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THE  ‘Ted Kennedy Y2K’ HANDICAP
- Press Mentions -


Nov. 13, 2000. Our greatest visibility probably came from the Nov. 13 issue of Time Magazine that was on the stands just before the Nov. 7 election and helped give us a bump of 100 hits a day on our website for a couple of days -

Don Quixotes, We Salute You
Voters seem less than inspired by the candidates this election, creating the perfect environment for the emergence of viable third parties. But after a careful examination of the self-made, buck-the-Establishment politicos who are making a run for office this year, we declare the following pretty much unelectable. Nice try, though.
[Then there's a map of the continental USA with eight cartoons representing each of the eight political parties described in short paragraphs below. The cartoon over New England shows a man in a suit with a pocketwatch head, similar to our little timesizing guy, and the last of the eight paragraphs says -]
TIMESIZING.COM PARTY Mass. If he gets to be Senator, Phil Hyde, the "Un-Kennedy" candidate, will shorten the workweek.
[One of the other parties deserves mention for its ecological platform - "MOUNTAIN PARTY W.Va. Gubernatorial candidate Denise Giardina seeks an end to coal miners' 'decapitation' of mountains."]




Nov. 1, 2000. The best article on Timesizing this year came out just before the election in *Boston's Weekly Dig - "A Weekly Publication Dedicated to Man's Ruin" (though "dig" is immediately explained as slang for "understand") -

"It's Ruining the Economy, Stupid"
by Jeff Thacker

              While Jack E. Robinson continues to provide comic relief for the Massachusetts Senate race and Carla Howell snaps up speaking engagements and lead articles in the Globe, other third-party candidates are mounting campaigns against Sen. Ted Kennedy.  One of them is Philip Hyde III, who is running under the banner of America's first dot-com political party, the Timesizing.com Party, after personally collecting all but 100 of the over 12,000 certified signatures he turned in to the state Elections Division.
              Timesizing.com's platform calls for, well, timesizing - an automated process that would put in place [constant, overtime-targeted] on-the-job training and would downsize the workweek instead of the workforce, with the effect of increasing job security and lowering unemployment.  Hyde states that while a two-percent unemployment rate today signifies a great economy, in the 1940s [when we had a great economy for everybody except for the little matter of World War II] it was cause for panic.  In addition to the problem of unemployment, he says, is the problem of under-employment, with many "employed" people working multiple low-paying part-time jobs with little or no benefits.  In a time of so-called "economic boom," American workers are putting in 60-hour weeks [just like 100 years ago], have an average savings rate in the negative numbers and are guaranteed zero vacation days by the federal government.  (In contrast, Spain and France guarantee 30 days per year to all their workers, in both public and private sectors.)
              Hyde figures he must have met nearly 40,000 people during his signature collection.  He said that most people he met felt they needed to reduce their workweek, but not the way you'd think.  Forget about 30 or 35-hour weeks, these people simple want to get back down to the federally mandated 40 hours per week.  For evidence that this is not only possible but also economically viable, Hyde cites the success of France's 35-hour workweek and of Nucor, a steel-making company based in Charlotte, North Carolina, which adjusts its employees' work schedules at $8/hr to 7-day workweeks at $22/hr.  He is also in favor of the 30/40 plan, in which you get 40 hours pay for 30 hours work.  (Hey, who wouldn't get behind that?)
              Hyde, a high-tech R&D consultant and self described "financial conservative and social liberal," also says that, far from making our lives easier, ever-improving technology is putting more of a strain on the workforce.  "We're trying to compete with robots by working longer and longer instead of shorter and shorter," he says.  In the process, the income gap is widening at an alarming rate, with the richest 1% of the population having so much money that the only thing they can do with it is buy stock, thereby creating a grossly overvalued market (similar to the 1920s), but one that allows for the illusion of national prosperity.  Instead, Hyde says, "They [the 1%] should be reinvesting in their own markets via their employees' salaries and benefits."  In other words, [as Henry Ford said in 1914] workers should be paid enough money to buy the products they produce.
              Naturally, timesizing is an issue that large corporations will fight against, not because it is anti-corporate but because corporations will see it as a means to empower workers and won't look beyond that oversimplification to see that if implemented correctly, timesizing could bolster the economy and at the same time give it stability, something that has yet to happen in this country.  It will empower workers - not to revolt against CEOs - but to get back from the economy something equal to what they put into it.  Hyde explains that our economy is improperly structured because it allows for accumulation without end.  As evidence that [accumulation] can in fact end and begin again, he refers to the Hebrew jubilees, during which...slaves were freed and debt was forgiven.  He also makes the more modern analogy to the beginning and end of sports seasons - what purpose would it serve if a team continued winning or losing ad infinitum? We've already dealt with the bottom level, or end, if you will, of [accumulation] by establishing a minimum wage and a poverty line.  Why not establish a wealth line at the top? Once you cross that line, you don't have to return the extra earnings, but rather divert them [into] hiring additional employees or providing training.
              As for other issues that typically get politicians all riled up, such as gun control, abortion and drug laws, Hyde believes the best approach is to filter them through "decision trees" and subject them to public referendum, which would truly bring "power to the people" - instead of relying on officials who you believe will represent your views, you cast the vote yourself [and cut out the middleman].  Public referendums would not only prevent the media from forming myths about certain issues as they do today but would also, as Hyde says, "turn elected officials into housekeepers of the public will."



9/16/2000   ...Also on the ballot are Libertarian Carla Howell, Natural Law candidate Dale E. Friedgen, and Constitution Party candidate Philip Lawler and Timesizing.com Party candidate Philip Hyde.
[From "Robinson's staffer quits," by Joanna Weiss, Boston Globe, p. B3.]


9/15/2000   ...Kennedy's other opponents are Philip Hyde III of Somerville, Philip Lawler of Lancaster and Dale Friedgen of Worcester....
Hyde...ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 1996 (against Kennedy's nephew, Joseph) and 1998.... Hyde's slogan is "Timesizing Not Downsizing." He would work to keep the nation's near-full employment and record economic expansion going by reducing the length of the workweek....
[Or to be more accurate, Hyde would work to actualize the nation's near-full employment illusion and solidify the record economic bubble by sharing the vanishing work and spreading the funnelling earning and spending power. - ed.]
[From "Kennedy faces five challengers to re-election," by Lane Lambert, Patriot Ledger (SouthOfBoston.com), p.9.]


9/10/2000   ...And Kennedy won't even discuss debating Robinson and Howell (not to mention the other candidates, Phil Hyde, Philip Lawler and Dale Friedgen) while he's still trying to push a patient's bill of rights, prescription drug coverage and other measures through Congress....
[From "Ted K race an odds-on favorite," by Wayne Woodlief, Boston Herald, p. ?.]


["It doesn't rain but it pours."  The weekly Somerville Journal comes up with nearly 7 column inches and a name headline.]
9/07/2000   Hyde campaigns for Senate seat, Somerville Journal, p.5.
      Philip Hyde III, the "UNkennedy" GOP nominee against Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II in 1996 and 1998 (Kennedy resigned halfway through the 1998 race), is on the ballot in the 2000 Senate race against Kennedy's uncle, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.  Hyde turned in over 12,000 certified signatures at the state Elections Division in Boston ahead of the deadline.  Hyde personally collected all butt 100 - "Probably a Guiness record," he laughed.  Hyde figures he must have met 40,000 people in the process, more than any other candidate.  "Americans are looking a little further ahead in a millennium year like this," he said.  "They provided great feedback on my issues.  People are getting fed up with improving technology but worsening lives."
      Hyde, a high-tech R&D consultant, is running under the banner of the nation's first dot-com political party, the Timesizing.Com Party.  "We registered out motto, 'Timesizing, Not Downsizing,' to appear on the ballot," said Hyde.  "It's more self-explanatory for senior citizens who made up the majority of the voters."
      Timesizing refers to cutting the work week instead of the workforce - "at least back down to 40," jokes Hyde.  He says the new 35-hour work week in France is working well and likes the 30/40 plan (www.30/40.com) where you get 40 hours' pay for 30 hours' work.  Hyde cites a business consultant in Indiana (Ron Healey) who call this "the 10-hour incentive."


[Overcome with noblesse oblige, the Globe comes up with another mention a day later -]
9/06/2000  Kennedy opponents press campaigns - Howell airs ads; Robinson seeks debates, by Frank Phillips, Boston Globe, B4.
      US Senator Edward M. Kennedy, seeking a record seventh term against a field of five little-known candidates, discovered yesterday that, while he may be heavily favored, the race won't be comfortable, or conventional.
      The Libertarian Party candidate Carla Howell, with over $500,000 in her account, launched a series of tough radio ads blaming him for creating the Big Dig traffic snarls and cost overruns....
      Meanwhile the only Republican candidate, Jack E. Robinson, who once vowed to go toe-to-toe with Kennedy in fund-raising and organization, yesterday outlined a sharply scaled-back campaign.... Six weeks ago, Robinson...said he would raise up to $7m and hire a fleet of consultants, media advisers, and staff.
      "We have completely changed our strategy," said Robinson in a telephone interview.... "This will be an unorthodox campaign, with minimal expenses," Robinson said. He said Kennedy's 1994 GOP opponent, millionaire businessman Mitt Romney, demonstrated that raising as much money as Kennedy and relying on a host of political operatives is futile....
      "We are going to focus on...doing things through the Internet and through grass-roots campaigning," Robinson said. Robinson also issued a challenge to Kennedy to debate him twice in October....




      While Robinson takes to cyberspace to challenge Kennedy, another challenger, Philip Hyde III of Somerville,...

...will also be on the ballot. His party designation is "Timesizing, not Downsizing."



      Also on the ballot is Dale E. Friedgen of Worcester, who designated himself unenrolled [the state needs to change this to 'unaffiliated' - "unenrolled" sounds like "completely out of the system"] but ran for Congress in 1996 in the Third District as the Natural Law Party candidate.
      A conservative, Philip Lawler of Lancaster, is also on the ballot as the Constitution Party nominee.

[Comments in this column -]







[Note how quickly Robinson gets third place once it becomes known that his big-campaign-money hints were bluff or...reconsidered in the light of reality. However, for the $200k he's already spent, he got more media than Ted Kennedy in the meantime.]





[Jack sees the light....]



[The real question is, how many multiples of a Kennedy warchest would you need to balance their 50-year celebrity?]



[If Kennedy's clever, he'll include all the other candidates, despite Robinson's threat to exclude Howell for joining the Dems in trying to keep him off the ballot, because that will dilute the brawl aspect threatened by this bait&switch artist ("HUGE campaign - well, naaa") who occasionally mentions issues but more often chants "Chappaquiddick."]


[Here we're all expecting him to say, "...has been on the Web all along," but no, he wimps out...]
[That's political designation, Frank. The party's named the Timesizing.com Party - or are you trying to avoid giving out our website? Why not do democracy a favor and just publish all our website addresses?]

[The only shot at explanation we have here is that "national" got Dale's signatures for him and they were thinking they might merge with the Reform Party over the spring or summer.]
[Now the only candidate taking the big financial swandive into an empty pool is Carla. Good luck, gal! Alas, we fear that the GOP candidate, despite all his flaws and new campaign cash curtailment, will log more votes than you, despite your big bankroll, just based on the kind of robotic vestigial GOP voting that Hyde got in the last two Races for the Eighth.]



[Letter to editor finally published -]
9/05/2000  Don't ignore third-party candidates for Senate, letter to editor by Philip Hyde III of Somerville MA, Boston Globe, A14.
      Once again the Globe feigns sympathy for US Senate candidate Jack E. Robinson, lamenting that he “can’t get noticed by even the smallest powers that be” while lavishing upon him yet another frontpage spread and ignoring the other four Kennedy challengers in the race and their issues (“Robinson gets points for persistence,” Page A1, Aug. 28).
      Candidates for the US Senate seat include a Libertarian (Carla Howell - smaller government), a Natural Law candidate (Dale Friedgen - proven solutions and problem prevention), a Constitution Party candidate (Philip Lawler - criminalizing abortion), and a Timesizing.com Party candidate (Philip Hyde, myself - trimming the workweek instead of the workforce).
      There's already confusion because the race includes two candidates with the same first name and very different issues.
      The Globe and other print media are signing their own death warrants by driving people to the Internet for the full menu of candidates and for any treatment of issues.
[Note the letter actually faxed to the Globe had a lot more personality, which the Globe edited out (they favor Ted) -]

      8/28/2000
      Once again the Globe feigns sympathy for U.S. Senate candidate Jack Robinson, lamenting he “can’t get noticed by even the smallest powers that be” (“Robinson gets points for persistence,” frontpage, Aug. 28) while lavishing upon him yet another frontpage spread and completely ignoring the other four Kennedy challengers in the race - and their issues.
      Remember issues? There’s a Libertarian (Carla Howell - smaller government), a Natural Law candidate (Dale Friedgen - proven solutions & problem prevention), a Constitution Party candidate (Philip Lawler - criminalizing abortion), and a Timesizing.com Party candidate (Philip Hyde, myself - trimming the workweek instead of the workforce - ‘timesizing, not downsizing’). Confusion already reigns between two candidates with the same first name and very different issues.

      The Globe and other print media are signing their own death warrants by driving people to the Internet for the full menu of candidates, and for any treatment of issues. And long, long ago, in the remote mists of time, seems to me I dimly recall something about an actual law requiring equal coverage....


[Got most of a Boston Tab article, but not the headline. Lots of minor errors tho'. Here's a corrected version on the left...]
9/01/2000  Ballot set for Senate race - Kennedy faces five challengers for U.S. Senate seat - "To really make a breakthrough, you've got to go outside the box." Philip Hyde III, by David Ortiz, Boston Tab, p.5.
      With the ballot now set, U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy wll face five opponents in his November bid for reelection: disavowed Republican Jack E. Robinson III, Libertarian candidate Carla Howell, Natural Law Party candidate Dale E. Friedgen, Constitution Party candidate Philip Lawler, and Philip Hyde III, the Somerville resident who got on the ballot when his 10,000 necessary signatures of nomination, plus 20% extra, were checked and receipted by the state election commission on Aug. 24.
      Hyde, who is running under the banner of his own Timesizing.com Party, said he personally collected all but 100 of his nearly 14,000 raw signatures.
      Hyde has run for an array of public offices in the past without being elected. He has been a candidate for Alderman-at-Large in the city of Somerville three times, in 1995, 1997 and last September. In 1996, Hyde ran against then-U.S. Congressman Joseph Kennedy Jr., winning 16% of the vote while spending $600 on his own campaign, he said. Hyde ran for U.S. Congress again, again as the Republican nominee, when Kennedy stepped down from his seat representing the Eighth District, in 1998. That election was won by a fellow Somerville resident, Michael Capuano.
      Born in Canada, Hyde received academic degrees in ancient languages and linguistics from the University of Toronto, and studied linguistics at Harvard University before switching to humanistic psychology at the University Without Walls' Union Graduate School in the early 1970s.
      Today, Hyde is a research and design consultant for the high-tech industry.
      Hyde said he believes that the state's current economic boom is overworking people who have full-time jobs while at the same time increasing the number of "under-employed" - people who can find only part-time work or who aren't working at all. Hyde said this situation is similar to the way the economy looked just before the great stock market crash of 1929, with a "huge Wall Street bubble and a downsized American workforce and consumer base."
      To prevent another Great Depression, Hyde recommends "timesizing," or cutting the amount of hours people work while continuing to make the same income - an expense that will be paid by employers.
      Hyde is not the first politician to propose lowering the workweek to create economic stability and guard against recession. A similar idea was proposed in the U.S. in the 1930s. And France uses the economic model today; the country went from a 40- to a 39-hour workweek in 1982, and again lowered the workweek this year to 35 hours.
      Hyde's own model is influenced by Benjamin Hunnicutt, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa who researched the underlying history for his 1988 book "Work Without End."
      Though it has often been equated with socialism, Hyde said that it's actually a single new groundrule in the center rather than a host of regulations all over the place, and that he is actually a fiscal conservative, though a social liberal.
      "Welfare is just giving out money. Our abhorrence for redistributing money will ultimately force us to overcome our reluctance to redistribute work. Timesizing is a first step in bringing our population together instead of continuing to split into an under-class and an over-class."
      Hyde also said he is trumpeting his economic theory by running for political office because he doesn't believe he can affect major social change from the ranks of academia.
      "There has been generation after generation of well-intentioned and very idealistic economists who didn't make change. To really make a breakthrough, you've got to go outside the box."
[...and the original on the right.]

9/01/2000  Ballot set for Senate race - Kennedy faces five challengers for U.S. Senate seat - "To really make a breakthrough, you've got to go outside the box." Philip Hyde III, by David Ortiz, Boston Tab, p.5.
      With the ballot now set, U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy wll face five opponents in his November bid for reelection: disavowed Republican Jack E. Robinson III, Libertarian candidate Carla Howell, Natural Law Party candidate Dale E. Friedgen, Constitution Party candidate Philip Lawler, and Philip Hyde III, the Somerville resident who became the final candidate of the ballot when his 10,000 necessary signatures of endorsement were announced by the state election commission on Aug. 24.
      Hyde, who is running under the banner of his own Timesizing.com Party, said he personally collected all but 100 of his nearly 14,000 raw signatures.
      Hyde has run for an array of public offices in the past without being elected. He has been a candidate for Alderman-at-Large in the city of Somerville three times, in 1995, 1997 and last September. In 1996, Hyde ran against then-U.S. Congressman Joseph Kennedy Jr., winning 16% of the vote while spending $600 on his own campaign, he said. Hyde ran for U.S. Congress again, this time as an Independent, when Kennedy stepped down from his seat representing the Eighth District, in 1998. That election was won by a fellow Somerville resident, Michael Capuano.
      Born in Canada, Hyde received academic degrees in linguistics and theology from the University of Toronto and Harvard University before studying ecological economics at the University of Massachusetts' Union Graduate School in the early 1970s.
      Today, Hyde is a research and development consultant for the high-tech industry.
      Hyde said he believes that the state's current economic boom is overworking people who have full-time jobs while at the same time increasing the number of "under-employed" - people who can find only part-time work or who aren't working at all. Hyde said this situation is similar to the way the economy looked just before the great stock market crash of 1929, with a "huge Wall Street bubble and a downsized American workforce and customer base."
      To prevent another Great Depression, Hyde recommends "time sizing," or cutting the amount of hours people work while continuing to make the same income - an expense that will be paid by employers.
      Hyde is not the first politician to propose lowering the workweek to create economic stability and guard against recession. A similar idea was proposed in the U.S. in the 1930s. And France uses the economic model today; the country went from a 40- to a 39-hour workweek in 1982, and again lowered the workweek this year to 35 hours.
      Hyde's own model is influenced by Benjamin Honeycutt, an economist at Iowa State University who detailed his theory in the 1988 book "World Without End."

      Though it has often been equated with socialism, Hyde said it is not, and that he is a fiscal conservative and a social liberal.

      "Welfare is just giving out money. Our abhorrence to giving away money will ultimately overcome our reluctance to give away the work. This is a way to keep our population together instead of creating an under-class and an over-class."
      Hyde also said he is trumpeting his economic theory by running for political office because he doesn't believe he can affect major social change from the ranks of academia.
      "There has been generation after generation of well-intentioned and very idealistic economists who didn't make change. To really make a breakthrough, you've got to go outside the box."


[Associated Press mention -]
8/31/2000  Kennedy challengers using election to build parties, sell ideas, by Steve LeBlanc, AP via Lexis-Nexis via VideoTerry.
Bleary-eyed workers of the world, unite. Somerville computer consultant and U.S. Senate candidate Philip Hyde III may have this year's most tantalizing campaign promise:
A 30-hour work week at equal or greater pay.
[Actually Phil's concept is to vary the workweek inversely with under-employment, including unemployment, welfare, disability, homelessness and incarceration. As the workweek comes down and spreads the skills and work onto more people, the empowered workforce demands the higher pay levels they should be getting from all the additional technology-amplified output they're putting out, and centrifuges wealth out of the dysfunctional concentration thereof that we're now experiencing - ed.]
"The fact we are not working 15-20 hours a week already is because of our own stupidity," said Hyde, who also advocates fining companies who ask employees to work overtime.
[But subsidizing them if they set up on-the-job training and hiring targeted by the overtime - the stress becomes self-resolving.]
There's only one thing standing in the way of Hyde and his vision of a brave new working world: the candidacy of 38-year Democratic incumbent Sen. Edward Kennedy.
[Actually Ted and the Dems are pretty irrelevant. What's really standing in the way is the linking of benefits such as health insurance to a rigid concept of "full-time employee" = 40 hours/week plus.]
Hyde isn't alone. A handful of candidates are using the Senate campaign - and association with Kennedy's high-profile name [- and the millennial year 2000 -ed.] - to lay the groundwork for struggling third parties or to pitch unconventional ideas.
Maynard [Mass.] autoparts store owner Dale E. Friedgen said he didn't spend much time thinking about politics until a friend introduced him to the Natural Law Party in 1992. Two years later Friedgen was running for Congress. "We'd like to see government shift from crisis-management to prevention," Friedgen said. The party would spend more Medicare and Medicaid money on alternative medicine, shift foreign policy emphasis from military involvement to the export of new technologies, and promote campaign finance reform, he said. "Americans are being force-fed candidates," Friedgen said. "We want to present candidates that inspire, have integrity, and really lead the country."
To the right of the political spectrum is Constitution Party candidate Philip Lawler, a Lancaster father of seven on leave from his job as editor of the conservative Catholic World Report magazine. The party believes the federal government should adhere scrupulously to the dictates of the U.S. Constitution, he said. For Lawler, that includes a ban on abortion, an end to the U.S. Dept. of Education and a federal government limited to defense, postal service, foreign policy and the regulation of interstate commerce. "The further the government is away from the citizen, household and family, the less it should do," Lawler said.
Harder to place on the ideological spectrum is Hyde and his Timesizing.com Party. "Timesizing" refers to Hyde's belief that shortening the hours people work will not only improve their private lives, but help the country avoid economic boom and bust cycles.
[It's simply a matter of stablizing everyone's income and spending by sharing the national workload, however high or low (with onrushing technology) it may go.]
A lot of these high tech people are working 50-, 60-, 70-hours-a-week and ignoring their families and [communities] and ruining their lives," Hyde said. "We're turning ourselves into a Third World country by working longer and longer hours."
[The Third World, home of the sweat shop.]
Hyde, Lawler and Friedgen aren't the only candidates challenging Kennedy, who is also facing opposition from Repubican Jack E. Robinson and Libertarian Carla Howell. Because Howell won more that 3% of [a statewide] vote when she ran for state auditor in 1998, the Libertarian Party is now officially recognized by the state.
While Howell is planning to launch $50,000 worth of anti-Kennedy radio ads next week, Hyde, Lawler and Friedgen concede their campaigns are more about message than victory. "You don't beat a Kennedy in Massachusetts," Hyde said. "This is an idea race - a million-dollar idea against a million-dollar name."
[Basically, Carla and Jack are going to waste hundreds of thousands of dollars losing this race, and Hyde, Lawler and Friedgen aren't.]
For his part, Kennedy plans to "run for the office of U.S. Senator and not against his opponents," said Kennedy spokesman Will Keyser....
[But what would you expect him to say? He's the closest thing this country has to a reigning monarch. Bigredwire.com long distance (ab)uses Queen Elizabeth's image on their vulgar L.A. billboards. They plan to (ab)use Ted Kennedy's on their Boston ones (8/19/00 article, Boston Globe, C1). If anyone could run with no money and still win, it's a Kennedy in Massachusetts - but they don't have the...let's say "stomach." So Joe had over $2m in '96 and '98 and Ted has over $4m in 2000.]


[At last the little Attleboro Sun Chronicle breaks the long press silence -]
8/30/2000  Hyde: Reduce the workweek, by Jim Hand, Sun Chronicle.
      Vice President Al Gore says he is running for president to look out for the interest of working families, but senatorial candidate Philip Hyde appears to have the most novel approach for aiding workers.
      Hyde, who is running against U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass, is touting a platform of reducing the work week.
      He advocates cutting the work week back to 30 hours, but paying workers for 40 hours.
      Hyde, whose independent party is called Timesizing.com, said a shorter work week would allow companies to employ more people and spread the wealth around.
      Companies would be given generous tax breaks to encourage them to reduce the work week and hire more people, he said.
      As far as a labor shortage, Hyde said the real problem is that companies need to provide more training to people looking for better jobs would qualify for the work available.
      Hyde is a native of Toronto who moved to Massachusetts in 1968 to attend college and has since become a U.S. citizen. He ran unsuccessfully for Congress twice.
      He is one of several people running against Kennedy.
      The others include Republican Jack E. Robinson, Dale Friedgen of the Natural Law Party, Libertarian Carla Howell and Phillip Lawler of the Constitution Party.


[Boston Herald mention -]
3/22/2000  GOP handling of Senate candidacy hapless at best, by Howie Carr, Boston Herald, 25.
        ...After all the headlines, in the race we now have Phil "I Am Not a Straw" Hyde,...
[As if there are anything but "straws" in a race with a Kennedy in Massachusetts - ed.]
...Carla Howell, who in her last race ran on a ticket with a nudist selectman from P-town, and a guy whose Web site address is www.dumpted.com. Paging Dr. Mildred Jefferson....


[Associated Press mention -]
3/17/2000  Comprehensive coverage of the 2000 elections - Coast seems clear for Kennedy after GOP challenger bows out, by Caren Benjamin, AP via NandoTimes.com.
[This is what the tired old wire-service media of the year 2000 call "comprehensive coverage" -]
...Until this week, it appeared that Kennedy's Republican challenger would be Michael J. Sullivan, district attorney in Plymouth County, Mass.  But Sullivan had little money or name recognition despite a solid political background that includes three terms in the Massachusetts House and two terms as district attorney. And early Thursday, he said he would not be running for the Senate. He cited several reasons, including a distaste for fund raising, satisfaction in his current job and his four school-age children. Sullivan said he understood that Jack E. Robinson III, a former Eastern Airlines executive now running a cellular phone firm, would run in his place....
Most campaign watchers had given Sullivan, 45, about the same odds as the race's other two candidates: Libertarian Carla Howell, whose mantra is "Small government is beautiful," and Philip Hyde, running as a "timesizer" who says he can eliminate poverty, racism, sexism, unemployment and homelessness by shortening the work week to 30 hours....
[Media message mangling mocks on - and no mention of the other two (possibly three) candidates in the race.]


[Boston Globe mention -]
1/30/2000  Kennedy's support makes him solid partner in Gore campaign, by Robert Jordan, Boston Globe, C4.
        ...Kennedy will also be conducting his own bid for reelection this year. But he appears to be even stronger now than when he defeated Mitt Romney six years ago. Even some of his Republican critics agree that Kennedy has enhanced his image since then. Nonetheless, Plymouth County District Attorney Michael Sullivan may stick with his plan to challenge Kennedy after the New Hampshire primary, giving Kennedy a GOP opponent. Another person who has said he will run against Kennedy is Phil Hyde of Somerville, an independent and a perennial candidate for local and congressional seats [that's "perennial issue," Robert, not "candidate" - the candidate doesn't matter, but the Timesizing issue is fundamental & isn't going away till we do it - ed.].
        While the GOP's support might make Sullivan a stronger candidate than Hyde, the question is whether he has the name recognition, the finances, and the political skills to even rate consideration as a serious contender....
[Apparently not, because although he finally took out nomination papers from the Secretary of State's office on Feb. 15, he withdrew from the race in mid-March in favor of carpet-bagging Jack Robinson III, who promptly went up in the flames of a dozen personal accusations and revelations.]



For more details about the Timesizing.com Party's economic program, our laypersons' handbook Timesizing, Not Downsizing is available at bookstores in Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. or from *Amazon.com online.

Questions, comments, feedback? Phone 617-623-8080 (Boston) or email us.


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