Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
February 2-28 + 3/01/2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Harvard Sq PO Box 117, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. German unemployment falls further in February, 3/01 FinanceMarkets.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. - Germany, which is Europe’s largest economy, saw a further fall in the number of people out of work in February to 3.07 million – the lowest since September 1992. The Federal Labour Office said unemployment dropped by 52,000 in February, taking the unemployment rate to 7.3%, from January‘s 7.4%. The country’s job market has performed much better than in many other countries and many believe it is the result of the “Kurz-arbeit” scheme, introduced by the German Government, designed to prevent mass redundancies. Last year, Germany’s unemployment rate plunged to 7.7% from 8.2% in 2009 as a result of the Government initiative... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Republicans Are A Strong Force Against Any Other Unemployment Measures, 2/28 DailyNewsPulse.com
    WASHINGTON DC? - Currently, 17 states [make that 20] have opted into the “short-time compensation” or “work-sharing” program within their unemployment insurance system, which allows workers to receive partial benefits from the unemployment insurance system if their hours have been reduced, not just if they lost their job or their pay is reduced... Mark Zandi estimates that the multiplier for the short-term [typo for short-time?] compensation program would be relatively high: for every dollar spent on the program, $1.69 would be added to our economy’s output... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Short time working at Malaga, 2/28 PortStrategy.com
    MALAGA, Spain - Malaga's port labour company, SEMA, is to introduce short time working, which will affect 72 of its 180 stevedores. This is the result of a decision by Maersk to substantially reduce the amount of containers it handles in the port... - see whole article under today's date.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Old Saybrook cuts budget by 3% - Selectmen support $14.8 million plan, 2/26 TheDay.com
    OLD SAYBROOK, Conn. -.. Meanwhile, social services coordinator Sue Consoli's hours are projected to increase from 28 hours a week to 32, and the selectmen's two secretaries - who currently work 32 hours a week - are projected to increase to full-time hours, or 35 hours a week, Pace said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [It's less disruptive and disincentivating to decrease and increase the workweek than to decrease and increase jobs.]
  2. Catfish companies to cut hours, institute layoffs in H1, 2/25 Fish Information & Services via FIS.com
    ITTA BENA, Miss. - Mississippi-based company Heartland Catfish will exercise temporary layoffs and cut its employees' hours during the first half of this year... - see whole article under today's date.
    [It's more team-building and morale-boosting to avoid as many layoffs as possible by cutting as many hours as it takes and keeping employees employed and consumers spending.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, FEB.23-24/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Holly and Frontier Oil a-greed to merge, underscoring the continued consolidation of the refining sector, 2/23 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to B2.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -
  • Most Canadian cities won't match 2010 growth this year, report finds - Government expected to shed about 7,000 jobs, 2/23 Ottawa Citizen, D3.
    [And you can't get growth alias UPsizing out of DOWNsizing.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES and CLOSINGS in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Diminishing returns - Fine furniture store bids farewell - Age, market competition persuade DeBoer's owner to close Ottawa, Toronto outlets - ..Store weathered tough economic times - 'This recession has been the worst since the Great Depression. Its impact is lingering [or accelerating?] still. Not so much in Ottawa, but in Toronto and other cities' - Barry Nabatian..analyst, 2/23 Ottawa Citizen, D1,D4.

    PRISONS in the news (archives) -
  • Canadians agree with building more jails - But majority want to know cost: poll, 2/23, Ottawa Citizen, A6.
    [So is Harper's totalitarian Canada determined to copy every single suicidal move of the once-great USofA in the past 40 years? Today's USA has the largest prison population in the world, even "besting" Russia. But maybe there's hope because only -]
    26% of Canadians..say they would be comfortable with the "Conservatives" [our quotes - these people are radicals, not conservatives] winning a majority after the next election..., 2/23 Toronto Globe, A1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Arab unrest stuns markets - Oil soars, stocks fall as Libyan rebels [or freedom-fighters?] take energy zone; Ports are closed, 2/23 WSJ, A1.
  • U.S. crude oil prices settled at 28% higher at $98.10 after touching $100... The Dow industrials slid 107.01 points to 12105.78, 2/24 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Canuck "take" -]
    Stock markets slip on oil fears - U.S. crude hits 30-month highs on concern Libya unrest may spread,
    2/23 Ottawa Citizen, D1.
  • Wages - Cutbacks put hold on raises, 2/23 (Ottawa Citizen or Toronto Globe?)
    ..Choppy [or no] economic growth, an uncertain outlook and slack in the labour market - with roughly 1.5 million Canadians unemployed - put a dent on wage settlements [yielding] an average of 1.8% increase for 2010...
    [At least Canadians are still talking about raises - in contrast to Americans...]
  • 'Dual price shock' threatens economies - The costs of energy and food are skyrocketing at the same time and the ramifications for all countries are dire, 2/23 Toronto Globe, B7.
  • Weak retail sales add to global uncertainty, by Julian Beltrame, 2/23 Toronto Globe, B8.
    Canada's consumers ended 2010 on a miserly note...
    [It couldn't possibly be that they don't have the money now, could it ... naw, they're just holding back out of orneryness despite worsening the downturn... - this seems to be the mainstream explanation, however stretched, and nary a mention of using deepening labor surplus to funnel the national revenue to the topmost brackets where a much smaller percentage is spent...]
  • Saskatchewan Premier visits Britain to heal wounds, 2/23 Toronto Globe, B2.
    Premier Brad Wall [is trying] to convince Britain's brusque business community to invest in his province...
    [This kind of thing is happening all over North America and the world and its just another kind of government distortion of the markets. It is emphatically NOT the role of government to promote business in their constituency except by leveling the playing field between employees and employers, without which aggregate income is diverted from those who spend higher percentages of their income (employees) and funnels up to those who spend lower percentages of their income (employers and investors). And the only way the playing field can be leveled is by engineering a labor "shortage" by continuously adjusting the workweek downward against unemployment.]
  • No recession? No problem, 2/23 Toronto Globe, B15.
    With 6,800 stores in the U.S., the Family Dollar discount chain reeled in more than $8 billion in revenue over the past 12 months. (photo caption)
    [Or maybe there IS a problem - with the GDP index and definitions that are telling us there's no longer a recession...]
  • Pressed for time? 2/23 Toronto Globe, A1 pointer to B20.
    A new paper in the Journal of Applied Psychology suggests that people who earn more money may believe they are more time-stressed even when they aren't.
    Feeling stressed? Blame your payscale, by Sue Shellenberger, 2/23 Wll St Journal via Bay St Journal (Toronto Globe), B20 target article.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Key dates in the early American labor movement, 2/23 Yahoo! News via news.yahoo.com
    NEW YORK, NY - ..Referencing the "pursuit of happiness," one of the unalienable rights in the Declaration of Independence, printers in New York went out on strike for shorter working hours and better wages in 1794... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Letter: For a more just economy, 2/24 Rockford Register Star via rrstar.com
    ROCKFORD, Illin. - ..It is mainly through the strenuous struggles of unions over decades that most employees today — union members or not — enjoy such benefits as safer workplaces, shorter hours, decent wages, pensions, paid vacations, sick days... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Half the labor movement is good... but -]
  3. WISCONSIN UPDATE: Why collective bargaining is a fiscal issue, 2/23 Washington Examiner MADISON, Wisc. - ..When he was Milwaukee County executive, for example, Walker was not allowed to reduce work hours to 35 hours a week - not even to avoid layoffs - because of union opposition... - see whole article under today's date.
    [There's always 50% of the labor movement that's suicidally clueless about their power goal = shorter hours and less labor surplus.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, FEB.20-22/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Most profitable reply to suitors is often 'no', by Cox & Arnold, 2/21 New York Times, B2.
    Potash Corp. investors gained when a buyout bid failed. (photo caption)
    A company's independence may sometimes [we'd say, "is usually"] worth more than investors realize...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
    -- No Wall St Journal on Mon., Feb.21 cuzzof Presidents' Day holiday --
  • Rising property taxes overwhelm many who are living on the edge,
    2/21 New York Times, A15.
  • Number of restaurants [in USA] keeps falling, by Alex Mindlin, 2/21 NYT, B2.
    584,653 in autumn 2009.\.
    -579,102 in autumn 2010
    5,551 fewer = nearly 1%..in a decade in which the number..has fallen by roughly 0.5% each year. A disproportionate number of the resstaurants closed have been independently owned, leaving the field to chains, which now make up 46% of American restaurant locations..\..according to NPD Group, a market research firm...
    [Still think this is a recovery? Plus we're losing diversity, indicating a sick economic ecosystem, since the key variable for long-term survival is ... variability itself, the raw material of which is variety alias diversity.]
  • The FTQ [Fédération des Travailleurs du Québec = Federation of Quebec Workers union] fund puts $4 billion outside Quebec, 2/22 Le Journal de Montreal, p.1 pointer to p.44,45 (nice catch, Jean-Paul Duquay in the Café Corsé sur l'Île de Hull).
  • Facing antitrust fights at home, Google tries to avoid one in Europe - Claims that Google is distorting search results to benefit its own services, 2/21 NYT, B1, B5.
  • Despite efforts by Greece to limit tax evasion, the payments still only trickle in, 2/21 NYT, A4.
    [Never mind the worse situation in the U.S. where those who can most easily afford tax burdens think it's smart to continuously contrive to foist them off onto those who can less and least afford them - thus attacking the systemic foundations of their wealth starting with a maximum velocity of currency circulation. Their mindless game amounts to suicide, everyone else first.]
  • Unrest around the [Islamic] region, 2/21 NYT, A6.
    [Could easily spread to the once-great USA if the super-rich continue to support a long, frozen, pre-computer workweek and pre-political theocrats who continue to unseparate church and state.]
    Libya -..Antigovernment protests..spread to the capital, Tripoli, while protesters in the eastern city of Benghazi took over the city.
    Bahrain - Protesters consolidated their hold on Pearl Sq, joined by 1000s more supporters, and an opposition party demanded that the government account for the many demonstrators still missing.
    Iran - Security forces choked off an effort by opposition supporters to conduct synchronized demonstrations around the country...
    Morocco - More than 10,000 people turned out in cities across the country to call for more limits to the power of King Mohammed VI, lower food prices, freedom for Islamist prisoners, rights for Berbers, and other causes. The situation remained peaceful, and the police did not intervene.
    Yemen - Violence seemed to ebb as protesters and supporters of Pres..Saleh entered a standoff in the capital, Sana.
    Tunisia - 1000s joined the biggest rally in Tunis since the January revolution, demanding that the interimm government resign.
    Egypt - More banks reopened, and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo and the pyramids of Giza were opened for tourists for the first time since protests began in January.
    Iraq - In the country's north, clashes between students and rival political factions convulsed the Kurdistan region for another day. ending with 1 dead and ca.48 wounded. A TV station that had been covering the turmoil was..set afire by guhnmen.
  • Alibaba.com's CEO resigned after the Chinese e-commerce site found that more than 2,300 sellers were defrauding buyers, 2/22 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Bargaining is threatened, 2/20 SantaMariaTimes.com
    SANTA MARIA, Calif. -..The law protecting worker’s rights [is] a direct result of collective bargaining. Without it, it won’t be long before we no longer have a 40-hour work week, minimum wage, worker-safety laws, sick time, or child labor laws. This country will become a nation without a middle class... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Five-day workweek proposed for all workers, 2/21 ChinaPost.com
    BEIJING, China - Lawmaker Chen Chieh of the ruling Kuomintang has proposed amending the Labor Standards Law to reduce the legal working hours for workers to “80 hours two weeks” from the existing “84 hours two weeks,” so as to allow workers to have a five-day workweek as enjoyed by civil servants, causing polarized responses from the management and the labor sides... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Restriction on overtime hours in industries may go, 2/22 (2/23 dateline issue?) DeccanHerald.com
    BANGALORE, India - The State Cabinet on Tuesday gave its approval for certain amendments to the Karnataka Factories Act, 1948, which includes extending overtime work hours by two hours a day. The present prescribed upper limit of working hours including an hour of OT, is nine hours a day. However, total number of regular working hours will remain at 48 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, FEB.18-19/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news( archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Retiring boomers find 401(k) plans fall short, 2/19 Wall Street Journal, A1.
    ..less than one-quarter of what is needed...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Split in economy keeps lid on prices - Dual track, 2/18 WSJ, A1.
    ..Soaring commodity costs [and funneling M1s (national money supplies)] are pushing prices up world-wide while a slowly [or non-]recuperating U.S. economy, soft housing market and a persistently high unemployment rate are holding down prices for U.S. services...
    [We'd say a more realistic generalization would be that global underemployment and sinking wages (even in shorter-hours Germany!) are dragging prices down while certain producers are still trying to push them up by engineering "Act of God" shortages in certain commodities, but it won't work because markets are weakening and currency circulation is decelerating as more and more of the world's income and wealth is coagulated in the topmost tiny brackets, who just don't - can't possibly! - spend a big percentage of it. Here's an example where certain providers of U.S. services are trying to push prices up, with or without a shortage -]
  • The largest U.S. banks are testing how much their customers are willing to pay for checking-account services that used to be free, 2/19 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [How are their remaining customers doing? -]
  • The number of U.S. households behind on their mortgage payments fell during the fourth quarter to the lowest level in two years, 2/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [It doesn't matter how big the number is, or how little it "fell," as long as it came down, even a tenth of a percent... It doesn't matter that the number fell because so many people lost their houses in foreclosures... The Wall St Journal wants "good news" and they're gonna git it no matter how they hafta cook it!]
  • The House neared approval of a bill to slash the budget by over $61 billion, 2/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [The insulated and isolated super-wealthy want 100% of the money supply, no matter how much of the economy collapses around their ears.]
  • The World Trade Organization will issue a prelliminary report concluding that China has no "legal right" [our quotes] to impose export restrictions on nine raw materials, 2/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [Here's hoping China ignores this arrogance. Basically, it's OK when we engineer shortages, not OK when anyone else does. But the U.S.-controlled "World" Trade Org. has failed. Its idée fixe that free trade makes everyone rich and avoids recession is patently delusional.]
  • Two former Wall Street bankers and a former Freddie Mac lobbyist were named to senior posts at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 2/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Oh, now there's a trio that'll REALLY protect consumers! Clarabel the Clown would do a better job plus be funny.]
  • Top Senate Democrats tried to scotch efforts by Majority Whip Richard Durbin to include Social Security in comprehensive deficit reduction negotiations, 2/19 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    [The worst are full of a passionate intensity, while the best lack all conviction, and the Democrats, somewhere in between, still think it's 1979 before the country got switched to one political, and one religious party.]
    Talks to cut deficit stumble - In heated White House meeting, Democrats try to bar Social Security from bipartisan negotiations, 2/19 WSJ, A1:3 target article.
    [Never mind that the separate Social Security fund was unseparated in the mid-90s. Never mind that people are just getting back what they put in over the years. Never mind that Social Security is one of the last remaining anchors of the U.S. domestic consumption base, still being billed as 70% of the economy but if true, true only because the whole economy is shrinking except for all the contorted whitewashing of negatives and figure-cooking in the GDP. The insulated and isolated super-rich want 100% of the national income and wealth, no matter how much of their economic habitat withers and dies around them.]
  • Why investors can't get more cash out of U.S. companies, 2/19 WSJ, B1.
    [They're papering their walls with it now?]
    Earlier this month, MicroSoft borrowed $2.25 billion in unsecured debt [despite possessing] $40 billion in cash and short-term securities... [Why?] Rock-bottom interest rates [and] the bizarre, byzantine U.S. tax code... [ie: tax evasion]...
    [as it MicroSoft and ilk had nothing to do with creating that bizarre byzantinity.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Truckers may soon need to shorten hours, 2/18 CNN via news.blogs.cnn.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The number of hours that truckers can drive each day may soon be cut. The U.S. Department of Transportation is considering a rule change reducing the time allowed on the road by an hour. Current rules allow truckers to spend 11 hours behind the wheel per day, with some limited exception... The agency believes reducing trucking hours would make for safer highways. Insurance groups are supporting the change... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. South African truckers' strike cuts flow of fuel, 2/18 MonstersAndCritics.com
    JO-BURG, RSA - ..Unions representing the 60,000 drivers seeking higher pay and employers failed to reach an agreement in talks the previous night, according to media reports... They are demanding a 20% pay rise over the next two years, housing allowances and shorter working hours. The industrial action has left some 20 trucks damaged, 16 people injured and 32 arrested... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Overtime Pay Calculator Being Provided by US Overtime Lawyers.com, 2/19 Emailwire.com (press release)
    ORLANDO, Fla. – The overtime lawyers at Morgan and Morgan are offering a free overtime pay calculator on their US Overtime Lawyers.com website. The overtime pay calculator is being provided to help non-exempt workers determine whether they are being paid properly when working more than 40 hours in a single workweek... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, FEB.16-17/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too artificial, too arbitrary, too eco-stressing, in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • Frankly speaking - The bling-bling economy, by Richard Martineau, 2/16 Le Journal de Montreal, p.6.
    ..A few days after the Quebec government had announced that it will invest 200 millions of dollars in an amphitheatre, a block of cement has detached itself from a viaduct on the South Shore of Montreal and some physicians have taken to the 'attack internet' to denounce the lamentable state of their hospital. "What are they doing investing in an amphitheatre when our roads and hospitals are literally falling in ruins?", these citizens are wondering...
    [One word: makework. Sharing the vanishing work by redefining the full-time workweek downward is a lot less disagreeable and more sustainable than makework, but then how would the compassionately conceited and people with "superiority complexes" express their pity for the less fortunate if there were so many fewer less fortunate? To whom would they be able to condescend? They could, however, still compete among themselves for higher pecking order. (Timesizing pushes the pecking-order competition out of extreme hours or workaholism and into extreme wage or hourly rate.) ]
  • Cyber attack hits Ottawa; Problem focuses on IP addresses from China, 2/17 Toronto Globe, A1.
    [Guess there's quite a few hackers in China with nothing better to do...]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Food prices - World Bank sound the alarm - 44 million more people in extreme poverty, 2/16 Le Devoir de Montreal, B1.
    [For example, in the new 2d-"largest" economy in terms of our major meaningless measure, GDP -]
  • "Inflation" woes - Food prices in China increased 10.6% in January, 2/17 Toronto Star, B1 pointer to B8.
    [This is not actually insubstantial "inflation" - this is market forces signaling scarcity due to drought.]
  • Climatic threats for investors - Political hesitation costs dearly - The uncertitude surrounding environmental decisions of governments could represent 10% of the total risks if investment, 2/16 Le Devoir de Montreal, A1.
    ..recent floods and fires have cost tens of billions of dollars...
    [And more on the new bubble abuilding -]
  • Global investors flooding into equities - After the financial crisis made stocks a scary alternative, the fear subsided and the trickling flow of cash has turned into a torrent, 2/17 Toronto Globe [= Bay Street Journal], B1.
  • Average [Canadian] family debt hits $100,000 - For every $1,000 it earns, typical family owes $1,500, with many "struggling": Report,
    2/17 Ottawa Citizen, A1.
    Canadian families' average debt has hit six figures for the first time - and what they owe now amounts to one and a half times what they make, according to the latest family financial checkup from the Vaneir Institute of the Family. The Ottawa-based thinktank's twelfth annual report [was] released Thursday...
    [If the AVERAGE Canadian family is wealthy and credit-worthy enough to owe $100,000, they're a heckuvva lot better off than American families! But maybe the sample bears inspection?...]
  • Slash or tax, states' new choice, 2/17 National Post, FP1.
    [There's nothing new about this choice - it's as old as government itself. But the more government facilitates the money funnel of the wealthiest, the slower the currency circulates and the faster depression deepens into squalid poverty.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Paddy Waggin', by Paddy Notar, 2/17 TurnagainTimes.com
    GIRDWOOD, Alaska - ..The United States is one of the few countries to have a 40 hour work week and most of us work much more than that. They have had riots in Europe due to extending work from 30 to 35 hours a week. When I was visiting the Netherlands and France nobody worked on Friday... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Lorne Gunter: Cuts to spending and civil servants only way to balance fed budget, 2/17 National Post (blog) via fullcomment.nationalpost.com
    WINNIPEG, Man., Canada -..Indeed, civil servants are rapidly becoming Canada's new working elite with better pay, better pensions and benefits and shorter working hours than their private-sector counterparts... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. About 5500 miners might be on short-time working scheme till 2013, 2/16 ACTmedia.eu
    BUCHAREST, Romania - About 5,500 employees, of the 19,000 ones working with the power stations in Craiova, Rovinari and Turceni (southern Romania) as well as with the National Company of Lignite Oltenia (SNLO) might be on a short-time working scheme in the next two years for 24 months... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. BONUS clip - Job vacancies in SE Minnesota on the rise, 2/17 Post-Bulletin via postbulletin.com
    ..Among other findings, the survey indicated that 48 percent of the job vacancies in southeastern Minnesota were for part-time employment (fewer than 35 hours a week) and 16 percent were for temporary or seasonal work...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, FEB.13-15/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Motorola a-greed to buy 3LM [for $undisclosed], a small company developing software to boost the security of mobile devices powered by Android, 2/14 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • GE a-greed to buy the well-support division of John Wood Group for $2.8 billion, bulking up its oil and gas services business, 2/14 WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too artificial, too arbitrary, too eco-stressing in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • School-stimulus benefit may be short-lived - Massachusetts and other states received millions, but impact of aid appears to be flagging, by Michelle McNeil, 2/13 Boston Sunday Globe, B1.
    ..Two years [have passed] since Congress made the federal government's largest one-time investment in public schools... Education was one of the biggest beneficiaries of the $814 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act [ARRA], designed to help correct the worst economic nosedive since the Great Depression...
    [The economy doesn't need "education" and an indefinite perpetuation of the pre-computer 40-hour workweek of 1940. It needs jobs, and if that means, gosh oh golly, we have to continue our 1840-1940 workweek reduction till we restore full employment and full markets in the age of robots, then that is what we must do, kicking and screaming about our "laziness" and feeling guilty as hell about working less for higher pay - but think about it, THAT'S WHAT TECHNOLOGY IS FOR!]
  • Student loan cut worries colleges - University leaders urge extension of the Perkins loan [program], 2/13 BSG, B1.
    [More of the same. Colleges and universities, in a deepening job shortage and labor surplus, have become a huge makework campaign functioning to please PLEASE keep young people out of the weakening job markets as long as possible!]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Rising China beats a shrinking Japan, 2/14 WSJ, A1.
    [If China is the future, we might as well all commit harikari, cuz China's got over 20% unemployment, no birds (cuz they ate them all in desperate hunger), ecological disaster of megaproportions... - but, economists don't count that...stuff.]
    ..passed Japan in 2010 to become the world's second-biggest economy...
    Country 2010-GDP
    U.S. $14.66 trillion
    China $5.88 trillion
    Japan $5.47 trillion
    [We'll move to Japan rather than China any day!]
  • US budget - The American gamble - The budget presented yesterday by the Obama administration gives one vertigo - Expenditures of $3.7 trillion. A deficit of $1.1 trillion. Washington is trying to reduce expenditures but above all is counting on economic recovery to refill its coffers..., 1/14 La Presse de Montreal, affaires1.
    [Even if a real recovery were possible with continuous downsizing of the workforce and consumer base, what good would it do when neither party has the guts to "follow the money" and tax the rich, and only a minority of the rich have the sense to see their hoarding is hatcheting their roots and trunks. Apparently none have the insight to realize they need to foster a wage-raising labor shortage if they ever want to get past the downward staircase of investment bubbles.]
  • Like Gaul, Europe recovery divided in three, by Kelly Evans, 2/14 WSJ, C1.
    [ref.to Caesar: original Latin: Gallia in tres partes divisa est. Eng: Gaul in three parts divided is.]
    ..the region's fourth quarter growth figures..are expected to be..divided into three distinct flavors.
    First is Germany, whose strong rebound out of recession is almost single-handedly powering euro-zone growth.
    Next are the more middling economies like France, Italy and Sweden.
    And finally, there are the lagging peripheral nations of Portugal, Ireland, Greece and Spain (the infamous "PIGS")...
    [More or less in the order that they practice timesizing instead of downsizing. And speaking of 3-way splits -]
  • Fissures open in fortunes of 'the consumer', by Kelly Evans, 2/15 WSJ, C1.
    It is impossible to talk about the U.S. consumer anymore without clarifying which one. Broadly speaking, there are 3 types now:
    the upper-income investor,
    the middle-income homeowner and
    the lower-income worker. [like the homeowner doesn't work??]
    Disparities among their wealth and prospects have widened. That also is opening up a performance gulf between companies catering to each group...
    [If Kelly had included the est. comparative population of each of the three groups, we would see that by far the biggest group is the bottom one and if we reactivated that group with wage-raising workweek reduction, we'd have a wartime boom without the war.]
  • The Dow industrials slipped 5.07 points to 12268.19..,
    2/15 WSJ, A1 pointer to C5.
  • [US] Budget forecasts bigger 2011 deficit [$1.6 trillion],
    2/14 WSJ, A1.
  • For small businesses, a hesitancy to hire - Added costs can outweigh gains in sales, 2/14 Boston Globe, A1.
    The cost of employment - For a $40,000 salary, an employer will pay at least an additional $17,000 - or a premium of more than 40% - on a new hire (graph headline)
    [Breakdown -]
    $12,500 Health Insurance - Employer share for family coverage
    $3,060 Social Security/Medicare - 7.65% of pay (varies by industry)
    $897 Unemployment Insurance - May vary widely
    $560 Workers' Compensation - 1.4% of pay (varies by industry)
    $130 Unemployment Insurance Add-ons [such as?]
    [$17,147 Total]
    [This is a design for economic collapse based on concentration of market-demanded remunerated hours on cumulatingly fewer people, endless workforce downsizing, and resulting impoverishment and shrinkage of the consumer base.]
  • The cost of raw materials is rising at a faster pace than revenues for many firms, 2/14 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    ..squeezing margins and raising concerns about future earnings.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Will Congress Come Up With A Solution To The Unemployment Extension, 2/13 Daily News Pulse By Adriana Barnes [dateline??] - Currently, 17 states have opted into the “short-time compensation” or “work-sharing” program within their unemployment insurance system, which allows workers to receive partial benefits from the unemployment insurance system if their hours have been reduced, not just if they lost their job or their pay is reduced... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Part-time jobs for semiretired workers, others, 2/15 Atlanta Journal Constitution via ajc.com
    ATLANTA, Ga. -..In some companies, for example, 32 hours a week is considered full time, while the same schedule is called part time elsewhere... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Men want to cut working hours too, 2/14 World Radio Switzerland via worldradio.ch
    ST. GALLEN, Switzerland - A large number of men want to reduce their working hours and are willing to take a pay cut to do so...based on survey answers from more than 800 men at small- and medium-sized businesses in the canton. 56% of those surveyed have children. ..90% wanted to reduce their working hours by more than 5%. 70% wanted to cut their hours..By more than 10%... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, FEB.11-12/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Big takeover deals are back, reflecting increased corporate confidence [lol] amid the recovery [LOL], and investors are cheering them on, 2/11 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Takeovers reflect only CEOs finding it easier to grow by buying another company's market share rather than by actually growing their own markets within a consumer base they have been downsizing via its employment basement.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -
  • Harmonix [Music Systems Inc.] confirms layoffs amid sales slump - 'Rock Band' maker [cuts] up to 36 jobs, by D.C. Denison, 2/11 Boston Globe, B5.
    ..Boston area..video game developer..has laid off between 26 to 36 employees from its staff of about 240...
    [Split the diff and say it was 31 jobs. That would be 13% of 240. So what should they have done, and what will companies be doing in the sustainable economies of the future which no long mistake downsizing for growth (=UPsizing)?]
    13% workforce cut (31 of its 240 jobs) as Harmonix downsizes its own best customers and their dependent consumers instead of just trimming 13% of its workweek (62 minutes a day for everyone, including top executives), re-investing any overtime profits in overtime-targeted training & hiring, & keeping everyone together working, earning & buying 87% as many music-based video games, instrument-shaped controllers & upgrades as before

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too artificial, too arbitrary, too military, too eco-stressing in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • The Pentagon's 2012 budget is expected to call for spending increases on major rocket and satellite projects, 2/11 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to A4.
    [If you can't kindle a nice hot war, you resort to your ever-waiting "pyramid project," space.]
  • The state [Massachusetts] is trying to persuade Hollywood to keep filiming here.., 2/12 BG, A1 pointer to B1.
    ..sending a delegation of union and state officials to California this week to sway studios.
    [Government has NO BUSINESS in business except to prevent individual businesses from committing cumulative suicide by individual downsizing instead of timesizing. This government can and is doing in the most successful companies, states and nations by supporting cuts in the workweek ('timesizing') instead of cuts in the workforce-consumerbase-domesticmarkets-marketableproductivity-sustainableinvestments.]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Borders prepares to file for reorganization in bankruptcy court, 2/11 NYT, B1 pointer to B5.
    [So who has time to read books in today's over-work(ed)force, or money to buy books in today's lengthening unemployment?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • "It will take more than an appeal to regional pride to save Detroit, home to 80,000 abandoned buildings and an unemployment rate of 29%", op ed by Renee Loth, 2/12 BG, A11.
    - It will take a national urban policy the likes of which the United States hasn't seen for 40 years.
    [Renee is still gasping-grasping for the great export mirage, ignoring the fact that the U.S. consumer base has supposedly been sustaining the world for the past 10 years. The solution has to be here, Renee, not somewhere else where we have no control. And it has to be rebuilding our consumer base with the "one-two punch" of worksharing and timesizing.]
  • Arizona's governor sued the federal government for failing to control the border and enforce immigration laws, 2/11 WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Bad that the U.S. economic organism has no skin. Good that Arizona is trying to get it one. Capitalism has always worked best with an employer-perceived labor "shortage" that harnesses market forces to raise wages and spread the national income and wealth to those who immediately spend it - notice the war-time prosperity of World Wars I and II and the plague-time prosperity of Europe from repeated visitations of the Black Death starting(?) in 1348. Uncontrolled immigration, like uncontrolled automation and uncontrolled outsourcing and uncontrolled imports and uncontrolled births, makes labor shortage impossible, and makes capitalist prosperity less a matter of fact and more a matter of news manipulation.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. LETTER: Keep four-day week at Town Hall, 2/12 Wicked Local Plymouth via wickedlocal.com/plymouth
    PLYMOUTH, Mass. - The Advisory and Finance Committee urges the Board of Selectmen to continue the four-day workweek at Town Hall... In a time when every penny counts, why would you eliminate a successful, money-saving program preferred by both management and labor that allows for greater access for residents? - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Trenton furloughs create four-day work week, 2/11 newjerseynewsroom.com
    TRENTON, N.J. - Trenton has become the latest city to use furloughs of employees to attempt to close budget deficits. City workers were told that they must take one day off a week without pay between April 1 and June 30... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, FEB.9-10/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -

  • Coakley says National Grid's [1200] layoff plans may hamper utility's emergency response, 2/10 Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B7.
    [i.e., Mass. state Atty.Gen. Martha Coakley, who ran for Ted Kennedy's Senate seat recently.]
    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Job openings tumbled at end of '10 - Decline indicates firms hesitant to boost hiring, by Christopher Rugaber, 2/09 AP via BG, B6.
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..The Labor Dept. said yesterday that employers advertised about 3.1m jobs in December, a drop of almost 140,000 from November and the second straight monthly decline. That's the lowest total since September... Openings have risen by more than 700,000 since they bottomed out in July 2009, one month after the recession "ended" [our quotes - ed.]. That's an increase of 31%...
    [But by what percentage had they declined from before the recession? An increase of 31% of a small number sounds big but can be insignificant compared to a decline of 3% of a big number. And indeed, this happytalking article makes us dig through three more paragraphs of cheerleading before we get to -]
    For now, openings are still far below the 4.4 million available jobs advertised in December 2007...
    [OK, finally a comparable figure, but we're left to calculate the percentage ourselves, and it ain't hard to see why, once we calculate it. Monthly job ads in Dec.2007 were 4,400,000; and in Jul.2009 (3,100,000-700,000=) 2,400,000, down 45%; and in Dec.2010 (3.1m=) 3,100,000, still down 30% from before the recession. We still haven't gone back up by half, and one wonders how bogus "up" was considering all the cooked and padded indicators that supposedly signal it. Still want to rejoice? This is how the Prozac-spiked valium of today's news tranqs works. "Don't worry, be happy." Counterspin take notice.]
    Nearly 14.5m people were out of work in Dec.[2010]. ..On average, there were 4.7 people competing for each available job, about the same as in Nov.[2010]. That's below the ratio of 6.3 [people competing for each available job] reached in Nov.2009, the highest since the Dept. began tracking job openings in 2000. In a healthy economy [def'n??], the ratio would fall to roughly 2 people per job, economists [which?] say.
    ..A mixed job report released last week..found that employers added a net total of only 36,000 jobs [in Jan.2011], far below what's needed to consistently reduce unemployment...
    [which is what? 300,000? 400,000? Meanwhile, the P/E-ratio bubble of the early 1990s has picked up again -]
  • Dow closes at its highest [12,233.15] since June 2008, 2/09 BG, B8.
    [Reason? The relatively teensy fraction of the world population in Wall Street and associated "electronic cottages" has wisely shied away a bit from the basket of bogus investment instruments invented in the 90s (hedge funds, derivatives, swaps, CDOs, single stock options...), a reaction that leaves them with NO ALTERNATIVE beside...the stock market, which has therefore once again become a giganto pyramid scheme. Meanwhile, back on Main Street -]
  • Bishops urge state [Massachusetts] to stop cuts for poor, by Lisa Wangsness, 2/10 BG, B1.
    The state's four [Roman] Catholic bishops called on elected officials yesterday to protect the poor from painful service cuts despite enormous budget shortfalls created by the recession...
    [And the Kondratieff-cyclical anti-tax tantrum of the super-rich and ovine wannabe's.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Supporters turn out to support aid for library, 2/09 Indianapolis Star via indystar.com
    INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -..The Marion County system had considered shutting some branches. But instead, it balanced its $37.9 million operating budget for 2011 by cutting hours [26%] across nearly all branches, laying off [37] employees and cutting $1 million in spending on books and materials... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. USPS Posts $329 Million Loss, Receives $70000 OSHA Fine, 2/10 Occupational Health & Safety via ohsonline.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..USPS is trying to cut $2 billion in operating costs this fiscal year by cutting 40 million work hours. Since the end of 2007, total employee headcount is down 15.1%... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is not the kind of workhour cut we're talking about - this is a headcount or job cut. But at least somebody is thinking in terms of overall work hours and the fact they're a surplus commodity. The next step is to think in terms of a surplus workweek which has not been adjusted since 1940 = before computers and needs to be if we ever want to see a real economic recovery.]
  3. Number of jobless rises to three million [to annual 5.6% from 5.5%], 2/10 The Express Tribune via tribune.com.pk
    [But who knows how forgiving a definition of joblessness we would find in a dictatorship, considering how misleadingly forgiving it is here in what we jokingly call the American "democracy," with our single-party designed&manufactured voting machines and money-drowned campaigns. Bet Pakistan isn't counting their millions of flooded-out farmers, and the fading USA ain't countin' welfare, disability, prison, homelessness, not to mention the swelling numbers of self-"employed" and suicides.]
    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - ..As much as 28.8% of the workforce worked 56 hours and above in a week, reports the FBS. Near eight in 10 people [80%] worked more than 35 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Solution, for them and us = resume our 1840-1940 workweek reduction as far as it takes to restore World War II levels of full employment and full markets - without the war.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, FEB.6-8/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Ensco agreed to buy Pride International for $7.3 billion, a deal that would step up consolidation of the offshore drilling industry,
    2/08 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B5.
    [Oh THAT's JUST what we need - not.]
  • Danaher to acquire medical-test maker [Beckman Coulter for $5.87 billion], 2/08 WSJ, B1 pointer to B3.
    [These boys throw around so much dough, it inevitably becomes meaningless to them except in a pecking-order sense - "Oh MY deal is bigger than YOURS, nyaaa nyaaaaaaa."]

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • A new study suggests that the longer teenagers live in the United States, the more likely they are to become violent,
    2/06 BSG, A1 pointer to B1.
    Violence a lure for foreign teenagers - Immigrants likely to adopt US peers' ways, [Northeastern University] study says, by Maria Cramer, 2/06 Boston Sunday Globe, B1 target article.
    ..Many studies have shown that newly arrived immigrants are incarcerated at a much lower rate than US-born residents.
    [But then, we get to refuse entry or deport the others.]
    But rates of incarceration spike for second-generation Americans...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • No rush to hire even as profits soar - Slow to hire - U.S. employment is lagging alongside solid corporate earnings, 2/07 WSJ, B1.
    [How "solid" can earnings be when the consumer base is not being fed by the employment "basement"? Another take -]
    Factories boom, but with few new workers, by John Schoen, 2/07 msnbc.msn.com
    ...“In the old days, we had a $6 an-hour-guy who would hand-bend 300 bends an hour,” he said. “Now we have guy who’s paid $22 an hour with the robots but he’s giving me (20,000) bends an hour. Do the math.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [If you really do the math, you discover you're going to run out of customers. As Walter Reuther retorted to Henry Ford's "Let's see you unionize these robots": "Let's see you sell'em cars."]
  • Obama told business leaders they should stop hoarding cash and start hiring in return for tax breaks and other government support, 2/08 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Haven't taxpayers done enough for these self-downsizing private-sector whiners? Drop the coaxing, preaching and welfare for the wealthy and just create a job-creating labor shortage by resuming our 1840-1940 workweek reduction. The private sector must stop downsizing its own markets via its workforce and start upsizing both by downsizing our fossilized pre-computer workweek.]
  • Big U.S. banks still hold plenty of bad assets and their potential impact is a source of concern for some accounting and banking observers, 2/07 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [The savings and loan crisis of the early 90s was cleaned up. The mortgage-hedgefund-derivatives-swaps-CDOs-SSFs crisis of 2008 was covered up.]
  • Governors chop spending - Politicians in both parties aim to balance state budgets through cuts, not taxes, 2/07 WSJ, A1.
    [The tax-cutting American wealthy get richer and richer in a poorer and poorer America, more insecurity for them and closer to Egypt & China's Tehrir & Tiananmen Sqs. for eveyone else -]
  • Florida's governor unveiled a budget that overhauls Medicaid, curbs the pension system and cuts state services, 2/08 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [So pensioners have less and consumers have higher charges for medical and other services = lower incomes and higher costs. And when there's no consumer spending left to anchor the economy?]
  • Pay gap widens at big law firms as partners chase star attorneys, 2/08 WSJ, A1.
    [Thus the feudal and toxic 'star system' spreads its infection from films to sports to law firms...]
  • Vital [or morbid?] signs - Americans took on slightly more debt in December..., 2/08 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    ..Total consumer credit outstanding roses by $6.1 billion from Nov. to $2.41 trillion.
    Nonrevolving credit, which includes categories like car loans, rose by $3.8 billion to $1.61 trillion.
    Revolving credit (almost entirely credit card debt) rose by $2.3 billion to $801 billion - the first increase since August 2008.
    [The consumer base doesn't need more debt. It needs more reversed redistribution to the rich. It needs more ownership and less borrowing. And the rich need more marketable productivity to sustain their investments, and that means an economy with more fluid and circulating spending power and less turgid and deactivated investing power. (AND the rich need less distance between them and everyone else, not more.) ]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Factories boom, but with few new workers, 2/07 MSNBC.com
    ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, N.J. - ..Last July, the company, which makes wire baskets, installed $700,000 worth of robots, continuing a steady process of automation Greenblatt began when he bought the company in 1998. “In the old days, we had a $6 an-hour-guy who would hand-bend 300 bends an hour,” said Greenblatt. “Now we have guy who’s paid $22 an hour with the robots but he’s giving me (20,000) bends an hour. Do the math.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The math is that the American workforce can no longer buy its own output. So this 'genius' is now dependent on unstable export markets over which neither he nor we have any control. So this whole situation is out of control and unsustainable.]
  2. Monetary Policy and Jobs: Investment Strategy Implications, 2/06 SeekingAlpha.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - ..It would be wonderful if our politicians were engaged in an effort to come up with a more cost effective policy instrument to increase employment. The Germans have a program called Kurzarbeit which encourages employers to shorten the work week rather than laying off workers; Congress should be analyzing this kind of program and determining whether it could work here... - see whole article under today's date.
    [It did work here for over 100 years when we shortened the workweek by half, from over 80 hours to 40, particularly 1938-39-40 when we went 44,42,40 hours and unemployment went 19.0-17.2-14.6%. We have 20 states with worksharing programs to help with this. How come they're still being described as a best-kept secret?]
  3. Big Society tsar tells council staff to cut hours, 2/08 Independent.co.uk
    LONDON, England - The Conservatives' Big Society tsar has suggested that councils cut the hours of their staff and ask them to volunteer in the community instead... - see whole article under today's date.
    [The American way of doing this was satirized by Michael Moore - Cut everyone's hours completely - lay everyone off and shut down the factory in every one-industry town. Refit the building as a prison while waiting for the population to get desperate and turn to crime. Then arrest them all, toss them into the prison, and get them to make the same widgets as before for prison pocket change, a fraction of their previous wage. Here's a situation in Quebec where some top professionals' hours have been cut (at least to 35) and they are being asked/pressured to volunteer longer hours for the community - ]
  4. IQOvertime.com to Help Call Center Workers Settle their Unpaid Overtime Wages, 2/09 TMCnet via call-center-services.tmcnet.com
    OMAHA, Neb. - According to Nebraska overtime law, call center employees are entitled to overtime pay when working more than 40 hours in a single workweek. The overtime wages are at a rate of time-and-a-half for every hour worked over 40 in a single workweek..
    [Thus incentivating employees into more and more overtime in a recession, and diseincentivating employers from offering overtime less and less as "fulltime benefits" get costlier, all adding up to more overtime and fewer jobs and ... weaker consumer base and longer recession...]
    ..according to a statement from IQOvertime.com, which was established to provide legal help and information for workers who have been denied overtime compensation
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Quebec prosecutors, government lawyers on strike, 2/08 Postmedia News via EdmontonJournal.com
    QUEBEC CITY, Québec — ..Crown prosecutors, she said, are paid for only 35 hours a week — there's no overtime — even though the job demands much more time... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • A nation of quitters? Could be a good sign, by Kelly Evans, 2/08 WSJ, C1.
    Quitting isn't always a bad thing... The Jan. employment report showed those voluntarily leaving their jobs as a percentage of the unemployed rose to 6.4% from a recent low of 5.5% in September...
    [But wait a minute - didn't official unemployment DECLINE sharply in Jan., 9.4 to 9.0%?! = another misleading indication of good news? Bonus - The hidden title of this page on the web is - "Take this job and..." (*shove it). And on a related note -]
  • Stand alone - The case for a new isolationism, by Thanassis Cambanis, 2/06 Boston Sunday Globe, K1.
    [Amen. It's time for the once-great USA to quit its chest thumping and recognize and heal its own wounds for a change. Fastest, most flexible way? Immediate worksharing leading to permanent timesizing. Compare one week later -]
    Rebel rebel - Scholar Grace Elizabeth Hale traces the strange history of American outsiderdom, 2/13 BSG, K3.



    Today, fri-sat, FEB.4-5/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal ageed to a merger that would create the world's No.2 steel maker
    and likely spur more industry consolidation
    ,
    2/04 Wall Street Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Firms facing hostile suitors may cut jobs to lift stock - but that tactic often fails, 2/05 Boston Globe, B1 pointer to B5.
    [Here's another reason takeovers are toxic and temporary, though how many decades/centuries it'll take to lose them? - who knows. So do firms think jobcuts are bad while suitors think they're good? No, firms think jobcuts are good for stock because investors still think jobcuts are a buy signal (good) but higher stock price is bad...for suitors - all of which keeps this whole M&A world unsustainably divided against itself, needing growth (=upsizing) while practicing downsizing.]
    Suitors aren't put off by layoffs - As antitakeover tactic, cuts often don't cut it - Under pressure, firms find that suitors aren't put off by layoffs - With efforts to fight off a takeover, 'there is a risk you're diluting the long-term value in favor of the short run,' William McGinnis, hostile takeover consultant [Milwaukee], by Todd Wallack, 2/05 BG, B5 target article.
    [It doesn't get any clearer than this. The long term is being sacrificed in favor of the short run. What we have is short-term capitalism, and the purely cyclical nature of its deterioration (recession) is getting harder to sell as its "recoveries" get briefer and weaker and more academic and rhetorical. What might long-term capitalism look like?]
    Under pressure from shareholders or unwanted suitors... firing employees.\.an old standby to boost their stock prices..\.. several Massachusetts companies...
    Genzyme Corp..in September..\.. said..would eliminate 1,000 jobs... face[d with] takeover effort by..Sanofi-Aventis SA and pressure from activist shareholders... in the meantime..going ahead with..jobcuts...
    Charles River Laboratories Inc. in Wilmington... recently cut..300 jobs.\. 4%\of\its workforce... faced pressure from disgruntled shareholders...
    BJ's Wholesale Club [in] Westborough.\.last month... cut nearly 500 jobs... faced pressure to sell [to] Leonard Green & Partners... spokeswoman..insisted..job cuts..intended.."for future success and.\.to..make us..stronger company...
    Anheuser-Busch..in 2008..\.. hostile..bid..by InBev NV.\.Belgium... announc[ed] plans to..slash $1 billion in annual expenses... sold before..cost cuts, but InBev wound up eliminating 1,400 US workers after...
    [Bored and incompetent CEOs today are addicted to the paregoric of this M&A game. In the future, surviving economies will get rid of it except in the case of bankruptcies (yes, then a quiet profession will develop around forcing companies into bankruptcy - but this is probably already exists in various forms) and get CEOs refocused on real management skills, first among which, for the forseeable future, will be the smooth suturing and management of shorter and shorter shifts, a vital expertise once CEOs begin to connect the dots between their staff and their customers' customers, i.e., their workforce and their consumer base. Maybe we can divide long-term human evolution into alternating period of ranchers and vultures, or rather cattlemen and vulturemen...]

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Big bankers seen weathering losses - Fed says smaller banks strained by property lending, by Marcy Gordon, 2/05 Boston Globe, B6.
    [Ah, a perfect example of a calming headline, a slightly unnerving subhead and, buried in the text, the real alarming news -]
    ..Hundreds of billions in losses on loans for commercial property and development were a major reason why
    157 US banks failed in 2010, the highest annual tally in nearly two decades
    [the S&L crisis]...

    PRISONS & CRIME in the news (archives) -
  • MBTA reports rise in crimes [up 19% last year in Mass.Bay Transit Authority] - Red Line had highest number of serious cases, by Rocheleau & Finch, 2/05 BG, B1.
    BOSTON, Mass. - ..Overall, 987 serious crimes were reported in 2010, up from 829 the previous year... violent crimes up 29% and property crimes up 14%... Still, total incidents amounted to the fourth-lowest crime tally in the past three decades...

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The U.N. food-price index hit a record high in January, up 3.4% on the month,
    2/05 WSJ, A1 news squib.
    [Rising food and energy prices could be called inflation. Add to that, high unemployment, and you get a situation that used to be called "stagflation" in the 1970s. But now media moguls seem almost as reluctant to mention that as they are to use the word "depression," maybe because more people have realized it's a hallmark of Third World economies. Here's the unemployment part -]
  • U.S. payrolls ticked up 36,000 in Jan., far less than expected [or needed for sustainability], 2/03 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    The unemployment rate fell to 9.0% from 9.4%, however, creating a contradictory picture.
    [It is NOT contradictory. One index says employment improved little; another index implies employment improved a lot. One of these indexes is very inaccurate, and we bet its the current U.S. unemployment rate, which is so forgiving as to be not just irrelevant but misleading. It is nothing but fluff and should be DROPPED. The Bureau of Labor Statistics maintains a number of other indexes which are more useful and truthful. Here's the target article headline -]
    Job report muddies outlook - Paroles advance at snail's pace in stormy weather even as unemployment rate falls sharply to 9%, 2/04 WSJ, A1:3.
    [In any case, as in the early 1970s, we now have high unemployment (ie: stagnation) AND rising food and energy prices (inflation) - in short, stagflation, a word that surprisingly we have not been hearing at all in the WSJ or the NYT, perhaps because the next sentence is... stagflation is totally common in the Third World.]
  • In a jam, more skip mortgage payments - Unresolved ownership strains market further, 2/04 Boston Globe, A1.
    Tens of thousands of Massachusetts property owners are living in their homes without making mortgage payments as they fight foreclosure, plead with lenders for loan modifications, or simply take advantage of free housing while awaiting eviction. About 36,000 borrowers statewide have not written a mortgage check in at least three months, and one-third of these borrowers are a year or more in arrears, according to the most recent data from Lender Processing Services Inc., a Florida company that collects mortgage data nationwide. Most homeownders fail to pay their mortgages because they are out of work, have had their wages cut, or are saddled with ballooning interest payments on subprime loans...
  • A whistle-blower group says on a lawsuit that Bank of New York Mellon currency traders created fake trades and overcharged Virginia pension funds by at least $20 million,
    2/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Obama and Canada's prime minister [Harper] unveiled an initiative to integrate the two countries more closely in security and trade, 2/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [How out-of-touch and frozen-in-time do you have to be to want to integrate more closely with the dying giant USA in its period of fastest self-corruption, self-downsizing, and self-degradation? If this Parliament-bashing Harper from hell keeps it up, Americans will no longer have a close-by escape-hatch to the north - and Canadians can't seem to get it together to dislodge him. Sarkozy has the same Copy-America-Suicidal-Or-Not syndrome, as did Blair (UK) and Howard (Auz).]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. A machine running smoothly - German companies great and small are making the most of globalisation - Their success owes more to judgment [dba timesizing] than to luck, 2/05 The Economist, p.81.
    BERLIN, Germany - ..Employers and unions have also made agreements to establish flexible working hours: workers put in extra shifts at busy times and have time off when things are slack. “We had to learn to breathe with the cycle,” says Ralph Wiechers, the chief economist of the VDMA, an industry group... For workers, who conceded flexibility and agreed to wage restraint, the bargain has meant they have kept their jobs, even during the depths of the downturn when most German firms cut working hours instead of firing people... - see whole article under today's date.
    [And German CEOs also have "wage restraint" with a much smaller gap between their pay and that of their average employee.]
  2. Unions balk at some changes debated for state retirement system, 2/05 Foster's Daily Democrat via fosters.com
    DOVER, N.H. - ..He said they also agree with the language that prohibits "double-dipping" — current law allows employees to receive a full pension from previous employment while working part time..less than 32 hours a week in another NHRS-covered position. The legislation proposes reducing part-time employment to 24 hours a week [max] that would be eligible for a second pension... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Here's a different kind of workweek reduction, but a kind that also frees up more employment for potential consumers handicapped by unemployment.]
  3. Shrinking workweek, 2/04 Fredericksburg.com (blog)
    FREDERICKSBURG, Va. -..There’s another issue at work out there, too–the average length of the workweek. When the recession started in 2007, it was 34.6 hours and sank as low as 33.7 hours in June of 2009, according to the Economic Policy Institute. In January, it was 34.2 hours, about the same as it’s been since May. Many are doing the same job (or theirs and someone else’s) in less time... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, FEB.2-3/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • Permanent boost for a "temp" company [Manpower], by Kelly Evans, 2/2 WSJ, C1.
    ..Since the labor market hit bottom in December 2009, 27 percent of the 1.1 million jobs added have been temporary ones - triple the ratio of temps hired after the last recession ended in 2001...
  • The government gained time on its borrowing limit... The government is $200 billion shy of its $14.3 TRILLION borrowing cap and could reach that by May, 2/03 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [That's $14,000,000,000,000.]
  • Food-stamp recipients rose 14% from a year ago to 43.6 million in November, 2/03 WSJ, A1 pointer to A6.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. HR European news roundup – January 2011 - A selection of the latest European HR news from the Federation of European Employers (FedEE), 2/2 Expatica.com
    BRUSSELS, Europe - A recent report has found that short-time work schemes retained jobs in 19 European countries during the recent recession. Take-up was highest in Belgium, Turkey, Italy and Germany, accounting for between 3 to 6% of all employees in 2009. Schemes generally allowed working time to fall by 20-40% of their normal level, but only in Hungary did subsidies protect the full value of weekly wages and salaries... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Future office, 2/03 Sydney Morning Herald (blog) via smh.com.au
    SYDNEY, Australia - ..Consider this: the old nine to five routine is being replaced by shift work and shared work and the workplace today is a mix of casuals blending in with part-timers and full time employees... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.