through "work-sharing" rather than mass layoffs. Mr. Brown, a Democrat, told reporters Wednesday that..the Layoff Prevention Act is a partial solution to the sluggish rebound of the economy following the recession... Scott Blue, plant manager of Kenworth Truck Co. in Chillicothe OH, applauded the proposed legislation. He said Kenworth was able to retain orders at sister plants in states with the short-term compensation policy while competitors had to forgo orders because they had made layoff decisions... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Layoff Employee or Reduce Work Hours? Brown's Bill Would Give Business Flexibility, Youngstown Business Journal via business-journal.com
    YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio -- .."There are two ways basic ways to increase employment: increasing output, thereby increasing demand for labor, or -- less preferably but not unimportantly -- dividing up the existing work among more workers," Brown, D-Ohio, told reporters during a conference call... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["He's a true believer in the Fixed Lump of Labor Fallacy" (LOLF), shriek the superficial thinkers, meaning a large number of mainstream economists - "Everyone knows there's an infinite amount of work to be done!" But in what timeframe? - they never specify, so we're left to assume "sooner or later" or infinity. Well, Brown and other worksharers are not talking about "sooner or later" or infinity but NOW, when work (not "labor"!) is neither growing nor fixed but shrinking. And even if it were infinite, there isn't an infinite willingness or ability to pay for it, so it's hobby, not work. Every nitwit economist who parrots this LOLF sneer should get laid off so he has the opportunity to see for himself just how "infinite" work is these days.]
  3. The Case for Working Less - Why recent bad economic news means it's time to change how we work, by Juliet Schor, X-Ray Issue 28 via xraymagazine.ca ("nice catch" credit to Jane Gibson of Ottawa)
    BOSTON, Mass., U.S.A. - ..Austerity economics says we can't afford to work less. A serious reading of our economic history suggests we can't afford not to. - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Wednesday, July 13, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Deficit-cutting talks stalled as positions hardened.., WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Wall-Street prozac-talk for USA-bankruptcy-avoidance talks stalled.]
  • The U.S. notched its widest trade gap in over 2 1/2 years in May..,
    Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
  • Vital signs - The competition for jobs remains fierce, WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    [Wall-Street valium-speak for "is getting fiercer."]
    For each U.S. job opening at the end of May, there were 4.7 people looking for work, according to Labor Dept. figures. That is down from a year earlier [but only because more people have quit looking and turned to disability, welfare, less-policed crime, homelessness, clientless self-"employment" and suicide], when there were more than 5 job seekers for every opening. But throughout 2007 [before the crisis] there were fewer than 2 unemployed people [ie: active jobseekers] per job opening.
    [The Wall Street Journal and other media are sooo sloppy with language, ya hafta be a linguist to catch them up - here we see the ridiculous exclusion of unemployed people who have become too discouraged to continue an "active job search" - to whitewash the disastrous timeblind records of incumbent politicians.]
  • Verizon pursues tough line on labor, WSJ, B1.
    [American CEOs still stupidly clobber their own consumer base via their employee basement. Productivity is meaningless with marketability - without markets, there ain't no marketability - and without lotsa well-paid employees (not just a few obscenely paid executives), there ain't no markets.]
  • The Federal Reserve's toolbox is emptying, WSJ, C1.
    [But then, it was a tool "box" with only one tool anyway, manipulating interest rates, and that tool was for fixing something that wasn't really broken, and it was both a tool and a toxin, because it only controlled inflation, ignoring overtly and covertly rising unemployment and weakening consumer spending, and it only controlled the good kind of inflation = rising wages&consumerspending&markets, and so it only controlled inflation by clobbering growth (by raising interest rates so firms wouldn't borrow and expand and hire and fund more shoppers). This wasn't trickle-down economics. This was triple-dumb economics! Timesizing controls inflation a more natural way that doesn't clobber growth.]
  • Stocks in the U.S., Europe and Asia fell amid fresh sovereign-debt worries, with the Dow losing 58.88 points to 12446.88 - The euro dropped, WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
  • Moody's downgraded Ireland's bonds to junk..,
    WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
  • Europe readies for the worst, WSJ, C1.
    Some of Europe's biggest banks are taking steps to shore up their defenses should the debt crisis spiral out of control and one or more countries leave the euro zone...increasing worries over the continent's plight...
    [The continent dba the prematurely conceived euro would have a lot less worrisome "plight" if one or more insanely-bankered member countries DID leave the euro zone to take their medicine in quarantine! The whole continent is not in "plight" mode - just halfaduz suckers who listened to cellulite-brained bankers from suicidal UK-US = ucky us.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Part-time hours, full-time rewards, Toronto Globe and Mail via theglobeandmail.com
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ..She asked her boss...about job sharing – an arrangement now offered by about 20% of Canadian firms...
    [Worksharing (temporarily funded from unemployment insurance system) and timesizing (sustainably funded from, e.g., an overtime tax) are really about incrementally trimming the workweek to allow full employment and markets as more human employment is taken over by automation and robotics. Jobsharing is a sudden jump to half of an unreduced 40-hour workweek split between two people, but it's a useful transitional step.]
    After 15 years in HR management, Hannah McKinnon of Pooling People Inc. is convinced that work sharing is a great idea. “I believe there are a lot of people out there who would jump at the chance of doing it, and would be so motivated they would blow your socks off,” she said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Commission gives employees option of 32-hour work week, (7/14 early pickup) HartselleEnquirer.com
    MORGAN COUNTY, Alab., U.S.A. - Morgan County Commission is giving employees whose salaries are paid from the general fund the option of reducing their workweek from 40 to 32 hours per week as a budget-reduction measure for fiscal 2011-2012... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Menlo Park cops to work 100 fewer hours under new contract, Daily News via MercuryNews.com
    MENLO PARK, Calif., U.S.A. - Early morning patrols of Menlo Park's streets will remain lighter than a month ago under terms of a new deal the city struck with its police union to save about $340,000 a year. The Menlo Park Police Officers Association ratified a tentative two-year contract that calls for 28 officers to work about 100 fewer hours each year and contribute more to their retirement plans... The police officers' previous contract..was too "burdensome" because of the economic recession, according to a city staff report... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vita consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. It may be fun to sneer at those who believe in the "fixed lump of labor fallacy" based on the obviously infinite amount of work to be done, but there ain't an infinite amount of money to pay for it, and without pay, it ain't work - it's just hobby. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. Shorter hours is a strategy that is reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • The financial crisis slowed migration to [de-?]industrialized countries as demand for [cheap!] labor shrank, a study said, WSJ, A1 pointer to A10.
    [Well, that's a mercy. The first thing the then-really-industrialized countries did at the start of the Great Depression (the one before this one, 1929-41), was implement the common-sense but now politically incorrect policy of shutting down immigration so as not to make the depression worse.]
  • Children now make up 24% of the U.S. population, a record low, and the rate is expected to decline [further], census data showed, WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Well that's another mercy. Only the truly bubble-headed are ignoring the Big All-Worsening Doomloom = planetary overpopulation. Unfortunately, like Boston Chicken, ZPG (Zero Population Growth) changed its name to something bland.]



    Tuesday, July 12, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The unemployed worker's best friend: Outsourcers[??] - Job hunters pay firms to launch resume blitz, WSJ, A1.
    [They could have much clearer wording here. They apparently mean job-search firms, which have little to do with (offshore) outsourcing. But the results are pathetic either way - they spotlight a guy with 20 years' experience managing sales teams whose resume was sent to people looking for a receptionist, a manicurist, a hair stylist and to a fitness company. The odds are so bad, even the job-search agencies are getting desperate - and offering pathetic service.]
  • Drought spreads pain from Florida to Arizona - Crops and livestock suffer in swath of 14 states,
    New York Times, A1.
  • Dow down on Europe debt worries - Euro falls as alarm reaches Italy - Italian bank stocks swoon as concerns rise on contagion, Wall Street Journal, C1.
    ["Reaches" Italy? Italy's Berlusconi invented alarm! And any yap about Europe is pure distraction anyway - US is in no position to worry about anyone else's debt, and should quit prolonging the wealthy's illusion that there's anyone else who can pay them back but themselves.]
    Italy fears jolt markets - Debt, political concerns fuel flight from nation's bonds, boosting risk to euro, WSJ, A1.
    [Italy is Europe's 3rd largest economy by GDP, which gives points for lots of bad stuff.]
  • Moody's warned of "red flags" at 61 rated Chinese companies amid rising investor concern about corporate governance at such entities, WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Where Have America's Jobs Gone? - Hiring at McDonald's; Wireless Networks' Job-Killing Effect; One Machine Doing The Work of Three, Wall Street Journal, B1.
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ..Of course, restaurants continue to hire even as the overall economy remains dismal because the work tends to be low-paying, either minimum wage and part-time, or both... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So all together now: shorter hours are happening anyway but not the best way. But sound the trumpets and hautboys for this headline! It's something we never thought we'd see: the front page of section 2 of the Wall Street Journal is debunking the myth that "technology creates more jobs than it destroys." Guess they finally noticed there are no jobs. But hey, we did everything "right," right? We gave all the money to the richest 30,000 Americans who were supposed to be creating jobs like rabbits. We injected technology like banshees. So, where are the jobs? What happened? What's wrong? What's wrong is those two myths. Technology does NOT create more jobs than it destroys (ever heard of "lights out" manufacturing?) and you gotta replace technology's human job takeover with workweek reduction or you kill your own markets and economy. You can't get Growth (UPsizing) out of DOWNsizing. Unless you're downsizing the workweek to avoid an army of desperate mutually-underbidding jobseekers. IT'S NOT OPTIONAL. You trim the workweek as much as it takes to maintain full employment and high wages and spending or ... or your economy splits into workers and drones - the workers are too overworked to spend and the drones are too poor, sick, desperate and/or alienated to spend. The wealthy might as well be painting targets on one anothers' backs with these dumb myths.]
  2. Lower Merion issues 'Smart' cards for parking, Main Line via mainlinemedianews.com
    LOWER MERION, Wales - ..Because more workers are part-time or assigned for shorter hours these days, he said, there is a need for more flexible arrangements. He proposed sales of permits on a monthly, weekly or daily basis, saying these options may be “more convenient economically” to users... - see whole article under today's date.
    [First story we've seen where shorter hours has repercussions on' parking.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun-Mon,, July 10-11, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by shifting to timesizing -

  • Paper expires but scandal will not die - Documents reportedly show News of the World executives knew more about phone hacking than they let on, 7/11 AP via Ottawa Metro, 08.
    Cross words - Some of the 200 journalists laid off from News of the World appeared to sneak a message [via crossword puzzles] into the paper to Rebekah Brooks, who was editor-in-chief when the tabloid committed some of the worst ethical lapses, but has kept her job. Clues in one crossword puzzle included "Brook," "stink," "catastrophe" and "criminal enterprise."

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • Canada's military hardware sales soar - Most Canadian arms went to NATO allies, but others found their way to human rights abusers, 7/11 Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    [Whatever happened to Canada's proud reputation as a peacemaker?]
  • Good works mean good pay, for some, 7/11 Canadian Press via Ottawa Metro, 08.
    Some senior executives of Canadian charities earn salaries well into six figures, The Canadian Press has found. The Canada Revenue Agency..database shows more than 6,000 of them earned above $120,000 last year... It's likely the number..is greater, since organizations must disclose only their Top 10 earners..\.. A few hundred made more than $350,000, and another hundred workers made $80-120k...
    [So like the rest of the economy, "non-profits" are bled by The Great Leak Upward - so maybe it's time to phase out this whole questionable tax loophole cum special interest. Do you want smaller government and less taxes or not? Then focus on the underlying priority, guaranteeing full employment, however short a workweek it takes, and whatever design works best to convert overtime smoothly and automatically into training and hiring.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • No deal yet on U.S. debt,
    7/11 Ottawa Metro, 08.
  • Broadcasting - CBC's plan to go digital leaves poorest Canadians out,
    7/11 Toronto Globe, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. 40 Hour Work Week, 9-5 Era A Thing Of The Past, 7/11 WFMY News 2
    GREENSBORO, N.C. - ..When was the last time you or anyone you know, actually put in a 40 hour work week?
    [IF you still have a full-time job, that is!]
    According to the Center for American Progess, the era of a 9-to-5 work week appears to be coming to an end
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Unions Should Concede Shorter Hours, 7/11 The Hartford Courant via articles.courant.com
    HARTFORD, Conn. - ..Here's a new concept, a state employee concession plan that everybody can understand: guarantee jobs for a shorter workweek... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's the essential timesizing "wheel" being reinvented again - it's such common sense that it will eventually prevail, despite the inertia of the old Protestant work ethic "work hard to get ahead" and the ignorance of the change robotization has already made and the confused superstitions about the time dimension and the desire for time to stay part of the unchanging woodwork of life...]
  3. Hubs a 'pioneering new way of working', 7/11 South Devon Herald Express via thisissouthdevon.co.uk
    TOTNES, Devon, U.K. - ..The county council wants to site the first shared work 'hub' to be built in Devon in the town as part of a £5million package of projects to encourage sustainable transport across the county... John Carter, South Hams councillor for planning, economy and community said: "Work hubs provide an environment which encourages business collaboration and networking. This concept of sharing ideas and services [and underused employees and cross-training a la *Pooling People?] will work very well in Totnes, where businesses have demonstrated a demand for such a facility.".. - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Manufacturers are adding jobs as business picks up, 7/10 SouthCoastToday.com
    NEW BEDFORD, Mass. - ..The factory, which employed 575 people in 2006, had to lay off many of those workers and shorten hours when the recession battered the men's apparel business... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Saturday, July 9, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -

    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -

  • Lost jobs, lost flights - Air traffic has been reshaped in last few years as flights have been cut at cities hit hardest by the recession, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    [And what about bus routes? Greyhound used to run buses from White River Junction to Newport, Vermont = not any more! America is crashing and burning, all because the wealthy are sacrificing function for symbol, converting spending power into investing power - that never gets recycled back into spending power via jobs.]

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too wasteful, too artificial, too military, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • California cuts weigh heavily on its colleges, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    [And without colleges generating intimidating busywork for all they're worth, how we gonna keep young people out of the sinking job market as long as possible? - and going into megadebt to do it! - all on the false premise/promise that they're going to get good jobs, or even any jobs, when they graduate?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Dismal job data rock U.S. recovery,
    Financial Times Weekly, FT1.
    Jobs debacle -..- A shocking lack of job creation - only 18,000 - pushes June unemployment to 9.2%,
    Financial Post, FP1 pointer to FP7.
    Jump in jobless rate stuns U.S. - Labour market in 'fragile state' as hiring at weakest level since May 2010,
    Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    [The Canadian press really sounds the alarm but the U.S. press is like "don't worry, be happy" valium -]
    Worries grow over jobs - Stocks drop as unemployment rate climbs to 9.2% - Private sector hiring sags,
    Wall Street Journal, A1.
    Feeble job numbers show recovery starting to stall - Defying economists' forecast for hiring, unemployment creeps up to 9.2%, New York Times, A1.
    ["Starting" to stall? Nonsense! Modern economic "science" is a septic tank of lethally flawed, rosied-up indexes and definitions designed - unintentionally of course! - to almost NEVER show problems. The "radar" is set so high that monstrous system bugs are growing unflagged beneath the radar. Last word to the Canucks -]
    Markets erode over gloomy data, although job growth in Canada brightens outlook, Financial Post, FP1 pointer to FP7.
    [Nyaa, nyaa, so there! (Editor exploits dual citizenship to identify with whichever side is winning at the moment.) And why bad job numbers? Because American politicos are weakening consumer spending -]
  • Horror Story - For decades, the rise in the cost of living has been greater than official measurements indicate—but Washington is determined to ignore that fact, by Alan Abelson, Barron's via online.barrons.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The economy burns while Washington fiddles—and what our chosen representatives and the administration are fiddling with is not the great American job machine, which, as June's downright putrid employment report demonstrated beyond cavil, badly needs cranking up. Instead, they are laboring unstintingly on how to plug the deficit gap by such smarmy tactics as changing the way inflation is reckoned to make it easier to stick it to the geezers [AND to consumer spending cuz most of us geezers are living hand-to-mouth - we spend what comes in immediately - unlike the wealthy who generally spend a tiny fraction of their incomes].
    Social Security and vets' disability payments are tied to the cost of living, and, in their infinite wisdom, the politicos have concluded that the current gauge overstates inflation. No less an authority—and we can't think of any less an authority—than Oklahoma Republican Sen. Tom Coburn is quoted by Bloomberg as saying: "There hasn't been any economist anywhere that says we shouldn't do that." The senator obviously needs to get out more. For the life of us, we cannot remember any sober being in full possession of his faculties believing that the Bureau of Labor Statistics has ever overstated—and we must stress overstated—inflation...
    It's not the first time, of course, that Washington has sought to tackle the thorny issue of inflation by manipulating how the cost of living is calculated (elimination of food and energy when they were rising vigorously, remember, gave us "core inflation," which just happens to invariably lag behind plain old inflation).
    ...We've passed along, from time to time, John Williams' blistering critiques of it from his perch at Shadow Government Statistics. ..John's take is that for decades, the rise in the cost of living has been greater than the official measurements indicate. ..Such silly tinkering is symptomatic of how much at a remove Washington is from what's happening to the economy (and just about everything else, for that matter).
    The atrocious June job numbers bring that disconnect into sharp relief. Although the incurable bulls strained to put a smiley face on the report, prattling on about a soft patch and trying to change the subject to the second half of this year, which they naturally envisioned as a period of quickening recovery, unimpeded by the absence of stimulus, the continuing drag of a bum housing market and a dismal job picture, [it was] what our friends Philippa Dunne and Doug Henwood at the Liscio Report dub "an unspinnably disappointing report"...
    The unemployment rate edged up to 9.2% from May's 9.1% [="U-3" - click and scan down to 3/08/96 "U.S. Labor Dept releases alternative jobless rates"]... What we find alarming as well is the rise in U-6, which includes both the unemployed and underemployed, to 16.2%, from 15.8%. This all-inclusive category hasn't been so high since back in December. And while there are roughly 14 million people out of work by the usual count of unemployment, there are, uncomfortably, some 25 million by the U-6 measure. That translates into an awful lot of unhappy people...
    The estimable Dave Rosenberg, Gluskin Sheff's man about markets and economies, calls the employment report a "mega reality check."... Scanning the gory details of the data, Dave notes that the total of unemployed in June swelled by 173,000 and exceeded 14 million for the first time this year. Including discouraged workers, the pool of available labor soared by 483,000 to 20.6 million, which works out to seven people vying for every job opening. The normal ratio is close to three.
    The logical question, he writes, is what are the prospects for a rebound in July? Not great, he says. In the June report, virtually all the tell-tale indicators of what's ahead—temp hiring, the decline in the workweek, since "hours tend to lead bodies" [we'd love to agree but what the heck does this MEAN?], and the revisions, which have a habit of feeding on themselves—were negative.
    In his summing up, Dave points out that: "Here we are, two years into an economic recovery, and the level of employment at 131 million is actually lower than it was in March 2000. At this stage of the cycle, what is normal is that payrolls are making new cyclical highs. This time around, barely 20% of the recession losses have been recouped." He scoffs at the "myopic attention paid to a second-half revival," which he considers "a classic failure to look at the forest past the trees." The U.S. economy, "sadly enough, is saddled with numerous structural headwinds from excessive noncorporate debt, excessive housing inventories, excessive reliance on imported oil and excessive labor-market supply." And he adds, facetiously, "Did we mention excessive denial?"...
    [So what kind of data would it take to get Dave to overcome his fear of ridicule from the Lump of Labor sneerers and push for worksharingand timesizing?]
  • Big debt and America - Once radical, support for a return to the gold standard is making a comeback, National Post, NP1 pointer to FP1.
    [If ya don't have the discipline, responsibility and judgement to ride a bicycle, ya gotta go back to training wheels or the tricycle.]
    Money gone rogue - Amid U.S. debt talks, a growing number of Americans see the gold standard as the way to restore fiscal sanity, Financial Post, FP1 target article.
    Where [else] to hide if the United States defaults - Seek safety [if any], by Jonathan Ratner, Financial Post, FP1 ptr to FP8.
    ..silver...cash...other currencies...Swiss francs...Japanese yen...euro...British pound...Latin American currencies [oh yeah]...[but not Canadian dollar cuz too-close ties to US - and Harper wants closer?!...]
  • Investors beware U.K. - Slow growth and rising inflation cool the outlook for British markets, Financial Post, FP9.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
              (free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society)
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. First Automated Library System In Southeast Opens In Oceanway, FirstCoastNews.com
    [Automation vs. jobs]
    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - ..City Councilman Ray Holt says it is a way to expand services while the library had to cut hours and people. Holt says if this service is used a lot it could lead to building a new library in Oceanway when the city's financial situation improves... - see whole article under today's date.
    [So worksharing (shorter hours) vs. automation -]
  2. Legislation Introduced to Reform UI System, HR.BLR.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Congresswoman Rosa L. DeLauro (CT-3) and Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) have introduced legislation to reform the unemployment insurance (UI) system by encouraging short-time compensation, also known as work-sharing... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Local example -]
  3. Jones County jobless rate among best in state - Officials credit number of jobs in area, Laurel Leader Call via leadercall.com
    LAUREL, Calif. - ..Solis encouraged Congress to reform the unemployment insurance system so more states will participate in work-sharing programs. She said the programs allow employers to avoid making layoffs during lean times by instead reducing some workers’ hours, while states make up a portion of their lost wages through their unemployment funds... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We either "get a grip" on this issue and run with emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing, or what's happening will get worse. What's happening? The "income gap" or more actionably, the concentration of income among the richest, is getting reduplicated in the more basic time dimension and there's now a worktime gap, or more actionably, a concentration of worktime among the overworked -]
  4. 40-Hour Dashed, (7/08 late pickup) Portfolio.com
    WASHINGTON, D,C, - ..A growing divide [exists] between the hours demanded of high- and low-income workers... The Center for American Progress reports that..high-income workers are asked to work more and low-income workers are asked to work less... Companies cutting costs by turning full-time, low-income positions into part-time jobs are driving the changes... The study also showed that both men and women in professional and management roles work 50-hour weeks more frequently than 30 years ago. Often, these high-level workers are required to put in extra hours to compensate for the decreasing number of full-time, low-income employees—thus broadening the divide between the workload of high- and low-income workers.... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And thus concentrating the natural market-demanded employment on ever fewer people and leaving more people with smaller or no paychecks and the economy with weakening consumer spending and a surer trip to the dumpster of permanent unspinnable depression. Emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing are no longer a luxury option but an urgent necessity.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, July 8, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Cable - Cogeco pinched as Portuguese customers pull the plug, by Iain Marlow, Toronto Globe, B1.
    ..Montreal-based Cogeco Inc., in a rare international move for a Canadian telecom company, acquired Cabovisao in a bold $660-million bid in 2006. But the worsening situation for ordinary people in Portugal has turned a growing headache into a stinging loss for Cogeco, which on Thursday announced it had written off its Portuguese investment, resulting in a $56.7-million third-quarter loss...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • What's the worst that could happen? The U.S. has an extraordinarily dangerous problem - How missing the debt deadline could sink the nation, Toronto Globe & Mail, A1 pointer to B1.
    In debt fight, a nation on the brink - Observers criticize 'political chicken' over raising Treasury Dept's annual debt ceiling, by Brian Milner, Toronto Globe, B1 target article.
    Worst[??] case scenario
    1. Congress doesn't raise $14.3-trillion debt ceiling by Aug.2
    2. U.S. Treasury is unable to make a $30-billion debt payment due on Aug.4
    3. The U.S. credit rating is cut, and investors demand higher interest rates to hold U.S. debt
    4. The government is forced to [print &] pay billions more to borrow money
    5. Government spending is reduced, slowing the economy
    6. Consumers and businesses, forced to pay higher interest rates to borrow money, cut back
    7. Foreign investors flee U.S. securities, the dollar devalues, and inflation soars
    8. Stocks plunge amid a widespread loss of confidence
    [But is a stock-market plunge really the worst that could happen?]
  • Spectre of debt - Obama hints at cuts to social programs, Ottawa Metro, 14.
    [But for Satan's sake, don't cut any military-industrial programs or jobs, and don't cut any billions in "foreign aid" to trouble-makers like Pakistan and Israel - they help sell weapons, one of our biggest exports! Never mind that cuts to programs for the elderly will further weaken consumer spending and the economy's circulatory system - who needs circulation anyway? Give more to the 30,000 wealthiest and ignore the pleading of the 300,000,000 others - pleaders are weak - "Let them eat cake!" The Republicans sense weakness and have no reason to reason with Obama. 'Bam' doesn't even know what battle he's in - he's still looking for table manners and napkins from a wall of sharks who've been in a feeding frenzy for the past 10 years. Would Hillary have turned the presidency into such a patsy position? Dubya sure didn't wait for agreement from the Dems - just kept shoving it down America's throat - sleeping pills, hemlock, Guiana koolaid, sloppy cuts of fugu... The rubes in the Tea Party will swallow anything their talkshows tell them to.]
  • Stock options help CEOs cash in - Gap grows between executives and employees, USA Today, 1A.
    [Never mind the gap. The real problem is, any money you redistribute to executives you're effectively taking out of circulation, cuz they've already got waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more money than they can spend and by now, waaay more than they can invest sustainably that could thereby create jobs. So it's a self-worsening problem, until we adjust the workweek downward as far as it takes to reverse from employeesurplus-jobshortage to employeeshortage-jobsurplus.]
  • Canada - Ivey PMI index slips in June, Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    The pace of purchasing activity in the Canadian economy slipped in June from May [according to the] Ivey Purchasing Managers Index..to 59.9 from 65.5...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. The Layoff Prevention Act of 2011 Introduced, compensation.blr.com
    [Synopsis of the newly introduced U.S. federal worksharing law -]
    WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. - Congresswoman Rosa L. DeLauro (CT-3) and Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) have introduced legislation to reform the unemployment insurance (UI) system. The Layoff Prevention Act of 2011 encourages short-time compensation, also known as 'work-sharing, which allows employers to avoid layoffs by reduce their workers’ weekly hours and pay... There are currently 23 [individual] states in the United States that have similar programs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. US unemployment rate jumps to 9.2 percent, (7/09 early pickup) BNO News via Channel 6 News Online via channel6newsonline.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..In addition, the DOL Secretary said Congress could immediately keep workers on the job by reforming the unemployment insurance system so more states would participate in work-sharing programs. "These programs allow employers to avoid making layoffs...
    - see whole article under today's date.
    [And this is the only chance the once-great self-fragging USA has... you can't reverse a downspiral unless you replace downsizing, and the only replacement with NO ADVERSE EFFECTS is timesizing - it's gradual. it's market-oriented, it maximizes markets and monetary circulation by maximizing employment and general wage levels - it centrifuges the lethal black hole of trillion$ frozen in the hoards of the wealthiest.]
  3. Vacationing in Europe minus the expensive hotels, (7/09 early pickup) Daily News & Analysis via DNAindia.com
    MUMBAI, India - ..They also work only 35 hours a week and take frequent vacations (a habit that has vastly profited the Indian IT industry whose minions work 10 hours a day and have absolutely no life whatsoever)..\.. European cities are like Barbie dolls while American ones are like GI Joe action figures...
    - see whole article under today's date.
    [So. We can have it the European way, which used to be the American way till 1940. Or we can have it the new American way -]
  4. Jobless College Graduates Struggle Under Ongoing Recession, Huffpost College via HuffingtonPost.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. -- ..For 20-somethings hoping to jumpstart their adult lives, the economic "recovery" is starting to feel endless [or startless?] and euphemistic... Working 32 hours a week at $16000 a year, the job was seen as a stepping-stone toward an eventual career as a full-time librarian or museum curator. But unable to secure a better job, Dalrymple remains at Saint Peters -- and without benefits, he's barely scraping by. "I think a lot of people in my generation have it tough," said Dalrymple. "We are entering into a job market that is virtually dead. The economy is on the verge of collapse.".. - see whole article under today's date.
    [Kate: Not to mention your student loans...]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Philanthropy - Buffett's [sic] gives big to Gates foundation, Bloomberg via Toronto Globe, B7.
    Warren Buffett, who is urging fellow billionaires to commit most of their wealth to philanthropy, gave away stock valued at about $1.5 billion in his annual gift to the foundation established Bill Gates. The donation of 19.3 million Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Class B shares was made Thursday, according to a filing. Buffett has pledged the majority of his holdings to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and to charities run by his three children and one named after his first wife..who died in 2004. His chosen philanthropies combat poverty and disease, fund U.S. education initiatives and promote access to abortions. "Intelligent..big-time charity should tackle things where it'll fail," Mr. Buffett..said at a press conference in Bangalore in March.
    [meaning either "should tackle things that'll fail if they don't get some help" - which can make sense depending on whether the "intelligent charity" is strategic or just trying to justify the possibility of billionaires in the first place - or it could mean "should tackle lost causes where the intelligent big-time charity's intervention will fail" - based possibly on the billionaire's awareness that someone so grossly out-of-proportion can barely make a move that doesn't backfire - like a bull in a china shop - like a government that whenever it meddles, it mars - so ... build-in the failure upfront. But this second approach is an exercise in studied futility and therefore defaults to an underlying purpose of just trying to justify the possibility of billionaires in the first place - which doesn't make sense except as a very primitive stage in the evolution of ecological economics. And all of Buffett's charities are damage-control, not strategic: combat poverty and disease, promote education and accessible abortion. People with accessible money have accessible abortion so any problem there gets back to lacking money, alias poverty. People with money can get an education so that too boils down to poverty. And people with money have access to healthcare, so "disease" gets us back to poverty too. But people with good jobs aren't poor, so it all goes back to joblessness, and Buffett does not mention that. It seems the conventional mind, however wealthy, will do ANYthing but face the root issue.]



    Thursday, July 7, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -


    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • 401(k) law suppresses saving for retirement, by Anne Tergesen, WSJ, A1.
    A 2006 law designed to boost employees' retirement-savings [allows] companies...to automatically enroll workers in their 401(k) plans, rather than employees signing up on their own.... The problem: More than two-thirds of companies set contribution rates at 3% of salary or less, unless an employee chooses otherwise. That's far below the 5-10% rates participants typically elect when left to their own devices....

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Bulls have left the ring - After three-month run, Treasury investors lose faith, by Min Zeng, WSJ, C7.
    For the first time since 2005, investors held no outright bullish positions on Treasury prices... Most investors remain neutral rather than bearish... 'Repo' reforms lag...
  • Vital signs - The service sector has slowed down, Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    The Institute for Supply Management's nonmanufacturing index - based mostly on service firms - fell to 33.3 in June from 54.6 in May. Readings above 50 indicate expansion. The index reached 59.7 in February, before rising energy prices and supply-chain problems began cutting into service-sector growth.
    [Not to mention continuing coagulation of the money supply and starvation of consumer spending. Hey, isn't the service sector supposed to be the great white hope for jobs, now we've given up on agriculture and manufacturing?]
  • Goldman borrowed $15 billion from the Fed in late 2008, the biggest single loan in a crisis-era program for which previously secret details were disclosed Wednesday. WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [As long as the wealthy keep sacrificing function for symbol, currency circulation for hoard$ize-based pecking order, they are committing "Suicide, everyone else first." And if we had any doubt about the Typhoid Mary operations of the IMF, this should settle it -]
  • THE NEXT SIR ROGER DOUGLAS, excerpt from the Gartman Letter ('nice catch' credit to the Marquess de la Cerda)
    Sir Roger Douglas was the Minister of Finance of New Zealand back in the early 80's and to our mind the finest Minister we've seen in any government before or since.
    Having seen the damage that the IMF had done to New Zealand in the years prior to his ascendancy to the Ministry, and having seen the IMF demand [corporate??] tax increases ostensibly to balance the budget and demand that New Zealand devalue her currency in order to increase export trade and finally having seen New Zealand's tax revenues fall with each increase in the income tax rate while her exports fell each time the currency weakened, Mr. Douglas said simply that he was going to put New Zealand on a path diametrically opposed to what the IMF had prescribed.
    Rather than raising tax rates, he would cut them, and rather than devaluing the currency in hopes of increasing export trade, he was going to do all within his power to raise the value of the "kiwi" dollar and in so doing send a signal to potential buyers of New Zealand's' goods that they should buy now because the price would be going up as the currency rose.
    His policies worked… marvelously. By cutting taxes… figuratively taking an ax to them and chopping the highest marginal tax rates from somewhere above 70% to eventually less than 20%... he saw tax revenues into the capitol rise relentlessly year after year after year.
    And as the currency strengthened, New Zealand's trade deficit became a trade surplus of rather extreme proportions. Sir Roger was and is one of our heroes when it came to national policies, rivaling Mr. Reagan and Ms. Thatcher and standing beside them rather than in their shadows.
    Now we've a new potential hero: Mr. Antonis Samaris, the head of the conservative, pro-free market, New Democracy Party in Greece. Mr. Samaris was educated here in the US… Amherst and Harvard; B.A. from the former; MBA from the latter and has been the head of the Party and the leader of the opposition in Parliament since '09.
    Mr. Samaris has voted against the austerity programs, not because he is opposed to spending cuts, but because he believes that spending must be cut and so too must taxes…materially.
    Mr. Samaris wants to cut the Greek corporate tax rate from the usurious 24% level… which no one pays any attention to anyway… to 15%, which he knows will make Greece more competitive in the world markets.
    [No one in Greece pays any attention to taxes anyway. That's the root of their problem: it's tax-evasion nation.]
    Mr. Samaris believes that lower corporate and individual taxes would give way to a "creative shock" to the Greek system, stimulating investment and savings and increasing consumer demand for Greek manufactured goods and services.
    [Ohoh, where did we hear about "shock therapy" before? Oh yeah, Jeff Sachs' technique in getting Russia onto the 'free market' - basically his plan was tantamount to 'greed licensing' and Russia subsequently turned into the world's biggest gangster economy, if you exclude Italy. Oh yeah, shock, creative or therapeutic, works REAL well! They need a lesson from Lao Tzu = Rule the empire as you would cook a small fish (delicately).]
    His is the theory that has been proven wise in the past. Sadly, however, the IMF and the European banks with exposure to Greek debt take him to task, preferring the massive, debilitating austerity programs currently in place. He has had the temerity and the courage to tell Ms. Merkel and Mr. Sarkozy that their "troika" plan will fail and that his plan is the only one that is rational and wise. As he said to Ms. Merkel, "Look, if your plan works, then I am wrong; but if it doesn't work, then you are going to need a new plan and I am the one who can bring that about."
    Roger Douglas should and would love this guy! We do.
    [But when his plan doesn't work either, cuz it just concerns trade, while the majority of the economy is domestic consumption, then he is going to need a new plan and Timesizing is the plan that can do it, because it maximizes domestic consumer spending per capita and it has backup.]
  • The U.S. and Mexico agreed to end a ban of nearly two decades on Mexican trucks entering the U.S.  Mexico will begin lifting tariffs on U.S. goods as part of the deal, WSJ, A1.
    [Big deal. Mexican consumers have even less money than Americans to provide markets. At best, US agrobusiness will ruin what's left of Mexican small farmers as it has in Jamaica and trigger poverty and famine and even weaker Mexican markets. At worst, it will also ruin many American truckers, for whose jobs we sacrificed our rail system.]
  • Shuttle's last flight leaves Russia with space monopoly, WSJ, A1.
  • China's central bank raised interest rates for the fifth time in eight months, signaling its concern about accelerating inflation, WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Statement by Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis on unemployment insurance reform legislation, PR Newswire (press release) via prnewswire.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. - .."I am pleased that Sen. Jack Reed and Rep. Rosa DeLauro have introduced legislation to reform the UI system to benefit both workers and employers across the U.S. The legislation put forward promotes short-time compensation, also known as 'work-sharing.' "Work-sharing is a true win-win for workers and businesses, and an important tool for helping support our economy during tough times. It enhances our social safety net by providing prorated unemployment insurance benefits to individuals whose work hours are reduced in lieu of layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. On summer Fridays, more are giving work the slip — with bosses’ blessing, WashingtonPost.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. - .."The gift of time is the most precious gift you can give an employee, and it pays off in employee engagement.”.. - see whole article under today's date.
    [= a great sentiment, though much in this article is just flextime and compressed workweeks, not the free time and reduced workweeks that have historically got the unemployed hired and raised consumer spending.]
  3. The End of the 40-Hour Workweek, The Street via Minyanville.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C., U.S.A. - ..Higher-level workers [or just, employees with benefits] are increasingly being asked to put in 50 hours or more a week, effectively working an 8-to-6 workweek at the very least, while lower-income workers are often forced to work fewer hours but at jobs with irregular schedules [or just, jobs without benefits], according to a comprehensive report from the Center for American Progress, which reviewed dozens of studies from the previous 30 years to understand the changing work/life struggles of the country's labor force... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. French Socialist Primary Field Takes Shape Sans Strauss-Kahn, Arutz Sheva via israelnationalnews.com
    PARIS, France - ..Aubry is the daughter of Jacques Delors, who served as finance minister under Francois Mitterand and spent two terms as president of the European commission. He was considered presidential timber but elected not to run. She made her mark as the minister of Employment and Solidarity in the gauche pluriel -pluralistic left governments of Lionel Jospin, where in an effort to reduce unemployment, France went to a 35 hour workweek... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. The Sunday imperative - Shortening the work week will undoubtedly have the downside of hurting economic output, Jerusalem Post via jpost.com
    [This imagination-challenged journalist may be right about more fundamental freedom (in terms of more free time) hurting production, but more free time will help productivity (production per hour per employee) and more free time will help creativity (you need some detachment to see the obvious and make creative connections).]
    TEL AVIV, Israel - ..By raising GDP per capita, Israel could easily accommodate a shorter workweek without suffering a drop in total output .. - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Bair's legacy: An FDIC with teeth, by Deborah Solomon, WSJ, C1.
    Sheila Bair, who is stepping down as chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. this week, leaves behind an agency transformed from a sleepy bank overseer into a financial regulatory powerhouse focused on preventing another financial crisis..\..
    The house Bair built [photo caption]
    The FDIC's powers have expanded greatly as part of last year's Dodd-Frank financial overhaul and many of the provisions were inserted at Chairman Sheila Bair's behest. Here are some of the agency's newfound powers:
    • "Living wills" - requires large banks and nonbank financial firms to deliver a map on how to wind them down in a crisis
    • Expanded seizure power - allows for takeover of large banks and financial institutions in danger of failing, not just smaller regional banks
    • "Backup supervision" - allows for placement of on-site analysts at institutions with $50 billion or more in assets
    • "Clawbacks" - recovers pay from executives deemed "substantially responsible" for a financial firm's failure
    Incoming [chair]...: Martin Gruenberg...



    Wednesday, July 6, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • For small businesses, recession isn't over, WSJ, B1.
    Small businesses are delaying hiring and capital expenditures as they grapple with jittery [or jobless] customers, rising costs [of paying CEOs' offthescale salaries] and tight credit, WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Massachusetts employers losing confidence, by Kaivan Mangouri, Boston Globe, B6.
    ..in their economic recovery, according to the Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) Business Confidence Index, a monthly survey of companies belonging to AIM... The overall index dropped for the second month [in June?], slipping 1.7 points to 50 out of a possible 100. The highest level ever reached was 68.5 in 1997-98, and the record low was 33.3 in Feb.2009...
    [Must be a fairly new (20-yr?) index. Massachusetts has been less hammered by the downturn than a lot of states, so if Mass. employers are losing confidence, ohoh!]
  • Study [of 173 low-income residents in New Bedford MA] details distrust poor have for banking system, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    [And "poor" would include everyone off-WallStreet and not a banker, right?]
    Karen Faria of Fairhaven stopped using a bank after she was charged $90 in fees for a $3.08 overdraft. (photo caption, B7)
  • Moody's drops debt rating for Portugal [to "junk"], citing risks - Says a second [do we hear 'third'?] bailout may be needed, Boston Globe, B7.
    Rally stalls as Portugal's debt rating cut,
    Boston Globe, B8.
  • Dearth of deficit-cutting ideas, NYT, A1 pointer to B1.
    Fiscal conservatives say they favor cuts in the federal budget deficit but are short on specifics...
    [Raise taxes on the people who have way more money than ever before in history, and restore full employment and markets however short a workweek that may take. Then dismantle all the government programs designed to compensate for how hard we have made it to support oneself on a pre-robotics workweek in the age of robotics.]
  • Better lives for Mexicans cut allure of going north -
    [- not to mention the worse lives of Americans -]
    - Shifts in jobs, and education are cited in decline of illegal traffic to U.S.
    , NYT, A1.
    [- not to mention tougher entry laws in Arizona and other forced-host, forget-your-own-jobless states]
  • Vital signs - Factories are carrying more stock on their shelves, WSJ, A1.
    [= excess inventory or "overproduction"? = key symptom of economic depression!]
    The ratio of U.S. manufacturers' inventories-to-shipment rose to 1.34 in May from 1.33 on in April. While not as high as after the 2008 financial crisis, the ratio is above the 1.22 it averaged in 2007. One reason why: Rising commodity costs have encouraged companies to warehouse more goods and materials.
    [huh? - how about falling real employment and wages continues to gut consumer spending?! But we're not the only dummies - other English-speaking economies are just as self-mutilating as us. The oldest one, for instance -]
  • Bank of England's tough job on inflation, by Richard Barley, WSJ, C26.
    [Inflation? No wonder they're having a tough job! They're focused (like us) on the wrong problem. The real problem is unemployment, as shown by the fact this article doesn't even mention inflation till the last paragraph! Here's the first -]
    The headlines on U.K. job losses make gloomy reading.
    In banking, Lloyds is shedding 15,000 jobs.
    A string of retailers from chocolatier Thorntons to fashion chain Jane Norman are [should be 'is' - editor!!] closing stores.
    Even[?] in manufacturing, transport group Bombardier [hold on, that's Canadian, not British] is cutting over 1,400 jobs...
    Structural unemployment has risen... Some [meaning 'lots of'] capacity may have been [meaning 'definitely has been'] destroyed...
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Saving money means less time for school, New York Times, A14.
    SAN DIEGO, Calif., U.S. - After several years of state and local budget cuts, thousands of school districts across the nation [and] an "untold number" of schools nationwide have reduced their hours and days, often furloughing teachers... - see whole article under today's date.
    [All the while, the super-selfish super-rich bunker back in their gated and crenellated castles, coagulate and decirculate the currency, and nudge the nation back into feudalism. Simple, fast, market-oriented correction? Change the job shortage into a job surplus by repackaging work from 40 hrs/wk per person to 36 (4x9), or 35 (5x7), or 32 (4x8), or 30 (5x6), or 28 (4x7)... And btw, a big co-relate of better-off economies today is the quality of their education system in years past (ref.credit to my anthrop prof).]
  2. Public sector shake-up: pensions are only the start, First Post via thefirstpost.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - ..According to the latest official figures, workers in the public sector now earn an average of 8% more than their private sector counterparts. They tend to work shorter hours as well. When many in the private sector hardly have any pension provision at all, this makes the public sector's privileged position even less tenable... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Isn't this criticism what we used to praise government for = leading the way to a better future? Isn't this commentator recommending exactly what we used to criticize Communism for = reducing everyone to the lowest common denominator? Why not talk about ways to raise the private sector? How? By lowering the newly-right-off-the-charts supersuperhigh topmost brackets and abandoning the dizzy idea that you can redistribute any percentage of your money supply (M1) however large, to any percentage of your population, however minuscule, and have a better economy for it because "that money will immediately get invested creating jobs." If you believe that, SHOW US THE JOBS!]
  3. Northumberland firm Renolit invest £10m in machinery, nebusiness.co.uk
    CRAMLINGTON, Northumberland, U.K. - ..Cramlington-based Renolit has recovered from a tough trading period in late 2008 and 2009, when a shrinking order book forced the firm to put its 215 staff on short time working... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS excerpt - Connecticut Becomes First State Requiring Paid Sick Time, Associated Press via WSJ, A2.
    HARTFORD, Conn.— ..The measure requires businesses in the service industry with 50 or more employees to allow workers to accrue one hour of sick time for every 40 hours worked. Backers estimate that between 200,000 and 300,000 workers will benefit. Opponents said the law will make Connecticut less competitive.
    [- if you want to keep competing toward the bottom...]
    School bus driver Desiree Rosado..a mother of three from Groton.\.appeared before lawmakers [saying] she has no sick days, just two personal days a year that she can use when she's sick... The legislation..years in the making..narrowly passed the Senate on May 25 on an 18-17 vote and was approved June 4 by the House on a 76-65 vote after more than 11 hours of debate...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Tuesday, July 5, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -


    growth-gagging DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -

  • More bank branches closing - Weak economy, tighter rules prompt decision, by Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, A1.
    For the first time in 15 years, banks across the United States are closing branches faster than they are opening them, eliminating locations in Massachusetts, other parts of New England, and the rest of the country.
    Bank of America, the nation's largest bank...plans to close roughly 580 of its 5,800 branches by the end of 2014, in addition to 150 shuttered last year. ..In Mass. [it] has already shut five this year, including locations in Holyoke, Springfield, Worcester and Boston. The bank still has 270 branches in the state, more than any other bank..\..
    Webster Bank of Waterbury CT plans to close a half-dozen branches including one in Mansfield MA in October.
    Rockland Trust...recently decided to close [MA] branches in Plymouth, Swansea and Whitman...
    The Community Bank of Brockton plans to close [MA] branches in Brockton, Falmouth and Hyannis later this month...
    Citizens Bank, the second largest retail bank in the state..plans to close 14 branches across its 12-state territory this year, including one in Middleborough MA, but also plans to open 11 new locations, including three in Mass.
    Sovereign Bank, the third largest retail bank, [has no] plans to reduce its branch network...
    TD Bank, the state's fourth largest..plans to add as many as 15 branches in Greater Boston by the end of 2012..\.. [That's Toronto power = the Toronto Dominion Bank...]
    Overall, banks have eliminated more than 1,400 US locations in the past two years. And almost every week, more branches go dark... Overall, banks closed 28 more branches in Mass. than they opened between June 2009 and June 2010, a 1% decline, according to the FDIC. Nationwide, the number of branches also decline 1%, to about 98,500 during the same period, the first decline since 1995. Banks have reduced that number by another 400 branches, according to SNL Financial, a research firm in Charlottesville, Va...

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Banks closing branches at a rapid rate, Boston Globe, A4.
    ...More than 340 banks have failed since the beginning of 2009, and many others have merged or slashed operations to stay in business...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Profits thrive in weak recovery [or at least, corporate profit expectations], Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [As Chomsky says, the Journal has to have some truth for investors but here's an unusual case where the NY Times has more straight talk than the Journal -]
    Profit lag may hinder stock rally,
    New York Times, B1.
  • Fewer jobs for film students - Graduates confronted by a changing industry, NYT, A1 pointer to C1.
    For film graduates, an altered picture - Traditional career paths disappearing, NYT, C1 target article.
    [But then, this is true of all jobs and career paths in America in the age of robotics and outsourcing - and in a self-martyring age clinging to a pre-computer workweek of five 8-hour days that's been frozen for 71 years, representing a ceiling often violated due to job insecurity, and "part time" often offered instead of "full time" to keep benefits out of the picture.]
  • A city's wrenching budget choices - A fire truck, road paving and raises compete for priority, NYT, A1.
    Wilmington, N.C...
    [And thousands of other American cities...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. How to fix unemployment, phillyBurbs.com (blog)
    WARMINSTER TOWNSHIP, Penn. - The nation ought to take a page from World War II to fix unemployment. During that time, some large companies, instead of letting people go, cut everyone's work week by one hour per day. Therefore, instead of a 40-hour work week, employees for that company worked 35 hours a week. If implemented today, all employees would lose some pay, granted, but almost everyone would have a job if this idea caught on... - see whole article under today's date.
    [In some particularly arrogant and stupid economies, this "wheel" is not going to get rolling until it is reinvented thousands of times by those who are much more naive than the professional economists who are good at pulling six-digit paychecks while the big problems go on and on. But then as Someone once said, "Except ye become as little children..." Apparently a few people in Harrisburg are seeing the obvious -]
  2. A Conversation with Senator Brubaker: General Assembly Takes Action to Reform Unemployment Compensation Law, Boyertown Berk Montgomery Newspapers via berksmontnews.com
    HARRISBURG, Penn. - ..The legislation also creates a new shared work program that allows employers and employees to agree to reduce work hours instead of eliminating jobs. The program would allow employees participating in a shared work plan to receive unemployment benefits for their lost time... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Teamsters' Push For Shorter Hours May Leave Drivers Very Short On Pay, RedState.com
    [Here we have one of America's suicidal radicals in conservative clothing and reeking with sarcasm - but s/he starts off well -]
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - It is axiomatic—a given, if you will—that unions do not like workers to work overtime. Sure, they’ll do it, but if unions had their druthers, the work week would be limited to 40 hours—in some cases unions prefer 35 hours. The reasoning is simple, the fewer hours worked, the more employees an employer must employ and, in a workplace where unions can require dues, the union makes more money... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We only WISH unions had the sense to oppose overtime and push for shorter hours and fuller employment and markets! Centrifuge the national income with that magic labor shortage that brought "wartime prosperity" in WWs I and II but do it without killing consumers... If only ulnions realized their power issue was shorter hours, not higher pay & trinkets, cuz if they can only get one and it's shorter hours, they wind up with both, since shorter hours absorbs the 'army of unemployed' and harnesses market forces to raise wages and spending, while with higher pay they wind up with neither since that just tacks an artificially higher price on a surplus commidity, overall human working hours.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Sun.-Mon., July 3-4, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Editorial: One way to stop foreclosures, 7/03 BSG, K1 pointer to K8.
    Nonprofits can help in clearing glut of homes in foreclosure, editorial, 7/03 Boston Sunday Globe, K8 target.
    ["Nonprofits" are not part of any solution. With their unregulated top salaries and perks, they are part of the problem.]
  • 'Skills gap' leaves employers without workers in pipeline, 7/03 AP via BG, G3.
    [Well, maybe that's because American employers, spoiled by floods of resumes since the babyboomers replaced the labor surplus of the depression since 1970, have forgotten about planning ahead or on-the-job training - and 'apprenticeship': what's that?!]
  • Firms struggle to stay ahead of fuel-cost swings - $3.65 avg. price per gallon of regular, self-serve gas in Massachusetts, 7/03 BG, G1.
  • Mobile wallets need security to stop hackers, 7/04 BG, B5.
    [Maybe that's because - all together now - our computer software has outpaced our social software, but with timesizing we're integrated around a common workweek range, and we don't have downsizing and desperation to embitter and motivate hackers.]
  • Rhode Island joins push to halt unemployment benefits fraud, by Laura Crimaldi, 7/04 AP via BG, B9.
    A nationwide crackdown is coming for people fraudulently drawing unemployment payments - those who were never eligible and workers who keep getting checks after they return to work [30% of wrong payments in 2010] - a $17 billion benefits swindle last year alone, say federal officials...
    [Guarantee full employment and markets no matter how short a workweek it may take, and you make it easier to for people to support themselves in the age of robotization. That demotivates fraud and and allows the downsizing of the unemployment insurance system and associated taxes - safely.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Canadian firm makes hay while the sun shines - in Germany, 7/03 Toronto Globe & Mail via CTV.ca
    BISCHOFSWERDA, Germany - ..First, employers could shorten the work week, and workers could get part of their lost hours paid by the government (a system called *"Kurz-arbeit," similar to Canada's federal *work-sharing program)... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Steinitz comes out in favor of five-day work week, 7/04 Jerusalem Post via jpost.com
    TEL AVIV, Israel - ..Finance Minister Yuval Steinitz on Monday came out for the first time in favor of initiating a five-day work week [instead of current 5 1/2 days: Su-Th+1/2F]. But Steinitz issued serious opposition to Vice Premier Silvan Shalom's idea of making Sunday a day off, as it is in the United States... Steinitz said it was more right for Israelis to have Fridays off, because of the Jewish identity of Israel and the Muslim sabbath. His associates said he would also consider having the work week end a couple hours earlier on Thursdays. When Steinitz asked Shalom sarcastically why he didn't promote a shorter work week when he was finance minister, Shalom said the government was toppled before he could... Elkin..welcomed Steinitz's backing for shortening the work week. He called Steinitz's proposal "revolutionary."... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. What's holding women back? The Islander via theislanderonline.com.au
    KINGSCOTE, South Australia - ..If women with children are to take senior roles, then flexible working hours clearly matter. Some suggest senior men should be encouraged to work shorter hours and spend time with their families. "But who gets them to do it?" Ross-Smith asks... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Who gets them to do it? Other senior people who want to have sufficient markets of millions of wage-earning consumers to buy all the products & services the robots are churning out and know that a few thousand employees working unlimited workweeks controlling legions of 24/7 robots aren't going to do it no matter how much money those few make. As Walter Reuther retorted to Henry Ford's "Let's see you unionize these robots!" - "Let's see you sell them cars."]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Amid shutdown, Minn. governor resolute on need to tax the rich, by Patrick Condon, AP via 7/03 Boston Globe, A10.
    ST.PAUL, Minn. - Mark Dayton, the..Democratic governor of Minnesota who let his state's government shut down rather than accept the refusal of Republican lawmakers to raise income taxes on the wealthy, was born into money. It made him sure of something: "I grew up in that environment. I know people can afford it."...
    [And as Will Rogers said when asked who'd he get the money from to pay for his scheme to end the Depression, "Wal, I guess we'll git it from the rich, cuz they's the only ones that's got any."]



    Saturday, July 2, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -

    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Blackboard, maker of college software, is acquired [for $1.64B by Providence Equity Partners], New York Times, B2.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Quincy Medical Center says it is bankrupt, Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Minnesota shuts down, and not just for the Fourth, by Monica Davey, New York Times, A1.
    ST. PAUL, Minn. - ..The fundamentally different fiscal approaches of the Republicans and Democrats here did not change, and Minnosota began its broadest shutdown of services in state history with no end in sight...
    Minnesota Shutdown: Political Fireworks Display Instead - Mark Dayton, Republicans Budget Dispute Furloughs 23,000 Gov't Workers - Lawmakers fail in budget talks, ChristianPost.com
    ..This week's sudden number of furloughed state workers will shove the unemployment rolls above 221000 just at a time when the state's economic recovery was gaining momentum... - see whole article under today's date.
    [- too many furloughs don't prevent layoffs - they are layoffs - by another name.]
  • Businesses feel lockout's bite - NBA impasse keeps [TD Boston] Garden quiet, while bars, cafes lose cash, Bos.Globe, B5.
    [It used to be the TD Bank North Boston Garden - but then they dropped the Bank North. So what's TD stand for, you ask? TORONTO Dominion. My hometown has taken over New England. And sonny, I remember waaay back when the Bank of Toronto merged with the Dominion Bank.]
  • Greece will receive $17 billion to help avoid avoid looming default, NYT, B1 pointer to B3.
    [And while we're giving out OPM (other people's money) -]
  • Regulators provide $14 billion bailout for Bank of Moscow, NYT, B2.
    [Now that "moral hazard" is flying off the charts, how about $10 billion or so for the Bank of Nigeria?!]
  • Long and winding road for electric vehicles, WSJ, B14.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. [It's Furlough Teachers Day! -]
    State cuts millions from Montgomery County schools, YourHoustonNews.com
    MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Tex. - ..As a companion bill to SB1, Senate Bill 8 allows school districts the use of furloughs, mandatory time off without pay, and reduction in pay for all professional employees, not just teachers, Eissler said. “That saves teachers jobs,” Eissler said... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Duquesne City schools OKs budget; teachers furloughed, (6/29 late pickup) Pennsylvania.StateNews.net
    DUQUESNE CITY, Penn. - The state board of control overseeing the Duquesne City School District approved a $14 million final budget, with no tax hike, that calls for the furlough of 19 teachers... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. [In Hawaii, everyone suffers - and hits the beaches - together -]
    Furlough end comes too late to tell workers - A deal to extend a UPW pact does not leave enough time to notify city employees, Honolulu Star-Advertiser via staradvertiser.com
    HONOLULU, Hawaii - .Furloughs for all city workers, including UPW members, ended Thursday. State and county government workers have returned to a regular 5-day workweek after two years of furloughs. Government offices, schools and other public facilities were closed at least twice a month. The furloughs were instituted as a way to deal with budget deficits. The last official Furlough Friday for state employees was June 24. Furloughs for county workers on Kauai ended in January and April for those on Maui. Furloughs ended last month for Hawaii County employees... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. [How do we know there'd be more jobcuts if there were fewer hourscuts such as furloughs? -]
    BONUS excerpt - At least 20 Moon Area staff positions eliminated, (7/01, late pickup) Coraopolis Moon Record via yourmoontownship.com
    MOON TOWNSHIP, Penn. - ...School board members this week voted to approve a $57.6 million budget that called for no tax increases... Five teaching positions originally scheduled to be furloughed were recalled this week following the approval of the teachers contract.\. At least 20 Moon Area School District support staff members received letters Thursday explaining that their positions had been eliminated...
    Comments - 30 Staff Positions Eliminated, Submitted by letsbereal on July 1, 2011 - 8:26am.
    What the article does not explain is that those positions eliminated are all..people who work directly with students with cognitive and physical disabilities...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Friday, July 1, 2011 while the Great Depression replays today as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we bring you first a dose of -
    doom du jour
    tm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -
    - free consulting to writers interested in setting a play or novel in a futuristic work-balanced or money-balanced society -
    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news (archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Two rulings find cuts in pensions permissible, New York Times, B1.
    ..in Colorado..and Minnesota...
    [There goes another chunk of consumer spending...]

    JOB-RELATED SUICIDE OR KAROSHI (death by overwork) in the news (archives) -
  • Foxconn Worker Dies in the Bath After Working 60 Hours a Week, M.I.C. Gadget via micgadget.com via CrunchGear.com
    SHENZHEN, China - This. Is. Sad. 23 year old Foxconn employee Chen Long died on June 25th after a continuous 60-hour working week... - see whole article under today's date.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
    [But here's a story about how overwork can actually CREATE jobs - crap jobs, that is -]
  • Six million Britons need hired help at home due to longer working hours - Thinking of mowing the lawn this weekend, or battling through some DIY [do it yourself]? Then why not do what six million Britons do and hire somebody to do it for you? by Ross McGuinness, (6/30 afterhours) Metro.co.uk
    LONDON, England - Some 12% of households pay for domestic help despite many struggling to make ends meet, new figures reveal. The economic climate has forced some to put in so many hours at work that they need hired hands to do the jobs they can no longer fit into their day, the Churchill Home Insurance survey says. Many simply do not have the time because both adults – especially in modern households – work full time and may need someone to pick their children up from school, or walk the dog...
    [Now back to more common indirect deterioration due to workweeks uncoordinated with rising worksaving-technology levels -]
  • To the limit - Debt, extortion, and the moment of truth, op ed by Paul Krugman, NYT, A19.
    In about a month, if nothing is done, the federal government will hit its legal debt limit [$14.3T]. There will be dire consequences if this limit isn’t raised. At best, we’ll suffer an economic slowdown; at worst we’ll plunge back into the depths of the 2008-9 financial crisis.
    [The 2008-9 financial crisis isn't the worst, Paul.]
    So is a failure to raise the debt ceiling unthinkable? Not at all [because of] the extremism of the modern G.O.P. [But] traditionally the debt limit has been treated as a minor detail. During the administration of former pResident George W. Bush — who added more than $4 trillion to the national debt — Congress, with little fanfare, voted to raise the debt ceiling no less than seven times. So the use of the debt ceiling to extort political concessions is something new in American politics...
    Last December..Mr. Obama agreed to extend the Bush tax cuts — a move that many people, myself included, viewed as in effect a concession to Republican blackmail... The president...was sure that [Republican] John Boehner, as speaker of the House, would accept his “responsibilities to govern.” Well, we’ve seen how that worked out.
    ...Failure to raise the debt limit..could convince investors that the United States is no longer a serious, responsible country, with nasty consequences. Furthermore, nobody knows what a U.S. default would do to the world financial system, which is built on the presumption that U.S. government debt is the ultimate safe asset.
    ..Failure to raise the debt limit would also force the U.S. government to make drastic, immediate spending cuts, on a scale that would dwarf the austerity currently being imposed on Greece. And don’t believe the nonsense about the benefits of spending cuts that has taken over much of our public discourse: slashing spending at a time when the economy is deeply depressed would destroy hundreds of thousands and quite possibly millions of jobs [and billions in consumer spending, and marketable productivity, and sustainable investment - why is Krugman leaving stopping short of carrying this into the self-interest of the GOP-supporting wealthy?].
    ...G.O.P. leaders don’t actually care about the level of debt. ...What’s really going on is extortion pure and simple. As Mike Konczal of the Roosevelt Institute puts it, the G.O.P. has, in effect, come around with baseball bats and declared, “Nice economy you have here. A real shame if something happened to it.” And the reason Republicans are doing this is because...Obama caved in over tax cuts, and they expect him to cave again...
    [The former "conservatives" are now playing Chicken. It's not just baseball bats. It's cars, and if somebody doesn't swerve, BOTH DIE. And it's not just baseball bats or cars. It's more like grenades - "Do exactly what we tell you or we'll pull this pin and we'll all blow up." These scum should have been stopped long before they got anywhere near the Little Red Button, but here they are, threatening to blow the world financial system, and a bunch of the US wealthy are supporting them too? The power elite in the biggest economy have become suicidal and they're willing to take any number of anyone else along with them. The solution is emerging elsewhere. Right now, Germany is in the lead. But it's going to take quarantining of the suicidally insane USA on the part of everyone else, from Canada to Europe and China and Japan... and it's going to take fast and thick insulation measures against the new U.S. annihilism. Unfortunately, Canada is infected with Harper, and Europe hasn't the sense to quarantine or amputate Greece and Portugal and any of its other parts that won't quit playing in sewers -]
  • Playing make-believe with Greece - In Europe, a strategy that got a U.S. bank in legal trouble, by Floyd Norris, NYT, B1.
    .."Extend and pretend" in which bad loans are treated as if they were just fine...
  • German banks agree to a rollover of Greek debt, NYT, B1.
    [This is like the vast monoculture of agrobusiness - a new blight can easily kill it all and shut down the whole game.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. [First, a story about cutting hours the right way -]
    Vital signs - Germany's job market is in better shape than America's, Wall Street Journal, A1 graph caption.
    NEW YORK, N.Y., USA - Germany's June unemployment rate was 7% [thanks to worksharing hourscuts instead of jobcuts], making it the lowest on records going back to 1991, shortly after East and West Germany unified. ..If Germany measured jobs the same way as the U.S., its unemployment rate would be about a half-point lower [6.5%]. - see whole caption under today's date.
    [Then, two stories about cutting hours the wrong way -]
  2. County parks to shorten hours, SalisburyPost.com
    SALISBURY, N.C., USA — Starting today, tightening budgets will cause Rowan County’s parks to close a bit earlier and its libraries will skip some annual events. Earlier this year, the county asked each of its departments to make a 4-5%budget cut, adding up to a reduction of more than $2m for the county budget. It was up to the department heads to decide how to make those cuts... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Dalton library to cut hours, The Daily Citizen via daltondailycitizen.com
    DALTON, Ga., USA - The Dalton-Whitfield Library will cut its hours of service later this summer due to budget cuts... “We and the board have really agonized over these choices,” said Joe Forsee, director of the Northwest Georgia Regional Library System, which is headquartered in Dalton... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way which maintains personal income and vital consumer spending via emergency worksharing and sustainable timesizing. We simply can't perpetuate a pre-computer 40-hour workweek forever into the age of robotics. We need to take charge of this workweek-trimming process, systematize it and make sure it happens in a way that absorbs the surplus of jobseekers, gets employers bidding against one another for good help, thereby harnesses market forces to flexibly maintain and raise wages and spending, leeches money out of the huge black hole of income and wealth in the top 0.01%, and gets those trillions back into circulation. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite willingness to PAY for it and infinite consumer spending money during a labor surplus to satisfy those desires. It also ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.