Timesizing® Associates - Homepage

hopes/dooms du jour,
January 2-31 + 2/01/2011

[Commentary] ©2011 Phil Hyde, The Timesizing Wire, Box 117, Harvard Sq PO, Cambridge MA 02238 USA (617) 623-8080 - HOMEPAGE


    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. German unemployment drops to 18-year low, 2/01 FinanceMarkets.co.uk
    LONDON, U.K. -..Germany’s job market has performed much better than in many other countries and many believe it is the result of the “Kurz-arbeit” scheme, introduced by the German Government, designed to prevent mass redundancies... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Why do we keep working after 65? 1/31 CANOE via money.canoe.ca
    MONTREAL, Quebec - About 40% of those who choose to keep working after the age of 65 say they do so because they haven’t saved enough, a new Statistics Canada report on retirement has found... StatsCan also found that the overwhelming majority of partially retired Canadians work part time because they want to and not because they have to. Two-thirds of people in this group work part time, or fewer than 30 hours per week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. 'I was shocked, I feel sorry for families -- this is beyond them' - From accountants to nurses, everyone is hurting as the true cost of the USC becomes clear, 1/30 Irish Independent via Independent.ie
    DUBLIN, Ireland - "The universal social charge [USC] means I am net out of pocket €30 a week. Both myself and my husband Jim (working as a chef 30 hours a week) are from Fianna Fail backgrounds, but never again. With pay cuts and hour reductions in the past two years, we've had to tighten belts. In December, I got rid of the Telecom land line and reduced health cover... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Gotta reign in them loose-cannon bankers or you're stuck with their gambling debts via some kind of USC.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS  (archives) -
  • How to tax the rich, by Scott "Dilbert" Adams, 1/29 WSJ, C1.

    [Provide incentives like -]
    Big cartoon... - Perks and privileges.\. - [use of carpool lane in rush hour]
    Subcartoon 1 - incentives - dog jumping for bone on one side and rich guy jumping for money bag on other side
    [Ah, Scott, the problem is precisely that there is already way WAY too much of the money supply coagulated in the top tiny brackets... Paying the rich for paying more taxes?? hel-lo-o... Your big cartoon suggestion was more like it.
    Subcartoon 2 - gratitude - rich guy opening mail "You're awesome!"
    [Kate suggests full genuflection.]
    Subcartoon 3 - [free] time - rich guy sleeping on couch with dog and blackberry on knee
    [This is what workweek adjustment better give everyone or the concentration of natural market-demanded employment on fewer and fewer employed people will leave fewer and fewer people to buy all the stuff the robots are churning out.]
    ..If the rich can be taxed at a different rate, why not other differences in how they are taxed?...
    [The rich should NOT be taxed at a different rate, but that single rate needs to be logorithmic or exponential, not simple or arithmetic. Steve Forbes gets a lot of support for a flat tax cuz the rich want their cake and eat it too - they want, as Scott Fitzgerald says, to be "different," but they also want to be the same - in short, they want the privileges without the responsibilities - but even though their tax rate on the first increment IS THE SAME, the fact that there's a series of sharp boundaties after that where the rate jumps makes them feel victimized and "penalized for success" etc. - so what's the answer? obviously a single LOGORITHMIC tax rate that's the same formula all the way up but that continuously steepens with NO sharp boundaries or tax brackets = one logorithmic formula that begs the question, why does it escalate as it goes up? And evokes the obvious answer, Because if more than a certain percentage of M1, the money supply, is coagulated in the tiny topmost brackets for purposes of mere pecking order, we all get into a self-deepening recession-depression.]



    Today, fri-sat, JAN.28-29/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Alpha Natural Resources is close to a pact to buy Massey Energy for about $7 billion, in a deal mostly made up of stock with some cash, 1/29 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to B1.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Secret to Bank[United]'s comeback: A rich uncle named Sam, 1/28 WSJ, A1.
    ..Florida's biggest bank...
    [Corporate socialism. Taxation without representation to prop up failed and corrupt banks and bankers. Result: deeper impoverishment of consumer base and employee basement - and "recovery" an even tougher sell...]
  • Japan was hit by a surprise downgrade of its bonds by S&P, sending the yen tumbling, 1/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to A8, C8.
    The ratings agency slammed political leaders for having no "coherent strategy" to tackle the nation's fiscal problems.
    [So who does? S&P? No, cuz we're not hearing anything from them about rebuilding the consumer base via the employment basement with worksharing and timesizing - yet. What are they still rebuilding? The megamoney black-hole/sink-hole in the tiny topmost brackets -]
  • Goldman boosted the base pay of executives and partners, tripling CEO Blankfein's salary to $2 million, 1/29 WSJ, A1 pointer to B2.
    [This despite grumbling -]
    The intelligent investor - A chance to veto a CEO's bonus,
    by Jason Zweig, 1/29 WSJ, B1.
  • Hedge fund manager John Paulson personally netted over $5 billion in "profits"in 2010, likely the largest one-year haul in "investing" history [our quotes], 1/28 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:6.
    [Nothing corrected. Nothing learned. The insanity deepens. In 1929 it was all "margins" and "blood buckets." Now it's all "hedge funds" and "swaps" and "single stock futures." More comforting words but...same thing = leveraging farther and farther out over cliffs.]
  • A panel investigating the financial crisis [Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission] issued its report, painting a picture of a system let loose by lax regulation and careening out of control, 1/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [The target article, A4, by Mollenkamp, Licchetti & Ng, begins...]
    Twelve of the 13 largest U.S. financial institutions "were at risk of failure" at the depth of the 2008 financial crisis, while at least 50 hedge funds tried to capitalize on it,..
    [And apparently succeeded, if Paulson scooped $5B last year. Even so, people are desperate for sustainable investments -]
  • Christie's latest sales figures indicate that collectors spent more on art last year than they did before recession hit the art market, 1/28 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [But this is not consumer spending that circulates quickly and densely and builds real economic recovery.]
  • Beware the hiccups of consumer spending, by Kelly Evans, 1/28 WSJ, C1.
    [These aren't hiccups. They are upticks in an accelerating downward spiral.]
    U.S. consumers are proving a fickle bunch...
    [Early last decade, Wall Street was complaining about "Quirky consumers!" and "Why are they holding back?" Wall Streeters just can't fathom that after decades of downsizing and now millions of foreclosures, U.S. consumers no longer have the money. The U.S. "consumer miracle" is over. Wall Street kept it going with a housing bubble funded by "liars' loans" = POP - but now. even the subsequent "bailout bubble" is popping...]
  • Banks as lab rats in U.K. experiment, by Simon Nixon, 1//28 WSJ, C10.
    [Well, the "rats" part is probably right.]
    What is the optimal level of capital that a bank should hold? The new Basel III agreement sets a minimum level of 7% core Tier I capital...
    [Compare our Most Important Question: What is the minimum level of spending power (percentage of M1, the money supply) that economies should keep from concentrating (and decirculating) in the topmost income and wealth brackets? And how do we reverse it on a market basis? Hint: immediate WS and long-term TS.]
    ..core Tier I capital, whose definition has been tightened to consist mostly of common equity...
    [They call that tightening??]
    But if Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee member David Miles is to be believed [he is], regulators should be forcing banks to hold as much as 20% core Tier I capital [based on] mathematical models...
    [Didn't they used to require a 20% downpayment on mortgages? What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.]
  • U.S.-Europe oil gap widens, by Strumpf & Amanat, 1/28 WSJ, C10.
    New York, N.Y. - The gap between the world's most widely used oil contracts widened to a record gulf Thursday, as high inventories weighed on the U.S. contract while the European benchmark held above $97 a barrel... The difference of $11.75 a barrel is the biggest ever for the benchmarks, - which typically trade within $2 of each other...
    [So Europeans can still afford gas for their cars but fewer Americans can? Another palimpsest of "writing on the wall" for tax-sloughing, robots-vs.-workweek-ignoring American super-rich and their Economics Depts,, B-Schools, and CEO buddies?]
  • Spain's jobless rate [on a fossilized 40-hr workweek] shot above 20% [just like China's is continuously!] in the fourth quarter, casting doubt about its economic recovery, 1/29 WSJ, A1 pointer to A14.
    [Nyaa nyaa Europe - our own dear USofA is MUCH better! (according to our bogus indicators...) ]
  • U.S. economic output regained its prerecession level in the [3-holiday] fourth quarter on consumer spending and exports - GDP rose at a 3.2% annual rate, 1/29 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:4.
    [Never mind spending boosts from Thanksgiving, Xmas-Channukah and New Year's, shrinking export markets and all the liabilities the GDP counts as assets. And there are places where not even holidays or exports or padded indicators helped -]
  • Ford's fourth-quarter profit fell 79% as production and debt-related costs crimped one of its most profitable years ever, 1/29 WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [The Ford-Reuther paradox: Ford, "Let's see you unionize these robots!" Reuther, "Let's see you sell'em cars."]
  • Dow declines 166 on Egypt unrest [1.4% to 11823.70], 1/29 WSJ, B1.
    [So why is our government still supporting Mubarak, or, why aren't investors merely switching to military stocks?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Share the pain, Mr. Premier, 1/29 Telegraph-Journal via telegraphjournal.canadaeast.com
    FREDERICKTON, N.B., Canada - ..Innovative polices, such as furloughs or Kurzarbeit (reduced work weeks), might be more effective in maintaining a skilled public service while reducing costs in the short term. It instills confidence on the part of the public service, in that their income, albeit reduced, would be maintained while they wait for better times to come... Kurzarbeit refers to a short-term, recession-related program adopted by several European countries. Under the program, companies agree to avoid any layoffs but reduce the working hours of all or most of their employees. Kurzarbeit has won praise from both conservative and liberal economists. Indeed, various Kurzarbeit bills have been proposed in the U.S. Senate [and House!]... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Jobless Germans Below 2 Million 'Unrealistic,' Weise Tells WiWo, 1/29 WirtschaftsWoche via Bloomberg.com
    FRANKFURT, Germany - ,,In light of the economic recovery, the government should allow a crisis-related extension of short-time work benefits to expire at the end of March 2012... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Success Secrets Of '4-Hour' Guru Tim Ferriss, 1/28 Forbes (blog) via blogs.forbes.com
    DAVOS, Switzerland - ..Tim Ferriss [is] the idiosyncratic author of the bestselling books “The 4-Hour Workweek” and “The 4-Hour Body”... Ferriss talked candidly for about an hour about the methods he has employed to promote his books and other projects... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS about miracle CEOs  (archives) -
  • How to tax the rich, by Scott "Dilbert" Adams, 1/29 WSJ, C1.

    [Provide incentives like -]
    Big cartoon... - Perks and privileges.\. - [use of carpool lane in rush hour]
    Subcartoon 1 - incentives - dog jumping for bone on one side and rich guy jumping for money bag on other side
    [Ah, Scott, the problem is precisely that there is already way WAY too much of the money supply coagulated in the top tiny brackets... Paying the rich for paying more taxes?? hel-lo-o... Your big cartoon suggestion was more like it.
    Subcartoon 2 - gratitude - rich guy opening mail "You're awesome!"
    [Kate suggests full genuflection.]
    Subcartoon 3 - [free] time - rich guy sleeping on couch with dog and blackberry on knee
    [This is what workweek adjustment better give everyone or the concentration of natural market-demanded employment on fewer and fewer employed people will leave fewer and fewer people to buy all the stuff the robots are churning out.]
    ..If the rich can be taxed at a different rate, why not other differences in how they are taxed?...
    [The rich should NOT be taxed at a different rate, but that single rate needs to be logorithmic or exponential, not simple or arithmetic. Steve Forbes gets a lot of support for a flat tax cuz the rich want their cake and eat it too - they want, as Scott Fitzgerald says, to be "different," but they also want to be the same - in short, they want the privileges without the responsibilities - but even though their tax rate on the first increment IS THE SAME, the fact that there's a series of sharp boundaties after that where the rate jumps makes them feel victimized and "penalized for success" etc. - so what's the answer? obviously a single LOGORITHMIC tax rate that's the same formula all the way up but that continuously steepens with NO sharp boundaries or tax brackets = one logorithmic formula that begs the question, why does it escalate as it goes up? And evokes the obvious answer, Because if more than a certain percentage of M1, the money supply, is coagulated in the tiny topmost brackets for purposes of mere pecking order, we all get into a self-deepening recession-depression.]



    Today, wed-thu, JAN.26-27/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think this is a real recovery, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news( archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -

  • Moody's credit ratings of states to factor in unfunded pensions,
    1/27 NYTimes, B1.
    [What a disgrace. Americans at all levels seem to be making all kinds of experiments with irresponsibility. Insulated and isolated American super-rich are leading an attack on the sanctity of contract that will return to bite them grievously.]

    PRISONS in the news (archives) -
  • The Justice Dept. is mulling budget-cutting ideas, including shorter prison terms, as the administration seeks to reduce spending, 1/27 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [What happened to the old law&order rightwingers? What happened to the recent applause for more consumer spending? Apparently spending is right when consumers do it (except for environmentalists who get it mixed up with "consuming the planet" instead of Buckminster Fuller's "doing more with less") but wrong when governments do it - because no matter how many mentally ill they have to release onto the streets and now no matter how many criminals they have to release onto the streets after how few rehab and job training programs, and no matter how much of the national income and wealth they coagulate, our "leaders" and their superwealthy puppeteers want to pass all the taxes onto anyone and everyone NOT superwealthy, effectively sacrificing their own foundations for ... pecking order. Everywhere the wealthy are forgetting the fundamental purpose of democratic government = to save them from their own worst enemy...themselves.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The CBO [Congressional Budget Office] warned the federal budget deficit will hit a record of nearly $1.5 trillion this year due to a weak economy, higher spending AND FRESH TAX CUTS [for the wealthy - our caps], 1/27 WSJ, A1:2 pointer to A1:3.
  • CEOs bedeviled by uneven growth [alias shrinkage], 1/26 WSJ, A1.
    [In other words, they're bedeviled by their own failure to connect the dots between downsizing their workforces and downsizing their markets...]
  • Federal Reserve officials, acknowledging a slow [or no] economic recovery and stubbornly high unemployment [they noticed?!], unanimously decided to continue with plans to purchase as much as $600 billion in Treasuries as they await a stronger pickup in growth, 1/27 WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [Why don't they CREATE the stronger pickup in growth by giving every one of our 300,000,000 Americans (let's see, 600B/300m = 200B/100m =2B/1m = 2000/1) $2000, only the top 1% (3m) of whom will save it and everyone else (297m) will pay off debts and/or SPEND it, creating... daaa dada daaaaaa ...a stronger pickup in growth. (And if they want to make it sustainable, they can push emergency-response worksharing and longterm-care timesizing.]
  • Treasury's Geithner said that creating "a level playing field" would be a major goal of a board to revamp corporate taxes, 1/27 WSJ, A1 pointer to A4.
    [Like the fox in the henhouse would know anything about level playing fields? He probably figures, hey, there's no taxes on wealthy individuals - why should there be any taxes on wealthy corporations? Here's how it's rolling out -]
  • The President said he wants to cut corporate tax rates "without adding to our deficit", 1/26 Wall St Journal, A1.
    [So the difference between Obama's temporary? insanity and what we would have got with McCain would be...?]
  • Concerns are growing among investors and regulators about the quality of financial disclosures by state and local governments, 1/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [What about the quality of financial disclosures by the big banks and mortgage companies who can't even figure out who owns what at this point? Oh yeah, we forgot, they made NO financial disclosures to complain about the quality of. But that was OK cuz it was themselves, right?]
  • U.S. steelmakers blamed a slow recovery for their latest losses, as soaring costs and lukewarm demand offset recent price increases, 1/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to B4.
    ["Offset" recent price increases?? Wasn't "lukewarm demand" partly CAUSED BY "recent price increases"?!]
  • Wal-Mart said it is spending half a billion dollars this year to expand in Canada, the latest example of retailers rushing north, 1/27 WSJ, A1 pointer to B3.
    [Oh great, strangler-vine Wal-Mart has destroyed small retailers and millions of jobs for rural Americans and now they're going after Canadians! Capitalism undisciplined by job surplus or labor shortage is seeping round the world, robotically hunting every last surviving remnant of higher living standards (and associated consumer base and jobs), vacuuming income and wealth into its tiny-population, MASSIVE-money Black Hole, not to be sated nor stopped till everyone outside the gated communities are starved or dying of disease. Wealthy people everywhere are forgetting the fundamental purpose of democratic government = to save them from their own worst enemy...themselves.]
  • The CDC [Centers for Disease Control] raised the estimate of Americans with diabetes to nearly 26 million, 1/27 WSJ, A1 news squib.
  • The emotional health of college freshm[e]n has fallen to a 25-year low, a survey said, 1/27 WSJ, A1 pointer to D2.
  • An exam found that fewer than one third of U.S. elementary and high-school students are proficient in science, 1/26 WSJ, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Ohboy, we have ringside seats for the Fall of the Roman Empire à l'Americain and in fast-forward!]
  • Negative data from Britain sends the pound stirling on a skid, 1/26 WSJ, C1 pointer to C5.
    [Nice try, but the British Empire already fell.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Swiss Industries 2011: Entering Calmer Waters After the Storm, 1/26 The FINANCIAL via finchannel.com
    ZURICH, Switzerland - ..In the latest Sector Handbook, the Economic Research team at Credit Suisse reports on its first study into the effect of short-time working in the various industries. They show that in the worst-hit sectors, such as the machinery and metal industries, unemployment would have been as much as seven percentage points higher if it had not been for short-time working...
    [Unemployment without worksharing would have been 7% higher?! THAT IS HUGE! Is it a government program in Switzerland, as in Germany?]
    Short-time working – an employment policy instrument that is dealt with in a special section of this year's Sector Handbook – undoubtedly helped to defuse the situation," Credit Suisse says...
    [So, is that a government thing as per Deutschland?]
    Switzerland's economy weathered the recession faster than expected. Particularly surprising was the robustness of the labor market, and the fact that unemployment showed a less pronounced rise than in earlier recessions. This can be ascribed in part to short-time working, an instrument that enabled companies – at least in the near term – to avoid more drastic headcount reductions.
    In their Sector Handbook the economists at Credit Suisse examine the development of short-time working in the individual sectors for the first time. In relation to total employment, short-time working was seen most frequently in the metals industry, in textiles and clothing, and in mechanical engineering. In the peak month of May 2009, for example, one in four workers in the metals sector and one in five in mechanical engineering were on short-time working
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Wow! This has got to be a government program - gotta find their webpage! Let's see. Short-time working (British) is "worksharing" or "shared work" in American or "Kurz-arbeit" in German. *Found it!]
  2. Short-time work [STW] schemes save jobs in Japan, 1/27 Thomsons Online Benefits via thomsons.asia
    LONDON, England - ..The schemes saved 415,000 jobs in Japan during the recession, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). According to an OECD working paper, 22 countries adopted STW schemes during the economic crisis. Short-time working means employers reduce working hours, either by days per week or by hours per day... - see whole article under today's date.
    [We still need a good Japanese gov't webpage for STW alias worksharing, preferably a page in English. Anybody found one? Email us at ecdesignR@yahoo.ca x.Phil]
  3. Kein optimalen Währungsraum [= German for "No optimal currency area"(?)], 1/27 The Economist (blog) via economist.com/blogs
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - .. *Kurzarbeit is the short-work scheme through which the government encourages firms to reduce worker hours rather than cut jobs, and subsidises the salaries of those working less than full time...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-mon-tue, JAN.23-24-25/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Rock-Tenn said it agreed to buy Smurfit-Stone for $3.5 billion in cash and stock, just seven months after Smurfit emerged from Chapter 11, 1/24 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to B3.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -
  • Postal Service eyes closing thousands of post offices, 1/24 WSJ, A1.
    [Oh that'll really help America grow...]

    vanishing RETIREMENT in the news( archives) - no problem with short-time full employment via timesizing -
  • Illinois says its underfed pension fund is under inquiry by the SEC,
    1/25 WSJ, C1 pointer to C2.

    tsunami of BANKRUPTCIES & CLOSINGS in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Smaller banks can't get past the crisis, 1/24 WSJ, C1.
  • States can go broke - Ask Arkansas, 1/23 NY Sunday Times, WK1 pointer to WK3.
    [On the other hand -]
  • House majority leader Cantor said he opposes letting states seek bankruptcy protection, and ruled out bailouts, 1/25 WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [So, he's either in the No Solution, Let It Get Worse school, or, the Raise Taxes school, meaning eventually, Raise Taxes on the Rich, cuz, as Will Rogers said, "They's the only ones that's got any money."]
  • Vital [or morbid] signs - Americans had fewer options for dining out last year, 1/25 Wall St Journal, A1 graph caption.
    As of September 2010, there were 599,102 restaurants in operation, down 1% from 584,653 a year earlier. ..Visits to restaurants also fell 1% over the time period.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Global price fears mount - As food, raw materials soar, Europe's central bank head warns of inflation, 1/24 Wall St Journal, A1.
    [Central bank heads love warning of inflation and ignoring unemployment, but the only tool they have to fight inflation (raising interest rates) clobbers growth - how soon can we switch to an intelligent approach?]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Do you have workweek creep? 1/25 KippReport.com
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - Do you find yourself answering emails at home? Using your BlackBerry over the weekend? Taking work calls at dinner? Then you’ve got workweek creep... When Kipp asked readers if they answer work-related emails outside of work hours, we got an overwhelming response: an incredible 80% of you do. Half of those (so 40% overall) say they always answer work-related emails out of work, while the other half (again, 40% overall) say they occasionally do... - see whole article under today's date.
    [This is what's killing economies everywhere in the age of automation = no boundaries, employment hoarding among those who still have jobs, layoffs, job insecurity, more hoarding, more layoffs, more insecurity, more hoarding...]
  2. Short Time Work Plan Saved Jobs - Study: Shorter Hours Preserved Jobs, by Phil Izzo, 1/24 Wall Street Journal via blogs.wsj.com/economics
    PARIS, France - Short-time work programs effectively preserved jobs in many countries during the financial crisis... An OECD working paper by economists Alexander Hijzen and Danielle Venn looks at whether government programs aimed at keeping workers on the job were effective. Under the programs, companies seeing low demand received government subsidies to cut hours or use [furloughs] instead of letting workers go. “The results provide clear evidence that [short-time work] schemes helped preserve permanent jobs during the economic downturn, while also providing some evidence that [short-time work] schemes promoted average hours reductions among permanent workers”...
    [Average hours reductions, let us point us, that are utterly necessary to maintain or grow markets once CEOs start using robots to create "lights-out manufacturing" systems with no humans onsite at all. Henry Ford: "Let's see you unionize these robots!" - union leader: "Let's see you sell them cars."]
    The largest impacts of short-term work programs on employment were found in Germany and Japan among the 16 countries considered... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. SPECIAL REPORT - Life in Europe's "squeezed middle", 1/24 Forexyard.com
    BERLIN, Germany - A government-subsidised programme that allows firms to cut workers' hours rather than [jobs], Kurz-arbeit is one of Germany's signature responses to recession -- and in "Anna's" case, it has worked, as she's now back full time at work and busy. Other parts of Europe may still be contracting, but Germany -- Europe's largest economy -- grew by 3.6% in 2010, with the number of unemployed falling below 3 million [for an unemployment rate of what??]... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. New contracts mean rebirth for longtime Shoals AL industry [Wise Alloys], 1/23 TimesDaily.com
    LISTERHILL, Ala. - ..Slappy also endured having his time cut to 32 hours a week this past decade. Scarborough said many employees were reduced to 32 hours a week around 2009. Today, all shifts are operating 40 hours a week and the plant is running 24 hours a day, seven days a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Jobs axed at New Forest National Park, 1/25 DailyEcho.co.uk
    LYNDHURST, Hamps., England - ..Some of the employees who keep their jobs will have to work shorter hours, which will mean a pay cut... - see whole article under today's date.
  6. BONUS clip - As schools make cuts, employees learn to curtail their own finances, by Stephanie Knowlton, 1/23 StatesmanJournal.com
    SALEM, Ore. - Melinda Adams remembers five years ago when her bus route zipped from field trips to student programs throughout the Salem-Keizer School District. She sees few field trips these days, and overtime is rare as the district tightens its budget.
    [Apparently many Americans are ignorant of how overtime is antithetical to their future, and how there should be a lot more of it getting converted into jobs by the downward redefinition of "full time" in the age of automation.]
    Now she's lucky to work six hours per day.
    [It's happening anyway, but not in a systemic way (even if the "system" is just a single entire municipality or state, or even corporation, some of which already do it) that would create a perceived labor shortage and harness market forces in raising wages and spending.]
    If she dips below 30 hours per week, she falls into a lower tier and her health insurance rates would double. "I've never seen it like this since I started working in education 15 years ago," she said. Adams watched her paycheck shrink by about $2,000 per year for the past few years because of rising insurance costs and fewer hours, and now there's talk of more cuts
    ...
    [This ain't going away until employees take charge of the process and do some emergency temporary worksharing and permanent timesizing.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, JAN.21-22/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • People's United [Financial of Bridgeport CT] buys Danversbank [parent Danvers Bancorp for $493m, its third purchase of a Massachusetts bank in less than a year], 1/21 Boston Globe, B11.
    [April: Butler Bank of Lowell MA; July: LSB Corp. of North Andover MA.]

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -
  • The banking industry, facing slower revenue growth, is starting to cut "costs" [our quotes, actually it's cutting its own markets], increasingly at the expense of jobs, 1/21 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Massachusetts employers cut 2,000 jobs in Dec. - Leisure, hospitality sectors led decline amid slower growth, by Megan Woolhouse [good old English name!], 1/21 Boston Globe, B7.
  • Boeing will slash 1,100 jobs in US,
    1/21 Boston Globe, B8. [These nightmare CEOs love doin' this right before the holidays - more Ex-mass than Christ-mass. What a day for layoffs! Folks, we have ringside seats for the destruction of the American economy by our prevailing goofy management 'wisdom' of upsizing ('growth') by downsizing! How is timesizing (cutting the workweek) different? Think about it: 1000 jobs on an 80-hour workweek (as in 1840) becomes a 40-hour workweek (as in 1940) with 2000 jobs. Cut the workweek, increase the jobs. Workweek reduction without job (&market) loss is the one corporate strategy and government policy that has no adverse long-term effects, and any short-term problems we can bandaid from the unemployment insurance fund which is saving money cuz we're saving jobs. We DID THIS for over 100 years, 1840-1940. We have tons of experience with this to guide us. It's a tried and true and successful method, but workaholism and "work hard to get ahead" and Busyness Equals Importance is blocking us, so down we go with deeper and deeper labor surplus, all officially denied despite 5000 resumes for every 5 openings. Don't Worry, Be Happy!]
  • Lenders see little choice: layoffs, 1/21 WSJ, C1 target article.
    ..Wells Fargo, American Express..unspecified layoffs "to become leaner"...
    [Through debt, the super-rich are returning us to the stifling feudal period, with all its insecurity, inefficiency, and slower, more bogus "growth."]
    ..PNC Financial Services, Fifth Third Bancorp "want to become more efficient"...
    [They'll be real efficient with no customers...]
    ..Synovus Financial..850 cuts..13% and close 39 branches "to save $100 million"...
    ..State Street..14000 cuts to be completed this year...
    ..Barclays Capital laid off 600 worldwide earlier this year [ie: in the last 21 days??]...
    ..Many banks are struggling to put their bad loans behind them [LOL]...
    ..Employment [in banking] is down 9% to 2.04 million jobs from 2.22 million in the fall of 2007...
    ..Especially at weaker banks, "the only meaningful way to cut expenses is to cut jobs," said bank analyst Gerard Cassidy of RBC Capital Markets...
    [Here's hoping the pink slips flutter his way soon... These guys don't wake up till their turn at the guillotine, or someone's close to them, like Morgan Stanley's Steve Roach in the 90s, after his sis got the chop...]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • The Dow industrials fell 2.49 points to 11822.80 as improved economic data helped it avoid following selloffs in Asia and Europe, 1/21 WSJ, A1 pointer to C6.
    [or as the Boston Globe puts in more pungently -]
    | Stocks dodge biggest 2-day loss since Nov.,
    1/21 BG, B10.
  • Muni market blame game, by Rolfe Winkler, 1/21 WSJ, C10.
    Meredith Whitney..'s bearish prediction of 50 to 100 "sizable" defaults potentially totalling "hundreds of billions of dollars" is widely blamed for the recent selloff in muni bonds...
    [Never mind she was being conservative. Investors, getting wise to all the zilch-fundamentals of Wall Street's 1990 creativity in terms of hedge funds, derivatives, swaps, CDOs, single stock futures et al, are getting back to the more familiary zilch-fundamentals in shares and blowing another huge pyramidding bubble -]
  • As bonds raise more red flags, investors are cautiously returning to stocks, 1/21 Boston Globe, B10.
    [So how inflated are P/E ratios today, after two decades of nowhere else to stow the multimegabucks being crammed into the topmost tiny income brackets by the exploding labor surplus? The only "cautious" thing investors could possibly do today is back political candidates who want as much workweek-cutting worksharing as it takes to restore wartime levels of labor "shortage," full employment, rising wages, full markets, more marketable productivity, and as a result, more sustainable investment targets.]
  • Dec. only a glimmer in 2010 home sales - Recovery may be years away,
    1/21 Boston Globe, B7.
  • The U.S. Army plans to award an exclusive contract to a Russian state firm to supply helicopters for Afghanistan, 1/21 WSJ, A1 pointer ro A8.
    [Now we've seen everything! On the other hand, the Russkies wasted trillions of roubles in Afghanistan before Bush started on taxpayer dollars, so maybe they have special Afghan-adapted whirlybirds... But then there's also the Chinese invasion of America banking now US bankers' corrupt culture has concentrated their cunning on coverup instead of cash accumulation...]
  • China's biggest bank signed a pact to make it the first Beijing-controlled institution to own retail bank branches in the U.S., 1/22 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Bank of America reported a $1.2 billion quarterly loss, a rough first year for CEO Moynihan, 1/22 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Tony Blair told an Iraq-war inquiry that he disregarded concerns from top advisers about the legality of the 2003 invasion, 1/22 WSJ, A1.
    [And he's still running around loose? Just like Bush and Cheney in USA and Harper and Mulroney in Canada...]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. France's 35-hour week creeps onto electoral agenda, 1/21 ForexPros.com
    [Isn't Forex a condom?]
    PARIS France - France's struggle to compete with a booming German economy has helped nudge reform of its restrictive 35-hour working week back onto the political agenda ahead of an April 2012 presidential election... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Apparently these French geniuses have completely failed to notice that Germany's recession-surfing secret focused on Kurz-arbeit = "restricting" employers and employees from cutting jobs and domestic consumption by subsidizing SHORTER WORKWEEKS. "None are so blind as those that will not see."]
  2. Here's Why France Isn't An Economic Backwater, 1/20 BusinessInsider.com
    PARIS, France - Economics blogger extraordinaire Tyler Cowen had a reader ask him a question: why isn't France an economic backwater? Between the 35 hour workweek and the taxes and the regulation, France should be doing much, much worse than it has been... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Watch in awe as two talking heads, one a France-hating Frenchman, try to explain why three cardinal sins of the prevailing religion of self-downsizing anglophone economies are not killing France - while lack of them IS killing aforesaid anglophones.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, JAN.19-20/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -

  • The S&P500 posted its biggest one-day drop in two months, as big banks weak earnings sent it down 13.10 points, or 1%, TO 1281.92..., 1/20 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C5.
  • Appeals court rules for Jennie-O on pay issue, by David Phelps, 1/19 Minneapolis Star Tribune via startribune.com
    MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - Turkey giant Jennie-O is not required to pay its workers for the time it takes to put on and take off their production-line uniforms, a practice known in the trade as "donning and doffing,'' under a ruling this week by the Minnesota Court of Appeals. The appeals court decision upholds a similar finding in Hennepin County District Court that the Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act does not apply to the workers if they are paid overtime at 40 hours per week, not 48 hours as set by state law...
    [Slavery returns in Minnesota of all places. How is it that the federal Fair Labor Standards Act no longer pre-empts state FLSAs, or that federal laws in general no longer pre-empt conflicting state laws? The once-great USA takes another giant step toward weakening its consumer base via its employment basement, and toward the dumpster of history. Employers can now pack more and more of the job into "donning and doffing." Jennie-O chiefs are truly a flock of turkeys who couldn't think two moves ahead in chess, now they joined the brilliant Wall St. Baby Huey's who practice Suicide, Everyone Else First.]
  • Soaring food prices are prompting restaurants and hotels to renegotiate contracts, find cheaper suppliers and reconfigure menus, 1/20 WSJ, A1 pointer to A5.
    [So much for human fuel. How about auto fuel? -]
  • As oil nears $100, threat to nascent recovery grows, 1/19 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Ah, don't they mean "threat to imaginary recovery grows"?!]
  • FDIC will spread losses in future [bank] bailouts, 1/19 Boston Globe, B11.
    [Spread the job losses by downsizing the "full time" workweek and you mop up the labor surplus, the 5000 resumes for 5 job openings each underbidding the next, and get market forces flexibly raising wages, employers struggling for good help each overbidding the next, raising wages & spending, & building real recovery. But for continued imaginary recovery, continue with -]
  • Wealthy bolstering US consumer spending [LOL], 1/19 Boston Globe, B8.
    [Not only do the wealthy donate a smaller percentage of their HUGE money to charity, they also spend a smaller percentage of their HUGE money as consumers. So our past 40 years of Socialism for the Rich = redistributing the national money supply to the topmost tiny fraction of the population, has de-activated a huge percentage of that money supply by converting it from spending power to investing power. Think about it. There's tons of money in every Third World country but... it's all in the hands of the top 1% of the population - here in the once-great USA it's getting down to the top 0.01% of the population - another billionaire, another 10000 poverty cases - and even if the poor spend 100% of their money, 25c ain't gonna do much for economic recovery...]
  • Spain is set to pour billions more euros into its troubled savings banks and force greater transparency as the country seeks to ward off an international bailout, 1/20 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Old-Time Short-Time Work, by David Leonhardt, 1/20 New York Times (blog) via economix.blogs.nytimes.com
    NEW YORK, N.Y. - On Wednesday, I mentioned the idea of “short-time” work policies, in which workers and companies avoid layoffs during tough times by cutting everyone’s work hours. Alex Keyssar, author of one of the definitive histories of unemployment, points out that the debate over short-time work is nothing new... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Even though the success of short-time work alias worksharing is nothing new, judging from the history of the U.S. workweek (cut in half, 1840-1940), especially 1938-1939-1940 (workweek 44-42-40 hrs, unemployment 19.0-17.2-14.6%), French history (1997-2001, workweek 39-35 hrs, UE 12.6-8.6%) and South Korean history (2004-2011, 44-40 hrs, results not yet in) - meaning, if there's still a debate, it's like the cigarette companies denying that nicotene causes lung cancer, or the continuing denial of global warming by companies it might harm - meaning, it's not a debate that's nothing new (there's almost no serious debate), it's ignorant recession-deepening denial that's been going on ever since the start of the Industrial Revolution, which employers started with the promise that it would make life easier for everyone, but of course, that would only happen if employers downsized working hours instead of employee-consumers...]
  2. Employment Worldwide, 1/19 NPR.org/blogs
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Forty percent of adults worldwide were employed full time in 2009 and 2010, according to new Gallup survey data. Gallup defines full time as working at least 30 hours per week... - see whole article under today's date.
    [30-hour workweek? Fairly advanced except we need that changed from "at least" to "at most" to spread the natural market-demanded employment and activate the spending potential of that remaining 60% who are either part time or completely unemployed - "natural market-demanded" employment so we can get government and taxpayers out of the doomed-from-the-start task of dreaming up enough fakework makework to take care of it - though always too little too late except during World Wars I and II.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, JAN.16-18/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    BANKRUPTCY tsunami in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -

  • Blockbuster is asking creditors to put up more money to help it emerge from bankruptcy protection..., 1/18 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    ["Sending good money after bad"?]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Some analysts and investors say the market rally is showing signs of fatigue, with technical indicators portending a broad decline, 1/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    Bears see stocks on borrowed time,
    1/18 WSJ, C1 target article.
  • Regulators have missed or postponed several deadlines to write rules to implement the financial overhaul triggered by the Dodd-Frank law, 1/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [That's what happens when the foxes are left guarding the henhouse: Obama never replaced Bernanke as head of the Fed and Obama never replaced Geithner as head of the Treasury. Result: continued coverup. The rest of the world can start to relax as the once-great USA destroys itself from within and from the top. "Cry the beloved country!"]
  • Inflation is coming, inflation is coming!, 1/17 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [How can otherwise intelligent people obsess about inflation during a deflationary spiral? How can prices rise except to signal nonrenewable resource shortages when we're in a steepening, diagonally downward spiral with the 1/11/11 Wall Street Journal reporting on "Downturn's ugly trademark: Steep, lasting drop in wages," front page.]
  • Why the nuclear renaissance is at risk of going up in smoke, 1/17 Toronto Globe, B1.
    [Better the nuclear "renaissance" go up in smoke than we all go up in a mushroom cloud or down in Chechnya-like radiation poisoning. Nuclear energy is appropriate for stars like our Sun. It is not appropriate for the surface of planets or moons - and where did you say you were going to dispose-of the spent fuel rods, which remain radioactive for 30,000 years???]
  • House Republicans are set to vote on health-care repeal..., 1/18 WSJ, A1 pointer A9.
    [Based on mandatory car insurance instead of Hawaii's great 1991 plan? No great loss.]
  • Decline of service clubs a worrying trend, by Dave Brown, 1/17 Ottawa Citizen, B1.
    [But a logical consequence of our concentration of the nation's money supply without limit in the top 1% of the population, who spend a smaller proportion of their income on charity than the poor. How reverse the hyperconcentration of M1 in the topmost brackets on a market basis? Downsize the workweek, not the workforce.]
  • Chinese shares slumped 3% Monday, dragging other Asian markets lower, while most stock markets in Europe were little changed, 1/18 WSJ, A1 pointer to C2.
    [China has long hours and no vacation, over 20% unemployment and zilch average consumption per person. Ergo dependence on exports and no domestic fundamentals. Europe has shorter hours and loooong vacations, 10% unemployment (needs even shorter hours!) and high average consumption per person. Ergo exports nice but domestic consumption sufficient = domestic fundamentals.]
  • Return of 'Baby Doc' [after 25-year exile] bodes ill for Haiti,
    1/17 Toronto Star, A1.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Job perks shifting out of neutral, 1/16 Pioneer Press via twincities.com
    ST. PAUL, Minn. - ..The state's *Shared Work program offers companies a chance to reduce hours, thereby avoiding layoffs, while their employees can offset the cost of the reduction with jobless benefits. In the summer of 2009, 13,000 employees were enrolled in the Shared Work program. Today, that number is down to 1,276... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. State program saving jobs, keeping businesses afloat, 1/18 TheStateColumn.com (blog)
    OLYMPIA, Wash. - ..Instead of just eliminating jobs, the *Shared Work Program allows struggling employers to cut their payroll costs by reducing the hours of their full-time employees. The Employment Security Dept. then provides those workers with partial unemployment benefits to make up for some of the lost wages. ..More than 32,000 Washington workers kept earning a paycheck in 2010, up from the record 22,000 saved jobs in 2009. “The Shared Work program is a great example of the kind of assistance the state can provide to struggling business owners,” said Chris Reykdal, the freshman legislator..who sits on the Labor & Workforce Development Committee. “It’s helping keep businesses afloat, paychecks going to workers, and money flowing into our local communities. Before any employer considers layoffs, I highly recommend giving the Shared Work Program a shot at saving jobs first.”... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["Timesizing, not downsizing!"]
  3. Broadway Threatened by New Child Labor Laws - New rules would prevent child performers from working more than five hours a day or past 10 p.m., 1/17 DNAinfo.com
    MIDTOWN NEW YORK, N.Y. — Legislation proposed to curb the hours that child actors work on Broadway has producers worried that their shows may not be able to go on. The new Labor Department rules would prohibit actors under the age of 18 from working past 10 p.m. and limit the work hours of actors between the ages of nine and 16 to five hours per day with three hours of school, the New York Daily News reported... Many Broadway shows don't finish until after 10 p.m., the paper reported. Broadway blockbusters including "The Lion King", "Les Miserables", "Hairspray" and the current "Billy Elliot" production have all featured child actors... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Madison360: Might as well face it, you're addicted to e-mail, 1/16 Capitol Times via host.madison.com
    MADISON, Wisc. - The phrase is "workweek creep," and no, it doesn't refer to an obnoxious co-worker. Instead, it's defined as "the gradual extension of the workweek caused by performing work-related activities during non-work hours." The first known usage was a 1997 Baltimore Sun story reporting that 73% of survey respondents said they worked at home or the office outside of regular hours... The phrase joins other creepy website word usages, as in: commercial creep, jargon creep, mission creep and Christmas creep... - see whole article under today's date.
  5. Long Work Hours May Lead To Stress, Health Problems, 1/17 DailyHealthReport.org
    MENLO PARK, Calif. - Most people believe spending more than 12 hours at the office shows dedication and hard work. However, studies show that work quality decreases as employees become overburdened and health problems soon arise... - see whole article under today's date.
  6. Rep./Commissioner Tharinger says he'll return part of pay to Clallam County, 1/16 Peninsula Daily via peninsuladailynews.com
    PORT ANGELES, Clallam County, Wash. - .."Let's say I spend . . . 35 hours a week doing county business, then I would pay back to the county for five hours," he said. Assuming a 40-hour work week, his $63,504 county salary works out to about $30.44 an hour...
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, fri-sat, JAN.14-15/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Zellers on endangered list - U.S. retailer Target to take over as many as 220 Zellers locations across Canada - 'Deal will lead to thousands of new jobs': Target CEO [Greg Steinhafel], 1/14 Ottawa Metro, p.1 pointer to p.3.
    [Yeah, ri-i-ght! "New" only cuz name changed and old workforce fired -]
    Target will encourage Zeller employees to apply for jobs, 1/14 Ottawa Metro, p.3 first subhead.
    [And still he feels guilty, so -]
    5% of Target income goes to local charities, 1/14 Ottawa Metro, p.3 second subhead.
    [Plus see story #2 below under Hope du Jour. When we fi-i-inally implement as much timesizing as it takes to engineer full employment, we won't need charities.]
    Changing face of retail landscape - Few tears for Zellers, 1/15 Toronto Globe, D2.
    Launched in 1930s, chain joins Eaton's, Beaver Lumber and other former retail icons.
    [And what about national icons like Avro Arrow? At least Toronto Dominion has taken over zillions of banks across the northeast U.S. and you can see the green TD logo in centres-villes throughout New England - and on the Boston Garden!]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Foreclosures soar - U.S. banks repossessed more than a million homes in 2010,
    1/14 Toronto Star, B1 pointer to B4.
  • Auto making - Parts makers rebound [sure sure], but jobs are slow to return, 1/15 Toronto Globe, B9.
    As car manufacturers regain strength [now that Chrysler and American Motors have been replaced by Honda, Toyota and Hyundai?], it's unclear if suppliers will ever make it back to 'eight-cylinder level'
    [If that particularly inept metaphor means 'pre-crisis headcount', it certainly is clear and the answer is a resounding No. Most people have NO IDEA how automated and robotized auto making is these days, verging on "lights out" manufacturing where the lights are off cuz there are no humans there at all, and the Suicide, Everyone Else First "strategy" of American CEOs is becoming more and more obvious - "further fields are greener" has become "markets elsewhere will buy all this" - but "elsewhere" would be explicitly Where exactly, bearing in mind that China and India have their own more-affordable-car manufacturing?]
  • Global gold production at record high, 1/14 Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    [= The crisis metal]
  • Canada - Home sales down in Dec..., 1/15 Toronto Globe, B11.
    ..resale housing market...
  • Canada - Trade deficit falls 'for all the wrong reasons' - Drop in imports points to a slowing economy; Experts suggest troubling trend, 1/14 Toronto Globe, B1.
  • Canada - Recession short [per academic definition & wishful thinking], not so sweet, 1/14 Ottawa Citizen, F1.
    ..the exact dates of both the onset and the end..remain ambiguous...[source:] Statistics Canada...
  • Forced to live "from one paycheck to the next", by Mathieu Belanger, 1/15 Le Droit d'Ottawa-Gatineau, p.1.
    Half of Quebeckers go to bed at night anxious, wondering how long they'll be able to make ends meet at the end of the month, according to a CROP poll commissioned by the group of Gesca dailies, including Le Droit (of Gatineau-Ottawa) and La Presse (of Montreal)...
  • Debt crisis - 'Dear Tim'...can you spare a billion? - With its economy reeling in the fall of 2008, Ireland's central banker made a personal appeal to Geithner, 1/15 Toronto Globe, B7.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Hanover, NJ: Township votes to lay off 10 public workers, cut hours for 5 more, 1/14 DailyRecord.com
    HANOVER, N.J. — After more than two months of tense debate, the Township Committee voted unanimously at its Thursday meeting to lay off 10 employees and reduce the hours of five other employees from full time to part time to close a projected budget gap... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Better five more part-timers than five more layoffs (= zero-timers).]
  2. Zellers: Target moved 8,000 full time employees to part-time positions in one swoop, 1/14 The Canadian via lecanadian.com
    TORONTO, Ont., Canada - ..Apparently the email went on to say that HR will receive another email within 3-4 months directing stores to reduce current specialist hours to below 32 hours a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Portakabin workers vote in four-day week, 1/15 The Press, York via yorkpress.co.uk
    HUNTINGTON, Yorks., U.K. - ..The hourly-paid staff agreed that short-time working from January 17, suggested by the management, was better than being made redundant at a time when there is a shortfall of orders for the company’s factory-built off-site buildings."... “The lads realise that this is a sensible thing to do,,," - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Niederrhein economy on the road to recovery, 1/14 SteelGuru.com
    LOWER RHEIN (NIEDERRHEIN), Germany - It is reported that [although] Niederrhein has not reached pre crisis levels, employment balance is well in the black, short time working continued to run strong... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, JAN.12-13/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • Cliffs Natural Resources agreed to acquire Consolidated Thompson for about $4.95 billion, aiming to boost iron-ore production, 1/12 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
  • Duke Energy to buy Progress [Energy for 2.6125 Duke shares per Progress share], 1/12 WSJ, A1 squib.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • New pay pressure on UAW, 1/13 WSJ, B1.
    [Gotta keep bashin' thet consoomer base!]
  • Prices soar on crop woes - U.S. cuts global grain supply outlook - Higher prices expected at grocery stores, 1/13 WSJ, A1.
    [Oh well, "let them eat cake!"]
  • Oil at 2-year high: $91.86 [per barrel] - A possible decline in crude suipplies have been pressuring futures prices, 1/13 WSJ, C12.
    Price rises for fuel threaten airline net, 1/13 WSJ, B1.
    [But it hasn't stop this migration yet -]
  • College graduates continued to relocate to sunbelt cities during the recession, a Census data analysis found, 1/12 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Great, many of these cities are built in the middle of deserts and are already straining surrounding water supplies for hundreds of miles. Plus, as global warming intensifies, the electric-grid drain for A/C will be huge. Is it that they can't find jobs that pay enough for heat in winter? - better to be homeless in the south than the north? Well, maybe the housing slump will make it easier to avoid homelessness -]
  • U.S. housing slump beats Depression level, 1/12 Reuters via Toronto Globe, B9.
    U.S. home prices fell for the 53rd consecutive month in November, taking the decline past that of the Great Depression. Home prices have fallen 26% since their peak in 2006, exceeding the 25.9% drop registered in the five years between 1928 and 1933... Prices fell 0.8% over the month...
    Four horsemen of the housing bust saddled with homes, 1/13 WSJ, C12.
    [Could these be the four big mortgage banks whose corruption created the bust in the first place?]
  • Rising poverty, 1/12 Toronto Star, A1.
    TORONTO, Canada - Toronto's poor are becoming increasingly concentrated in aging houses that are rife with disrepair...
  • Crackdown fails to halt Tunisian jobs anger, 1/12 Financial Times, FT6.
    Protesters mobilize: demonstrators take action against unemployment in Requeb, Tunisia, at the weekend. (photo caption)
    [Followup -]
    After unprecedented demonstrations, yesterday - The Tunisian president chased from the country,
    [translated from:]
    Apres des manifestations sans precedent, hier - Le president tunisien chasse du pays,
    1/15 Le Droit de Gatineau-Ottawa, p.23.
    [And speaking of Africa -]
  • A continent [Africa] of new consumers beckons - [Funny how the insulated and isolated media barons assume megaconsumption in places (China, Africa) where labor surplus has coagulated monetary circulation in the top 1%, who only spend about 1% of it...]
    - As disposable incomes continue to climb..., 1/13 WSJ, B1.
    [Could this be the same continent from which we receive at least 20 desperate spam emails per day promising great riches if we will send them our bank-account numbers and passwords? Could this be the same continent with massive unemployment? - just like China, but of course we never hear about the downside in China any more. We sense the presence of the usual suspect = the average income has been yanked up artificially by the hyperconcentration of the Third-World money supply in the top 0.1% of the population, same as in the New USA... Bigger-money smaller-population Black Hole of billions at the top, wider event horizon of income gap around it. More insulation and isolation of the decision makers and less and less adaptibility, ecolofriendliness, econocompetitiveness and general sustainability.]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Stuttgart assistant chief talks about problems with youth, 1/13 StuttgartDailyLeader.com
    STUTTGART, Ark. — ..The Stuttgart Police Department hopes to add five new patrol officers in the coming months... This will allow for more officers available during shifts, with shorter working hours..\.. Currently patrol officers work 12-hour shifts five days a week... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Nurses' Long Work Hours, Scheduling Can Increase Patient Mortality, 1/13 UMB News via oea.umaryland.edu
    BALTIMORE, Maryld. - ..A new study has found that patient deaths from pneumonia and acute myocardial infarction were significantly more likely in hospitals where nurses reported schedules with long work hours... Most U.S. hospitals use 12-hour nursing shifts exclusively, as opposed to eight-hour shifts, a trend begun during nursing shortages nationwide in the 1980s. "Although many nurses like these schedules because of the compressed nature of the workweek, the long schedule - as well as shift work in general - lead to sleep deprivation," says Trinkoff... - see whole article under today's date.
    [American medicine and health insurance is a shambles because in the hospitals, the main actors are locked in a psychopathological, steeply sexist sado-masochism, with doctors playing sadist and nurses playing masochist. As a matter of fact, that's starting to be true for the whole of the rapidly sickening U.S. economy, with employees playing masochist and employers, especially CEOs and "investors," playing sadist. Check out the film "Up in the Air" starring George Clooney.]
  3. DLR set to be hit by strikes following RMT ballot, 1/12 The Wharf via whart.co.uk
    LONDON, England - ..The ballot was called by the RMT over a number of issues it claims to have with Serco Docklands, who operate the rail service. These include failure to consult over redundancies, failure to consult and the imposition of new pension arrangements, failure to consult over the introduction of new grades and a claim for a 35 hour week. RMT general secretary Bob Crow said: "This ballot shows we mean business..." - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Unions promise no 60 hour work week for Russia, 1/13 The Voice of Russia in New York via english.ruvr.ru
    MOSCOW, Russia - The Independent Trade Unions Federation of Russia [ITUFR] promises not to allow an increase in the duration of the working week from the current 40 to 60 hours... - see whole article under today's date.
    ["The best defense is an offense," and the ITUFR should be demanding a 35-hour workweek to match France and create more market-demanded jobs and generate more domestic consumption.]
  5. BONUS clip - Germany's economy grew 3.6% in 2010, its strongest increase since reunification, but some question whether this pace can be sustained, 1/13 WSJ, A1 pointer to A8.
    [Who cares? Everyone else is barely growing at all! With "Kurz-arbeit" (worksharing), Germany has kept more of its workforce employed and more of its consumers consuming than anyone anyway, so Germany will have an easier time sustaining anything than anyone anyway.]
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, 1/09/11--1/11/11 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs & a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills -
    Buy instead of build market share? - See 'overlap' & lay off more of your customers' customers? = a suicidal joke - Real CEOs don't do 'M&As' -

  • M&A rush for deals as "recovery" [ourquotes] gains pace, 1/11 Financial Times, FT1.
    [Hey, with enough mergers, overlap and consequent "smartsizing," we can destroy even the illusion of recovery!]
  • Dupont said it agreed to but Danish food-ingredients maker Danisco for $5.8 billion, part of a strategy shift by the U.S. company, 1/10 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Yeah, from sustainable to suicidal? It's always "further fields are greener" instead of investing in your own foundational consumer base, via the wages of your own part of the employment basement. Even Henry Ford didn't pay his people 5 bucks a day out of the goodness of his heart - it was actually a successful bid to forestall unionization. Labor shortage is the only thing that harnesses market forces and gets CEOs to raise wages and consumption and quit vacuuming money out of their consumer base for the sake of their dysfunctional pecking order, And the only way to get that playingfield-leveling labor shortage without losing potential consumers to plague or war is ... change overtime into jobs and resume our 1840-1940 hours-cutting overtime-increasing process.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Downturn's ugly trademark: Steep, lasting drop in wages,
    1/11 Wall St Journal, A1.
  • Congresswoman [Gabrielle Giffords] critical, 6 dead in Tucson rampage, by Tang & Myers, 1/09 Boston Sunday Globe, A1.
    [And so we move through Orlov's stages of collapse: economic, political, social...]
    TUCSON, Ariz. -..Claude Dupnik, the Pima County sheriff, said.."When you look at unbalanced people, how they respond to the vitriol that comes out of certain mouths about tearing down the government, the anger, the hatred, the bigotry that goes on in this country is getting to be outrageous... And unfortunately, Arizona, I think, has become the capital. We have become the mecca for prejudice and bigotry."...
    [Maybe more Arizonans should visit their beautiful Grand Canyon, and take a lesson from the "people of peace," the Hopis, who live on three mesas in northeast Arizona.]
    The Tucson office of Giffords was vandalized a few hours after the House voted to approve the health care law in March... In an interview after the vandalism, Giffords referred to the animosity against her by conservatives. Palin listed her seat as one of the top targets in the midterm elections because of the lawmaker's support for the health care law. "For example, we're on Sarah Palin's targeted list, but the thing is..she has it depicted [with] the crosshairs of a gun sight over our district. When people do that, they have to realize that there are consequences to that action," Giffords said in an interviewe with MSNBC...
    [Of course, now we've defunded all the halfway houses and mental health facilities, and turned all these people out onto the streets. And then there's -]
    Climate of hate - What is happening to America? op ed by Paul Krugman, 1/10 NYT, A19.
    ..Last spring Politico.com reported on a surge in threats against members of Congress, which were already up by 300%... It's the saturation of our political discourse - and especially our airwaves - with eliminationist rhetoric that lies behind the rising tide of violence... It's coming, overwhelmingly, from the right...
    [Colleague Kate says, why not call it, more directly, assassinationist rhetoric? This is how Hitler rose to power and it's probably a function of the income gap and the class war the wealthy of America, unrestrained by labor shortage, have declared on their fellow citizens while, of course, blaming them for starting it.]
    A right to bear Glocks? op ed by Gail Collins, 1/10 NYT, A19.
    ..Loughner's gun, a 9-millimeter Glock, is.."not suited for hunting or personal protection," said Paul Helmke, the president of the Brady Campaign [to Prevent Gun Violence]. "What it's good for is killing and injuring a lot of people quickly."
    America has a long, terrible history of political assassinations and attempts at political assassination. What we did not have until now is a history of attempted political assassination that took the lives of a large number of innocent bystanders...
    [Like Giffords was guilty??]
    The difference is not about the Second Amendment. It's about a technology the founding fathers could never have imagined... We should be able to accommodate the strong desire in many parts of the country for easy access to firearms with sane regulations of the kinds of weapons that make it easiest for crazy people to create mass slaughter. Most politicians won't talk about it because they're afraid of the N.R.A., whose agenda is driven by the people who sell guns and want the right to sell as many as possible...
    [Maybe when they get more afraid of the Glocks, they'll get the guts to defy the N.R.A. and the gun sellers...]
  • That guy who called the big one?.., by Joe Keohane, 1/09 BSG, B9.
    In 2006, a somewhat obscure economist, [Nouriel Roubini, said] the United States was about to get hit with a ghastly housing bust... The price of oil was about to skyrocket, and a particularly nasty recession was on its way, bringing with it untold ruin and misery for citizens, bankers, and businesspeople all over the world. The prophecy was dismissed initially as the mutterings of a pessimistic crank. A year later, he was proved right beyond all doubt...
    [except for that bit about misery for bankers...]
  • Big consultant payouts hint insider problem will broaden, 1/10 WSJ, A1 col.3...
    Big payments to some consultants charged in an insider-trading case.., 1/10 WSJ, A1:1 pointer to A1:3.
    ..indicate they may have talked with dozens of hedge funds, suggesting the investigation could widen.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Cut in yearly working hours, 1/09 (1/10 acr.dateline), english.donga.com
    SEOUL, South Korea - ..In July, Korea will introduce the 40-hour workweek [down from 44] to companies employing five to 19 people. The rule, which began with workplaces with more than 1,000 staff in 2004 under the Roh Moo-hyun administration, will be expanded to some 300,000 offices and 2 million workers... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Tackling U.S. Unemployment: The 80% Solution, guest post by Juliet Schor, blogs.worldwatch.org/greeneconomy [finder's credit to Dianne of Ottawa-Hull]
    BOSTON, Mass. — ...At the beginning of the 1980s, there was a sharp worldwide downturn, and Western Europe was hard hit. The Netherlands took an especially pro-active stance, opting for stable real wages and declining hours of work in order to get people back to work. New government employees were hired at 80% of a full-time schedule... In the Netherlands, part-time work is the new full-time... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Cut Hours; Don't Close Postal Facility, 1/10 Fort Smith Times Record via swtimes.com
    FORT SMITH, Ark. - ..Perhaps an hourly reduction by most employees, or a few hours a week by some employees would solve a budget problem. A reduction of just 5 percent per employee could be justified in place of reduction in force and possible transfers from the Fort Smith area... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.

    less strategic GOOD NEWS about miracle CEOs  (archives) -
  • We all 'own' the Constitution - Why should liberals [or independents] cede the meaning of the nation's founding document to a hostile ideology?, op ed by Renee Loth, 1/08 Boston Globe, A11.
    ..James Madison, the father of the Constitution...believed the federal government ought to prevent a widening gap between rich and poor, passing laws to "raise extreme indigence towards a state of comfort," and "reduce extreme wealth."...
  • Tom White, 90; built fortune as a builder and gave it away - "I'm sorry I don't have more money to give away" (2004 Globe interview), by Bryan Marquard bmarquard@globe.com, 1/08 Boston Globe, A12.
    ..Tracy Kidder..said, "..He was really deeply upset by the unfairness of the world and its grotesque disparities." ..He revived the family construction business his father had let languish... Gradually, he turned his attention to philanthropy and stopped spending time with others as affluent as he. "With them," he told the Globe in 2004, "it's all about me, me, me."...
    [Well, judging from the state of the U.S. economy, charity isn't much better. It's high time that 'deeply upset' CEOs got strategic and backed immediate worksharing and long-term timesizing so we can all move on to the next (lighter) family of megaproblems - our present ones are getting b--o--r--i--n--g................]
  • Vital signs - The number of young people in China is falling, 1/10 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    [Good - that's the only way to solve overpopulation. Their strategy of One Child Per Couple sure wasn't the best or free of negative side effects but they were desperate and it was the simplest and despite all the objections and problems, this is the first we've heard that IT'S WORKING. The fact that a large majority of China's fewer young people are boys, though itself a result of poverty-induced sexism (a boy seems to offer couples more old-age security?), will help reduce their huge overpopulation even faster,]



    Today, fri-sat, JAN.07-08/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    A DELUGE OF DISABILITY & "disability" in the news (archives) - so-o-o unnecessary with the shorter workweeks of the timesizing program -

  • Vital [or morbid] signs - In a difficult job market, more people have opted to go on long-term disability.., 1/07 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    ..There were 2.94 million applications to the Social Security Disability Inprogram last year, up from 2.82 million in 2009 and 2.32 million in 2008. About half of all applicants are eventually awarded benefits; disability-benefit recipients rarely re-enter the work force.
    [The only thing disabling America is a fossilized workweek, deep-frozen since 1940 instead of adjusting automatically against un-(der)employment to guarantee full employment and consumer markets (still 70% of the shrinking economy) downsized by kamekazi CEOs bent on increasing the population and the workweek while decreasing the jobs and public services. America the Disabled.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • US near default, Geithner warns, 1/07 Boston Globe, B9.
    [He should know - he stood by and watched quietly while we built up to this, and maybe greased its path a bit... As Bill Black, former S&L cleaner-upper pointed out on Bill Moyers' show two years ago, America's banking industry stinks like an unburied corpse. Meanwhile, Canada kept its banks regulated so Toronto Dominion (TD) is seen on downtown corners throughout New England (including on the Boston Garden). And as for Europe, which the Wall St Journal is always trying to paint as more troubled than us, we have this in the article right above -]
    Confidence rises in Europe about economic outlook - Germany's gains boost region - The euro's slide against the dollar over the past year has helped fuel European exports, 1/07 Boston Globe, B9.
  • The Dow industrials lost 25.58 points, or 0.2%, to 11697.31 as retail and telecom shares sagged and eurozone debt worries resurfaced, 1/07 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C5.
    [on Thursday and then again the next day -]
    The Dow industrials fell 22.55 points on Friday [to] 11674.76, 1/08 WSJ, A1 pointer to B13.
    ..The number of jobs created fell short of the tally needed to bring about a sustained labor recovery...(B13)
    [And since labor supplies money to the consumer base and the consumer base constitutes 70% of the economy, no labor recovery, no economic recovery.]
  • Vital[?] signs - In a difficult job market, more people have opted to go on long-term disability, 1/07 WSJ, A1 graph caption.
    ..There were 2.94 million applications to the Social Security Disability Inprogram last year, up from 2.82 million in 2009 and 2.32 million in 2008. About half of all applicants are eventually awarded benefits; disability-benefit recipients rarely re-enter the work force.
    [America the Disabled. What's Pres. Barak "Mr. Hope" Obama doing about it? -]
  • President revs up campaign to make peace with business - Mr. Obama is now seeking the help of businesses to create jobs.., 1/07 WSJ, A1.
    [Ah, aren't businesses the ones that are still downsizing more jobs than hours. Take a lesson from Republican Pres. Hoover in 1932 in the depths of this same problem 80 years ago (and apparently we've learned nothing since then): "The quickest way to create jobs is shorter hours." But he didn't realize how central, urgent, comprehensive and sustainable this strategy is and neither does Obama. Meanwhile -]
  • Weak hiring casts a cloud - Unemployment rate drops sharply to 9.4% [temp holiday jobs] but pace of hiring too slow for sustained improvement, 1/08 WSJ, A1. [and -]
  • For long-term jobless, the wait goes on, 1/07 WSJ, C1.
    [Meanwhile, in the investors' isolation tank -]
  • Investors are warming to technical companies, raising concerns that the froth in the market may echo the early 2000 dot-com craze, 1/08 WSJ, A1 pointer to B1.
    [Bubble Formation Alert!]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Vermont To Implement State Government Hiring Freeze, 1/07 Gov Monitor via thegovmonitor.com
    MONTPELIER, Ver. -..A voluntary reduced work week for state employees, allowing them to opt for a shorter work week, subject to management approval, while still ensuring overall departmental quality service levels. Employees would not lose health benefits under the arrangement. A conservative estimate of savings from this step is $2 million in General Funds... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Couriers urged to speak up over working hours, 1/08 (1/09 acr.dateline) Radio New Zealand via radionz.co.nz
    WELLINGTON, N.Z. - The New Zealand Transport Agency is encouraging couriers to speak up if they have concerns about excessive working hours. A courier, Nathan Dodkin, was killed in a collision with a truck in Taranaki on Thursday. The National Distribution Union says owner-operators are being forced into unfair contracts which lead to dangerously long hours on the road... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Industry struggles to rebuild, 1/07 Albany Democrat Herald via democratherald.com
    ALBANY, Ore. -..O'Connor said larger companies often kept employees but cut hours; as production increases, he said, those companies will likely restore hours for those workers before hiring... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Why is hiring at snail's pace as profits surge? 1/08 (1/09) NYT via St.Petersburg Times via Tampabay.com
    WASHINGTON, D.C. -.."Corporations are taking huge advantage of the slack in the labor market — they are in a very strong position and workers are in a very weak position.... They are using that bargaining power to cut benefits and wages, and to shorten hours." That strategy, Lachman said, serves corporate and shareholder imperatives, but "very much jeopardizes our chances of experiencing a real recovery."... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, wed-thu, JAN.05-06/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    looting- and layoff-triggering MERGERS in the news (archives) -
    Mergers&acquisitions (M&As) provide a last resort for incompetent CEOs and a highway to monopoly - Management's
    economy-shrinking merger skills need replacement by economy-growing workspreading skills - Real CEOs
    don't do 'M&As' -

  • Qualcomm is in advanced talks to buy chipmaker Atheros, which has a market capitalization of about $3.08 billion, 1/05 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.

    growth-choking DOWNSIZING in the news (archives) - all reversible by a shift to timesizing -
  • 2 chains sharpen their axes - BJ's will shed 500 jobs, close five stores, reorganize managers' ranks - Grocer [Shaw's] mum on how many workers [five] closings will affect, 1/06 Boston Globe, B7.
    ..The United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Local 721...said it has about 300 union members in.\.the New Bedford and both Rhode Island stores... Some may be shifted to other union stores, based on seniority..\.. The [other] Massachusetts locations are in..Stoneham and Revere...

    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too artificial, too arbitrary, too military, too eco-stressing in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -
  • U.S. boosts Afghan surge - Pentagon plans to send 1,400 extra marines to supplement spring campaign, 1/06 Wall St Journal, A1.

    BANKRUPTCY tsunami in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • The Milwaukee archdiocese filed for Chapter 11 as it faced sexual-abuse suits, 1/05 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to A2.
    [Job insecurity has been pushing a lot of people into the church who should never have been there.]

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • New formula finds more Americans in poverty - Health costs push tally to 47 million, by Hope Yen [she's not kiddin'!], 1/06 AP via Boston Globe, A1.
    WASHINGTON, D.C. - ..1 in 6 Americans - many of them 65 and older - [are] struggling in poverty due to rising medical care and other costs... Under a new revised census formula, overall poverty in 2009 stood at 15.7%m ir 47.8 million people. [Ah, woundn't that round to 48m, not just 47m as in headline?!] That's compared to the official 2009 rate of 14.3%, or 43.6 million, that was reported by the Census Bureau in September...
  • Despite some good news, the rally pauses, 1/05 Boston Globe, B8.
    [Good news like what? Well there's this at the bottom of the page -]
    Stronger consumer demand [=70% of the economy] means businesses ordered more from factories in Nov., 1/05 Boston Globe, B8.
    [Supports the thought that attention anywhere else (eg: exports) for recovery is a relatively trivial distraction. And yet, CEOs are bashing their own customer base right and left and turning around and wondering why it's weakening. See our Makework section on 1/04 below for example and here's another example of the weakening -]
  • U.S. album sales continue decline, 1/06 WSJ, B1 pointer to B4.
    [And another example of soaking cxonsumers (not to mention converting graduated income taxes into sales taxes) -]
  • Bank of America testing fees in Mass. - Lender seeks revenue from checking accounts, 1/06 Boston Globe, B7.
    [What's going on here? The general picture was painted in the Wall Street Journal the previous day -]
    Banks are looking at new ways to raise fees on basic products like debit cards, ATMs and checking accounts as regulations curtail other charges, 1/05 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
    [Like the "other" fraudulent and extortionate charges bankers have been dreaming up over the last few decades, like all the little extra fees on mortgages and like creditcard monthly "late" fees with short grace periods instead of the single annual card fee in the past - all to support their grotesquely overpaid CEOs? Weren't ATMs supposed to reduce costs and fees? And now these geniuses want to impoverish their non-wealthy customers even further? With various domestic markets collapsing along with our fisheries, our super-rich bankers are looking for quick ways to maintain their huge pay&perks no matter what it does to their customer base. Honestly, if politicians can't "soak the rich" cuz the rich now own them, the private sector is going to have to devise ways of doing it, because no one else has any money. And still the super-rich can't understand why they should pay any higher fees than the homeless (like, to get their billions back into circulation...). Want to do it by market forces? OK, then cut the workweek to level the playing field between employees and employers and leach the trillions out of the black hole of uncirculating money around the richest 30,000 Americans. The workweek is completely arbitrary anyway, and unlike the workforce, can be downsized any amount with no adverse effects or additional stress to the economy, except to managers who will need actual management skills, for example, to keep employees who will then have job choices, and for example, to suture ever shorter shifts - but managers themselves will have shorter shifts as well so they can rest up for the challenge...]
  • Jobless rate highest in [California's] Inland Empire and Las Vegas, by Phil Izzo, 1/05 Wall St Journal, A7.
    ..highest among the largest metro areas in November at 14.3%,,,Bureau of Labor Statistics...
  • Food prices surge, lifting unrest fears, 1/06 WSJ, C1 target article.
    A prominent indicator of international food prices hit a record in December, signaling looming threats to the world's poor and to global growth, 1/06 WSJ, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Shaming property owners to action - Webster MA desperate to ease blight of abandoned houses, 1/05 Boston Globe B1.
    [And exactly how is "shaming" going to get people with NO MONEY to fix up their houses??]
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Layoff-avoidance program sets new record for saving jobs, 1/06 Nisqually Valley News via yelmonline.com
    OLYMPIA, Wash. - More than 32,000 Washington workers kept earning a paycheck in 2010, thanks to the Employment Security Department’s Shared-Work Program – that’s up from the record 22,000 saved jobs in 2009... - see whole article under today's date.
  2. Mayor doesn't like new four-day city work week, 1/06 LasVegasSun.com
    LAS VEGAS, Nev. - ..Goodman said the decision the city council made to approve the four-day work week was made with two promises. One, when the economy improves, the city can unilaterally re-establish a five-day schedule for City Hall employees. And two, the City Hall administrative staff will be on call on Fridays, with the public community centers and facilities still open and available to the public... - see whole article under today's date.
  3. Numbers signing on Live Register rose in December, 1/06 IrishTimes.com
    DUBLIN, Ireland - .."The number of people on the Live Register [US: 'welfare'] who are part-time workers has grown strongly over the last year as firms cut hours worked to avoid redundancies... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.



    Today, sun-tue, JAN.02-04/2011 while the Great Depression replays as the 'great recession', and lest you think it's going away by itself, we give you first a dose of -
    doom du jourtm = today's headlines from helltm (archives)
    - face the bad news here in the context of a sustainable solution (see hope du jour below) -
    - editor's comments in [square brackets] – editor: Phil Hyde ecdesignr@yahoo.ca -


    MAKEWORK: too little, too late, too artificial, too arbitrary, too eco-stressing in the news (archives) - all unnecessary with full employment via temporary worksharing & permanent timesizing -

  • A self-checkout way of life - Stores add aisles, scanners and phone apps to encourage customers to pay on their own, 1/04 Boston Globe, A1.
    [Then there's this odd development of making more work for customers = unpaid work = slavery. Passing more and more time-costs onto customers and then wondering where why consumer markets are weakening - while CEOs vacuum more and more of M1, the money supply, into their investment portfolios because of the labor surplus and the 5000 desperate resumes flooding in for every five job openings... What have "modern" CEOs pushed onto customers? Travel agenting, bank tellering (ATMs). supermarket checkout, gas station pumping and paying, corporate telephone receptioning (robot receptionists)...]

    BANKRUPTCY tsunami in the news (archives) - staunched only by risky war or safe timesizing -
  • Personal bankruptcies in the U.S. topped 1.5 million last year, rising 9% from 2009 as more households buckled under debt loads, 1/04 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to A2.

    spiraling ECONOMIC DECLINE via $$ funnel-up (archives) - solved by war, or smarter, timesizing -
  • Cheney is back , less fierce but vigorous - Heart pump ends political sabbatical, 1/02 Boston Globe, A8.
    [He's BA-A-ACK! Just like Jason or Freddy = Nightmare on Pennsylania Avenue...]
  • Public employees face wrath of strapped taxpayers - Union contracts criticized amid budget crisis, 1/02 Boston Sunday Globe, A5.
    [Why aren't strapped taxpayers raging against the super-super-super-super-superrich, who have been shedding taxes ever since wartime prosperity began to end with the end of World War II in 1945 (and totally ended around 1970 when the grown-up babyboomers restored the labor surplus of the Depression)? Any rage against unions ends in a further shrinkage in the consumer base and marketable investment and sustainable investment. Any rage against the superX3 super-rich ends in growth in the consumer base and marketable investment and sustainable investment. Pick one.]
  • Now the rich get richer quicker - The mythic land of equality has the largest income disparity of any Western nation, 1/03 Boston Globe, A9.
  • Bank of America paid Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac almost $3 billion to cover bad mortgages the agencies purchased from the bank's Countrywide Financial unit, 1/04 Wall St Journal, A1 pointer to C1.
  • Treasurys fell as optimism about the U.S. each lured many [insulated investors] into riskier assets, 1/04 WSJ, A1 ptr to C9.
    [Check our bankruptcy item above for a corrective to this cockeyed optimism.]
  • Gold inches up to another high [$1422.60/troy oz.], 1/04 WSJ, C10.
    [= the chief of the Crisis Commodities or Meltdown Metals.]
  • Some CEOs face big repair jobs in 2011, by Joann Lublin, 1/04 WSJ, B6.
    Most chief executives are entering 2011 with big decisions to make - especially how to revive sales...
    [Duh, let's see. Sales require customers. Customers require money. Money requires pay. Pay requires jobs. Jobs require downsizing the workweek instead of downsizing the workforce and the consumer base and marketable productivity and sustainable investment.]
  • Deep-water drilling in the Gulf of Mexico could resume within weeks under a policy announced by the Obama administration..., 1/04 WSJ, A1 pointer to A3.
    hope du jourtm  TIMESIZING instead of downsizing in the news (archives) -
    Google Search newsclips of what the world's doing that's on the right track - here's our latest ranking of leading countries - the core solution is so obvious, nobody's noticing it - usually it's just one item on a list - few yet realize it's the ink & paper of the list itself - it's our closest candidate to a single all-sufficient control and despite *dismissal by the 'experts,' it's reinvented thousands of times a day in every downturn by businesses & governments, for ex.,*Washington State's video on replacing downsizing with timesizing alias 'shared work' -
  1. Reducing Unemployment in the New Year, 1/03 Huffington Post (blog) via huffingtonpost.com
    HERNDON, Va. -..One direct solution to putting more Americans to work..is expanding workplace flexibility to reduce unemployment by reducing working hours. Reducing the workweek to 30 hours from 40..would increase the number of employed by 30%. That is 30% more jobs.
    [Why would cutting hours 25% increase employment more than 25%??]
    Modification of the existing business tax credit for hiring new employees could include incentives for reduced hours. Tax credits could apply to companies that would hire the currently unemployed and those with employees at risk of being laid-off or who prefer a reduced workweek. A reduction in working hours can be prorated across the number of hours in a week or days worked in a year
    ... - see whole article under today's date.
    [U.S. experience 1840-1940 has a lot to teach here, as well as French experience 1997-2001 and South Korea 2004-2011.]
  2. German Unemployment Unexpectedly Rises In December, 1/04 RTTNews.com
    LONDON, U.K. - .."The rise [what rise, UE is steady at 7.5%] may raise fears that the resilience of the German labor market might be fading as a result of support from the Government's "Kurzarbeit" [=worksharing] subsidy scheme beginning to expire," Capital Economics economist Ben May said... - see whole article under today's date.
    [Germany has used Kurz-arbeit to save its employment basement, its consumer base, its marketable productivity and its sustainable investment. There's no way its labor market is "fading." Ben MAY be a Chicken Little - generally, anglophone economists LOVE spinning worksharing as problematic cuz they have ignored or even ridiculed it for so long.]
  3. Capitalism and Degrowth—An Impossibility Theorem, 1/02 MonthlyReview.org
    EUGENE, Ore. - ..rather than dealing with the unemployment problem directly...degrowth theorists prefer to emphasize shorter working hours... - see whole article under today's date.
  4. Facts or Fallacies Part III: Combinations, Murder and the Primordial Lump, by Tom Walker, 1/04 Benzinga.com
    VANCOUVER, B.C., Canada - ..My intention in Part III is not to refute the fallacy claim. I believe I did that sufficiently in "Why Economists Dislike a Lump of Labor" and "The Lump-of-Labor Case Against Work-Sharing"... - see whole article under today's date.
    Shorter hours are happening anyway, but not the best way. The argument that work is infinite because human desires are infinite ignores the absence of infinite money to satisfy those desires or pay for that work AND ignores the increasing scarcity of good 40-hr/wk jobs to maintain wages and spending in the age of robotics. Thus, shorter hours is a strategy that is being reinvented hundreds of times a day across the U.S. in this recession and thousands of times a day across the world in both public & private sectors, in every industry, and in a variety of ways. Many countries and U.S. states already have worksharing programs to cushion the transition to permanently shorter workweeks that automatically adjust to our rising levels of productive technology in the Age of Robotics. These programs currently are designed to be temporary. Here's what their permanent program will look like when they finally succumb to the inevitable.