Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
March 2-31, 2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. A closer look at compensation, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel via jsonline.com via articles.sfgate.com
    MILWAUKEE, Wisc. -..More recently, they have seen their incomes cut due to furloughs - required unpaid days off. While some employees take these furlough days off, many others, such as managers or professors, ignore the furlough and work anyway. For them, it is simply a pay cut. More cuts are on the way - as even "job security" is on the chopping block, allowing younger workers to replace older, higher-paid workers... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. No Saturday mail delivery would save $3 billion, San Francisco Chronicle
    WASHINGTON, D.C. -..A new Government Accountability Office report agrees USPS could save $3.3 billion by cutting the work hours of letter carriers and reducing operational costs to better match declining mail volume... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. BP's Lost Laptop And The Price Of Increased Productivity, LezGetReal.com
    BURLINGTON?, Vt.? -.. Standard operating procedure in retail chains is to keep workers below the hours-per-week threshold a state sets for providing benefits. It ranges from 24 hours a week to 36... For the supermarket chain I used to work for, that designation was “20 to 28 hours per week.” They have dropped it to “0 to 28 hours per week,” allowing them to cut their longest serving employees to 10 hours a week. The last time anyone could live on $80 a week was thirty years ago when I was barely getting by on $90. To save a whopping 50 cents a hour, ten freaking dollars a week, they have hired a new cashier and cut two older workers from 20 to 10 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [But when a whole industry or city or state or region or nation cuts hours, they cut the desperate surplus of jobseekers and wages RISE instead of falling. It even happens within some individual companies.]
  2. Help? In Texas for federal workers, what's that? EightFeetDeep.com (blog)
    AUSTIN, Tex. -..The issue is more than just will I be “furloughed” from my part-time job and be paid or not be paid after all the congressional hubris settles. Will a budget finally be passed so I can have my measly $204-attaboy tied up, supposedly because [of] the budget SNAFU?... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Urgent: Nashville's Hudler confirms Q2 furloughs, Gannett Blog via gannetblogspot.com
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Nashville Tennessean Publisher Carol Hudler..told employees the following in an early-afternoon e-mail, according to two of my readers: "Many of you have been wondering if we will be asked to take another furlough in the 2nd Quarter. Most of our employees will not. Our top executives and a few others in higher paid positions will be asked to take a furlough. Those staffers will be notified by their department heads by the end of the day today." The furloughs come only a week after Gannett disclosed top executives got huge pay raises last year. Chairman and CEO Craig Dubow's doubled to $9.4 million, in part for cutting costs through furloughs and other austerity measures... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We have ringside seats for the Decline and Fall of the American Empire via the provocation of class warfare by our cushioned clueless super-rich, with their unofficial motto, "Suicide - Everyone Else First."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Layoffs and Furloughs and Their Effect on Internal Controls, 3/29 Clifton Gunderson LLP via cliftoncpa.com
    WAUWATOSA, Wisc. - ..However, there are still risks that should be considered as a result of implementing furlough days. In order to achieve the same level of output in a smaller period of time, employees may rush to perform the work, leaving the process incomplete or inaccurate. In addition, employees may find shortcuts that work around the systems of control... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Mayor's Budget Proposes To Close Some City Recreation Centers, 3/29WBAL Baltimore
    BALTIMORE, Maryld. -- Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is proposing to close some of the city's recreation centers, cut hours at the city's libraries and reduce the 311 call center operation in her budget plan for the next fiscal year... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Parts shortages force cuts in work hours at Honda plants, 3/29 Columbus Dispatch via despatch.com
    MARYSVILLE, Ohio - Honda employees in Ohio will work only partial shifts beginning Wednesday, because of a dwindling supply of parts from Japan. The move is taking place several days earlier than planned. This affects the assembly plants in Marysville and East Liberty, the engine plant in Anna, the transmission plant in Russells Point, and all other plants in North America, the company said today... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires and PAY for that work, AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-mon, 3/27-28/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Investors to buyout firms: Keep the cash, by John Jannarone, 3/28 Wall Street Journal, C8.
    ..World-wide fund raising for buyout funds peaked at $235 billion in 2006, according to research firm Pequin. ..Most funds have a deadline of five or six years, after which they lose the right to invest committed funds. But now that cutoff is nearing, plenty of investors are nervous trhat underinvested fund managers will rush into louzy deals...
    [Every buyout is a louzy deal unless the target is in corporate extremis.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Harry & David, the specialty gourmet fruit retailers, is preparing to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection as early as [today], 3/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Struggling Somerville MA biotech [Peptimmune Inc.] seeks Ch.7 liquidation,
    3/28 Boston Globe, B8.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The tax riddle - How can real estate bills still rise even as values of homes fall? 3/27 Boston Sunday Globe, GN1.
    [Yet another way for the super-rich to shift their taxes onto the less-rich and clobber their own consumer base and consumer demand and markets for the productivity they need to invest in? -]
  • Best Buy grapples with sagging demand,
    3/27 Boston Sunday Globe, G5.
  • Financial strains created by the crisis in Japan and Europe [and U.S.'s corrupt banking culture and huge national debt and deficit] are pushing rich nations near the point where they won't be able to bear the costs of anther disaster, 3/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [...unless they plug The Great Leak Upward and restore wartime levels of graduated income and estate taxes - the only ones capable of paying the wealthy back are the wealthy themselves. And speaking of financial strains -]
  • Who will rescue financial reform? 3/28 NY Times, A24.
    [Gee, you mean we might just have covered it up instead of fixing it? Yep, says Bill Black, cleaner-upper of S&L crisis in early 90s when banking culture was only 10-15% corrupt compared to now when it's 80-90% corrupt - interview on Bill Moyers, 4/03/2009.]
  • Foreign shocks [and domestic corruption] threaten to damp the demand fueling the "export engine" [our quotes] that helped propel the U.S. economy out of the recession, 3/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [on the strained assumption it IS out of the recession...]
  • Vital signs - Corporate profits kept rising in 2010's fourth quarter - but all the "gain" [our quotes] came from the financial sector.., 3/28 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    [The "plants" and "animals" are hurting but the "fungus" is doing fine.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Regional vote slams Sarkozy, 3/28 WSJ via online.wsj.com
    PARIS, France — ..Mr. Sarkozy's center-right Union for a Popular Movement gathered about 20% of the votes cast nationwide, well behind the Socialist Party, which had about 36%, according to the Interior Ministry... The Socialist Party has drawn support over the years for its moves to tame corporations, for example through high payroll taxes and laws reducing working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    [France struggling to take back the shortest hours title from Germany?]
  2. The HR answer blog - Working Hours and Overtime Calculations, 3/27 AllBusiness.com
    WASHINGTON, U.S.A. - ,,When training, or meetings, are mandatory and the company benefits it's considered working hours for overtime purposes. Even if the training is a team building class that includes fun, games and paint ball it will be counted towards a work week total... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, 3/25-26/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -



    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -

  • The Postal Service will cut 7,500 managers and shut seven district offices, amid big losses and declining mail volume, 3/25 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
  • Jobs move final, Fidelity tells governor, by Michael Levenson, 3/25 Boston Globe, B1.
    During a 45-minute meeting yesterday, Abigail Johnson apologized to Gov. Deval Patrick for the timing of the Fidelity announcement [while he was in England last week - ah, what was the whole purpose of that trip again, Deval??], but said the decision to move [1,100] financial jobs out of Massachusetts is irreversible. (Photo caption)
    ...Since 1996, Fidelity has received a state tax break designed to keep [its JOBS, not "mutual funds"!] from moving out of Massachusetts - what suckup reporting, Michael Levenson!]. At the time, the deal was estimated to save Fidelity [and cost taxpayers] about $20 million a year... Next Tuesday, the Massachusetts Senate plans to summon Fidelity executives to a hearing on the tax break..\..
    [High time this corrupt, unenforceable contract was nullified and these "poor little rich kids" paid up - or sank their hooks into some other patsy state. No organism needs a dumb parasite = the kind that harms its host.]
    He..asked Johnson if the Boston-based financial services firm was planning to move more jobs out of the state. "We were assured of their continuing commitment to Massachusetts," he said, without saying whether that amounted to a promise to keep the company's 7,300 remaining jobs here..\..
    [Deval, Deval, Deval - even if you got a promise, it's only worth the paper it's written on, and with the way CEOs are acting these days, there's no assurance even if you get it in writing!]
    .."Fidelity is a Massachusetts icon," he said....
    [No it isn't. It's a taxpayer tapeworm. Good riddance to any CEOs and corporations who can't figure out if they're private-sector or public-sector.]
    Johnson is a member of the Massachusetts Competitive Partnership, a group of about a dozen prominent chief executives, who counsel the governor on ways to create jobs in the state...
    [So Abigail is in a direct conflict of interest. And creating jobs is NOT a government responsibility. Government's sole responsibility is to referee the sharing of natural, private-sector, market-demanded employment by adjusting, usually downward, the state workweek to whatever level it takes to achieve and maintain full employment and full statewide markets. Or in other words, as Republican president Herbert Hoover put it in 1932, "The quickest way to create jobs is shorter hours." (Ben Hunnicutt, "Work Without End.") ]
    Johnson, the daughter of Fidelity's chairman, ignored shouted questions from reporters as she left the governor's office and ducked into a nearby elevator... The governor..acknowledged beforehand that there was nothing he could do to stop the jobs from leaving. Patrick described yesterday's exchange as "fulsome and candid"...
    [Possibly truer than either of them realizes, since oft-misused "fulsome" actually means "offensively excessive or insincere" or "disgusting" - look it up. Hopefully Deval used the term advisedly and used it to give the richbitch an elegant slap on her two-facedness. If only these people would commit suicide honestly and alone, instead of pushing everyone else ahead of them. Billionaire parasites, constantly breaking their contracts to any but one another - and even then - need to read The Suicidal Corporation, by Paul Weaver (sample: big business preaches free enterprise but practices big government - with disastrous results. In lobbying for tax loopholes, subsidies... corporations hurt not only the economy but themselves). And naive or corrupt politicians who give them taxbreaks ("doing 'good' with other people's money") need to get some watertight contracts from these wealthy leeches before making free with taxpayers' money, or better yet, showing them the door immediately - politicians' responsibility is NOT to "create jobs" but to referee private-sector worksharing to whatever extent required to see that they employ their own customers' customers and fund their own markets - it is definitely not taxpayers' responsibility. Abigail Johnson and her dumb-parasitic knockoffs have a four-word policy: Suicide, Everyone Else First.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Borders Group is seeking bankruptcy court approval to hand out as much as $8.3 million in executive bonuses, 3/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
    [American CEOs have become so suicidal they want BONUSES for going into BANKRUPTCY. Let's see how corrupt U.S. bankruptcy courts have become... if The Rest Of The Story even gets reported. This is what always happens at the end of an empire - the elite get sooo insulated and cushioned, they lose all touch with reality, and the empire is destroyed from within and from the top.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • [And speaking of losing touch with reality -]
    The price of taxing the rich - The top 1 percent of "earners" [our quotes] fill the ocffers of states like California, New York [& everywhere] during a boom - and leave them starving for revenue in a bust, 3/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1 (Review).
    [No, the top 1% fill the coffers of government during a big enough war to create a power-spreading labor shortage and institute highly graduated taxes, and the top 1% leave governments starving as peace, a frozen workweek, imports, immigration and births allow a power-concentrating labor surplus to develop so that the top 1% cut their taxes and redistribute more of the national income and wealth to themselves, people with way way more money than they can spend to keep it in fast circulation and eventually way more money than they can invest sustainably (or even give away) to keep it in slow circulation.]
    ,,Brad Williams..a former economic forecaster for \California thinks\ the real problem is..reliance on taxing the wealthy...
    [This genius flies in the face of Milton Friedman's dictum, "You get more of what you subsidize and less of what you tax." If he wants, as the prevailing self-destructive "wisdom" dictates, to tax everyone else besides the rich, he is essentially shifting taxes, again per current fashion, from investors to consumers, or more pointedly, from hoarders to spenders. But "you get less of what you tax" so this quickly gives you less consumer spending, and ... recession. In other words, the wealthy create downturns by redistributing more of the national income and wealth UP the income brackets from the huge-population lower and middle brackets to the tiny-population highest brackets, where it is decelerated and deactivated, useful only as status symbol rather than medium of exchange. But if you tax the rich, don't you get less rich people? Yes, but less hoarding is GOOD. And it's a lot better than taxing everyone else, alias spenders, because THEY are the economy and less spending is BAD. That's why the consumer base is called the consumer BASE (though it's seldom mentioned that it rests on the employment basement). It's the circulation of the currency that accounts for economic dynamism, not "investment" or rather, the pyramiding and bubble-blowing of "investors" in the financial markets, with P/E ratios of stocks far above historic norms because so much of M1 (the national money supply) has been concentrated and coagulated in the hands of so few, there is literally nowhere else to put that megascale of dough. And a few $100m financial transactions can't compare with the trillions of smaller transactions for providing economic dynamism. The wealthy are also inflationary, because money to them is seemingly infinite relative to ordinary price levels so it tends to lose its meaning and value for them except as status symbol, so they are relatively careless of it, wasting it frequently on mindboggling frivolities, or flinging it into nonsense like derivatives and Madoff schemes or million-dollar provisions for pets, while to everyone else, money is finite and budgeted and therefore optimized toward competitive pricing rather than status-flexing overpricing. (And then the wealthy have the nerve to demand that the Fed control inflation by raising interest rates - to reward themselves more for hoarding, oops, "saving" - thud discouraging business lending-expansion-hiring-comsumerreactivation - and clobbering the Growth they claim to want. Yes indeed, the wealthy create downturns in numerous ways. The solution? That magic power&money-spreading labor shortage via workweek reduction (rather than via war or epidemic. As technology and worksaving levels heighten, workweeks have to lower to maintain employment, otherwise there's fewer people with money to buy all the stuff the technology is producing = permanent recession (but quick, cook the definitions and the indexes to cover it up!).]
  • Nearly 30% of nuclear plants in the U.S. fail to report equipment flaws that could pose safety risks, the NRC said, 3/25 WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Audit: EDD has problems, but don't blame furloughs, 3/25 Sacramento Bee (blog)
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. - ..We also found that the former governor's furlough orders, which affected program representatives, had minimal impact on the department's performance because the average overtime hours worked by program representatives generally exceeded their average number of leave hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. A windfall courtesy of Will and Kate, 3/26 WashingtonPost.com
    DERBY, ENGLAND — The Royal Crown Derby porcelain factory ramped down to a four-day workweek two years ago, stung by the casual dining trend and a flood of cheap china from, well, China. But a sudden rush of business has its production floor of 150 workers back on full-time schedules, cranking out more gilded baubles and collectables fit-for-doilies than at any point in the past three decades... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, 3/23-24/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -



    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -

  • Termination of 38 jobs, 3/23 Le Devoir de Montreal, B2.
    LAVAL, Quebec - The pharmaceutical enterprise..Labopharm...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Japan - 13000 people missing roll call, 3/23 Le Droit de Gatineau-Ottawa, p.23.
  • Quake in Japan - 23000 dead and disappeared - 300 billions of dollars of damages - 126.7 times higher than normal for the rates of iodine 131, 3/23 Le Journal de Montreal, p.12.
    [The casualty rate increases from newspaper to newspaper.]
  • States pass budget pain to cities as cutbacks in services cascade, 3/24 NYT, A1.
  • Income rebounds unevenly, 3/24 WSJ, A4.
    [No kidding!]
  • Canada - When the economy goes, everything goes, 3/23 Le Journal de Montreal, p.6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Lauzon Announces the Next Phase of Canada's Economic Action Plan, 3/23 Seaway News via cornwallseawaynews.com
    OTTAWA, Ont., Canada -..Supporting Job Creation: a new Hiring Credit for Small Business to support job growth, supporting Ontario’s manufacturing sector by extending tax relief for investments in new equipment and machinery, an expanded work sharing program, and major new investments to help the agriculture, forestry and mining sectors grow... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Cost control is key for Toyota and its customers, 3/24 WorksManagement.co.uk
    LEEDS, U.K. - Strict control of costs, including a move to short-time working, enabled Toyota Material Handling's three European factories to remain in operation throughout the recession – despite a sharp decline in the forklift truck market of 50%... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • Heading for elections May 2, 3/23 Le Devoir de Montreal, A1.
    [Thank God - a chance to get rid of the secretive, Parliament-closing regime of Bush-loving prime minister Stephen Harper and his totally misnamed "conservatives"!]
    Editorial cartoon - After Tunis, Cairo, Tripoli... Ottawa?, by Garnotte, 3/23 Le Devoir de Montreal, A8.
    [The three opposition party leaders bearing protest signs march past PM Harper in full kingly regalia including crown -]
    Duceppe of Bloc Quebecois "Harper's disengaged," Ignatief of Liberals "Down with the despot," Layton of the New Democrats "Democracy for the people."
    Layton takes a plunge, Harper takes a fall, 3/23 La Presse de Montreal, A3.
    [transl.of: Layton plonge, Harper tombe]



    Today, sun-tue, 3/20-22/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Wireless giant formed - AT&T pays $39 billion in cash, stock for T-Mobile, 3/21 National Post, FP1.
    [Combined company would become America's largest wireless operator - Toronto Globe, A1.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Nuclear crisis in Japan - The situation still precarious, 3/22 Le Droit de Gatineau-Ottawa, p.16.
    [=transl.of: Crise nucléaire au Japon - La situation toujours précaire]
    Crisis in Japan - The future doesn't exist, Yves Boisvert in Sendai, 3/22 La Presse de Montreal, A1 pointer to A20.
    [=transl.of: Crise au Japon - Le futur n'existe pas]
  • Stampede to safety ends up where else? U.S. Treasuries, 3/21 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [And with Congress digging its debt gulf deeper instead of making the super-rich pay themselves back, how much safety in Treasuries?]
  • United States - Home resales plunge in February, 3/22 Ottawa Citizen, D1.
  • Canada - "Conservative" spending blitz [our quotes] runs $1 billion, 3/20 Ottawa Citizen, A3.
  • Ottawa - Office vacancies in city hit 5-year high - Relocations, mergers behind the increase, 3/22 Ottawa Citizen, D1.
  • It's budget day - Look who's holding the cards, 3/22 Toronto Globe, A1.
    ..Jack Leighton..leader of NDP..Canada's fourth political party..35 seats in Parliament...
    [If Leighton caves and takes baubles for allowing the radical, totalitarian, secret-gov't, Bush-worshipping "Conservatives" to continue, Canada is roadkill.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. No work in sight: An exclusive report on SLO County unemployment - Despite signs the economy is improving [what signs??], times remain tough for the long-term unemployed, whose numbers continue to rise, 3/20 San Luis Obispo [SLO] Tribune via sanluisobispo.com
    SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. - ..Appelbaum noted that more employers in California could be taking advantage of workshare or short-time work programs, which allow employers who need to trim expenses to keep people on the payroll... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Ich bin ein example: What we can learn from Germany about jobs, 3/22 The Upshot via news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thelookout
    BERLIN, Germany -..First, Germany has focused very directly on protecting existing jobs. Through its *"Kurz-arbeit" program program, the government provides subsidies to employers who avoid laying off workers during periods of low demand; instead bosses are encouraged merely to reduce the hours that employees work. Employers themselves have also created more flexible arrangements with their workers: Under a system of "working time accounts," employees work overtime without additional pay when demand is high during boom times, then during the downturn work shorter hours, again at regular pay. The system helps everyone better weather the ups and downs of the economy without the need for layoffs... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Image of France as a generous welfare state marred by grim reality - Hervé Boulhol, the OECD's France expert, says the French finances have deteriorated for the last 35 years, 3/21 Manchester Guardian via guardian.co.uk
    PARIS, France - ..This perplexing need to adopt both sides of the argument has paralysed debate, especially on pensions and the totemic 35 hour week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Instead of adopting flexible adjustment of the workweek against unemployment as more and more technology takes over human employment, France went for just another frozen level. And 35 hours is hardly radical considering many US sectors (colleges, insurance companies, NGOs,...) have a 35-hour workweek with no government intervention. Then there's the 30-hour workweek bill the U.S. Senate passed in 1933... France doesn't seem to have a clue what it's doing right, let alone how to upgrade it.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, 3/18-19/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Enemies of progress -.- The secession of the successful, 3/19 The Economist magazine of London, Special report p.9.
    Hollywood, Silicon Valley or any of the other places where successful Californians gather show a profound contempt for their government. At the most extreme, such people have walled themselves off in gated communities, with their own security, health services and even schools... Philanthropy continues [at lower percentages than in all lower brackets], but remarkably little goes into beautifying their environment (Silicon Valley is the ugliest industrial cluster imaginable). Similar complaints can be heard in other centres of elitism: Wall Street does not do much about the Bronx, and the City of London usually ignores the East End... Both globalisation and the Internet have increased this sense of separation...
    [Maybe globalization, like taxes per Leona Helmsley, is only for 'the little people.' This self-insulation and -isolation of the richest blocks the important kind of feedback, negative feedback (the kind that indicates needed change) from getting to the decision-makers, and is probably the single major reason for the decline and fall of empires, as ours seems to be doing. The wealthy, of course, are convinced they're not out of touch since they believe that money can buy anything, even though they spend a lot of it to get and stay beyond reach = out of touch, and they're well aware of F.Scott Fitzgerald's "the rich are different." The accumulating damage to their host social, political, economic and ecological systems will make their gated communities and security systems more and more expensive and less and less effective, and the more money they accumulate (and decirculate) to compensate, the faster their economic foundations will crumble...]
  • The G7 flies to the aid of the yen - The central banks have led a concerted action to brake the [inflationary] take-off of the Japanese currency, 3/19 Le Devoir de Montréal, C3.
  • Radiation continues to threaten - Attempts to cool heated nuclear reactors not deemed successful, 3/18 Ottawa Metro, p.1 pointer to p.14.
  • Overseas travel lags in January, 3/18 Ottawa Metro, p.18.
  • Pickpockets proliferate on the Internet, 3/19 La Presse de Montréal, B1.
    [So, virtual pickpockets picking virtual pockets...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Wash. State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' - in each case, more jobs would have been lost without the hours-cuts or furloughs -
  1. Menasha's unionized city workers to take first of six furlough days Monday - Furloughs begin for Menasha's union workers, 3/19 Appleton Post Crescent via postcrescent.com
    MENASHA, Wisc. — Six furlough days for about 50 unionized city workers, the first of which comes Monday, should be accomplished without any real disruption of services, said Mayor Don Merkes. "Employees and management worked together to find the best method to maintain services to the community while filling a gap in the 2011 budget," said Merkes... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Italian youth unemployment reaches thirty percent, 3/18 World Socialist Web Site via wsws.org
    ROME, Italy - ..Workers at Fiat and other companies that are repeatedly put on short-time working are still categorised as “employed”; this despite the fact they struggle to make ends meet and are dependent on the cassa integrazione, short-term government funds... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, 3/16-17/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Fear, fall, rebound, by David Pett, 3/16 Financial Post, FP1.
    Faced with the very real threat of Japan on the brink of nuclear disaster, investors lost their resolve ["resolve"??] and fearing the worst, sent global stock markets into free fall on Tuesday. Before cooler heads could prevail and cut the sell-off in half, more than US$1 trillion in equity was wiped out across major indexes around the world.
    [With grotesquely exaggerated P/E ratios, there were no fundamentals for it anyway.]
    The panic folloowed the third explosion ata the Fukushima Daiichi muclear complex that released high levels of radiation into the Japanese air...
    [But it's probably blowing our way...]
  • The slow-moving nightmare - No end in sight in Japan's nuclear crisis while snow hampers relief efforts on coast, 3/17 National Post, A1.
  • Surprises rock global recovery, 3/17 Financial Post, FP1.
    - Europe's sovereign debt crisis
    [The least serious first (just a matter of the wealthy paying themselves back)? Oh, because the States' is much worse and this distracts attention? When in doubt, whack Europe!]
    - Overthrow of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak
    - Revolution in Libya, protests in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia
    - Japan's nuclear meltdown, post-tsunami
    Damages...could total US$200B, 3/17 Financial Post, FP1 pointer to FP2.
    [A mere bagatelle compared to the $700B that was stolen from U.S. taxpayers to "bail out" the richest in 2008 - racall Paul Krugman on Monday -]
  • Another inside job - Abusive bankers and their political friends, 3/17 NY Times, A21.
    [Last paragraph -]
    ...In the days and weeks ahead, we'll see pro-banker politicians denounce the proposed settlement [between state attys general and the mtg srvcg industrly] , asserting that it's all about defending the rule of law. But what they're actually defending is the exact opposite - a system in which only the little people [Que: "nous autres"] have to obey the law, while the rich and bankers especially can cheat and defraud without consequences.
    [This is much more lethal than all of Japan's host of problems. The USA is being destroyed from within and from the top. The good news for the rest of the world is, this once-great, now hypocritical, "democratic" bully is history, committing suicide by victimizing its 270 million little people first. "Cry the beloved country" yes, but under the circumstances, and from the viewpoint of very long-term human progress, "Whew! What a relief!" This was a nation whose elite had become too sophisticated for their own good, especially in the area of 'framing' events and spindoctoring. When the wealthy decision-makers believe their own happytalk, it's the beginning of the end.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. The early bird gets... Nothing, 3/16 Graphic via .pepperdine-graphic.com
    NEW YORK NY(?) - ..The most baffling revelation is that there is little or no correlation between average annual income and average hours worked when compared by nation... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Not baffling at all. Just basic market forces of supply and demand. There's no relation between pay/income and hours but there is a corelation between average annual income and perceived shortage of labor, and the shorter the hours, the 'shorter' (scarcer) the labor and the higher the wage levels and the average annual income. Generally the longest hours go with the lowest pay AND vice versa on a system-wide basis, but the system can be a city, state, region or nation.]
  2. Health official calls for observance of working hours, 3/17 AngolaPress via portalangop.co.ao
    LUANDA, Angola – The chairperson of Physicians Order, Carlos Pinto de Sousa, asked Thursday the health professionals to fulfil their responsibilities, specially those related to observance of normal working hours at public institutions with a view to provide better services to the patients... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, 3/13-15/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway will pay $9 billion for chemical maker Lubrizol, the investor's latest foray into the industrial sector, 3/15 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Q: Gosh oh golly, surely you don't mean the Wizard of Omaha isn't a "real CEO"?! A: Not if you consider a real CEO wouldn't be dissing the Market by abstracting vast revenues from their sources instead of reinvesting them at the source and using the excess from market coincidence to spread value organically throughout the economy, Instead, like the usual condescending philanthropist, he steals from and distorts the Market and then turns around and redistributes at his market-ignoring whim, and redistributes without appreciable centrifugation. Plus in Buffett's case, he doesn't even do his own philanthropy so the distribution is even more giantized and less centrifuged and deconcentrated. Buffett just turns over his charity billions to the Gates Foundation. As Lao Tzu says, Verily mankind has been under a delusion for many a day.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Japan races to avert a nuclear meltdown - Explosion rocks one crippled reactor; second unit is failing - Monster tsunami claimed whole communities; death toll soars [up to 1700 est.], 3/13 Boston Sunday Globe, A1.
    Cascading disaster in Japan - Blast shakes a second reactor; death toll soars [over 10,000] - US nuclear industry gets more scrutiny - So far, little fear of a new Chernobyl, 3/14 Boston Globe, A1.
    [There will be a grisly economic silver lining to this complex-compound disaster. We used to create those wage-raising, prosperity-bringing labor shortages with wars or plagues but they're both ineffectual now, war because of robotics and plagues because of modern medicine. But here are a couple of things that still work: earthquakes and seismic waves. A meltdown would be a gory economic bonus if it doesn't blow away half the planet. Capitalism always deteriorates with a wage&market-depressing labor surplus but works hummingly with a mgmt-perceived labor "shortage" (as during the world wars and their "wartime prosperity") that gets employers bidding against one another for good help, raises wage levels, gets the national income spread out to the hundreds of millions of non-rich people who really want and need to spend it, and the rising tide floats all boats including the rich who now have marketable productivity to invest in instead of a down-staircase of investment bubbles, popping one after another. And hopefully this Japanese nuclear episode will nip in the bud the current attempt to rehab the nuclear industry in America and instead, kill it dead. This is a technology that is appropriate on the surface of a star, not a planet -]
  • Nuclear industry expects scrutiny after leaks, reactor blast, 3/13 BSG, A10.
    [Here's hoping it runs into extinction, not just scrutiny - before it extincts US/us.]
  • Showdown in Wisconsin - Next stop [ie: target], corporate contracts, 3/14 letter to editor from Jim Palermo of Southampton (Massachusetts USA), Boston Globe, A8.
    I have an idea for how governments can save money. All they have to do is get local and state legislatures to unilaterally change the terms of contracts that they have with the private-sector companies with whom ["whom" because corporate personhood has been reasserted despite not natural but artificial "persons"] they do business. That is essentially what Wisconsin did to its public employees ("Wis.Senate bypasses Democrats, strips bargaining rights," BG 3/10, A5).
    So, inasmuch as the Supreme Court ruled that corporations are "persons" whose constitutional rights must be preserved, why should they be treated any differently than natural-born persons, such as teachers, health care workers, police, and firefighters, whose constitutional rights apparently do not protect the terms and conditions of their contracts?
    I move that all respective legislatures serve notice on all their corporate suppliers and service providers [especially in the military-industrial complex], that the amounts the states [and the federal gov't] are contractually obligated to pay shall be reduced by 15 percent.
  • The rich write the tax code, letter to editor by Remy Shapiro via e-mail, Boston Metro, p.19.
    We know that the right wing is lying about taxing the rich. Their excuse that high taxes will force the wealthy out of the U.S. can't be true: America had a 75% rate on the rich before Reagan decided to bankrupt our country by drdopping it to 30 [or 38?]%. America was leading the world when we taxed the rich; now we don't tax the rich and our nation has the largest debt in human history, [owed to its own rich and to the Chinese!] Do the math.
    Also, can anyone explain to me why we don't tax the church? Why are we subsidizing religion? Doesn't that violate the First Amendment?
    [Hear, hear! on both points. But as Jared Diamond's book "Collapse" demonstrates, a number of human societies throughout history have carelessly chosen failure instead of success time after time, and Exhibit A is Easter Island. It's just sad when within a large population, like 300 million Americans, a very few people, like the richest 30,000, have so much power and bubbleheadedness that they can basically commit suicide-everyone else first.]
  • Vital signs - Americans' equity in their homes slipped further last year [to $6.3T from $6.7T in 2009], 3/15 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
  • Bernanke is changing his tune when discussing inflation in public.., 3/15 WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    ..in part to avert criticism that central bankers are out of touch with consumers.
    [They ARE out of touch with consumers. He'd have a much easier time if he focused on the other Fed mandate he's been ignoring, cut unemployment, and get off the interminable and irrelevant B.S. about inflation, which is going both ways at once because he and all his predecessors have been ignoring unemployment for so long.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Postal Service, APWU agree to four-year-plus contract, 3/15 DMnews.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. -..WWD [Women's Wear Daily] also reports that some retailers remain closed on Tuesday, or planned shorter hours. - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Armstrong chamber serves up Service Canada, 3/13 BCLocalNews.com
    ARMSTRONG, B.C., Canada - ..Topics of interest to business owners and employers will include ROE (Record of Employment) on the Web, work sharing and changes to Canada Pension Plan. This networking event is the third of the 2011 ‘Business-4-Breakfast’ networking seminars in a series presented by the Armstrong Spallumcheen Chamber of Commerce... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Cap work week at 36 hours, 3/14 Tasmania Mercury via themercury.com.au
    HOBART, Tasmania - Tasmanians should not have to work longer than 36 hours a week, Unions Tasmania secretary Kevin Harkins said yesterday. Mr Harkins..said it was important to remember that people worked to live, not lived to work. He said instead of working more hours compared with 30 years ago, Tasmanians should be working fewer. "A 36-hour week, that's a nine-day fortnight, would be a good point to aim for," he said. Mr Harkins said such an arrangement, already adopted by the Victorian construction industry, offered improved productivity with fewer stressed and/or sick workers... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. JAPAN QUAKE: Power Shortage Hits East Japan As Crisis Worsens, 3/15 AutomatedTrader.net
    TOKYO, Japan - ..Seven & i Holdings Inc, the nation's leading retail group, said it will close some of its 7,800 outlets, including Seven Eleven convenience stores, and shorten working hours to save power... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Banks Cut Hours, Allow Work From Home as Japan Reels From Quake, 3/15 Bloomberg.com
    TOKYO, Japan - JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) and Credit Suisse Group AG (CSGN) are among global banks allowing employees to work from home or leave the office early as Japan’s strongest earthquake disrupts public transport in Tokyo... - see whole article under today's date.
  6. Capcom slashes Street Fighter IV iPhone to 115 yen/59p/99c, pledges proceeds to tsunami victims, 3/15 PocketGamer.co.uk
    TOKYO, Japan - ..Friday’s earthquake and tsunami means that millions of people in Japan are still without electricity, and Capcom has promised to close or shorten hours at its amusement centres and offices in areas that are powered by Tokyo Electric Power or Tohoku Electric Power if necessary... - see whole article under today's date.
  7. Japan Fashion Week is Canceled, 3/15 NBC New York via nbcnewyork.com/blogs
    TOKYO, Japan -..Women's Wear Daily also reports that some retailers remain closed on Tuesday, or planned shorter hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, 3/11-12/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Families slice debt to lowest in six years, by Lahart & Whitehouse, 3/11 Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [Defaulting on debt cannot be described as "slicing" debt by any stretch of the imagination or of the spindoctoring -]
    U.S. families - by defaulting on their loans and scrimping on expenses - are shouldering a smaller debt burden in 2010 than at any point in the previous six years, putting them in a position to start spending more.
    [Wha-a-at? This is about as tortured as the reasoning of happytalking Wall Streeters can get. People DEFAULTING on loans and SCRIMPING on spending are supposedly in a position to "start spending more"? How stupid do they think their readers are? This is nothing but a dramatic example of our increasingly detached-from-reality, bubble-blowing financial community straining to turn bad news into good. Here's more of this sugar-coated disaster -]
    Total U.S. household debt, including mortgages and credit cards, fell for the second straight year in 2010 to $13.4 trillion, the Federal Reserve reported Thursday. That came to 116% of disposable income, down from a peak debt burden of 130% in 2007, and the lowest level since the fourth quarter of 2004...
    [Investors were not taken in -]
    The Dow...skidded 228.46, or 1.87%, to 11984.61 on Thursday...
    [But the main story carefully finds other reasons -]
  • Dow below 12000 on Mideast worries - Troubles in Europe and China add to jitters; DJIA slides 228.48..., 3/11 WSJ, C1.
    [So was it 228.46 or 228.48? A cardinal principle of textual criticism is LEGIVSDIFFICILIORPOTEST, the more difficult reading prevails - and since it's easier to write 28.48 than 28.46, we must preserve the more difficult 6.]
  • Unemployment high among young veterans, 3/12 AP via Boston Globe, A2.
    WASHINGTON - More than 20% of young Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans were unemployed last year, the Labor Dept. said yesterday. Concerns that...veterans might have mental health issues or lack civilian work skills appear to be factors keeping the unemployment rate for the veterans at 20.9%.
    That is a slight drop from the year before, but still well over the 17.3% rate for nonveterans of the same 18-24 age group... For Iraq and Afghanistan veterans of all ages, the unemployment rate last year was 11.5%. The problem has persisted despite government and private initiatives designed to help them..\..
    [So quit the excuses and CUT THE WORKWEEK to create more jobs. We did it for over 100 years. One thousand 80-hr/wk jobs became two thousand 40-hr/wk jobs. Is there something magic and eternal about FORTY? No. It's an historical accident. God did not hand it down to Moses on Mt. Sinai with the Ten Commandments. In fact, He handed down the six-day workweek which, based on 10-hr days, is a 60-hour workweek, so we're already "disobeying the Bible" with 20 hours a week "more laziness." We should all be living in an automated and robotized heaven by now of shorter hours and higher pay, but we've turned the promise of technology, more Freedom, into a curse, more insecurity, but downsizing the workforce instead of the workweek ("timesizing"). This has merely made it easier for people, not to earn an honest independent living, but to turn to crime or dependency -]
    Iraq veteran Christopher Kurz, 28..just moved back in with his parents in Arizona after spending two years looking for law enforcement work in New York. Kurz said his time as a military police officer in Iraq and aboard a nuclear aircraft carrier did not seem to translate into a job...
    [Chris, your last name is the first part of the term for "worksharing" in German, Kurz-arbeit, meaning short work or as the Brits would say, short-time work. Germany has just breezed through the recession with a nationwide program of Kurzarbeit and come out with its lowest unemployment rate since 1992. Is there ANY chance that Americans will smarten up and copy them? So far only 20 U.S. states have worksharing programs. Check out the additional story of a 30-year-old North Carolina veteran who's having his hours cut and has also been forced to move back in with his parents. This is a disgrace and it's all unnecessary. Let's quit arguing against it and get going on sharing the vanishing work in the Robotics Age. Technology's supposed to be good for us, not a source of job insecurity, but we'll never get to the "good" unless we stop the downsizing and replace it with emergency worksharing and permanent timesizing, no matter how short a workweek it takes to achieve full employment and full markets.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Worsening Scenario . . . - Work and finding a Job, 3/12 wrongplanet.net
    PIEDMONT REGION, N.C. - ..Currently one of the jobs has cut back over half the hours I used to work (ie 28 hours/week down to 14), and will likely cut more this coming week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Only one thing to do. Quit pretending we have enough 40-hour workweek jobs for everyone in the age of automation and robotics, quit straining for enough artificial makework to maintain that pre-computer workweek forever, and just divvy up and share the vanishing human employment. It's the only ticket there is to a future worth living. And it's a better future because paradoxically, wages will go UP as the workweek goes DOWN and soaks up the wage-depressing surplus of resumes.]
  2. What the future holds for the aging ex-Maytag worker - ..Working longer, harder for less, 3/11 Knox News via Galesburg Register-Mail via galesburg.com
    GALESBURG, Illin. — ..Although employees in their 30s report greater household incomes than they had at Maytag, they also work longer hours now: 80% of those in their 30s work overtime in their current job, an average of 52 hours a week; 38% of those in their 40s and 37% of those in their 50s work overtime, but their average hours per week are lower. Those in their 40s reported working an average of 41 hours per week, while those in their 50s worked an average of 41, and those in their 60s averaged 35 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Four-day state workweek reax, 3/12 Statesman Journal (blog) via community.statesmanjournal.com
    SALEM, Ore. - The idea being floated of a four-day workweek [10-hr days] for state employees has garnered a lot of reader attention. Here's one e-mail I received this week from Keizer resident Eunice Porter pointing out some flaws in the notion... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, 3/09-10/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Dynegy warns of Chapter 11, 3/09 WSJ, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Crude-oil prices rise toward a break point [$120/bbl - currently hovering around $105], 3/09 WSJ, C1.
  • Authorities in the UK and Iceland arrested nine men, including two property moguls, in connection with the collapse of Iceland's Kaupthing Bank, 3/10 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to C3.
  • Marketers celebrate glimmers of recovery, 3/10 NYT, B3.
    [But with no fundamentals, glimmers of recovery are just turbulence in the diagonal deathspiral. And here's why -]
  • World's richest billionaire is Carlos Slim [Helu, at $74B] of Mexico, Forbes says, 3/10 AP via NYT, B4.
    [Funny this isn't frontpage news. Is it hidden in a small flat rectangular article at the bottom of an even-numbered page in case it turns controversial?]
    The global ranks of billionaires have added 199 people in the last year, but none came close to unseating Mexico's Carlos Slim Helu, the world's richest man, who added $20.5 billion to his coffers, according to Forbes magazine's annual tally.
    [199 more billionaires at the cost of, say, 1,000,000,000 more poverty cases, since the more of the money supply you redistribute up the income brackets, the more you slow down the velocity of circulation. Why? Because the more money you have, the smaller the percentage you spend. This process is the recession-creating process, and since it's proceeding uncontrolled by labor shortage, the global economy is going down, desperately spun as "recovering" by the bubble-dwelling investment industry.]
    The number of people on Forbes' list climbed to 1,210 billionaires, setting a record with combined wealth of $4.5 trillion. That's up from $3.6 trillion last year...
    [And that, folks, is up 25%. The world is heading back into the Dark Ages thanks to the stupidity and cupidity of the morons at the top, who are everywhere sacrificing their foundations for ... pecking order. How? Oh, by sloughing off taxes and toughening bankruptcy laws and loosening banking regulations and, most of all, resisting, and silencing discussion of, labor-surplus reduction via workweek reduction. Capitalism has always and only run well under conditions of labor shortage to prevent this concentration and deactivation of M1, the money supply, in a tiny population at the top. That's where we get "wartime prosperity" - from a wage-boosting labor shortage achieved in the most wasteful and risky way that eliminates a lot of potential consumers as a negative side effect. (Japan is about to have an economic boomlet from its earthquake disaster.) How to achieve wartime prosperity without war? CUT THE WORKWEEK. We did it for over 100 years, from over 80 hours a week in 1840 to the 40-hour week in 1940 - but we've frozen it ever since - and sacrificed the one-income family, our living standards, and our future. But if we ever wake up, our deterioration is easy to reverse. Twenty states have already established beachhead programs, and Germany breezed through the last downturn with theirs ("Kurz-arbeit").]
    No. 2 on the list is Bill Gates, the co-founder of Microsoft and now a philanthropist, with networth of $56 billion. Forbes noted that Mr. Gates, once the world's wealthiest man, has given $30 billion to the Gates Foundation...
    [I'm sorry but charity just doesn't cut it. Any system that relies for vital functions (like centrifuging and circulating the money supply) on something as centralized and capricious/unsystemic as charity, is lethally flawed. And it's amazing that Gates doesn't realize this. Wars and plagues used to deconcentrate the money supply and restore prosperity much "better" by harnessing market forces in response to a labor shortage. Now wars are too robotized to kill enough Americans to provide this "magic" labor shortage, and modern medicine has become too efficacious for the plague "solution" to work. And the kneejerk downsizing response to automation and robotization, instead of 'timesizing,' just makes labor shortage more elusive. Occasional CEO whining about labor shortage is really about training shortage because CEOs today are too spoiled to train. And the only charities that are set up to receive money on a large scale are wealthy charities, so Gates and his fellow gated-estate-dwellers are essentially just "taking coals to Newcastle." Any time they try to inject a million or even "just" halfamillion into a poor situation, they just send that situation into shock and make it a magnet for crime. It happens every day-week-year with our foreign "aid." Much harder to find poor countries we've really helped than poor countries we've tried to help that now have a very very (small and) rich elite. Any further real progress on this planet depends on getting beyond this boring obsession with "getting rich," and Timesizing and its successor programs are the most market-oriented, diverse, gentle and gradual correctives. They will happen in some form or this planet will become a big Easter Island disaster, as so many parts of it already have (see Jared Diamond's book "Collapse."]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Can I collect unemployment benefits if my hours were greatly reduced even though i'm still employed? 3/10 Yahoo! ANSWERS via answers.yahoo.com
    SAINT PAUL, Minn. - I live in the state of Minnesota and my hours went from full time-45 hours per week to part time-28 hours per week but the catch is that I'm still employed with them... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Bill would change hours teens can work during school year, 3/09 BangorDailyNews.com
    AUGUSTA, Maine - "..Maine is considerably more restrictive than anybody else in New England. Not just a little bit, a lot,” said Dick Grotton of the restaurant group. “We’re just trying not to be the bottom rung of the ladder. The next up is Connecticut — they restrict hours of work per day to six rather than four... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Hey, at least they're raising people's consciousness, and ire...]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    Today, sun-tue, 3/06-08/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -
  • Western Digital a-greed to buy Hitachi's disk-drive business for $4.3 billion in cash and stock, a deal that will create a dominant supplier of hard drives, 3/08 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Sound the trumpets! We have a new term for "monopoly" = a "dominant supplier"...]
  • LVMH will take a controlling stake in Bulgari [market value ca.$3.22B], underscoring the French group's acquisitive streak as the luxury market rebounds.., 3/07 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Too bad the luxury market is such a small percentage of the whole.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • MERS? It may have swallowed your loan, by Powell & Morgenson, 3/06 New York Times, BU1.
    For more than a decade, the American real estate market resembled an overstuffed novel... Mortgage brokers hip deep in profits handed out no-doc mortgages to people with fictional incomes. Wall Street shopped bundles of these loans to investors, no matter how unappetizing the details. And federal regulators gave sleepy nods. That world collapsed under the weight of its improbabilities in 2008.
    But a piece of that world survives on Library Street in Reston, Va., where an obscure business, the MERS Corp., claims to hold title to roughly half of all home mortgages in the nation - an astonishing 60 million loans.
    Never heard of MERS? That's fine with the mortgage banking industry - as MERS is starting to overheat and sputter. If its many detractors are correct, this private corporation, with a full-time staff of fewer than 50 employees, could turn out to be a very public problem for the mortgage industry...
  • The Fed wants to see more evidence of the "recovery's" sustainability [our quotes] before pulling back on stimulus efforts, 3/07 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Oo. Evidence. Tough one!]
  • Stocks declined as investors continued to fret over rising oil prices... The Dow industrials fell 70.85 points, or 0.7%, to close at 12090.03.., 3/08 WSJ, A1 pointer to C6.
    The tech-heavy Nasdaq lost 1.4%.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Fox's Mark Fitzgerald Provides Testimony to Pa. House Education ..., 3/06 Education Law via educationlaw.foxrothschild.com
    HARRISBURG, Pa. - ..Undoubtedly, if all furloughs, including economic furloughs, allowed for multiple factors in combination to determine which employee to furlough ... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. International Women's Day - A hundred years, 3/07 (3/08) Dhaka Daily Star via TheDailyStar.net
    DHAKA, Bangladesh - ..In 1857, 15,000 women workers in garment factories demonstrated and marched through New York City demanding shorter working hours, better wages and voting rights. They were attacked by baton-wielding police... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Women's Rights: 100 years later, 3/08 SriLankaGuardian.org
    COLOMBO, Sri Lanka - International Women’s Day grew from women’s struggles starting in the early 1900s when women were deep in the struggle for the right to vote, the right to work for fair and equal pay, shorter working hours, the right to free expression and respect which was often denied them in society. So this is the centenary celebration which is to be held on 8th March, this year... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, 3/04-05/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Google will continue to be aggressive in pursuing acquisitions, even after its failure to land Groupon, 3/05 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Common syndrome these days in the topside of the dual economy = more money than sense. How about reinvesting in their own mission, raising wages and lowering prices?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Jobless rate falls further [to 8.9% in Feb.]... But data mask a troubling rise in people dropping out of the labor force, 3/05 Wall Street Journal, A1.
    [and into self-employment with no clients, welfare, disability, homelessness, prison and suicide.]
  • World food prices rose to a new high in Feb., the UN said..,
    3/04 WSJ, A1 pointer to C8.
  • Europe's signals it may raise interest rates to tamp down inflation, 3/04 NYT, B3.
    [Only insulated and isolated central bankers could fear inflation in a deepening downturn - but then, they're the ones trying to spin 9% up after 90% down as a 'recovery'...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Furloughs, staff cuts, bus fees could help D-11 balance budget, 3/05 Colorado Springs Gazette via gazette.com
    COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -..A single furlough day for [school] district employees would save more than $800,000 on a day that was just for staff, such as a professional development day. Food service and transportation employees normally don't work on the 12 such days in the school year [anyway]... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Furloughs Loom for Belmont Teachers Next Year, 3/04 Patch.com
    REDWOOD CITY, Calif. -..The Belmont-Redwood Shores School District Board of Trustees approved tentative agreements with district employees and teachers Thursday night that pave the way for four furlough days for the 2011-2012. ...The four furlough days the board had approved for this school year have been reinstated after the district was able to come up with enough money to keep all 180 school days... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, 3/02-03/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • PPL will buy the UK's second-largest electricity distributor from Germany's E.ON for $5.6 billion in cash and assumed debt, 3/02 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B2.
  • China to buy US plane maker [Cirrus Industries, for $??],
    3/3 WSJ, B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The House passed a bill to fund the government for two more weeks, and Senate leaders say they will follow suit as early as Wed., 3/02 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to A5.
    [Pathetic.]
  • The SEC is scrutinizing US banks that have restructured troubled loans to make them appear healthier than they really are.., 3/3 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Vital[?] signs - The construction slump continued in January..,
    3/02 WSJ, graph caption A1.
  • Ohio vote puts curbs on unions.., 3/3 WSJ, A1.
    [Nothing to curb management? Then there's even less to maintain consumer spending = 70% of the economy...]
  • US crude-oil futures settled above $102 a barrel and gold hit an all-time high as fighting in Libya stoked worries.., 3/3 WSJ, A1 pointer to C10.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. The Battle Over Budget Cuts, by Dean Baker, 3/02 CounterPunch.org
    WASHINGTON, D.C. -..If they think increased stimulus is an impossible lift at this point, why not argue the case for work-sharing? We can encourage employers to shorten hours instead of laying people off. If we can reduce the rate of layoffs by just 10%, this would translate into almost 2.5m additional jobs over the course of a year... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Should Teachers Be Furloughed? 3/3 WILK-FM via wilknewsradio.com
    HARRISBURG, Penn. - Should Teachers Be Furloughed? Businesses can furlough workers when times are tight. But, should the same logic apply to Pennsylvania's school teachers?... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.